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Cluster analysis of self-awareness levels in adults with traumatic brain injury and relationshipto outcome.

Cluster analysis of self-awareness levels in adults with traumatic brain injury and... The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-awareness, emotional distress, motivation, and outcome in adults with severe traumatic brain injury. A sample of 55 patients were selected from 120 consecutive patients with severe traumatic brain injury admitted to the rehabilitation unit of a large metropolitan public hospital. Subjects received multidisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation and different types of outpatient rehabilitation and community-based services according to availability and need. Measures used in the cluster analysis were the Patient Competency Rating Scale, Self-Awareness of Deficits Interview, Head Injury Behavior Scale, Change Assessment Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, and Beck Anxiety Inventory; outcome measures were the Disability Rating Scale, Community Integration Questionnaire, and Sickness Impact Profile. A three-cluster solution was selected, with groups labeled as high self-awareness (n = 23), low self-awareness (n = 23), and good recovery (n = 8). The high self-awareness cluster had significantly higher levels of self-awareness, motivation, and emotional distress than the low self-awareness cluster but did not differ significantly in outcome. Self-awareness after brain injury is associated with greater motivation to change behavior and higher levels of depression and anxiety; however, it was not clear that this heightened motivation actually led to any improvement in outcome. Rehabilitation timing and approach may need to be tailored to match the individual's level of self-awareness, motivation, and emotional distress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation Pubmed

Cluster analysis of self-awareness levels in adults with traumatic brain injury and relationshipto outcome.

The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation , Volume 13 (5): 13 – Oct 22, 1998

Cluster analysis of self-awareness levels in adults with traumatic brain injury and relationshipto outcome.


Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-awareness, emotional distress, motivation, and outcome in adults with severe traumatic brain injury. A sample of 55 patients were selected from 120 consecutive patients with severe traumatic brain injury admitted to the rehabilitation unit of a large metropolitan public hospital. Subjects received multidisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation and different types of outpatient rehabilitation and community-based services according to availability and need. Measures used in the cluster analysis were the Patient Competency Rating Scale, Self-Awareness of Deficits Interview, Head Injury Behavior Scale, Change Assessment Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, and Beck Anxiety Inventory; outcome measures were the Disability Rating Scale, Community Integration Questionnaire, and Sickness Impact Profile. A three-cluster solution was selected, with groups labeled as high self-awareness (n = 23), low self-awareness (n = 23), and good recovery (n = 8). The high self-awareness cluster had significantly higher levels of self-awareness, motivation, and emotional distress than the low self-awareness cluster but did not differ significantly in outcome. Self-awareness after brain injury is associated with greater motivation to change behavior and higher levels of depression and anxiety; however, it was not clear that this heightened motivation actually led to any improvement in outcome. Rehabilitation timing and approach may need to be tailored to match the individual's level of self-awareness, motivation, and emotional distress.

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ISSN
0885-9701
DOI
10.1097/00001199-199810000-00006
pmid
9753534

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-awareness, emotional distress, motivation, and outcome in adults with severe traumatic brain injury. A sample of 55 patients were selected from 120 consecutive patients with severe traumatic brain injury admitted to the rehabilitation unit of a large metropolitan public hospital. Subjects received multidisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation and different types of outpatient rehabilitation and community-based services according to availability and need. Measures used in the cluster analysis were the Patient Competency Rating Scale, Self-Awareness of Deficits Interview, Head Injury Behavior Scale, Change Assessment Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, and Beck Anxiety Inventory; outcome measures were the Disability Rating Scale, Community Integration Questionnaire, and Sickness Impact Profile. A three-cluster solution was selected, with groups labeled as high self-awareness (n = 23), low self-awareness (n = 23), and good recovery (n = 8). The high self-awareness cluster had significantly higher levels of self-awareness, motivation, and emotional distress than the low self-awareness cluster but did not differ significantly in outcome. Self-awareness after brain injury is associated with greater motivation to change behavior and higher levels of depression and anxiety; however, it was not clear that this heightened motivation actually led to any improvement in outcome. Rehabilitation timing and approach may need to be tailored to match the individual's level of self-awareness, motivation, and emotional distress.

Journal

The Journal of head trauma rehabilitationPubmed

Published: Oct 22, 1998

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