Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Identifying a new subcategory of aggression: sex differences in direct non-verbal aggression

Identifying a new subcategory of aggression: sex differences in direct non-verbal aggression This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of isolating for analysis an additional component of aggression, namely direct non-verbal aggression. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic procedures were used to design a self-report inventory measuring direct physical, direct verbal, indirect and direct non-verbal aggression (eg. silent treatment) in adults (Sample 1: n = 101 males, n = 112 females; Sample 2: n = 56 males, n = 160 females) and adolescents (Sample 3: n = 75 males, n = 100 females). The factor structure was replicated across the adult and adolescent samples. Analysis of sex differences on all three samples showed that men and adolescent boys were more physically aggressive than women and adolescent girls, while women and adolescent girls were found to use direct non-verbal aggression more than men and adolescent boys. No sex differences were found on indirect aggression, strictly defined, wherein aggressors must take steps to hide their identities and may use others as vehicles to deliver the harm. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research Pier Professional

Identifying a new subcategory of aggression: sex differences in direct non-verbal aggression

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pier-professional/identifying-a-new-subcategory-of-aggression-sex-differences-in-direct-jFGBY8fm6j
Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1759-6599
eISSN
2042-8715
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of isolating for analysis an additional component of aggression, namely direct non-verbal aggression. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic procedures were used to design a self-report inventory measuring direct physical, direct verbal, indirect and direct non-verbal aggression (eg. silent treatment) in adults (Sample 1: n = 101 males, n = 112 females; Sample 2: n = 56 males, n = 160 females) and adolescents (Sample 3: n = 75 males, n = 100 females). The factor structure was replicated across the adult and adolescent samples. Analysis of sex differences on all three samples showed that men and adolescent boys were more physically aggressive than women and adolescent girls, while women and adolescent girls were found to use direct non-verbal aggression more than men and adolescent boys. No sex differences were found on indirect aggression, strictly defined, wherein aggressors must take steps to hide their identities and may use others as vehicles to deliver the harm.

Journal

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace ResearchPier Professional

Published: Oct 1, 2009

Keywords: Indirect aggression

There are no references for this article.