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EFFECTS OF MICROMITE ON KATYDID DEVELOPMENT, 2006

EFFECTS OF MICROMITE ON KATYDID DEVELOPMENT, 2006 (D9) ORANGE: Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck, ‘Hamlin’ navel Elizabeth E. Grafton-Cardwell Department of Entomology University of California Riverside, CA 92521 Phone: (559) 646-6591 Fax: (559) 646-6593 E-mail: bethgc@uckac.edu Yuling Ouyang Forktailed bush katydid: Scudderia furcata Brunner von Wattenwyl The effects of 3.125 and 6.25 oz Micromite 80 WG and Delegate GF in 100 gpa on the development of various stages of forktailed bush katydid were studied in a greenhouse at the Kearney Agricultural Center (KAC), Parlier, CA. Potted 5 ft ‘Hamlin’ navel trees were used for the experiments. The katydids were collected from an untreated peach orchard in Ivanhoe, CA during 2006 and from a KAC greenhouse colony reared on pummelo citrus since 2005. The peach orchard katydid nymphs were reared on potted grapevines, peach leaf bouquets, water spinach, and peanuts until they reached the appropriate stage for testing. In test 1, using 6-8 branch replications during 2 Apr - 19 May 2006, branches were treated st nd with 3.125 oz Micromite, 6.25 oz Micromite, or water and allowed to air-dry prior to testing. Five 1 and 2 instar katydids were placed in polyester mesh bags over treated branches for a total of 30-40 katydids per treatment. The katydids were checked for mortality after 3, 7, and 14 days. In test 2, four branches were treated with 3.125 oz or 6.25 oz of Micromite, th Delegate or water on 23 May, 2006. The branches were air-dried for 2-3 hours. Five 4 and 5th instar katydids were placed in bags over the branches for a total of 20 katydids for each treatment. The katydids were checked for mortality after 3, 7, 10, and 14 days. In test 3, using 8-9 tree replications during 8 Jun – 8 Jul 2006, trees were treated with 3.125 oz or 6.25 oz Micromite, or water and allowed to air-dry prior to testing. Two unmated newly matured adult females and two adult males were placed in mesh bags over one branch for a total of 16-18 females per treatment. The katydids were moved to a new branch (to provide food and oviposition sites) 1-2 times a week until all the treated katydids stopped producing eggs. The number of eggs hatched was determined after 6 wk. The mean number of eggs per live female and the percentage egg hatch were calculated for each treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA after log (x) of numbers or arcsine square root (x) transformation of percentages and the means were separated according to LSD (P = 0.05). nd First and 2 instar katydids were not significantly affected by Micromite until they began to molt at 7 DAT (Test 1) and nearly complete mortality was observed at 14 DAT. Individuals that survived 14 days of the Micromite treatment did not develop wing pads. Fourth and fifth instars showed 70-100% mortality between 7-14 days for 3.125 or 6.25 oz Micromite treatment (Test 2). Delegate rapidly killed 90% of the late instar katydid nymphs in the first 3 DAT. Mortality of katydid nymphs was 100% 14 DAT in all treatments. Newly matured and mated katydid females exposed to water produced an average of 46.8 eggs/live female during their life-time and this was reduced to 16.4 and 28.4 for the 3.125 and 6.25 oz Micromite treatments (Test 3). The percentage of eggs hatched in water treatment was 97%, but was significantly reduced by both rates of Micromite. Test 1 st nd Mean % mortality 1 and 2 instar katydids Treatment/ Rate amt formulation product/acre No. tested 3 DAT 7 DAT 14 DAT Water 30 0.0a 0.0a 0.0a Micromite 80 WGS 3.125 oz 40 7.5a 37.5b 97.5b Micromite 80 WGS 6.25 oz 30 10.0a 66.7b 100.0b Means within a column not followed by the same letter are significantly different (LSD, P < 0.05) after arcsine (squareroot (x)) transformation. Untransformed means are listed. Test 2 Mean % mortality 4th and 5th instar katydids Treatment/ Rate amt formulation product/acre No. tested 3 DAT 7 DAT 10 DAT 14 DAT Water 20 0.0a 0.0a 0.0a 0.0a Micromite 80 WGS 3.125 oz 20 5.0a 5.0a 95.0b 100.0b Micromite 80 WGS 6.25 oz 20 70.0b 70.0b 95.0b 100.0b Delegate GF 6.4 oz 20 90.0c 90.0c 100.0b 100.0b Means within a column not followed by the same letter are significantly different (LSD, P < 0.05) after arcsine (squareroot (x)) transformation. Untransformed means are listed. Test 3 Treatment/ Rate amt Total no. katydid Mean no. eggs/live formulation product/acre females tested female Mean % egg hatch Water 18 46.8a 97.0a Micromite 80WGS 3.125 oz 16 16.4c 45.2b Micromite 80WGS 6.25 oz 16 28.4b 31.5c Means within a column not followed by the same letter are significantly different (LSD, P < 0.05) after log (x) transformation of numbers and arcsine (squareroot (x)) transformation of percentages. Untransformed means are listed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

EFFECTS OF MICROMITE ON KATYDID DEVELOPMENT, 2006

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Oxford University Press
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© Published by Oxford University Press.
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2155-9856
DOI
10.1093/amt/32.1.D9
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Abstract

(D9) ORANGE: Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck, ‘Hamlin’ navel Elizabeth E. Grafton-Cardwell Department of Entomology University of California Riverside, CA 92521 Phone: (559) 646-6591 Fax: (559) 646-6593 E-mail: bethgc@uckac.edu Yuling Ouyang Forktailed bush katydid: Scudderia furcata Brunner von Wattenwyl The effects of 3.125 and 6.25 oz Micromite 80 WG and Delegate GF in 100 gpa on the development of various stages of forktailed bush katydid were studied in a greenhouse at the Kearney Agricultural Center (KAC), Parlier, CA. Potted 5 ft ‘Hamlin’ navel trees were used for the experiments. The katydids were collected from an untreated peach orchard in Ivanhoe, CA during 2006 and from a KAC greenhouse colony reared on pummelo citrus since 2005. The peach orchard katydid nymphs were reared on potted grapevines, peach leaf bouquets, water spinach, and peanuts until they reached the appropriate stage for testing. In test 1, using 6-8 branch replications during 2 Apr - 19 May 2006, branches were treated st nd with 3.125 oz Micromite, 6.25 oz Micromite, or water and allowed to air-dry prior to testing. Five 1 and 2 instar katydids were placed in polyester mesh bags over treated branches for a total of 30-40 katydids per treatment. The katydids were checked for mortality after 3, 7, and 14 days. In test 2, four branches were treated with 3.125 oz or 6.25 oz of Micromite, th Delegate or water on 23 May, 2006. The branches were air-dried for 2-3 hours. Five 4 and 5th instar katydids were placed in bags over the branches for a total of 20 katydids for each treatment. The katydids were checked for mortality after 3, 7, 10, and 14 days. In test 3, using 8-9 tree replications during 8 Jun – 8 Jul 2006, trees were treated with 3.125 oz or 6.25 oz Micromite, or water and allowed to air-dry prior to testing. Two unmated newly matured adult females and two adult males were placed in mesh bags over one branch for a total of 16-18 females per treatment. The katydids were moved to a new branch (to provide food and oviposition sites) 1-2 times a week until all the treated katydids stopped producing eggs. The number of eggs hatched was determined after 6 wk. The mean number of eggs per live female and the percentage egg hatch were calculated for each treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA after log (x) of numbers or arcsine square root (x) transformation of percentages and the means were separated according to LSD (P = 0.05). nd First and 2 instar katydids were not significantly affected by Micromite until they began to molt at 7 DAT (Test 1) and nearly complete mortality was observed at 14 DAT. Individuals that survived 14 days of the Micromite treatment did not develop wing pads. Fourth and fifth instars showed 70-100% mortality between 7-14 days for 3.125 or 6.25 oz Micromite treatment (Test 2). Delegate rapidly killed 90% of the late instar katydid nymphs in the first 3 DAT. Mortality of katydid nymphs was 100% 14 DAT in all treatments. Newly matured and mated katydid females exposed to water produced an average of 46.8 eggs/live female during their life-time and this was reduced to 16.4 and 28.4 for the 3.125 and 6.25 oz Micromite treatments (Test 3). The percentage of eggs hatched in water treatment was 97%, but was significantly reduced by both rates of Micromite. Test 1 st nd Mean % mortality 1 and 2 instar katydids Treatment/ Rate amt formulation product/acre No. tested 3 DAT 7 DAT 14 DAT Water 30 0.0a 0.0a 0.0a Micromite 80 WGS 3.125 oz 40 7.5a 37.5b 97.5b Micromite 80 WGS 6.25 oz 30 10.0a 66.7b 100.0b Means within a column not followed by the same letter are significantly different (LSD, P < 0.05) after arcsine (squareroot (x)) transformation. Untransformed means are listed. Test 2 Mean % mortality 4th and 5th instar katydids Treatment/ Rate amt formulation product/acre No. tested 3 DAT 7 DAT 10 DAT 14 DAT Water 20 0.0a 0.0a 0.0a 0.0a Micromite 80 WGS 3.125 oz 20 5.0a 5.0a 95.0b 100.0b Micromite 80 WGS 6.25 oz 20 70.0b 70.0b 95.0b 100.0b Delegate GF 6.4 oz 20 90.0c 90.0c 100.0b 100.0b Means within a column not followed by the same letter are significantly different (LSD, P < 0.05) after arcsine (squareroot (x)) transformation. Untransformed means are listed. Test 3 Treatment/ Rate amt Total no. katydid Mean no. eggs/live formulation product/acre females tested female Mean % egg hatch Water 18 46.8a 97.0a Micromite 80WGS 3.125 oz 16 16.4c 45.2b Micromite 80WGS 6.25 oz 16 28.4b 31.5c Means within a column not followed by the same letter are significantly different (LSD, P < 0.05) after log (x) transformation of numbers and arcsine (squareroot (x)) transformation of percentages. Untransformed means are listed.

Journal

Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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