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APHID CONTROL ON CONNECTICUT BROADLEAF TOBACCO, 2001

APHID CONTROL ON CONNECTICUT BROADLEAF TOBACCO, 2001 (F114) TOBACCO: Nicotiana tabacum L., CT Broadleaf 'C9' James A. LaMondia Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory P.O. Box 248 Windsor, CT 06095 Phone: (860) 683-4982 Tobacco aphid: Myzus nicotianae Blackman Platinum 2SC (thiamethoxam) and Admire 2F (imidacloprid) and Orthene 75S (acephate) were evaluated for broadleaf cigar wrapper tobacco aphid control at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station Valley Laboratory in Windsor, CT. Platinum 2SC was applied at 0.8 and 1.3 fl oz per 1000 plants. Admire 2F was applied at 1.0 fl oz per 1000 plants. Orthene 75 S was applied at 1.0 lb per acre. The soil was an Entic Haplorthod (71.8% sand, 23.0% silt, 5.2% clay, pH = 6.0 and OM = 4.0%). On 5 Jun, plots were fertilized with 125 lb N/acre of cottonseed meal-based 6-3-6, broadcast with Lorsban 4E at 1.5 lb (AI)/acre and Ridomil 2E at 1 lb (AI)/acre, and spiked to incorporate. Tobacco 'C9' was transplanted on 14 Jun to two-row plots with eight plants per row (rows 39-inch apart with a 1-ft spacing within rows). There were 4 replicate double-row plots of each treatment. Each plot was bordered by an untreated row on each side. On 11 Jun, Admire 2F and Platinum 2SC were applied to tobacco transplants in 128-cell trays at rates of 1.0 fl oz per 1000 plants for Admire and 0.8 and 1.3 fl oz per 1000 plants for Platinum. Insecticides were applied in 1.5 oz of water per tray and rinsed with 15 oz water to move the insecticide into the mix. These transplants were hand planted into appropriate plots on 14 Jun. Admire and Platinum were each applied to appropriate plots on 14 Jun as soil drenches at the same rates as above using a backpack sprayer with a TeeJet TG-3 nozzle at 15 psi to apply 0.6 oz/plant in two 0.3-oz applications, 1-inch to two sides of each plant. Plots were side-dressed with 98 and 76 lb N/acre of cottonseed meal-based 10-4-10 and cultivated on 19 and 26 Jun, respectively. Prowl 3.3 E was applied as a lay-by directed spray at 2.4 pt per acre using a 8004E nozzle at 26 psi on 26 Jun. Orthene was applied to appropriate plots at 1 lb per acre using a backpack mist blower on 20 Jul. One leaf each from each plant per plot was examined on 19 Jul, 27 Jul, and 3 Aug, and rated for apterous tobacco aphids (scale: 0 = no aphids or winged only, 1 = 1 aphid per leaf, 2 = 2-10 aphids, 3 = 11- 50 aphids, 4 = 51-100 aphids, and 5 = more than 100 aphids per leaf). Treatments were compared within dates by the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis Test and the multiple comparison Z-Test. Aphids were transferred to one leaf of each plant in the untreated border rows on 12 Jul. These border rows were strong aphid sources for insecticide-treated rows. Aphid populations increased in all plots throughout early Aug. By Aug, aphid densities declined in all plots due to prolonged hot dry conditions and infection by an Entomophthora fungus. At all of the evaluation dates, all plots treated with Admire, Platinum, and Orthene had fewer aphids than control plots without insecticides (P = 0.001). Platinum resulted in significantly better aphid control than Admire applied as a transplant drench (P = 0.05). Aphid control with Admire was better for the tray treatment than the transplant drench treatment at the 3-Aug evaluation date. There were no significant differences between the tray application and transplant drench applications of Platinum at any of the evaluation dates. No phytotoxicity was observed for any treatment. The mean temperature during the season was 69.6, 69.7, and 75.2 °F, (+1.1, -4.0 and +3.6 departure from normal) for Jun, Jul, and Aug with rainfall of 5.7, 1.1, and 4.4 inches in Jun, Jul and Aug, respectively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

APHID CONTROL ON CONNECTICUT BROADLEAF TOBACCO, 2001

Arthropod Management Tests , Volume 27 (1) – Jan 1, 2002

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Oxford University Press
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© Published by Oxford University Press.
eISSN
2155-9856
DOI
10.1093/amt/27.1.F114
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Abstract

(F114) TOBACCO: Nicotiana tabacum L., CT Broadleaf 'C9' James A. LaMondia Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory P.O. Box 248 Windsor, CT 06095 Phone: (860) 683-4982 Tobacco aphid: Myzus nicotianae Blackman Platinum 2SC (thiamethoxam) and Admire 2F (imidacloprid) and Orthene 75S (acephate) were evaluated for broadleaf cigar wrapper tobacco aphid control at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station Valley Laboratory in Windsor, CT. Platinum 2SC was applied at 0.8 and 1.3 fl oz per 1000 plants. Admire 2F was applied at 1.0 fl oz per 1000 plants. Orthene 75 S was applied at 1.0 lb per acre. The soil was an Entic Haplorthod (71.8% sand, 23.0% silt, 5.2% clay, pH = 6.0 and OM = 4.0%). On 5 Jun, plots were fertilized with 125 lb N/acre of cottonseed meal-based 6-3-6, broadcast with Lorsban 4E at 1.5 lb (AI)/acre and Ridomil 2E at 1 lb (AI)/acre, and spiked to incorporate. Tobacco 'C9' was transplanted on 14 Jun to two-row plots with eight plants per row (rows 39-inch apart with a 1-ft spacing within rows). There were 4 replicate double-row plots of each treatment. Each plot was bordered by an untreated row on each side. On 11 Jun, Admire 2F and Platinum 2SC were applied to tobacco transplants in 128-cell trays at rates of 1.0 fl oz per 1000 plants for Admire and 0.8 and 1.3 fl oz per 1000 plants for Platinum. Insecticides were applied in 1.5 oz of water per tray and rinsed with 15 oz water to move the insecticide into the mix. These transplants were hand planted into appropriate plots on 14 Jun. Admire and Platinum were each applied to appropriate plots on 14 Jun as soil drenches at the same rates as above using a backpack sprayer with a TeeJet TG-3 nozzle at 15 psi to apply 0.6 oz/plant in two 0.3-oz applications, 1-inch to two sides of each plant. Plots were side-dressed with 98 and 76 lb N/acre of cottonseed meal-based 10-4-10 and cultivated on 19 and 26 Jun, respectively. Prowl 3.3 E was applied as a lay-by directed spray at 2.4 pt per acre using a 8004E nozzle at 26 psi on 26 Jun. Orthene was applied to appropriate plots at 1 lb per acre using a backpack mist blower on 20 Jul. One leaf each from each plant per plot was examined on 19 Jul, 27 Jul, and 3 Aug, and rated for apterous tobacco aphids (scale: 0 = no aphids or winged only, 1 = 1 aphid per leaf, 2 = 2-10 aphids, 3 = 11- 50 aphids, 4 = 51-100 aphids, and 5 = more than 100 aphids per leaf). Treatments were compared within dates by the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis Test and the multiple comparison Z-Test. Aphids were transferred to one leaf of each plant in the untreated border rows on 12 Jul. These border rows were strong aphid sources for insecticide-treated rows. Aphid populations increased in all plots throughout early Aug. By Aug, aphid densities declined in all plots due to prolonged hot dry conditions and infection by an Entomophthora fungus. At all of the evaluation dates, all plots treated with Admire, Platinum, and Orthene had fewer aphids than control plots without insecticides (P = 0.001). Platinum resulted in significantly better aphid control than Admire applied as a transplant drench (P = 0.05). Aphid control with Admire was better for the tray treatment than the transplant drench treatment at the 3-Aug evaluation date. There were no significant differences between the tray application and transplant drench applications of Platinum at any of the evaluation dates. No phytotoxicity was observed for any treatment. The mean temperature during the season was 69.6, 69.7, and 75.2 °F, (+1.1, -4.0 and +3.6 departure from normal) for Jun, Jul, and Aug with rainfall of 5.7, 1.1, and 4.4 inches in Jun, Jul and Aug, respectively.

Journal

Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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