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EVALUATION OF SELECTED INSECTICIDES FOR CONTROL AND IMPACT OF POTATO LEAFHOPPER IN VIRGINIA-TYPE PEANUT, 2001

EVALUATION OF SELECTED INSECTICIDES FOR CONTROL AND IMPACT OF POTATO LEAFHOPPER IN VIRGINIA-TYPE... (F78) PEANUT: Arachis hypogaea L., 'NC-V 11' EVALUATION OF SELECTED INSECTICIDES FOR CONTROL AND IMPACT OF POTATO LEAFHOPPER IN VIRGINIA-TYPE PEANUT, 2001 D. A. Herbert, Jr. Virginia Tech Tidewater Agricultural Research and Extension Center 6321 Holland Road Suffolk, VA 23437 Phone: (757) 657-6450, ext. 122 Fax: (757) 657-9333 E-mail: herbert@vt.edu Potato leafhopper (PLH): Empoasca fabae (Harris) Selected foliar applied insecticides were evaluated against PLH in Virginia-type peanut. 'NC-V 11' peanut was planted 22 Apr on a producer's field in Dinwiddie County, VA, using 36-inch row spacing. Foliar treatments were applied on 3 Jul and 29 Aug as a full coverage spray with a CO pressurized backpack sprayer calibrated to deliver 14.7 gpa at 40 psi through three D2-13 hollow-cone nozzles per row, one over the top and one on each side of each row. A RCB experimental design was used with 4 replicates; plots were four rows by 40 ft. PLH were sampled by making 10 sweeps per plot with a 15-inch diameter sweep net and counting numbers of captured adults and nymphs. A visual estimate of percentage of leaves showing typical PLH injury (yellow tipped) was also made for each plot on each sample date. Yield was determined from digging, drying and combining peanuts from the two center rows (80 row ft) of each plot. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and LSD procedures. Sweep net counts showed that all treatments resulted in significantly fewer PLH adults and nymphs, compared with the untreated control, for about 45 days after the first application. During that time, there were few differences among treatments, except the LABS 126-F02 480EW treatment generally had more, and significantly more than several other treatments on 25 Jul and 1 Aug. After 45 days, activity of all products apparently declined as PLH numbers increased in all treatments. After the second application, all but one treatment significantly reduced numbers by 4 Sep. All treatments had significantly less leaf injury compared with the untreated control until 16 Aug. Only Steward 1.25 EC had significantly less injury than the untreated control on 29 Aug. All treatments, except Karate Z and LABS 126-F02 480 EW, resulted in yields that were significantly higher than the untreated control. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

EVALUATION OF SELECTED INSECTICIDES FOR CONTROL AND IMPACT OF POTATO LEAFHOPPER IN VIRGINIA-TYPE PEANUT, 2001

Arthropod Management Tests , Volume 27 (1) – Jan 1, 2002

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Oxford University Press
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© Published by Oxford University Press.
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2155-9856
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10.1093/amt/27.1.F78
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Abstract

(F78) PEANUT: Arachis hypogaea L., 'NC-V 11' EVALUATION OF SELECTED INSECTICIDES FOR CONTROL AND IMPACT OF POTATO LEAFHOPPER IN VIRGINIA-TYPE PEANUT, 2001 D. A. Herbert, Jr. Virginia Tech Tidewater Agricultural Research and Extension Center 6321 Holland Road Suffolk, VA 23437 Phone: (757) 657-6450, ext. 122 Fax: (757) 657-9333 E-mail: herbert@vt.edu Potato leafhopper (PLH): Empoasca fabae (Harris) Selected foliar applied insecticides were evaluated against PLH in Virginia-type peanut. 'NC-V 11' peanut was planted 22 Apr on a producer's field in Dinwiddie County, VA, using 36-inch row spacing. Foliar treatments were applied on 3 Jul and 29 Aug as a full coverage spray with a CO pressurized backpack sprayer calibrated to deliver 14.7 gpa at 40 psi through three D2-13 hollow-cone nozzles per row, one over the top and one on each side of each row. A RCB experimental design was used with 4 replicates; plots were four rows by 40 ft. PLH were sampled by making 10 sweeps per plot with a 15-inch diameter sweep net and counting numbers of captured adults and nymphs. A visual estimate of percentage of leaves showing typical PLH injury (yellow tipped) was also made for each plot on each sample date. Yield was determined from digging, drying and combining peanuts from the two center rows (80 row ft) of each plot. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and LSD procedures. Sweep net counts showed that all treatments resulted in significantly fewer PLH adults and nymphs, compared with the untreated control, for about 45 days after the first application. During that time, there were few differences among treatments, except the LABS 126-F02 480EW treatment generally had more, and significantly more than several other treatments on 25 Jul and 1 Aug. After 45 days, activity of all products apparently declined as PLH numbers increased in all treatments. After the second application, all but one treatment significantly reduced numbers by 4 Sep. All treatments had significantly less leaf injury compared with the untreated control until 16 Aug. Only Steward 1.25 EC had significantly less injury than the untreated control on 29 Aug. All treatments, except Karate Z and LABS 126-F02 480 EW, resulted in yields that were significantly higher than the untreated control.

Journal

Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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