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European Corn Borer Control in Minnesota Snap Beans, 1993

European Corn Borer Control in Minnesota Snap Beans, 1993 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/amt/article-abstract/19/1/55/4639236 by DeepDyve user on 02 August 2020 E: VEGETABLE CROPS Arthropod Management Tests, Vol. 19 55 D. W. Bartels, C. R. Fossey, W. D. Hutchison, J. H. Rinkleff, (4E) BEAN (Snap): Phaseolus vulgaris L., 'Profit and P. C. Bolin European corn borer (ECB); Ostrinia nubilalis (Hiibner) Department of Entomology University of Minnesota 219 Hodson Hall 1980 Folwell Ave. St. Paul, MN 55108 EUROPEAN CORN BORER CONTROL IN MINNESOTA SNAP BEANS, 1993: This test was conducted on the University of Minnesota, Rosemount Experiment Station, in snapbeans planted 8 Jul. Plots consisted of three 30 ft (9.14 m) rows on 30 inch (0.76 m) centers. Two untreated border rows and 7 ft (2.13 m) alleys separated the plots. Treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design with 4 replications. Treatments were applied 13 Aug using a moderate-clearance Spirit sprayer with 7 TX-10 hollowcone nozzles delivering 27 gpa (252.5 liters/ha) at 50 psi (3.51 kg/ cm ) and 3 mph (4.8 km/hr). All treatments included the sticker/extender Bond at 0.10 fl oz/gal (0.79 ml/liter). During application, wind speed averaged 4-5 mph (6.4-8.1 km/hr) and the temperature was 72°F (22°C). Plots were artificially infested using a 'bazooka' applicator on 10, 16 and 20 Aug. Plants were at 20% bloom, 25% pin-bean (beans £ 1 inch) and 95% pod growth stages, respectively. On each infestation date, 15-20 consecutive plants in one row of each plot were infested with approximately 25 first-instar ECB larvae/plant. Infestations were designed to evaluate the activity of each material 3-d pretreatment, 3-d posttreatment and 7-d posttreatment. Feral ECB moth flights during this time were low (18/night/light-trap at peak). All treatments were evaluated 16 Sep by selecting five consecutive plants from the center of each infested row. Total pods, pods with feeding damage and total ECB larvae were recorded. Because of poor survival at the 10 Aug infestation, and high-survival in most treatments for the 20 Aug infestation, data only for the 16 Aug infestation are summarized. The relationship between damaged pods and larval infestation among treatments was variable. No significant differences were observed for feeding damage, and none of the treatments significantly reduced larval infestations below that of the untreated check. However, five pyrethroid treatments and the experimental material, TD2341 (0.46 lb AI), had significantly fewer worms (all zero) than the Sevin XLR Plus treatment. No phytotoxicity was observed among treatments. Avg. No. pods or larvae/5 consecutive plants Dam­ Total aged Treatment Rate (lb Al/acre) pods pods Larvae Pounce 3.2 EC 85.25 0.20 1.00 0.00b Pounce 3.2 EC 0.15 94.00 1.75 0.00b Ambush 2 EC 0.20 91.50 1.25 0.00b Ambush 2 EC 0.15 115.25 7.50 0.50ab Orthene 75 S 86.50 0.75 2.00 0.00b Orthene 75 S + Safers Soap (49% AI) 0.75 + 0.2% v/v 93.50 3.75 0.25ab Capture 2 EC 0.03 97.00 2.50 0.00b Karate 1 EC 0.03 97.25 2.50 0.25ab TD2341 1.84 L 0.46 74.75 4.25 0.00b TD2341 1.84 L 0.23 90.50 2.75 0.25ab TD2342 2 FM 0.50 94.50 4.75 0.25ab Penncap-M 2 FM 0.75 91.25 3.25 1.25ab Penncap-M 2 FM 0.50 83.50 4.25 0.75ab Asana XL 0.66 EC 0.05 100.25 4.25 1.00ab Sevin XLR Plus 4 F 93.00 1.5 4.25 1.75a Untreated check 99.75 5.50 0.75ab NS NS Means, within a column, followed by the same letter are not significantly different (P > 0.05); Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple F test (NS = not significant ANOVA; for total pods: P = 0.6106; damaged pods: P = 0.6127). 'Because of a non-normal distribution for low-density larval counts, a Square Root (x + 0.5) transformation was done prior to ANOVA; back-transformed means are presented. At-harvest larval counts include all instars, though most were either fourths or fifths. BEAN (SNAP): Phaseolus vulgaris L. 'Strike' John Speese, III (5E) European corn borer (ECB); Ostrinia nubilalis (Hiibner) Eastern Shore Agricultural Experiment Station Corn earworm (CEW); Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) 33446 Research Drive Painter, VA 23420 FOLIAR SPRAYS TO CONTROL INSECTS ON SNAP BEANS, 1993: Snap beans were planted on 12 Aug at the Eastern Shore Agricultural Experiment Station, Painter, VA. Each plot consisted of a single 25 ft long row, bordered on each side by an untreated guard row, and replicated 4 times in a randomized, complete block design. Spacing was 3 ft between rows. Sprays were applied in 60 gal water/acre at 40 psi using a 3 hollow cone nozzle backpack sprayer on the following dates: 27 Aug; 1, 7, 21 and 29 Sep. Evaluation criteria consisted of counts of insect damaged pods in 50 randomly picked pods/plot on 8 Oct, and yields from the entire 25 ft row of each plot. The plots were mechanically harvested on 15 Oct. Although http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

European Corn Borer Control in Minnesota Snap Beans, 1993

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Oxford University Press
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© 1994, Entomological Society of America
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2155-9856
DOI
10.1093/amt/19.1.55
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Abstract

Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/amt/article-abstract/19/1/55/4639236 by DeepDyve user on 02 August 2020 E: VEGETABLE CROPS Arthropod Management Tests, Vol. 19 55 D. W. Bartels, C. R. Fossey, W. D. Hutchison, J. H. Rinkleff, (4E) BEAN (Snap): Phaseolus vulgaris L., 'Profit and P. C. Bolin European corn borer (ECB); Ostrinia nubilalis (Hiibner) Department of Entomology University of Minnesota 219 Hodson Hall 1980 Folwell Ave. St. Paul, MN 55108 EUROPEAN CORN BORER CONTROL IN MINNESOTA SNAP BEANS, 1993: This test was conducted on the University of Minnesota, Rosemount Experiment Station, in snapbeans planted 8 Jul. Plots consisted of three 30 ft (9.14 m) rows on 30 inch (0.76 m) centers. Two untreated border rows and 7 ft (2.13 m) alleys separated the plots. Treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design with 4 replications. Treatments were applied 13 Aug using a moderate-clearance Spirit sprayer with 7 TX-10 hollowcone nozzles delivering 27 gpa (252.5 liters/ha) at 50 psi (3.51 kg/ cm ) and 3 mph (4.8 km/hr). All treatments included the sticker/extender Bond at 0.10 fl oz/gal (0.79 ml/liter). During application, wind speed averaged 4-5 mph (6.4-8.1 km/hr) and the temperature was 72°F (22°C). Plots were artificially infested using a 'bazooka' applicator on 10, 16 and 20 Aug. Plants were at 20% bloom, 25% pin-bean (beans £ 1 inch) and 95% pod growth stages, respectively. On each infestation date, 15-20 consecutive plants in one row of each plot were infested with approximately 25 first-instar ECB larvae/plant. Infestations were designed to evaluate the activity of each material 3-d pretreatment, 3-d posttreatment and 7-d posttreatment. Feral ECB moth flights during this time were low (18/night/light-trap at peak). All treatments were evaluated 16 Sep by selecting five consecutive plants from the center of each infested row. Total pods, pods with feeding damage and total ECB larvae were recorded. Because of poor survival at the 10 Aug infestation, and high-survival in most treatments for the 20 Aug infestation, data only for the 16 Aug infestation are summarized. The relationship between damaged pods and larval infestation among treatments was variable. No significant differences were observed for feeding damage, and none of the treatments significantly reduced larval infestations below that of the untreated check. However, five pyrethroid treatments and the experimental material, TD2341 (0.46 lb AI), had significantly fewer worms (all zero) than the Sevin XLR Plus treatment. No phytotoxicity was observed among treatments. Avg. No. pods or larvae/5 consecutive plants Dam­ Total aged Treatment Rate (lb Al/acre) pods pods Larvae Pounce 3.2 EC 85.25 0.20 1.00 0.00b Pounce 3.2 EC 0.15 94.00 1.75 0.00b Ambush 2 EC 0.20 91.50 1.25 0.00b Ambush 2 EC 0.15 115.25 7.50 0.50ab Orthene 75 S 86.50 0.75 2.00 0.00b Orthene 75 S + Safers Soap (49% AI) 0.75 + 0.2% v/v 93.50 3.75 0.25ab Capture 2 EC 0.03 97.00 2.50 0.00b Karate 1 EC 0.03 97.25 2.50 0.25ab TD2341 1.84 L 0.46 74.75 4.25 0.00b TD2341 1.84 L 0.23 90.50 2.75 0.25ab TD2342 2 FM 0.50 94.50 4.75 0.25ab Penncap-M 2 FM 0.75 91.25 3.25 1.25ab Penncap-M 2 FM 0.50 83.50 4.25 0.75ab Asana XL 0.66 EC 0.05 100.25 4.25 1.00ab Sevin XLR Plus 4 F 93.00 1.5 4.25 1.75a Untreated check 99.75 5.50 0.75ab NS NS Means, within a column, followed by the same letter are not significantly different (P > 0.05); Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple F test (NS = not significant ANOVA; for total pods: P = 0.6106; damaged pods: P = 0.6127). 'Because of a non-normal distribution for low-density larval counts, a Square Root (x + 0.5) transformation was done prior to ANOVA; back-transformed means are presented. At-harvest larval counts include all instars, though most were either fourths or fifths. BEAN (SNAP): Phaseolus vulgaris L. 'Strike' John Speese, III (5E) European corn borer (ECB); Ostrinia nubilalis (Hiibner) Eastern Shore Agricultural Experiment Station Corn earworm (CEW); Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) 33446 Research Drive Painter, VA 23420 FOLIAR SPRAYS TO CONTROL INSECTS ON SNAP BEANS, 1993: Snap beans were planted on 12 Aug at the Eastern Shore Agricultural Experiment Station, Painter, VA. Each plot consisted of a single 25 ft long row, bordered on each side by an untreated guard row, and replicated 4 times in a randomized, complete block design. Spacing was 3 ft between rows. Sprays were applied in 60 gal water/acre at 40 psi using a 3 hollow cone nozzle backpack sprayer on the following dates: 27 Aug; 1, 7, 21 and 29 Sep. Evaluation criteria consisted of counts of insect damaged pods in 50 randomly picked pods/plot on 8 Oct, and yields from the entire 25 ft row of each plot. The plots were mechanically harvested on 15 Oct. Although

Journal

Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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