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CONTROL OF POTATO LEAFHOPPER ON POTATOES USING FOLIAR INSECTICIDES, 2001

CONTROL OF POTATO LEAFHOPPER ON POTATOES USING FOLIAR INSECTICIDES, 2001 (E71) POTATO: Solanum tuberosum L., 'NewLeaf Russet Burbank' Joseph E. Munyaneza, Edward B. Radcliffe, and David W. Ragsdale Department of Entomology University of Minnesota 1980 Folwell Avenue, Room 219 St Paul, MN 55108 Phone: (612) 624-2751 Fax: (612) 625-5299 E-mail: munya002@tc.umn.edu Potato leafhopper (PLH): Empoasca fabae (Harris) Insecticide trials to evaluate the efficacy of foliar insecticides to control the potato leafhopper were conducted at the University of Minnesota Research and Outreach Center at Rosemount. To eliminate Colorado potato beetle as a factor in this experiment, 'NewLeaf Russet Burbank' potatoes were planted on 16 May. Plots were eight rows wide, 50 ft long, with 36 inches between rows and 12 inches between plants. To enhance PLH populations, plots were separated on all sides by 24 ft strips of alfalfa. Treatments were arranged in a RCB design with four replications each. All plots received a weekly application of the fungicide Bravo Zn for late blight prevention, starting with 20 Jun. Insecticide applications were made on 10 Jul and 10 Aug using a tractor-mounted Brittonya boom sprayer with three drop nozzles per row and delivering 33 gpa at 45 psi. Sampling consisted of counting PLH nymphs (excluding first instars) on 35 mid- potato plant leaves per plot. Pretreatment counts were made on 9 Jul. Posttreatment counts were made at different sampling dates until 10 Sep. Analyses of variance were performed following transformation of count data using log (x + 1). The level of significance was set at P = 0.05. Means were separated using the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch Multiple Range Test. Before the first application, the potato leafhopper density in the potato plots was about 38 to 55-fold the PLH economic threshold of 10 nymphs per 100 leaves (Table). Two d after the first application, all treatments were very successful in controlling PLH , including the lowest rates of materials tested, with the exception of Calypso and low rate of Dimethoate. However, these two treatments provided an excellent control 6 d after the first insecticide application. All treatments failed to control the PLH 27 d after the first insecticide application; thus, a second insecticide application was made on 10 Aug, and the leafhopper population was successfully kept under control until the end of the season. This study shows that it is possible to successfully control PLH populations in potatoes by making as low as two insecticide applications throughout the season, even at very low rates. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

CONTROL OF POTATO LEAFHOPPER ON POTATOES USING FOLIAR INSECTICIDES, 2001

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Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
eISSN
2155-9856
DOI
10.1093/amt/27.1.E71
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Abstract

(E71) POTATO: Solanum tuberosum L., 'NewLeaf Russet Burbank' Joseph E. Munyaneza, Edward B. Radcliffe, and David W. Ragsdale Department of Entomology University of Minnesota 1980 Folwell Avenue, Room 219 St Paul, MN 55108 Phone: (612) 624-2751 Fax: (612) 625-5299 E-mail: munya002@tc.umn.edu Potato leafhopper (PLH): Empoasca fabae (Harris) Insecticide trials to evaluate the efficacy of foliar insecticides to control the potato leafhopper were conducted at the University of Minnesota Research and Outreach Center at Rosemount. To eliminate Colorado potato beetle as a factor in this experiment, 'NewLeaf Russet Burbank' potatoes were planted on 16 May. Plots were eight rows wide, 50 ft long, with 36 inches between rows and 12 inches between plants. To enhance PLH populations, plots were separated on all sides by 24 ft strips of alfalfa. Treatments were arranged in a RCB design with four replications each. All plots received a weekly application of the fungicide Bravo Zn for late blight prevention, starting with 20 Jun. Insecticide applications were made on 10 Jul and 10 Aug using a tractor-mounted Brittonya boom sprayer with three drop nozzles per row and delivering 33 gpa at 45 psi. Sampling consisted of counting PLH nymphs (excluding first instars) on 35 mid- potato plant leaves per plot. Pretreatment counts were made on 9 Jul. Posttreatment counts were made at different sampling dates until 10 Sep. Analyses of variance were performed following transformation of count data using log (x + 1). The level of significance was set at P = 0.05. Means were separated using the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch Multiple Range Test. Before the first application, the potato leafhopper density in the potato plots was about 38 to 55-fold the PLH economic threshold of 10 nymphs per 100 leaves (Table). Two d after the first application, all treatments were very successful in controlling PLH , including the lowest rates of materials tested, with the exception of Calypso and low rate of Dimethoate. However, these two treatments provided an excellent control 6 d after the first insecticide application. All treatments failed to control the PLH 27 d after the first insecticide application; thus, a second insecticide application was made on 10 Aug, and the leafhopper population was successfully kept under control until the end of the season. This study shows that it is possible to successfully control PLH populations in potatoes by making as low as two insecticide applications throughout the season, even at very low rates.

Journal

Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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