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Risk Factors for Renal Cell Cancer: The Multiethnic Cohort

Risk Factors for Renal Cell Cancer: The Multiethnic Cohort The association of body size, lifestyle, and medical conditions with renal cell cancer risk was examined among 161,126 HawaiiLos Angeles Multiethnic Cohort participants (19932002). After 8.3 years of follow-up, 347 renal cell cancer cases (220 men, 127 women) were identified. Renal cell cancer risk increased with increasing body mass index in men (multivariate relative risk (RR) 1.06 per unit of body mass index, p 0.001) and women (RR 1.07, p < 0.0001). The relative risks associated with being obese compared with being lean were 1.76 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 2.58) for men and 2.27 (95% CI: 1.37, 3.74) for women. Hypertension was associated with renal cell cancer (RRmen 1.42, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.87; RRwomen 1.58, 95% CI: 1.09, 2.28). Smoking was confirmed to be a risk factor for both sexes. Among women, diuretic use was associated with increased risk (RR 1.63, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.57), whereas physical activity was associated with reduced risk (ptrend 0.027). Alcohol consumption was inversely associated with risk for men (ptrend 0.045). Compared with nondrinkers, men who drank 1 drinks/day had a 31% lower risk (95% CI: 0.49, 0.96). Results show that body mass index, smoking, and hypertension are risk factors for renal cell cancer in both sexes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Epidemiology Oxford University Press

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References (38)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
American Journal of Epidemiology The Author 2007. Published by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org.
ISSN
0002-9262
eISSN
1476-6256
DOI
10.1093/aje/kwm170
pmid
17656615
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The association of body size, lifestyle, and medical conditions with renal cell cancer risk was examined among 161,126 HawaiiLos Angeles Multiethnic Cohort participants (19932002). After 8.3 years of follow-up, 347 renal cell cancer cases (220 men, 127 women) were identified. Renal cell cancer risk increased with increasing body mass index in men (multivariate relative risk (RR) 1.06 per unit of body mass index, p 0.001) and women (RR 1.07, p < 0.0001). The relative risks associated with being obese compared with being lean were 1.76 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 2.58) for men and 2.27 (95% CI: 1.37, 3.74) for women. Hypertension was associated with renal cell cancer (RRmen 1.42, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.87; RRwomen 1.58, 95% CI: 1.09, 2.28). Smoking was confirmed to be a risk factor for both sexes. Among women, diuretic use was associated with increased risk (RR 1.63, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.57), whereas physical activity was associated with reduced risk (ptrend 0.027). Alcohol consumption was inversely associated with risk for men (ptrend 0.045). Compared with nondrinkers, men who drank 1 drinks/day had a 31% lower risk (95% CI: 0.49, 0.96). Results show that body mass index, smoking, and hypertension are risk factors for renal cell cancer in both sexes.

Journal

American Journal of EpidemiologyOxford University Press

Published: Jul 26, 2007

Keywords: body mass index body size carcinoma, renal cell cohort studies diuretics hypertension risk factors smoking

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