Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Memory and the Perception of Rhythm

Memory and the Perception of Rhythm Abstract Consideration of the roles of echoic, short-term, and long-term memory in rhythmic perception yields a three-fold division of the rhythmic hierarchy into foreground, middleground, and background. It appears that at middleground levels meter provides a quantitative basis for rhythmic perception, while at foreground and background levels rhythms are perceived more qualitatively. It also appears that at lower middleground levels meter is perceived using an entrainment strategy, while at higher middleground levels perception is based on a counting strategy. Evidence for these perceptual differences is found in the kinds of metric irregularities introduced at each level, with lower levels being characterized by syncopations and higher levels by expansions and contractions. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes Candace Brower is Assistant Professor of Music Theory at Northwestern University. © 1993 by the Society for Music Theory, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Theory Spectrum Oxford University Press

Memory and the Perception of Rhythm

Music Theory Spectrum , Volume 15 (1) – Mar 1, 1993

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/memory-and-the-perception-of-rhythm-t9u3ZBXOhC

References (9)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1993 by the Society for Music Theory, Inc.
ISSN
0195-6167
eISSN
1533-8339
DOI
10.2307/745907
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Consideration of the roles of echoic, short-term, and long-term memory in rhythmic perception yields a three-fold division of the rhythmic hierarchy into foreground, middleground, and background. It appears that at middleground levels meter provides a quantitative basis for rhythmic perception, while at foreground and background levels rhythms are perceived more qualitatively. It also appears that at lower middleground levels meter is perceived using an entrainment strategy, while at higher middleground levels perception is based on a counting strategy. Evidence for these perceptual differences is found in the kinds of metric irregularities introduced at each level, with lower levels being characterized by syncopations and higher levels by expansions and contractions. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes Candace Brower is Assistant Professor of Music Theory at Northwestern University. © 1993 by the Society for Music Theory, Inc.

Journal

Music Theory SpectrumOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1993

There are no references for this article.