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Cucumber Insecticide Trial, 2014*

Cucumber Insecticide Trial, 2014* Arthropod Management Tests, 2015, 1–2 doi: 10.1093/amt/tsv125 (E65) CUCUMBER: Cucumis sativus L., ‘Dasher II’ J. F. Walgenbach and S. C. Schoof Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center, 455 Research Dr., Mills River, NC 28759, Phone: (828) 684-3562, Fax: 828-684-8715 (jim_walgenbach@ncsu.edu; steve_schoof@ncsu.edu) and Corresponding author, e-mail: jim_walgenbach@ncsu.edu Subject Editor: Mark Abney Cucumber | Cucumis sativus banded cucumber beetle | Diabrotica balteata cotton aphid/melon aphid | Aphis gossypii tobacco thrips | Frankliniella fusca pickleworm | Diaphania nitidalis (S)-cyano(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl (aS)-4-chloro-a-(1-methylethyl)benzeneacetate; (1E)-N-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-N - cyano-N-methylethanimidamide; 3-bromo-N-[2-bromo-4-chloro-6-[[(1-cyclopropylethyl)amino]carbonyl]phenyl]-1-(3-chloro-2- pyridinyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide; (3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl 3-(2,2-dichloroethenyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate The study was conducted at the Mountain Horticultural Crops 50% ETOH, and counting dislodged insects under a stereomicro- Research Station in Mills River, NC. ‘Dasher II’ cucumber seeds scope. Mature fruit were harvested from the same 18 consecutive were field planted on 4 Jul on black plastic mulch with drip irriga- plants from each plot on 6 and 26 Aug and 2 Sep. Fruit were graded tion. Plots consisted of single 25-ft-long beds on 10-ft centers for insect damage, which consisted of surface scarring caused by planted with a single row of cucumbers spaced 12 inches apart adult cucumber beetle feeding, and fruit infested with pickleworm within rows. Plants were grown using a staked trellis system. larvae. All data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and means Treatments were replicated four times and arranged in an RCB were separated by LSD (P ¼ 0.05). design. All insecticide treatments were made with a CO -powered Thrips and cucumber beetles were relatively low in this trial, and backpack sprayer delivering 71 gpa. Materials, rates, and applica- on 6 Aug the 16.4 oz rate of IKI-3106 was the only treatment to sig- tion dates are listed in the tables. All plots were sprayed with a nificantly reduce numbers below the check (Table 1). Cucumber standard fungicide program. beetle populations were extremely low, with 0.5 beetles recorded Cucumber beetles were monitored by shaking 10 plants and in any plot, and no significant differences among treatments. On 6 recording the number of adult insects observed flying away. Aphids Aug, there were significantly more aphids in the check (approxi- were monitored by recording the number of apterous aphids on 10 mately 2 per leaf) than in the treated plots (<0.6 per leaf), and by 26 leaves per plot. Flower thrips and insidious flower bugs were moni- Aug populations had reached 18.9 per leaf in the check and over 30 tored by removing five flowers per plot, placing them in a vial of per leaf in the standard treatment. The pyrethroid applications in Table 1 Treatment Rate/acre Application dates Thrips/5 flowers (6 Aug) Cucumber beetles/10 plants Aphids/10 leaves Adults Immatures 6 Aug 6 Aug 14 Aug 26 Aug IKI-3106 SL 11.0 fl oz 7/29, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 1.3ab 0.0a 0.5a 6.0a 12.0a 5.5a IKI-3106 SL 16.4 fl oz 7/29, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 0.3a 0.0a 0.3a 2.5a 2.3a 18.0a Asana XL 6.0 fl oz 7/29, 8/18, 8/25 Assail 70WDG 4.0 fl oz 8/4 2.0ab 0.0a 0.0a 3.3a 14.8a 301.3b Perm-Up 3.2EC 6.0 fl oz 8/11 Untreated check – – 3.0b 0.0a 0.3a 19.8b 68.0b 188.5b Means in the same column followed by the same letter are not significantly different by LSD (P> 0.05). * This research was funded in part by industry gifts of pesticides or research funding. V C The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America. 1 This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com 2 Arthropod Management Tests, 2015, Vol. 40, No. 1 Table 2 Treatment Rate/acre Application dates Total fruit % Fruit scarred % PW damage 6 Aug 26 Aug 2 Sep Total 6 Aug 26 Aug 2 Sep Total 6 Aug 26 Aug 2 Sep Total IKI-3106 SL 11.0 fl oz 7/29, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 77.8a 45.5b 54.0a 177.3a 0.0a 12.6a 11.6a 6.5a 0.0a 0.0a 0.4a 0.1a IKI-3106 SL 16.4 fl oz 7/29, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 89.8a 34.8a 58.0a 182.5a 0.3a 11.0a 9.7a 5.8a 0.0a 0.0a 0.0a 0.0a Asana XL 6.0 fl oz 7/29, 8/18, 8/25 Assail 70WDG 4.0 fl oz 8/4 65.8a 47.5b 38.0a 151.3a 0.3a 10.8a 11.5a 6.2a 0.6a 0.4a 0.0a 0.3a Perm-Up 3.2EC 6.0 fl oz 8/11 Untreated check – – 74.0a 33.0a 36.0a 143.0a 2.9b 17.8a 15.3a 9.6a 1.1a 2.4a 10.7b 3.8b Means in the same column followed by the same letter are not significantly different by LSD (P> 0.05). Aug clearly flared aphid populations in the standard treatment, treatments compared with the check, but these data were highly var- while both IKI-3106 treatments maintained densities below an aver- iable, and there were no significant differences among treatments af- age of 2 per leaf. Despite the low cucumber beetles recorded in plant ter the first harvest date. Pickleworm damage was relatively low beatings, fruit scarring caused by adult beetles reached almost 10% until the last harvest date when almost 11% of fruit were damaged. in the check. Scarring was generally lower in the insecticide All insecticide treatments provided excellent pickleworm control. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

Cucumber Insecticide Trial, 2014*

Arthropod Management Tests , Volume 40 (1) – Dec 31, 2015

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.
eISSN
2155-9856
DOI
10.1093/amt/tsv125
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Abstract

Arthropod Management Tests, 2015, 1–2 doi: 10.1093/amt/tsv125 (E65) CUCUMBER: Cucumis sativus L., ‘Dasher II’ J. F. Walgenbach and S. C. Schoof Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center, 455 Research Dr., Mills River, NC 28759, Phone: (828) 684-3562, Fax: 828-684-8715 (jim_walgenbach@ncsu.edu; steve_schoof@ncsu.edu) and Corresponding author, e-mail: jim_walgenbach@ncsu.edu Subject Editor: Mark Abney Cucumber | Cucumis sativus banded cucumber beetle | Diabrotica balteata cotton aphid/melon aphid | Aphis gossypii tobacco thrips | Frankliniella fusca pickleworm | Diaphania nitidalis (S)-cyano(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl (aS)-4-chloro-a-(1-methylethyl)benzeneacetate; (1E)-N-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-N - cyano-N-methylethanimidamide; 3-bromo-N-[2-bromo-4-chloro-6-[[(1-cyclopropylethyl)amino]carbonyl]phenyl]-1-(3-chloro-2- pyridinyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide; (3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl 3-(2,2-dichloroethenyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate The study was conducted at the Mountain Horticultural Crops 50% ETOH, and counting dislodged insects under a stereomicro- Research Station in Mills River, NC. ‘Dasher II’ cucumber seeds scope. Mature fruit were harvested from the same 18 consecutive were field planted on 4 Jul on black plastic mulch with drip irriga- plants from each plot on 6 and 26 Aug and 2 Sep. Fruit were graded tion. Plots consisted of single 25-ft-long beds on 10-ft centers for insect damage, which consisted of surface scarring caused by planted with a single row of cucumbers spaced 12 inches apart adult cucumber beetle feeding, and fruit infested with pickleworm within rows. Plants were grown using a staked trellis system. larvae. All data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and means Treatments were replicated four times and arranged in an RCB were separated by LSD (P ¼ 0.05). design. All insecticide treatments were made with a CO -powered Thrips and cucumber beetles were relatively low in this trial, and backpack sprayer delivering 71 gpa. Materials, rates, and applica- on 6 Aug the 16.4 oz rate of IKI-3106 was the only treatment to sig- tion dates are listed in the tables. All plots were sprayed with a nificantly reduce numbers below the check (Table 1). Cucumber standard fungicide program. beetle populations were extremely low, with 0.5 beetles recorded Cucumber beetles were monitored by shaking 10 plants and in any plot, and no significant differences among treatments. On 6 recording the number of adult insects observed flying away. Aphids Aug, there were significantly more aphids in the check (approxi- were monitored by recording the number of apterous aphids on 10 mately 2 per leaf) than in the treated plots (<0.6 per leaf), and by 26 leaves per plot. Flower thrips and insidious flower bugs were moni- Aug populations had reached 18.9 per leaf in the check and over 30 tored by removing five flowers per plot, placing them in a vial of per leaf in the standard treatment. The pyrethroid applications in Table 1 Treatment Rate/acre Application dates Thrips/5 flowers (6 Aug) Cucumber beetles/10 plants Aphids/10 leaves Adults Immatures 6 Aug 6 Aug 14 Aug 26 Aug IKI-3106 SL 11.0 fl oz 7/29, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 1.3ab 0.0a 0.5a 6.0a 12.0a 5.5a IKI-3106 SL 16.4 fl oz 7/29, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 0.3a 0.0a 0.3a 2.5a 2.3a 18.0a Asana XL 6.0 fl oz 7/29, 8/18, 8/25 Assail 70WDG 4.0 fl oz 8/4 2.0ab 0.0a 0.0a 3.3a 14.8a 301.3b Perm-Up 3.2EC 6.0 fl oz 8/11 Untreated check – – 3.0b 0.0a 0.3a 19.8b 68.0b 188.5b Means in the same column followed by the same letter are not significantly different by LSD (P> 0.05). * This research was funded in part by industry gifts of pesticides or research funding. V C The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America. 1 This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com 2 Arthropod Management Tests, 2015, Vol. 40, No. 1 Table 2 Treatment Rate/acre Application dates Total fruit % Fruit scarred % PW damage 6 Aug 26 Aug 2 Sep Total 6 Aug 26 Aug 2 Sep Total 6 Aug 26 Aug 2 Sep Total IKI-3106 SL 11.0 fl oz 7/29, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 77.8a 45.5b 54.0a 177.3a 0.0a 12.6a 11.6a 6.5a 0.0a 0.0a 0.4a 0.1a IKI-3106 SL 16.4 fl oz 7/29, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 89.8a 34.8a 58.0a 182.5a 0.3a 11.0a 9.7a 5.8a 0.0a 0.0a 0.0a 0.0a Asana XL 6.0 fl oz 7/29, 8/18, 8/25 Assail 70WDG 4.0 fl oz 8/4 65.8a 47.5b 38.0a 151.3a 0.3a 10.8a 11.5a 6.2a 0.6a 0.4a 0.0a 0.3a Perm-Up 3.2EC 6.0 fl oz 8/11 Untreated check – – 74.0a 33.0a 36.0a 143.0a 2.9b 17.8a 15.3a 9.6a 1.1a 2.4a 10.7b 3.8b Means in the same column followed by the same letter are not significantly different by LSD (P> 0.05). Aug clearly flared aphid populations in the standard treatment, treatments compared with the check, but these data were highly var- while both IKI-3106 treatments maintained densities below an aver- iable, and there were no significant differences among treatments af- age of 2 per leaf. Despite the low cucumber beetles recorded in plant ter the first harvest date. Pickleworm damage was relatively low beatings, fruit scarring caused by adult beetles reached almost 10% until the last harvest date when almost 11% of fruit were damaged. in the check. Scarring was generally lower in the insecticide All insecticide treatments provided excellent pickleworm control.

Journal

Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Dec 31, 2015

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