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Editorial

Editorial Andy Mantell and Patti Simonson Welcome to Volume 2, Issue 2 of Social Care and Neurodisability. This quarterly journal aims to be a single source of knowledge on legislation, best practice and research for those working with, and affected by, neurological conditions. This issue explores issues of empowering those who are marginalised; people with dementia, sub-arachnoid haemorrhages and children who have acquired brain injuries. The practice section focuses on the needs of those with dementia. First, David Moore and Kirsty Jones discuss a local authority’s experience of implementing the personalisation agenda with people with dementia. From interviewing clients, family carers, social care staff and managers, they found that one of the biggest hurdles was the attitude of staff. This included deciding that people with dementia could not benefit from such initiatives. They highlight the importance of hearing what people with dementia and their familial carers want, rather than assuming this. As they note (Carr, 2010, p. 2): Personalisation means thinking about care and support services in an entirely different way. This means starting with the person as an individual with strengths, preferences and aspirations and putting them at the centre of the process of identifying their needs and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Pier Professional

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
2042-0919
eISSN
2042-874X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Andy Mantell and Patti Simonson Welcome to Volume 2, Issue 2 of Social Care and Neurodisability. This quarterly journal aims to be a single source of knowledge on legislation, best practice and research for those working with, and affected by, neurological conditions. This issue explores issues of empowering those who are marginalised; people with dementia, sub-arachnoid haemorrhages and children who have acquired brain injuries. The practice section focuses on the needs of those with dementia. First, David Moore and Kirsty Jones discuss a local authority’s experience of implementing the personalisation agenda with people with dementia. From interviewing clients, family carers, social care staff and managers, they found that one of the biggest hurdles was the attitude of staff. This included deciding that people with dementia could not benefit from such initiatives. They highlight the importance of hearing what people with dementia and their familial carers want, rather than assuming this. As they note (Carr, 2010, p. 2): Personalisation means thinking about care and support services in an entirely different way. This means starting with the person as an individual with strengths, preferences and aspirations and putting them at the centre of the process of identifying their needs and

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityPier Professional

Published: Jan 1, 2011

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