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Physiological Stress in Birds

Physiological Stress in Birds Abstract Although the control mechanism is less clearly determined, stress in birds, as in mammals, can be defined in terms of the activation of two integrative neurohumoral systems by external or internal stimuli: (a) the neurogenic system response, which is almost immediate and provides a rapid delivery of energy, and (b) the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal complex response, which is a slower, long-term mobilization of defenses. These responses, although temporary defense mechanisms against specific stimuli, place a bird in a state of general nonspecific stress, in which growth rates and resistance to many diseases are diminished. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes " The author is research leader, Poultry Environmental Physiology Research Unit, Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory, USDA-SEA-AR, 934 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605. © 1980 American Institute of Biological Sciences http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

Physiological Stress in Birds

BioScience , Volume 30 (8) – Aug 1, 1980

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References (55)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1980 American Institute of Biological Sciences
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
DOI
10.2307/1307973
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Although the control mechanism is less clearly determined, stress in birds, as in mammals, can be defined in terms of the activation of two integrative neurohumoral systems by external or internal stimuli: (a) the neurogenic system response, which is almost immediate and provides a rapid delivery of energy, and (b) the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal complex response, which is a slower, long-term mobilization of defenses. These responses, although temporary defense mechanisms against specific stimuli, place a bird in a state of general nonspecific stress, in which growth rates and resistance to many diseases are diminished. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes " The author is research leader, Poultry Environmental Physiology Research Unit, Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory, USDA-SEA-AR, 934 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605. © 1980 American Institute of Biological Sciences

Journal

BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Aug 1, 1980

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