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Discovery of Cancer Susceptibility Genes: Study Designs, Analytic Approaches, and Trends in Technology

Discovery of Cancer Susceptibility Genes: Study Designs, Analytic Approaches, and Trends in... Foreword Richard D. Klausner filled. Until that can be done, we must rely on the best practices Over the past decade, our understanding of cancer genetics now known about how to communicate cancer risk. These prac- has been transformed, and we have gained remarkable new in- tices are identified here and can be adopted immediately by sights into the causes of cancer. Almost every scientific advance those who disseminate cancer risk information. results, at some point, in a public discussion about cancer risks, Questions about how to communicate cancer risk are plenti- so it is sobering to realize that we probably know less now about ful, but they are only a fraction of the questions about cancer how to communicate cancer risks than we know about cancer communications that confront us today. How can we promote genetics. Moreover, decisions by both individuals and health the demand for access to and use of cancer information given the professionals about cancer prevention, detection, and treatment high national rates of medical and scientific illiteracy? How can should be an informed balancing of potential results with poten- we assure that cancer communications are salient, relevant, and tial risks. And, as scientists, we have a much clearer picture of culturally sensitive to diverse audiences? How can we better individual risks than ever. But here is the paradox: We know far design our interventions to learn what works, what does not less about how to communicate risks than we know about how work, and why? How can we help physicians, who have limited to calculate them. time to spend with patients, maximize their communication Because of the importance of this topic, and because so little about cancer? How can we redesign our information systems so is known about how to communicate cancer risks effectively, I they give people the information they want, how they want it, strongly supported the National Cancer Institute’s sponsorship and when and where they want it? of an important conference on “Cancer Risk Communication: Now, thanks to emerging communications technologies and What We Know and What We Need to Learn.” Publication of knowledge developed through academic research, we have an the papers presented at that conference as a monograph of the extraordinary opportunity to answer such questions, and we Journal of the National Cancer Institute adds important sub- must seize it. Each year, the National Cancer Institute prepares stance to the knowledge base on cancer risk communication. a budget proposal that identifies extraordinary opportunities to This monograph has a broad array of contributors, including further progress brought about by earlier research successes. Our renowned scholars whose field of study is risk communication proposal for 2001 will include cancer communications as an and those developing models for use by health professionals. extraordinary opportunity for investment. Such an investment The monograph also includes contributions from representatives can shape the emerging national information infrastructure to of special populations, medical journals that publish risk papers, improve cancer communications and thereby help improve the the mass media, and institutions that conduct risk-related re- public’s health. This monograph is an important step in that search and then communicate results of that research. As a re- direction. sult, the monograph not only is a major contribution to the literature about cancer risk communication, it provides a unique compilation of expertise. Affiliation of author: Director, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. Just as important, the monograph will help guide future re- Correspondence to: R. D. Klausner, M.D., National Institutes of Health, Bldg. search because it identifies gaps in knowledge that must be 31, Rm. 11A48, MSC 2590, Bethesda, MD 20892. Journal of the National Cancer Institute Monographs No. 25, 1999 1 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jncimono/article-abstract/1999/26/1/908184 by guest on 10 February 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JNCI Monographs Oxford University Press

Discovery of Cancer Susceptibility Genes: Study Designs, Analytic Approaches, and Trends in Technology

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Oxford University Press
ISSN
1052-6773
eISSN
1745-6614
DOI
10.1093/oxfordjournals.jncimonographs.a024219
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Abstract

Foreword Richard D. Klausner filled. Until that can be done, we must rely on the best practices Over the past decade, our understanding of cancer genetics now known about how to communicate cancer risk. These prac- has been transformed, and we have gained remarkable new in- tices are identified here and can be adopted immediately by sights into the causes of cancer. Almost every scientific advance those who disseminate cancer risk information. results, at some point, in a public discussion about cancer risks, Questions about how to communicate cancer risk are plenti- so it is sobering to realize that we probably know less now about ful, but they are only a fraction of the questions about cancer how to communicate cancer risks than we know about cancer communications that confront us today. How can we promote genetics. Moreover, decisions by both individuals and health the demand for access to and use of cancer information given the professionals about cancer prevention, detection, and treatment high national rates of medical and scientific illiteracy? How can should be an informed balancing of potential results with poten- we assure that cancer communications are salient, relevant, and tial risks. And, as scientists, we have a much clearer picture of culturally sensitive to diverse audiences? How can we better individual risks than ever. But here is the paradox: We know far design our interventions to learn what works, what does not less about how to communicate risks than we know about how work, and why? How can we help physicians, who have limited to calculate them. time to spend with patients, maximize their communication Because of the importance of this topic, and because so little about cancer? How can we redesign our information systems so is known about how to communicate cancer risks effectively, I they give people the information they want, how they want it, strongly supported the National Cancer Institute’s sponsorship and when and where they want it? of an important conference on “Cancer Risk Communication: Now, thanks to emerging communications technologies and What We Know and What We Need to Learn.” Publication of knowledge developed through academic research, we have an the papers presented at that conference as a monograph of the extraordinary opportunity to answer such questions, and we Journal of the National Cancer Institute adds important sub- must seize it. Each year, the National Cancer Institute prepares stance to the knowledge base on cancer risk communication. a budget proposal that identifies extraordinary opportunities to This monograph has a broad array of contributors, including further progress brought about by earlier research successes. Our renowned scholars whose field of study is risk communication proposal for 2001 will include cancer communications as an and those developing models for use by health professionals. extraordinary opportunity for investment. Such an investment The monograph also includes contributions from representatives can shape the emerging national information infrastructure to of special populations, medical journals that publish risk papers, improve cancer communications and thereby help improve the the mass media, and institutions that conduct risk-related re- public’s health. This monograph is an important step in that search and then communicate results of that research. As a re- direction. sult, the monograph not only is a major contribution to the literature about cancer risk communication, it provides a unique compilation of expertise. Affiliation of author: Director, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. Just as important, the monograph will help guide future re- Correspondence to: R. D. Klausner, M.D., National Institutes of Health, Bldg. search because it identifies gaps in knowledge that must be 31, Rm. 11A48, MSC 2590, Bethesda, MD 20892. Journal of the National Cancer Institute Monographs No. 25, 1999 1 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jncimono/article-abstract/1999/26/1/908184 by guest on 10 February 2018

Journal

JNCI MonographsOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1999

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