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Possible Transmission by Fomites of Respiratory Syncytial Virus

Possible Transmission by Fomites of Respiratory Syncytial Virus To test whether nosocomial spread of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) could occur through contact with environmental surfaces contaminated by RSV-infected nasal secretions, survival in the environment of RSV isolated from media, pooled adult secretions, and secretions from hospitalized infants was examined. RSV in freshly obtained infant secretions was recovered from countertops for up to 6 hr, from rubber gloves for up to 1 1/2 hr, from cloth gowns and paper tissue for 30–45 min, and from skin for up to 20 min. RSV in media and pooled secretions survived for slightly longer periods. Further experiments demonstrated that infectious virus could be transferred to hands touching these contaminated surfaces and could be recovered from these hands for up to 25 min. These studies suggest that survival of RSV in the environment of infected infant secretions is sufficient to allow transfer of infectious virus to the hands of hospital personnel. Thus, self-inoculation by contact with contaminated infant secretions may be a potential mode of nosocomial transmission of RSV. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Infectious Diseases Oxford University Press

Possible Transmission by Fomites of Respiratory Syncytial Virus

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References (12)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1980 by The University of Chicago
ISSN
0022-1899
eISSN
1537-6613
DOI
10.1093/infdis/141.1.98
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To test whether nosocomial spread of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) could occur through contact with environmental surfaces contaminated by RSV-infected nasal secretions, survival in the environment of RSV isolated from media, pooled adult secretions, and secretions from hospitalized infants was examined. RSV in freshly obtained infant secretions was recovered from countertops for up to 6 hr, from rubber gloves for up to 1 1/2 hr, from cloth gowns and paper tissue for 30–45 min, and from skin for up to 20 min. RSV in media and pooled secretions survived for slightly longer periods. Further experiments demonstrated that infectious virus could be transferred to hands touching these contaminated surfaces and could be recovered from these hands for up to 25 min. These studies suggest that survival of RSV in the environment of infected infant secretions is sufficient to allow transfer of infectious virus to the hands of hospital personnel. Thus, self-inoculation by contact with contaminated infant secretions may be a potential mode of nosocomial transmission of RSV.

Journal

The Journal of Infectious DiseasesOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1980

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