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Gamma-band activity reflects the metric structure of rhythmic tone sequences.

Gamma-band activity reflects the metric structure of rhythmic tone sequences. Relatively little is known about the dynamics of auditory cortical rhythm processing using non-invasive methods, partly because resolving responses to events in patterns is difficult using long-latency auditory neuroelectric responses. We studied the relationship between short-latency gamma-band (20-60 Hz) activity (GBA) and the structure of rhythmic tone sequences. We show that induced (non-phase-locked) GBA predicts tone onsets and persists when expected tones are omitted. Evoked (phase-locked) GBA occurs in response to tone onsets with approximately 50 ms latency, and is strongly diminished during tone omissions. These properties of auditory GBA correspond with perception of meter in acoustic sequences and provide evidence for the dynamic allocation of attention to temporally structured auditory sequences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain research. Cognitive brain research Pubmed

Gamma-band activity reflects the metric structure of rhythmic tone sequences.

Brain research. Cognitive brain research , Volume 24 (1): 10 – Aug 12, 2005

Gamma-band activity reflects the metric structure of rhythmic tone sequences.


Abstract

Relatively little is known about the dynamics of auditory cortical rhythm processing using non-invasive methods, partly because resolving responses to events in patterns is difficult using long-latency auditory neuroelectric responses. We studied the relationship between short-latency gamma-band (20-60 Hz) activity (GBA) and the structure of rhythmic tone sequences. We show that induced (non-phase-locked) GBA predicts tone onsets and persists when expected tones are omitted. Evoked (phase-locked) GBA occurs in response to tone onsets with approximately 50 ms latency, and is strongly diminished during tone omissions. These properties of auditory GBA correspond with perception of meter in acoustic sequences and provide evidence for the dynamic allocation of attention to temporally structured auditory sequences.

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ISSN
0926-6410
DOI
10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2004.12.014
pmid
15922164

Abstract

Relatively little is known about the dynamics of auditory cortical rhythm processing using non-invasive methods, partly because resolving responses to events in patterns is difficult using long-latency auditory neuroelectric responses. We studied the relationship between short-latency gamma-band (20-60 Hz) activity (GBA) and the structure of rhythmic tone sequences. We show that induced (non-phase-locked) GBA predicts tone onsets and persists when expected tones are omitted. Evoked (phase-locked) GBA occurs in response to tone onsets with approximately 50 ms latency, and is strongly diminished during tone omissions. These properties of auditory GBA correspond with perception of meter in acoustic sequences and provide evidence for the dynamic allocation of attention to temporally structured auditory sequences.

Journal

Brain research. Cognitive brain researchPubmed

Published: Aug 12, 2005

References