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Concurrent and Sequential Acquisition of Different Genital Human Papillomavirus Types

Concurrent and Sequential Acquisition of Different Genital Human Papillomavirus Types Coinfection with multiple types of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) has been reported, but how frequently it occurs and whether prior infection with specific HPV types inhibits subsequent infection by related types are not known. To address this, 518 women were followed for an average of 2.9 years, and behavioral information and cervical and vulvovaginal swabs for HPV DNA assay were obtained at 4-month intervals. A polymerase chain reaction—based method was used to detect types frequently found in cervical cancers (HPV 16, 18, 31, and 45) and in genital warts (HPV 6 and 11). Concurrent acquisition of multiple types occurred more often than expected by chance. However, no 2 types were more or less likely to be acquired concurrently than any other 2 types. When considering sequential acquisition of HPV types, we found that risk of acquiring a new HPV type was not decreased among those with prior infection by a phylogenetically related or unrelated type (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.0 [0.4–3.0] and 1.3 [0.8–2.1], respectively). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Infectious Diseases Oxford University Press

Concurrent and Sequential Acquisition of Different Genital Human Papillomavirus Types

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References (22)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
Subject
Major Articles
ISSN
0022-1899
eISSN
1537-6613
DOI
10.1086/315805
pmid
10979905
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Coinfection with multiple types of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) has been reported, but how frequently it occurs and whether prior infection with specific HPV types inhibits subsequent infection by related types are not known. To address this, 518 women were followed for an average of 2.9 years, and behavioral information and cervical and vulvovaginal swabs for HPV DNA assay were obtained at 4-month intervals. A polymerase chain reaction—based method was used to detect types frequently found in cervical cancers (HPV 16, 18, 31, and 45) and in genital warts (HPV 6 and 11). Concurrent acquisition of multiple types occurred more often than expected by chance. However, no 2 types were more or less likely to be acquired concurrently than any other 2 types. When considering sequential acquisition of HPV types, we found that risk of acquiring a new HPV type was not decreased among those with prior infection by a phylogenetically related or unrelated type (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.0 [0.4–3.0] and 1.3 [0.8–2.1], respectively).

Journal

Journal of Infectious DiseasesOxford University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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