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Aging Parents of Adults With Disabilities: The Gratifications and Frustrations of Later-life Caregiving

Aging Parents of Adults With Disabilities: The Gratifications and Frustrations of Later-life... Abstract Using a stress process model, we investigated the impact of later-life caregiving on 105 mothers of adult children with mental illness and 208 mothers of adult children with mental retardation. As hypothesized, mothers of persons with mental illness reported higher levels of frustrations and lower levels of gratifications. Whereas the adult child's behavior problems were the strongest predictor of maternal gratifications, the adult child's diagnosis was the strongest predictor of maternal frustrations once all other factors were controlled. In addition, the size of the mother's social network, the family social climate, and the child's participation in an out-of-home program were associated with the effect of caregiver stress. Caregiver burden, Quality of parent-adult child relationship This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes 1 The authors gratefully acknowledge the valuable contributions of Marty Wyngaarden Krauss, PhD, Rachel Cordon, and Christine Caldwell to the research on which this article is based. Support for the preparation of this article was provided by the National Institute on Mental Health (R03 MH46564), the National Institute on Aging (R01 AC08768), the Retirement Research Foundation, and the Mental Health Research Center of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Address all correspondence to Jan S. Greenberg, School of Social Work, 1300 University Avenue, Madison, Wl 53706. © 1993 The Gerontological Society of America http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Gerontologist Oxford University Press

Aging Parents of Adults With Disabilities: The Gratifications and Frustrations of Later-life Caregiving

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1993 The Gerontological Society of America
ISSN
0016-9013
eISSN
1758-5341
DOI
10.1093/geront/33.4.542
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Using a stress process model, we investigated the impact of later-life caregiving on 105 mothers of adult children with mental illness and 208 mothers of adult children with mental retardation. As hypothesized, mothers of persons with mental illness reported higher levels of frustrations and lower levels of gratifications. Whereas the adult child's behavior problems were the strongest predictor of maternal gratifications, the adult child's diagnosis was the strongest predictor of maternal frustrations once all other factors were controlled. In addition, the size of the mother's social network, the family social climate, and the child's participation in an out-of-home program were associated with the effect of caregiver stress. Caregiver burden, Quality of parent-adult child relationship This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes 1 The authors gratefully acknowledge the valuable contributions of Marty Wyngaarden Krauss, PhD, Rachel Cordon, and Christine Caldwell to the research on which this article is based. Support for the preparation of this article was provided by the National Institute on Mental Health (R03 MH46564), the National Institute on Aging (R01 AC08768), the Retirement Research Foundation, and the Mental Health Research Center of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Address all correspondence to Jan S. Greenberg, School of Social Work, 1300 University Avenue, Madison, Wl 53706. © 1993 The Gerontological Society of America

Journal

The GerontologistOxford University Press

Published: Aug 1, 1993

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