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Urbanization, Biodiversity, and Conservation

Urbanization, Biodiversity, and Conservation Articles Urbanization, Biodiversity, and Conservation MICHAEL L. M CKINNEY mong the many human activities that cause Ahabitat loss (Czech et al. 2000), urban development THE IMPACTS OF URBANIZATION ON produces some of the greatest local extinction rates and fre- NATIVE SPECIES ARE POORLY STUDIED, quently eliminates the large majority of native species (Vale and Vale 1976, Luniak 1994, Kowarik 1995, Marzluff 2001). BUT EDUCATING A HIGHLY URBANIZED Also, urbanization is often more lasting than other types of habitat loss. Throughout much of New England, for exam- HUMAN POPULATION ABOUT THESE ple, ecological succession is restoring forest habitat lost from farming and logging, whereas most urbanized areas in that IMPACTS CAN GREATLY IMPROVE SPECIES region not only persist but continue to expand and threaten CONSERVATION IN ALL ECOSYSTEMS other local ecosystems (Stein et al. 2000). Another great conservation challenge of urban growth is that it replaces the native species that are lost with wide- spread “weedy” nonnative species. This replacement consti- spread of suburban housing. It is estimated, for example, tutes the process of biotic homogenization that threatens to that residential yards occupy 135,000 acres in the state of reduce the biological uniqueness of local ecosystems (Blair Missouri (MDC 2002). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

Urbanization, Biodiversity, and Conservation

BioScience , Volume 52 (10) – Oct 1, 2002

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References (61)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2002 American Institute of Biological Sciences
Subject
Overview Articles
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
DOI
10.1641/0006-3568(2002)052[0883:UBAC]2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Articles Urbanization, Biodiversity, and Conservation MICHAEL L. M CKINNEY mong the many human activities that cause Ahabitat loss (Czech et al. 2000), urban development THE IMPACTS OF URBANIZATION ON produces some of the greatest local extinction rates and fre- NATIVE SPECIES ARE POORLY STUDIED, quently eliminates the large majority of native species (Vale and Vale 1976, Luniak 1994, Kowarik 1995, Marzluff 2001). BUT EDUCATING A HIGHLY URBANIZED Also, urbanization is often more lasting than other types of habitat loss. Throughout much of New England, for exam- HUMAN POPULATION ABOUT THESE ple, ecological succession is restoring forest habitat lost from farming and logging, whereas most urbanized areas in that IMPACTS CAN GREATLY IMPROVE SPECIES region not only persist but continue to expand and threaten CONSERVATION IN ALL ECOSYSTEMS other local ecosystems (Stein et al. 2000). Another great conservation challenge of urban growth is that it replaces the native species that are lost with wide- spread “weedy” nonnative species. This replacement consti- spread of suburban housing. It is estimated, for example, tutes the process of biotic homogenization that threatens to that residential yards occupy 135,000 acres in the state of reduce the biological uniqueness of local ecosystems (Blair Missouri (MDC 2002).

Journal

BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2002

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