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THRIPS CONTROL WITH IN-FURROW INSECTICIDES AND SEED TREATMENTS, 2002.

THRIPS CONTROL WITH IN-FURROW INSECTICIDES AND SEED TREATMENTS, 2002. (F72) COTTON: Gossypium hirsutum L., 'DP 451 BR' Glenn E. Studebaker Cooperative Extension Service University of Arkansas Northeast Research and Extension Center P.O. Box 48 Keiser, AR 72351-0048 Tel: (870) 526-2199 ext. 108 Fax: (870) 526-2582 E-mail: gstudebaker@uaex.edu Donald R. Johnson Cooperative Extension Service University of Arkansas P.O. Box 391 Little Rock, AR 72203 Doug Walsh Tobacco thrips: Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) This study was conducted at two locations, the Northeast Research and Extension Center in Keiser, AR and the Cotton Branch Station in Marianna, AR. Plots at the Marianna location consisted of 4 rows on 38-inch row spacing x 50 feet in length planted on 22 May. Plots at the Keiser location consisted of 8 rows on 38- inch row spacing by 50 ft in length planted on 24 May. Each test was arranged in a RCB with four replications. Plots were maintained with conventional tillage practices. University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service recommendations for fertility, weeds, insects and water management were followed. Plots were planted with a John Deere 7100 planter, with granular insecticide treatments being applied with the John Deere insecticide boxes on the planter. After emergence thrips populations were evaluated on 7, 14, 21 and 26 Jun at the Keiser location, and on 3, 11, 17 and 25 Jun at the Marianna location. The Orthene foliar treatment was applied at each location after the first sampling date (7 Jun at Keiser, 3 Jun at Marianna). Orthene was applied with a CO pressurized backpack sprayer calibrated to deliver 10 gpa at 42 psi through 2 TX-6 hollowcone nozzles per row. Thrips were sampled by clipping five plants from each plot and placing them in a jar of alcohol. Jars were then taken to the lab and the contents filtered through filter paper. Thrips captured on the filter paper were then counted under a dissecting microscope. Adults and larvae were counted separately. Plots at the Keiser location were also mapped using the University of Arkansas COTMAN program. Data were analyzed with Agricultural Research Manager. Thrips populations were quite high during the first two sampling dates of the study at both locations averaging near 90 thrips/5 plants. Similar results were obtained from both locations on the first two sampling dates with all treatments (except Orthene) reducing thrips numbers significantly. The Orthene treatment was not significantly different on the first date because the insecticide was not applied until after sampling had been completed. However, at both locations thrips numbers were not significantly lower in the Orthene treatment when compared to the untreated check throughout the study. Thrips numbers dropped in the untreated check and increased in the other treatments by sample dates 3 and 4. No significant differences in thrips counts were observed in the last two sampling dates. Maturity dates were obtained at the Keiser location by mapping plants in each plot using the COTMAN system. Treatments were considered cutout (a measure of maturity) when they averaged five nodes above the uppermost white flower on the first position (NAWF = 5). The Cruiser treatment was the earliest reaching cutout at 74 days after planting, 11 days earlier than the untreated check (85 days). Other treatments ranged from 4 to 7 days earlier than the untreated check. Yields from the Keiser location were all significantly higher than the untreated check with the exception of the foliar Orthene treatment. Yields ranged from 288 to 427 lbs of lint over the untreated control. However, yields at the Marianna location were not significantly different (P = 0.05), even though thrips pressure was similar in both locations. One obvious difference between both locations was soil-type. The Marianna location was planted on a silt-loam soil, while the Keiser location was a heavy-clay. It may be that the added stress of growing on a heavy-clay soil amplified the damage inflicted by the thrips. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

THRIPS CONTROL WITH IN-FURROW INSECTICIDES AND SEED TREATMENTS, 2002.

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Oxford University Press
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© Published by Oxford University Press.
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2155-9856
DOI
10.1093/amt/28.1.F72
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Abstract

(F72) COTTON: Gossypium hirsutum L., 'DP 451 BR' Glenn E. Studebaker Cooperative Extension Service University of Arkansas Northeast Research and Extension Center P.O. Box 48 Keiser, AR 72351-0048 Tel: (870) 526-2199 ext. 108 Fax: (870) 526-2582 E-mail: gstudebaker@uaex.edu Donald R. Johnson Cooperative Extension Service University of Arkansas P.O. Box 391 Little Rock, AR 72203 Doug Walsh Tobacco thrips: Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) This study was conducted at two locations, the Northeast Research and Extension Center in Keiser, AR and the Cotton Branch Station in Marianna, AR. Plots at the Marianna location consisted of 4 rows on 38-inch row spacing x 50 feet in length planted on 22 May. Plots at the Keiser location consisted of 8 rows on 38- inch row spacing by 50 ft in length planted on 24 May. Each test was arranged in a RCB with four replications. Plots were maintained with conventional tillage practices. University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service recommendations for fertility, weeds, insects and water management were followed. Plots were planted with a John Deere 7100 planter, with granular insecticide treatments being applied with the John Deere insecticide boxes on the planter. After emergence thrips populations were evaluated on 7, 14, 21 and 26 Jun at the Keiser location, and on 3, 11, 17 and 25 Jun at the Marianna location. The Orthene foliar treatment was applied at each location after the first sampling date (7 Jun at Keiser, 3 Jun at Marianna). Orthene was applied with a CO pressurized backpack sprayer calibrated to deliver 10 gpa at 42 psi through 2 TX-6 hollowcone nozzles per row. Thrips were sampled by clipping five plants from each plot and placing them in a jar of alcohol. Jars were then taken to the lab and the contents filtered through filter paper. Thrips captured on the filter paper were then counted under a dissecting microscope. Adults and larvae were counted separately. Plots at the Keiser location were also mapped using the University of Arkansas COTMAN program. Data were analyzed with Agricultural Research Manager. Thrips populations were quite high during the first two sampling dates of the study at both locations averaging near 90 thrips/5 plants. Similar results were obtained from both locations on the first two sampling dates with all treatments (except Orthene) reducing thrips numbers significantly. The Orthene treatment was not significantly different on the first date because the insecticide was not applied until after sampling had been completed. However, at both locations thrips numbers were not significantly lower in the Orthene treatment when compared to the untreated check throughout the study. Thrips numbers dropped in the untreated check and increased in the other treatments by sample dates 3 and 4. No significant differences in thrips counts were observed in the last two sampling dates. Maturity dates were obtained at the Keiser location by mapping plants in each plot using the COTMAN system. Treatments were considered cutout (a measure of maturity) when they averaged five nodes above the uppermost white flower on the first position (NAWF = 5). The Cruiser treatment was the earliest reaching cutout at 74 days after planting, 11 days earlier than the untreated check (85 days). Other treatments ranged from 4 to 7 days earlier than the untreated check. Yields from the Keiser location were all significantly higher than the untreated check with the exception of the foliar Orthene treatment. Yields ranged from 288 to 427 lbs of lint over the untreated control. However, yields at the Marianna location were not significantly different (P = 0.05), even though thrips pressure was similar in both locations. One obvious difference between both locations was soil-type. The Marianna location was planted on a silt-loam soil, while the Keiser location was a heavy-clay. It may be that the added stress of growing on a heavy-clay soil amplified the damage inflicted by the thrips.

Journal

Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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