Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Prospective Study of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type 16 DNA Detection by Polymerase Chain Reaction and Its Association with Acquisition and Persistence of Other HPV Types

A Prospective Study of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type 16 DNA Detection by Polymerase Chain... Human papillomavirus (HPV)—16 causes about half the cases of cervical cancer worldwide and is the focus of HPV vaccine development efforts. Systematic data are lacking as to whether the prevention of HPV-16 could affect the equilibrium of infection with other HPV types and thus alter the predicted impact of vaccination on the occurrence of cervical neoplasia. Therefore, the associations of HPV-16 detection with subsequent acquisition of other HPV types and with the persistence of concomitantly detected HPV types were examined prospectively among 1124 initially cytologically normal women. Preexisting HPV-16 was generally associated with an increased risk for subsequent acquisition of other types. HPV-16 did not affect the persistence of concomitant infections, regardless of type. These findings suggest that the prevention or removal of HPV-16 is not likely to promote the risk of infection with other types, a theoretical concern with current vaccination efforts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Infectious Diseases Oxford University Press

A Prospective Study of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type 16 DNA Detection by Polymerase Chain Reaction and Its Association with Acquisition and Persistence of Other HPV Types

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/a-prospective-study-of-human-papillomavirus-hpv-type-16-dna-detection-XEUKVT20wj

References (19)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
Subject
Major Articles
ISSN
0022-1899
eISSN
1537-6613
DOI
10.1086/317638
pmid
11087198
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV)—16 causes about half the cases of cervical cancer worldwide and is the focus of HPV vaccine development efforts. Systematic data are lacking as to whether the prevention of HPV-16 could affect the equilibrium of infection with other HPV types and thus alter the predicted impact of vaccination on the occurrence of cervical neoplasia. Therefore, the associations of HPV-16 detection with subsequent acquisition of other HPV types and with the persistence of concomitantly detected HPV types were examined prospectively among 1124 initially cytologically normal women. Preexisting HPV-16 was generally associated with an increased risk for subsequent acquisition of other types. HPV-16 did not affect the persistence of concomitant infections, regardless of type. These findings suggest that the prevention or removal of HPV-16 is not likely to promote the risk of infection with other types, a theoretical concern with current vaccination efforts.

Journal

Journal of Infectious DiseasesOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.