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Jeremy Mitchell: Electronic Banking and the Consumer — The European Dimension

Jeremy Mitchell: Electronic Banking and the Consumer — The European Dimension BUSINESS LAW ELECTRONIC BANKING AND THE CONSUMER—THE EUROPEAN DIMEN­ SION. By Jeremy Mitchell. London: Policy Studies Institute, 1988. Pp . 679. Reviewed by Edward Rubin* Our daily lives, which have been transformed by machines over th e course of the last two centuries, are now being transformed again by electronics. Among the many routine activities that we have begun doing differently is the process of paying for goods and services. Until a few years ago, people made payments by transfer­ ring pieces of paper, generally currency or checks. We still do so, of course, but it is now quite likely that the currency was obtained by punching numbers into a computer terminal. Before long, we will be making the payments themselves by operating a terminal, or by using a plastic card to activate it. For ordinary people, who are known as consumers when they participate in commercial transac­ tions, such a change is likely to produce far-reaching implications. In Electronic Banking and the Consumer - The European Di­ mension, Jeremy Mitchell explores these implications in the Euro­ pean context. There are two aspects to his book: first, a description of the consumer issues that have arisen, or will arise, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Comparative Law Oxford University Press

Jeremy Mitchell: Electronic Banking and the Consumer — The European Dimension

American Journal of Comparative Law , Volume 38 (4) – Oct 1, 1990

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1990 by The American Association for the Comparative Study of Law, Inc.
ISSN
0002-919X
eISSN
2326-9197
DOI
10.2307/840619
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BUSINESS LAW ELECTRONIC BANKING AND THE CONSUMER—THE EUROPEAN DIMEN­ SION. By Jeremy Mitchell. London: Policy Studies Institute, 1988. Pp . 679. Reviewed by Edward Rubin* Our daily lives, which have been transformed by machines over th e course of the last two centuries, are now being transformed again by electronics. Among the many routine activities that we have begun doing differently is the process of paying for goods and services. Until a few years ago, people made payments by transfer­ ring pieces of paper, generally currency or checks. We still do so, of course, but it is now quite likely that the currency was obtained by punching numbers into a computer terminal. Before long, we will be making the payments themselves by operating a terminal, or by using a plastic card to activate it. For ordinary people, who are known as consumers when they participate in commercial transac­ tions, such a change is likely to produce far-reaching implications. In Electronic Banking and the Consumer - The European Di­ mension, Jeremy Mitchell explores these implications in the Euro­ pean context. There are two aspects to his book: first, a description of the consumer issues that have arisen, or will arise,

Journal

American Journal of Comparative LawOxford University Press

Published: Oct 1, 1990

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