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GRAY GARDEN SLUG CONTROL IN FIELD CORN, 2004

GRAY GARDEN SLUG CONTROL IN FIELD CORN, 2004 (F22) CORN (FIELD): Zea mays L., ‘Pioneer’ Ronald B. Hammond Department of Entomology Ohio Agricultural Research & Development Center The Ohio State University Wooster, OH 44691 Phone: (330) 263-3727 Fax: (330) 263-3686 E-mail: hammond.5@osu.edu Gray garden slug (GGS): Deroceras reticulatum Müller Four molluscicide baits were tested against the GGS in field corn near Wooster, OH. The test was designed as a RCB with 5 treatments and an untreated check plot, and 4 replications. Plot size was 50 ft (20 rows on 30 in centers) × 50 ft. Corn was in the 3-4 leaf stage of development and beginning to show feeding injury at the beginning of the experiment. Molluscicide baits were applied using a hand spreader on 27 May. The treatments were a single rate of Deadline MPs, Orcal Slug & Snail Bait, and an Orcal oat bait, and 2 rates of Metarex, all which are metaldehyde baits. For comparative purposes, the average number of bait particles that was applied per ft for Deadline MPs, Orcal Slug and Snail Bait, and Metarex was determined (this was not done for the oat bait). The numbers of GGS per individual corn plant were counted at dusk at 6, 13, and 19 DAT. Ten consecutive corn plants were examined in the middle of the plots. Observations were taken each week on continued feeding injury and rated using a 1 to 5 rating scale, with 5 being the highest level of injury. All data were analyzed with ANOVA and means separated using LSD (P ≤ 0.05). Yield data were not obtained. There were more bait particles per ft for both Metarex rates than for Deadline M-Ps and Orcal Slug and Snail Bait. Slugs were abundant in the check plots on all sample dates. All molluscicide baits were effective in reducing the number of GSS and slug injury from the untreated check. Significant differences among them were obtained. Significant feeding continued in the untreated check plots. 6 DAT 13 DAT 19 DAT No. bait Treatment/ Rate particles/ Slugs/ Injury Slugs/ Injury Slugs/ Injury formulation lb product/acre ft plant rating plant rating plant rating Untreated check --- --- 5.8a 4.3a 5.3a 4.8a 5.1a 4.8a Orcal Bait 3.25% 10.0 4.7 0.4b 1.3b 1.0b 1.5b 1.0b 1.9b Orcal Oats 10.0 --- 0.3b 1.0b 0.6b 1.0d 0.9b 1.3cd Metarex 4% 7.5 8.9 0.4b 1.1b 0.8b 1.6bc 0.9b 1.7bc Metarex 4% 10.0 11.8 0.3b 1.0b 0.7b 1.0c 0.8 1.0d Deadline M-Ps 4% 10.0 4.3 0.3b 1.0b 0.9b 1.0c 1.1b 1.0d Means in a column followed by the same letter are not significantly different (LSD, P > 0.05). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

GRAY GARDEN SLUG CONTROL IN FIELD CORN, 2004

Arthropod Management Tests , Volume 30 (1) – Jan 1, 2005

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Oxford University Press
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© Published by Oxford University Press.
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2155-9856
DOI
10.1093/amt/30.1.F22
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Abstract

(F22) CORN (FIELD): Zea mays L., ‘Pioneer’ Ronald B. Hammond Department of Entomology Ohio Agricultural Research & Development Center The Ohio State University Wooster, OH 44691 Phone: (330) 263-3727 Fax: (330) 263-3686 E-mail: hammond.5@osu.edu Gray garden slug (GGS): Deroceras reticulatum Müller Four molluscicide baits were tested against the GGS in field corn near Wooster, OH. The test was designed as a RCB with 5 treatments and an untreated check plot, and 4 replications. Plot size was 50 ft (20 rows on 30 in centers) × 50 ft. Corn was in the 3-4 leaf stage of development and beginning to show feeding injury at the beginning of the experiment. Molluscicide baits were applied using a hand spreader on 27 May. The treatments were a single rate of Deadline MPs, Orcal Slug & Snail Bait, and an Orcal oat bait, and 2 rates of Metarex, all which are metaldehyde baits. For comparative purposes, the average number of bait particles that was applied per ft for Deadline MPs, Orcal Slug and Snail Bait, and Metarex was determined (this was not done for the oat bait). The numbers of GGS per individual corn plant were counted at dusk at 6, 13, and 19 DAT. Ten consecutive corn plants were examined in the middle of the plots. Observations were taken each week on continued feeding injury and rated using a 1 to 5 rating scale, with 5 being the highest level of injury. All data were analyzed with ANOVA and means separated using LSD (P ≤ 0.05). Yield data were not obtained. There were more bait particles per ft for both Metarex rates than for Deadline M-Ps and Orcal Slug and Snail Bait. Slugs were abundant in the check plots on all sample dates. All molluscicide baits were effective in reducing the number of GSS and slug injury from the untreated check. Significant differences among them were obtained. Significant feeding continued in the untreated check plots. 6 DAT 13 DAT 19 DAT No. bait Treatment/ Rate particles/ Slugs/ Injury Slugs/ Injury Slugs/ Injury formulation lb product/acre ft plant rating plant rating plant rating Untreated check --- --- 5.8a 4.3a 5.3a 4.8a 5.1a 4.8a Orcal Bait 3.25% 10.0 4.7 0.4b 1.3b 1.0b 1.5b 1.0b 1.9b Orcal Oats 10.0 --- 0.3b 1.0b 0.6b 1.0d 0.9b 1.3cd Metarex 4% 7.5 8.9 0.4b 1.1b 0.8b 1.6bc 0.9b 1.7bc Metarex 4% 10.0 11.8 0.3b 1.0b 0.7b 1.0c 0.8 1.0d Deadline M-Ps 4% 10.0 4.3 0.3b 1.0b 0.9b 1.0c 1.1b 1.0d Means in a column followed by the same letter are not significantly different (LSD, P > 0.05).

Journal

Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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