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EVALUATION OF MACH 2 AND MERIT FOR CONTROL OF WHITE GRUBS IN TURF, 2000

EVALUATION OF MACH 2 AND MERIT FOR CONTROL OF WHITE GRUBS IN TURF, 2000 (G9) Bermudagrass: Cynodon dactylon (L.) Mark A. Muegge Department of Entomology Texas A&M University Texas Cooperative Extension District VI Extension Center P.O. Box 1298 Fort Stockton, TX 79735 Phone: (915) 336-8585 Raymond Quigg Texas A&M University Texas Cooperative Extension Pecos County Extension Office 1010 E. 8th Street Fort Stockton, TX 79735 Phone: (915) 859-7725 Southern masked chafer (SMC): Cyclocephala lurida Bland May beetles (MB): Phyllophaga spp. Selected insecticides were evaluated for control of white grubs feeding on turf grass in a Fort Stockton, TX, city park. Treatments were applied 26 Jun and 1 Aug to plots measuring 5 by 5 ft and arranged in a RBD with factorial arrangement of treatments and replicated four times. The turf was equipped with a subsurface irrigation system that delivered approximately 1.0 inch of water weekly. Mach 2 SC was applied using a CO backpack sprayer delivering 50 gpa at 42 psi with 110015VS flat-fan nozzles spaced on 18 inch centers on a 4 ft boom. Merit 3G and Diazinon 5 G insecticides were applied using a shaker jar. All treated and untreated check plots received approximately 1.0 inch of irrigation water within 24 h postapplication. White grubs were sampled 11 Sep using a 6 inch wide flat-blade spade. Three sod samples (1 ft by » 4 inch deep) were collected per plot. Soil and sod from each sample were thoroughly examined for white grub larvae then soil and sod was replaced. All white grub larvae collected from each soil sample were counted, placed into vials filled with 90% EtOH, and labeled. White grub larva were identified to genus (Phyllophaga spp.) and/or species (Cyclocephala lurida). Soil tests were conducted on soil samples collected from the test site by the Texas A&M University System, Soil Testing Laboratory, College Station, TX. Soil analysis results showed soil pH as 8.0, 17% sand, 44% silt, and 39% clay. Precipitation data were obtained from the National Weather Service in Midland, TX. Rainfall amounts for Fort Stockton, TX, were 2.84, 0.11, trace, and 0 inches for Jun, Jul, Aug, and Sep, respectively. White grub sample data were subjected to ANOVA and treatment mean separation was performed using protected LSD. All analyses were conducted at the 0.1 probability level. Regardless of treatment application date, MB population densities were considered low and, at least in part, contributed to the lack of statistical differences among treatments. Population densities of SMC were significantly higher in the late treated plots relative to the early treated plots. Reasons for this phenomenon are unknown; however, regardless of treatment application timing all treated plots possessed significantly low SMC population densities relative to the untreated check plots. No significant differences were found among treatments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

EVALUATION OF MACH 2 AND MERIT FOR CONTROL OF WHITE GRUBS IN TURF, 2000

Arthropod Management Tests , Volume 27 (1) – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
eISSN
2155-9856
DOI
10.1093/amt/27.1.G9
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Abstract

(G9) Bermudagrass: Cynodon dactylon (L.) Mark A. Muegge Department of Entomology Texas A&M University Texas Cooperative Extension District VI Extension Center P.O. Box 1298 Fort Stockton, TX 79735 Phone: (915) 336-8585 Raymond Quigg Texas A&M University Texas Cooperative Extension Pecos County Extension Office 1010 E. 8th Street Fort Stockton, TX 79735 Phone: (915) 859-7725 Southern masked chafer (SMC): Cyclocephala lurida Bland May beetles (MB): Phyllophaga spp. Selected insecticides were evaluated for control of white grubs feeding on turf grass in a Fort Stockton, TX, city park. Treatments were applied 26 Jun and 1 Aug to plots measuring 5 by 5 ft and arranged in a RBD with factorial arrangement of treatments and replicated four times. The turf was equipped with a subsurface irrigation system that delivered approximately 1.0 inch of water weekly. Mach 2 SC was applied using a CO backpack sprayer delivering 50 gpa at 42 psi with 110015VS flat-fan nozzles spaced on 18 inch centers on a 4 ft boom. Merit 3G and Diazinon 5 G insecticides were applied using a shaker jar. All treated and untreated check plots received approximately 1.0 inch of irrigation water within 24 h postapplication. White grubs were sampled 11 Sep using a 6 inch wide flat-blade spade. Three sod samples (1 ft by » 4 inch deep) were collected per plot. Soil and sod from each sample were thoroughly examined for white grub larvae then soil and sod was replaced. All white grub larvae collected from each soil sample were counted, placed into vials filled with 90% EtOH, and labeled. White grub larva were identified to genus (Phyllophaga spp.) and/or species (Cyclocephala lurida). Soil tests were conducted on soil samples collected from the test site by the Texas A&M University System, Soil Testing Laboratory, College Station, TX. Soil analysis results showed soil pH as 8.0, 17% sand, 44% silt, and 39% clay. Precipitation data were obtained from the National Weather Service in Midland, TX. Rainfall amounts for Fort Stockton, TX, were 2.84, 0.11, trace, and 0 inches for Jun, Jul, Aug, and Sep, respectively. White grub sample data were subjected to ANOVA and treatment mean separation was performed using protected LSD. All analyses were conducted at the 0.1 probability level. Regardless of treatment application date, MB population densities were considered low and, at least in part, contributed to the lack of statistical differences among treatments. Population densities of SMC were significantly higher in the late treated plots relative to the early treated plots. Reasons for this phenomenon are unknown; however, regardless of treatment application timing all treated plots possessed significantly low SMC population densities relative to the untreated check plots. No significant differences were found among treatments.

Journal

Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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