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City Reading: Written Words and Public Spaces in Antebellum New York. By David M. Henkin. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1998. xvii, 242 pp. Cloth, $45.00, ISBN 0-231-10744-7. Paper, $16.50, ISBN 0-231-10745-5.)

City Reading: Written Words and Public Spaces in Antebellum New York. By David M. Henkin. (New... 224 The Journal of American History June 2000 Broaddus's antipathy to the conservative lean­ how she came to grips with the emotional pe­ ings of the authors. Broaddus relies on a lim­ culiarities of her husband and the gender im­ ited number of published primary and sec­ plications of her literary aspirations. Williams ondary sources, and many of her assertions finds Howe's poetry to be remarkable both for remain unconvincing. its emotional intensity and its technical mer­ Hungry Heart, by Gary Williams, is an en­ its. Nearly all of the topics addressed in her grossing account of how the difficulties faced poetry offer only thinly veiled representations by Julia Ward Howe in her emotionally tortur­ of the chief emotional force driving Howe­ ous marriage served as an impulse for literary her deep anger over the limitations her mar­ production. Williams succeeds in making sub­ riage imposed. For Howe, who was frustrated stantial contributions to literary and historical by the paternalistic and authoritarian attitudes scholarship in several areas. First, the record of of her husband, her book Passion-Flowers Julia Ward Howe's broad and extensive educa­ (1854) served as a kind of literary revenge tion, complicated married life, and determined against, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of American History Oxford University Press

City Reading: Written Words and Public Spaces in Antebellum New York. By David M. Henkin. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1998. xvii, 242 pp. Cloth, $45.00, ISBN 0-231-10744-7. Paper, $16.50, ISBN 0-231-10745-5.)

The Journal of American History , Volume 87 (1) – Jun 1, 2000

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0021-8723
eISSN
1945-2314
DOI
10.2307/2567968
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

224 The Journal of American History June 2000 Broaddus's antipathy to the conservative lean­ how she came to grips with the emotional pe­ ings of the authors. Broaddus relies on a lim­ culiarities of her husband and the gender im­ ited number of published primary and sec­ plications of her literary aspirations. Williams ondary sources, and many of her assertions finds Howe's poetry to be remarkable both for remain unconvincing. its emotional intensity and its technical mer­ Hungry Heart, by Gary Williams, is an en­ its. Nearly all of the topics addressed in her grossing account of how the difficulties faced poetry offer only thinly veiled representations by Julia Ward Howe in her emotionally tortur­ of the chief emotional force driving Howe­ ous marriage served as an impulse for literary her deep anger over the limitations her mar­ production. Williams succeeds in making sub­ riage imposed. For Howe, who was frustrated stantial contributions to literary and historical by the paternalistic and authoritarian attitudes scholarship in several areas. First, the record of of her husband, her book Passion-Flowers Julia Ward Howe's broad and extensive educa­ (1854) served as a kind of literary revenge tion, complicated married life, and determined against,

Journal

The Journal of American HistoryOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.