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Editorial

Editorial Welcome to a further edition of the Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research. We focus here on papers covering the broad remit of behaviour, by exploring aggression that occurs among the very young to that occurring across nations. The theme of the current edition is victimisation, a topic that is often not given the attention it deserves, and one that more commonly focuses on the role of perpetrators. The papers are ordered from exploring this among the very young through to adulthood and population perspectives. We commence with a study by Claire P Monks and Peter K Smith that explores the measurement of participant roles in bullying behaviours, and notes evidence of shortterm stability for aggressors and provocative victims. The paper is valuable in highlighting the young age at which roles relating to aggression begin to become static, emphasising further the distinction between provocative and passive victims. These findings build on a larger developing research base that indicates the young age at which humans become involved in behaviours we characterise as aggression. Andrew M Terranova, Paul Boxer and Amanda S Morris build on this study by focusing on a slightly older age group – middle childhood – http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research Pier Professional

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1759-6599
eISSN
2042-8715
DOI
10.5042/jacpr.2010.0531
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Welcome to a further edition of the Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research. We focus here on papers covering the broad remit of behaviour, by exploring aggression that occurs among the very young to that occurring across nations. The theme of the current edition is victimisation, a topic that is often not given the attention it deserves, and one that more commonly focuses on the role of perpetrators. The papers are ordered from exploring this among the very young through to adulthood and population perspectives. We commence with a study by Claire P Monks and Peter K Smith that explores the measurement of participant roles in bullying behaviours, and notes evidence of shortterm stability for aggressors and provocative victims. The paper is valuable in highlighting the young age at which roles relating to aggression begin to become static, emphasising further the distinction between provocative and passive victims. These findings build on a larger developing research base that indicates the young age at which humans become involved in behaviours we characterise as aggression. Andrew M Terranova, Paul Boxer and Amanda S Morris build on this study by focusing on a slightly older age group – middle childhood –

Journal

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace ResearchPier Professional

Published: Oct 1, 2010

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