Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Using Appreciative Inquiry to Explore Effective Medical Interviews

Using Appreciative Inquiry to Explore Effective Medical Interviews Article  Using Appreciative Inquiry to Explore Effective   Medical Interviews  Masud Khawaja  University of the Fraser Valley, Abbotsford, BC V2S 7M8, Canada; masud.khawaja@ufv.ca   Abstract: The objective of this study was to uncover the elements of successful medical interviews  so that they can be easily shared with health educators, learners, and practitioners. The medical  interview is still considered the most effective diagnostic tool available to physicians today, despite  decades of rapid advancements in medical technology. When the physician‐patient interaction is  successful, outcomes are improved. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted using an Apprecia‐ tive Inquiry approach, which seeks to uncover strengths from positive experiences. The inquiry  sought to identify the elements that comprise the participating physicians’ most successful patient  interviews. Subsequent qualitative analysis revealed eight themes: social support, mutual respect,  trust, active listening, relationships, nonverbal cues, empathy, and confidentiality. These themes do  not each exist separately or in a vacuum from one another; they are in fact strongly interconnected  and equally important. For instance, if a physician and a patient cannot at least maintain mutual  respect, then building a relationship, or even trust, is impossible. Given the qualitative nature of this  study, future quantitative research should seek to validate the results. As patients assume a more  participatory role in modern medical encounters, communication and other soft skills will be key in  satisfying patients and improving their medical outcomes.  Keywords: doctor‐patient relationship; social support; empathy; trust; active listening; nonverbal  cues; mutual respect; confidentiality; treatment adherence   Citation: Khawaja, M. Using   Appreciative Inquiry to Explore   Effective Medical Interviews.   Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116.  1. Introduction  https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11090116  Throughout the rise of modern medicine in the nineteenth century, the medical in‐ terview has long remained a physician’s most effective tool for both rapport‐building and  Academic Editor: Scott D. Lane  diagnosis [1]. Even in today’s high‐tech world, this human‐to‐human interaction remains  central to therapeutic relationships. Evidence suggests that in 90% of cases, physicians  Received: 30 June 2021  reach an accurate diagnosis during a medical interview alone [2]. Thus, thorough inter‐ Accepted: 17 August 2021  views where both parties participate in the conversation, result in better health outcomes  Published: 24 August 2021  for the patient [3]. Effective conversation is not unilateral, and the forces that moved med‐ icine away from paternalism are to thank for improved, participatory interview processes.  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  neu‐ tral  with  regard  to  jurisdictional  In partnership with their physicians, patients are now playing a more active role in their  claims in published maps and institu‐ diagnosis and treatment, leaving them more satisfied and with an increased likelihood of  tional affiliations.  treatment adherence [4]. Given these benefits, physicians cannot let the opportunity to  make partners out of patients go to waste. As the medical professional in the relationship,  it is the responsibility of the physician to facilitate these collaborative outcomes [5].   Such a partnership may not occur naturally if the physician is not adept at interview‐ Copyright: © 2021 by the author. Li‐ ing techniques. For truly effective interviews, a strength‐based approach is best utilized  censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  as  it  can  generate  positive,  effective,  and  sustainable  results  [6].  Whatever  diagnostic  This article  is an open access article  method is chosen, it should never be considered an alternative to honest and open com‐ distributed under the terms and con‐ munication. Health educators have identified physician dependence on technology as a  ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ significant impediment to effective and informative patient dialogue [7]. Should this dis‐ tribution (CC BY) license (http://crea‐ ruption impact the diagnosis process, physician‐patient relationships are sure to suffer.  tivecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11090116  www.mdpi.com/journal/behavsci  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  2  of  10  When patients are dissatisfied with a medical experience, they are ultimately less likely to  trust their physician [8]. Degradation of this crucial relational facet is further damaged if  ineffective communication is translated as a lack of transparency [9]. Thus, any barriers to  participatory and transparent communication must be identified and eliminated to pro‐ mote a trusting relationship that improves patient outcomes.  Since the onset of the COVID‐19 pandemic, it has become increasingly apparent that  mastery of clinical interview skills is needed to overcome new communicative challenges.  Thus, physicians must now adapt their communicative skills to build meaningful rela‐ tionships with patients even in the absence of physical meetings. With the patient in mind,  this study was envisaged to determine the commonalities of the most effective medical  interviews. Uncovering these elements will not only reveal barriers to effective physician‐ patient  communication,  but  more  importantly,  indicate  what  is  required  for  excellent  medical encounters to occur. This qualitative study investigates effective medical inter‐ views through the lens of physicians’ experiences, focusing on the techniques that they  found most advantageous. The aim of this study is to understand and share these insights  in such a way that they are easily integrated into future practice, which will ultimately  improve the patient experience.   2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Method  When evaluating the quality of medical interviews, a deficit‐based approach is typi‐ cally employed [10]. This approach examines poor experiences to identify the elements  which lead to dissatisfaction and to generate recommendations that remedy the issues.  For instance, a physician may find that an interview went poorly due to a patient refusing  to discuss symptoms in favor of details that are of less diagnostic value. Based on this  analysis, methods to refocus the discussion toward medically relevant details will likely  be suggested [11,12]. However, this dated method of analysis ultimately robs both the  participants  and  the  analyst  of  rich  discussion.  Further,  deficit‐based  analyses  can  be  counterproductive: for example, students who employ a deficit‐based approach, where  they focus on their weaknesses and attempt to improve upon them, face worse academic  outcomes than their peers who practice the opposite strategy [13]. In general, people will  perform better when they seek to build upon strengths rather than just eradicate weak‐ nesses.   This  study,  therefore,  employs  a  strength‐based  positive  psychology  approach,  which focuses on the conditions that contribute to optimal results [14]. Specifically, an  Appreciative Inquiry (AI) interview method was chosen, which uncovers elements that  result in a positive experience, rather than focusing on what went wrong in a negative  experience [15]. AI is grounded in social constructionist epistemology, which utilizes a  positive perspective to understand transformational change. This method was chosen for  the study because it provides the necessary foundation to explore what makes for best  practices in medical interviewing, rather than taking a more traditional, negative, prob‐ lem‐solving approach [16]. In doing so, physicians can deeply relate to and better diag‐ nose their patients by learning the positive elements that optimize medical interviewing  skills. The emergent recommendations do not attempt to remediate failures, but rather  share what works well and how to replicate positive experiences.  2.2. Participants  A convenience sample of six clinical faculty members was used for this study. They  were generally specialists working in one of two teaching hospitals. Participants were ma‐ jority male (83.33%), with an age range of 35 to 65 years (mean age: 51.67 years). Partici‐ pant interviews were not anonymized or recorded, and a notetaker was present alongside  the principal investigator for all interviews.   Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  3  of  10  2.3. Interview Process  A semi‐structured interview method was used. Each physician was asked about their  best interview experience, as determined by their own assessment. Where needed during  the interview, follow‐up questions were asked to fully understand the elements (actions  by physician, actions by patients, emotions felt by physician) present and if they contrib‐ uted to the outcome. They were further asked what exactly made it so successful, and how  medical training can be adapted so that such interactions can become the norm. The aim  of this line of probing was to elicit information about the specific elements that made those  experiences so successful; this method also ensured themes could be easily identified dur‐ ing the subsequent thematic analysis process.  2.4. Thematic Analysis    Braun and Clarke’s six steps [17] were followed to thematically analyze the interview  transcripts, as recorded by the notetaker. Three researchers conducted the analysis inde‐ pendently and then shared the findings, which helped in triangulation of the results. The  entire process involved the following phases: familiarize oneself with the data, generate  code data, form themes, examine and review themes, name the themes, and uncover ex‐ emplars [17]. Researchers firstly read the transcripts several times to become familiar with  the data. Then code data was generated by noting where similar discussions took place  within the interviews. Code data was subsequently refined into themes. During this stage,  data was mapped out and compared against the initial code data to ensure themes were  consistent and unique in the dataset. The themes were then labeled, and details added for  an accurate understanding of each of them.  3. Results  Eight  themes  emerged  from  the  thematic  analytical  process  (see  Table  1).  These  themes provide insight into what makes an effective medical interview. They are social  support, mutual respect, trust, active listening, relationships, nonverbal cues, empathy,  and confidentiality. Each theme was deemed important from the participating physicians’  perspectives.   Table 1. Eight themes found in effective medical interviews.  Theme  Physician Action   Probe patient to determine support network.  Social Support   Connect patient with social support when appropriate.   If unavailable, provide other options.   Avoid overuse of medical jargon.  Mutual Respect   Be aware of eye contact and body language.   Address patient by name.   Demonstrate professionalism.  Trust   Encourage open communication.   Adapt environment to meet patient needs.   Eliminate communication barriers.  Relationship   Be honest and encourage honesty from patient.   Listen carefully and repeat back to patient.  Active Listening   Use positive body language.   Minimize environmental distractions.   Assess patient’s cues.  Nonverbal Cues   Pay attention for signs of abuse or trauma.   Be cognizant of nonverbal cues in self.   Display genuine empathy for patient.  Empathy   Self‐assess for signs of burnout and excessive stress.  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  4  of  10   Reassure patient of privacy.  Confidentiality   Address patient’s concerns.  Physicians indicated that the availability of social support within a patient’s network  was essential for treatment adherence and success. In addition to minding physiological  needs, according to a participating physician, “Family and friends should be used to aug‐ ment the care that can be provided to the patient.” Physicians often probed patients about  the availability of such social resources. Elderly patients represent an especially vulnera‐ ble demographic when these resources are lacking. In one case, following probing by a  physician, a gravely ill elderly patient revealed that he had no remaining family except  for an estranged son. In this case, the physician stated that they “decided to be proactive  and instructed nursing staff to contact the son.” The outcome was not only medically ben‐ eficial for the patient, but the physician also remarked that it “brought a lasting and posi‐ tive change in the patient’s life.” In a similar case, a patient facing a serious illness was not  ready to accept the diagnosis and the physician felt that social support was required to  move forward with the medical treatment. A patient’s family member was contacted with  the patient’s consent, bridging a communicative gap that allowed for treatment to begin.  Taking the extra step to ensure patients are supported socially is only one way to  show they are more than just a disease entity. This, and many other acts, display mutual  respect. “One should not refer to the patient by his/her disease status,” said one physician.  Opportunities to show patients you care for them can make a world of difference. Regard‐ ing a dying patient, conflicted about their death, one physician stated, “I lent my ears to  listen to his grief. The catharsis that he had after relating his story, was something that  according to him none of the other physicians had offered him.” This act of compassionate  listening afforded a dying man some peace. To establish any relationship, mutual respect  is of essence.  The overuse of medical terminology is counter to the idea of mutual respect. This sen‐ timent was succinctly expressed by one participant during the investigation, “Healthcare  professionals should not use medical jargon which patients would be unable to under‐ stand.” Patients’ level of medical understanding will vary; physicians should be attuned  to determining this level and adjust accordingly. Though subtle, this type of adjustment  is invaluable as the physician is able to communicate unique respect to each of their pa‐ tients.  Transparency, mutual respect and trust were found to be inextricably linked during  the semi‐structured interviews. One participant described “the act of wholeheartedly wel‐ coming  the  patient,  handshake,  frank,  and  open  communication”  as  key  to  creating  a  transparent, trusting environment. This demeanour communicates many things to the pa‐ tient. One physician who managed to connect with a closed‐off patient remarked that “an  atmosphere must be created in which the patients can speak of their deep‐seated appre‐ hensions and desires.” In line with this notion, a male physician noted that he chose to  have a female nurse as a chaperone in the room after noticing a female patient’s discom‐ fort when discussing abortion. This adjustment helped ease the patient and enhanced the  communicative process. By changing the environment, the patient was more comfortable  communicating openly, resulting in a smoother interview process. Speaking further about  this situation, the physician mentioned that “the behavior and demeanor of the doctor is  central to the development of [a] trusting relationship.”  Strong relationships result in better treatment adherence and patient outcomes. Once  rapport is built during the medical interview, this ‘caring link’ will comfort patients as  they undergo medical treatment. Again, creating an open environment is necessary for  the patient to relieve themselves of “deep‐seated apprehensions.” Physicians must utilize  different approaches when conducting medical interviews to foster strong relationships,  tailoring their methods to the patient’s particular situation. Some patients may need spe‐ cific accommodations, such as one described by a physician alluding to a patient who did  not fluently speak the language in which the communication was taking place, “Hand  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  5  of  10  gestures and sign language can sometimes be used as an alternative if a translator is not  readily available.” Whatever barriers that may exist, physicians should seek to overcome  such challenges, where possible, to provide equitable medical treatment for all patients  and overcome factors that inhibit relationship development.  Active listening is another key facet of many of the themes discussed. Without it, mu‐ tual respect is not displayed, relationships are not built, and trust will not flourish. One  physician explained, “Physicians must not be preoccupied with something else or anxious  when interacting with patients.” Physicians must make a patient feel heard. Moreover,  they must remain present, both physically and emotionally, when communicating with  patients. Active listening can be displayed in many ways. For example, a simple nod of  the head demonstrates to the patient that they are understood. Poor listening habits may  include focusing on a computer screen while the patient is explaining medical issues or  pausing the interview to take a phone call. These behaviors tell the patient that they are  not the physician’s top priority at that moment.  Nonverbal cues are related to the idea of active listening. The interviews uncovered  the need for physicians to observe and interpret patient body language, including physical  demeanor, gestures, and facial expressions. As explained by one participant, “A physician  should be observant enough to get cues from the patient’s body language and eye move‐ ment.” Physicians can also use nonverbal cues to improve communication. During one  interview,  a  participant  made  the following  statement,  “[A  patient]  should  regard the  physician as a friend and healer and not as a superior being.” Physicians can adapt their  body language to indicate friendliness by facing the patient directly, sitting down instead  of standing, and kneeling beside or at the eye level of young children. If the physician is  frowning, the patient may assume they said something wrong. Just as the patient’s non‐ verbal cues influence physician perceptions, the opposite is also true; adjusting verbal  tone and body language based on the patient’s reaction is a valuable skill. In short, if a  patient seems uncomfortable, physicians should be cognizant of such signals and make  changes. In the physician‐patient relationship, the onus to adjust is on the physician as  they are the skilled care‐provider. Patients are not uniform but rather complex individuals  requiring personalized approaches, especially if something is noticeably amiss in their  behavior. Each patient brings unique needs and characteristics, and physicians must con‐ tinually  communicate  both  verbally  and  nonverbally  with  patients  to  adapt  to  those  needs.  A study participant commented that “it is imperative that learning the techniques to  empathize with patients be made an integral element of medical training.” Empathy re‐ quires that physicians relate to their patients and genuinely understand the emotions that  they are feeling. In this way, patients can be better comforted, allowing for enhanced com‐ munication  during  medical  interviews.  Participants  explained  that  a  physician  must  demonstrate that they are always acting in the patient’s best interest. For example, one  physician  made  the  following  statement,  “Going the  extra  mile  certainly  paid  off and  helped improve the patient’s quality of life.”  In another interview, by empathizing with a terminally ill patient, the physician was  able to give him the courage to face challenges that lay ahead, resulting in a positive ex‐ perience amid a bleak prognosis. Patients often lack a complete understanding of a given  medical process, so empathy is required to recognize if there is some confusion; the pro‐ cess can then be explained in a different way to help ease anxiety resulting from the con‐ fusion. Physicians can express empathy by being supportive, providing comfort and feed‐ back, and keeping patients informed regularly. Such empathetic communication strength‐ ens the physician‐patient relationship.   The theme of confidentiality also emerged in the interviews, with one participant not‐ ing that “privacy and confidentiality of the physician‐patient relationship must be main‐ tained.” Patients who do not trust their physician to maintain confidentiality may with‐ hold crucial information, potentially affecting proper diagnosis and treatment. For exam‐ ple, if  patients  do not inform  physicians  about their  socioeconomic  conditions, then it  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  6  of  10  could  potentially  result  in  treatment  non‐adherence  if  expensive  medications  are  pre‐ scribed in the absence of insurance. During medical interviews, it may be necessary for  physicians to communicate that all information will be kept private if the patient appears  uneasy regarding this matter.  Assuring the patient of confidentiality may also help to minimize dishonesty. Dis‐ honesty is a continual barrier to both effective communication and accurate diagnosis.  Patients may lie for various reasons, including fear of their information being shared out‐ side of the physician‐patient relationship. For example, a teen may lie about sexual activ‐ ity for fear of a parent finding out. The physician must overcome this challenge by com‐ municating the importance of trust and confidentiality in the relationship. Honesty is an  essential component of the medical relationship, and when extended it will be well recip‐ rocated.  4. Discussion  All of the themes identified are interconnected with one another. Failure in one re‐ gard is doubtlessly failure in another, or many. The inability to build a relationship with  a patient may stem from any number of failures related to skills pertinent to one of these  themes. Therefore, equal credence should be afforded to all of them. Over the past few  decades, the public’s overall trust in medical professionals has declined [18]. This signals  a need to search for ways to improve patient satisfaction, as was the aim of this study.  The first theme revealed that social support is a requisite for successful treatment.  This result was echoed in Turan et al.’s [19] study, which found that treatment adherence  positively correlates with social support. Furthermore, it is known that patients with little  or no social support are at a notable disadvantage compared to those patients that already  have a strong social network [20]. The patients who experienced a lack of social support  in this study were all elderly, but younger patients could experience the same void. When  support is lacking, healthcare workers can act as a surrogate social supporter [21]. During  the COVID‐19 pandemic, the elderly demographic has been hit particularly hard in terms  of isolation; this highlights the need for supportive healthcare workers, now more than  ever before.  When necessary, a physician may also assist a patient in strengthening that network  if it is lacking. This was the case in two of the interviews. However, physicians must tread  carefully, or they risk overstepping social norms and devastating the physician‐patient  relationship. In particular, family relationships can be complex, and it may prove inap‐ propriate to contact the patient’s family in some situations. Thus, determining the availa‐ bility of social support in a medical interview is a critical yet hazard‐prone step. Figure 1  is based on the content of the interviews, encompasses the theme, and offers a general  procedure for navigating this situation.  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  7  of  10  Figure 1. Framework flowchart for assessing patient support network.  Trust was observed to be interconnected with other themes and is known to be foun‐ dational to successful medical interactions with patients [22]. Physicians must communi‐ cate that they are competent and well‐informed to establish trust. Professionalism is one  such tool to facilitate this outcome [22]. However, in displaying professionalism, commu‐ nication should never be hindered. As previously stated, overreliance on medical jargon  will impair the conveyance of mutual respect. Studies also support the notion that com‐ munication stemming from a trusting relationship can reduce laboratory tests required to  reach a diagnosis [18]. Likewise, related to trust and addressed as a theme, confidentiality  will also result in better experiences for patients [23]. Moreover, research on patient com‐ munication increasingly emphasizes adaptation based on individual needs [24]. Failing to  do so could result in poor communication or understanding, with consequent worse out‐ comes [25]. All these factors are a lot to balance for anyone, but skillfully integrating all  the themes discussed stands to improve interactions with patients.  Patient satisfaction in general is associated with better communication during medi‐ cal encounters [26]. Likewise, the patient will view interactions poorly when active listen‐ ing skills are not employed [27]. This sentiment was shared in the physician interviews.  In the realm of listening and communication, physicians need to recognize signs of dis‐ comfort through adept empathy skills and by knowing patients well enough to see when  their nonverbal behavior differs from the norm [28]. This is particularly important for vul‐ nerable patients. For example, a person being abused by a partner or parent may exhibit  different nonverbal cues depending on whether the abuser is also in the room. When the  physician recognizes such cues, they can act in a trauma‐informed way to preserve the  physician‐patient relationship [29]. Furthermore, research indicates that empathetic inter‐ actions are beneficial for all types of patients, not just those with terminal illnesses [30].  This may help build trust and create a sense of confidence.  AI was the chosen methodology for this study as its focus is to enact positive change  for organizations. Working toward this change differentiates it from other methods of in‐ quiry. Phenomenology, for instance, seeks a similar outcome of deciphering an experi‐ ence, but lacks the underlying motivation to change organizations [31]. A narrative style  is strong when seeking to capture many details and captivate the audience [32]. However,  the experience captured with AI is not something that can be readily imparted. A measure  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  8  of  10  of  analysis  is  needed  to  distill  experiences  into  their  most  transferable  elements  of  knowledge, where consensus has deemed them important. The aim of this study was to  uncover these elements so they may be easily shared. Thus, AI was a suitable choice to  fulfill this objective.  Physicians cannot rely solely on medical knowledge or technology for successful pa‐ tient interactions. Medical interviews are used not only to diagnose issues quickly but also  to increase patient satisfaction. The results of this study signal a need to maintain soft  skills, such as empathy, alongside medical expertise. Doing so may prove especially ad‐ vantageous  for  assessing  and  supporting  patients’  mental  health.  The  COVID‐19  pan‐ demic and social distancing protocols have frayed social support networks for many. This  change is contrary to one of the most prominent themes of patients’ need for social sup‐ port. This is especially important for individuals who demonstrate mental health disor‐ ders and mental illness. For over a year now, isolation has become standard in our West‐ ern society, which has negatively impacted many people’s mental health. Unfortunately,  as the threat of COVID‐19 subsides, regaining social support may prove difficult for some,  leading to sustained mental health issues. Physicians can support patients’ mental health  by engaging in both social and medical topics during the medical interview, and suggest‐ ing avenues for treatment if mental health issues are present.  However, connecting with patients in this manner may come at a mental health cost  for physicians themselves. Like their patients, physicians have also experienced a mental  health  toll  during  the  pandemic,  leading  to  increased  stress  and  burnout  symptoms.  Workplace stress and burnout have long been attributed to high‐empathy careers and  tempering in this area may be required if stressors unduly burden physicians [33]. Work‐ ing with many patients with serious issues can weigh heavily on a physician, especially if  they take excessive personal responsibility for patients’ well‐being. Thus, it is beneficial  to partake in stress and burnout avoidance training programs to ensure a healthy work  environment. Such training should educate physicians to take responsibility for patient  outcomes without feeling unnecessarily responsible for factors beyond their control, such  as terminal illnesses. The best outcomes for patients will be out of reach if burnout impairs  work quality. Physicians must learn to self‐assess and take individual or organizational  steps to deal with symptoms of burnout, if present [34].  Strengths, Limitations, and Future Research  This study may be limited in its generalizability for several reasons. As physicians  were asked to evoke their own best experience and describe it in a conversational style,  results were vulnerable to distortion due to social‐desirability bias; especially since the  conversation relates to the physician’s own medical interviewing prowess. The sampling  method also limits this study; however, this is offset to some degree by the narrow aim of  the  study  and  by  the  established  interview  method  delivered  by  a  credentialed  inter‐ viewer [35]. The topic could benefit from future quantitative or mixed‐methods studies.  Mental health, psychological trauma, and other ailments also represent rich quarries of  analysis to determine how cognitive patterns and behaviors affect patient communication  in medical settings. Larger studies regarding complex medical issues, both physical and  psychological, will provide further insight into how medical interviews can be navigated  in difficult cases. Barriers to face‐to‐face communication, such as during the COVID‐19  pandemic, may also be specifically analyzed, to determine how physical boundaries have  affected relationships between physicians and patients. By exploring these areas, new in‐ formation  can  emerge,  resulting  in  more  comprehensive  medical  interviews  and  im‐ proved patient outcomes.  5. Conclusions  As technology pervades our lives evermore, soft skills such as communication must  never degrade through neglect. At the same time, opportunities to harness technology as  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  9  of  10  a communicative advantage, and not a barrier, should be carefully considered. Using tech‐ nology to augment the power of an effective medical interview can assist physicians in  fine‐tuning their skills. The theme of nonverbal cues indicates the importance of reading  and communicating body language. Facial recognition technology may help physicians  identify minute, nonverbal cues that signify discomfort. Artificial intelligence may be able  to score levels of empathy recorded in a conversation, as a training and evaluation tool.  Further analysis  will  reveal  new  pathways  to  improved  communication,  but  more  re‐ search is required. The opportunities are limitless and the benefits to patients much the  same. A proper balance between physician skills and technological advancements must  constantly  be  maintained,  with  the  latter  never  overtaking  and  causing  the  former  to  lapse. The themes outlined in this study provide a basis for future exploration on a larger  scale using novel methodologies in effective interview mechanics. However, one standard  method will never fit every unique patient, so a keen aptitude for adaptation should for‐ ever be honed to continuously improve therapeutic relationships.  Funding: This research received no external funding.  Institutional Review Board Statement: The study was conducted according to the guidelines of the  Declaration of Helsinki and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Civil Hospital, Department of  Health (4129).  Informed Consent Statement: Informed consent  was  obtained  from all subjects involved  in the  study.  Data Availability Statement: Restrictions apply to the availability of data. Data was obtained from  physicians and are available from the author if authorized by the physicians.  Conflicts of Interest: The author declares no conflict of interest.  References  1. Gebru, A. Patient Centered Communication: A Synoptic Review of the State of the Art. Ethiop. Med. J. 2020, 58, 263–269. Avail‐ able online: https://www.emjema.org/index.php/EMJ/article/view/1622 (accessed on 5 March 2021).  2. Hasnain, M.; Bordage, G.; Connell, K.; Sinacore, J. History‐taking behaviors associated with diagnostic competence of clerks:  An exploratory study. Acad. Med. 2001, 76, S14–S17, doi:10.1097/00001888‐200110001‐00006.  3. Rocque, R.; Levesque, A.; Leanza, Y. Patient participation in medical consultations: The experience of patients from various  ethnolinguistic backgrounds. J. Patient Exp. 2019, 6, 19–30, doi:10.35680/2372‐0247.1352.  4. Timmermans, S. The Engaged Patient: The Relevance of Patient–Physician Communication for Twenty‐First‐Century Health. J.  Health Soc. Behav. 2020, 6, 259–273, doi:10.1177/0022146520943514.  5. Honavar,  S.G.  Patient–physician  relationship—Communication  is  the  key.  Indian  J.  Ophthalmol.  2018,  66,  1527–1528,  doi:10.4103/ijo.ijo_1760_18.  6. Herrick, C.; Stoneham, D. Unleashing A Positive Revolution in Medicine: The Power of Appreciative Inquiry. UMA Bulletin  2005,  52,  8–10.  Available  online:  http://www.positiveimpactllc.com/downloads/Utah‐Med‐Bulletin‐‐A‐Positive‐Revolution‐‐ The‐Power‐of‐Appreciative‐Inquiry‐‐Herrick‐Stoneham.pdf (accessed on 2 December 2020).  7. Pealing, L.; Tempest, H.V.; Howick, J. Technology: A help or hindrance to empathic healthcare? J. R. Soc. Med. 2018, 111, 390– 393, doi:10.1177/0141076818790669.  8. Harbishettar, V.; Krishna, K.R.; Srinivasa, P.; Gowda, M. The enigma of doctor‐patient relationship. Indian J. Psychiatry 2019, 61,  776–781, doi:10.4103/psychiatry.indianjpsychiatry_196_17.  9. Seshadri, K. Doctor–Patient Communication. In Effective Medical Communication: The A, B, C, D, E of It, 1st ed.; Parija, S., Adkoli,  B., Eds.; Springer: Singapore, 2020; pp. 49–61, doi:10.1007/978‐981‐15‐3409‐6_5.  10. Skelly, K.; Weerasinghe, S.; Daly, J.; Rosenbaum, M. Impact of Medical Scribe Experiences on Subsequent Medical Student  Learning. Med. Sci. Educ. 2021, 31, 1149–1156, doi:10.1007/s40670‐021‐01291‐1.  11. Hunter, K. Seven Patients, Physicians, and Red Parakeets: Narrative Incommensurability. In Doctors’ Stories, 1st ed.; Princeton  University Press: Princeton, NJ, USA, 2021; pp. 123–147, doi:10.1515/9780691214726‐010.  12. Froehlich, A.; Siebrits, A.; Kotze, C. e‐Health: How Evolving Space Technology is Driving Remote Healthcare in Support of  SDGs. In Space Supporting Africa: Studies in Space Policy, 1st ed.; Froehlich, A., Siebrits, A., Eds.; Springer: Cham, Switzerland,  2021; Volume 27, pp. 91–185, doi:10.1007/978‐3‐030‐61780‐6_2.  13. Hiemstra, D.; Van Yperen, N.W. The effects of strength‐based versus deficit‐based self‐regulated learning strategies on students’  effort intentions. Motiv. Emot. 2015, 39, 656–668, doi:10.1007/s11031‐015‐9488‐8.  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  10  of  10  14. Waters, L.; Algoe, S.B.; Dutton, J.; Emmons, R.; Fredrickson, B.L.; Heaphy, E.; Moskowitz, J.T.; Neff, K.; Niemiec, R.; Pury, C.; et  al.  Positive  psychology  in  a  pandemic:  Buffering,  bolstering,  and  building  mental  health.  J.  Posit.  Psychol.  2021,  1–21,  doi:10.1080/17439760.2021.1871945.  15. Berg,  M.E.;  Karlsen,  J.T.  An  evaluation  of  management  training  and  coaching.  J.  Workplace  Learn.  2012,  24,  177–199,  doi:10.1108/13665621211209267.  16. Dinning, A.; Cooper, J.; Taylor, K.; Damas, R.; Hailes, L. ‘Knowing why we do what we do’‐Establishing a unit practice council to  improve evidence‐based nursing practice in acute medicine using appreciative inquiry. FoNS Improv. Insights 2014, 10, 1. Available  online: https://www.proquest.com/openview/2665c6b430474383c266442b729b81c8/1?pq‐origsite=gscholar&cbl=2030537 (accessed on  20 March 2021).  17. Braun, V.; Clarke, V. Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qual. Res. Psychol. 2006, 3, 77–101, doi:10.1191/1478088706qp063oa.  18. Khullar, D. Building trust in health care—why, where, and how. JAMA 2019, 322, 507–509, doi:10.1001/jama.2019.4892.  19. Turan, G.B.; Aksoy, M.; Çiftçi, B. Effect of social support on the treatment adherence of hypertension patients. J. Vasc. Nurs.  2019, 37, 46–51, doi:10.1016/j.jvn.2018.10.005.  20. Maldonado, J.R. Why It is Important to Consider Social Support When Assessing Organ Transplant Candidates? Am. J. Bioeth.  2019, 19, 1–8, doi:10.1080/15265161.2019.1671689.  21. Paz‐Soldán, V.A.; Alban, R.E.; Jones, C.D.; Oberhelman, R.A. The provision of and need for social support among adult and  pediatric patients with tuberculosis in Lima, Peru: A qualitative study. BMC Health Serv. Res. 2013, 13, 290, doi:10.1186/1472‐ 6963‐13‐290.  22. Nickel, P.; Frank, L. Trust in Medicine. In The Routledge Handbook of Trust and Philosophy; Routledge: New York, NY, USA, 2020,  doi:10.4324/9781315542294‐28.  23. Baghaei, R.; Iranagh, S.R.; Ghasemzadeh, N.; Moradi, Y. Observation of Patients’ Privacy by Physicians and Nurses and Its  Relationship with Patient Satisfaction. Hosp. Top. 2021, 1–8, doi:10.1080/00185868.2021.1877096.  24. Aelbrecht, K.; Hanssens, L.; Detollenaere, J.; Willems, S.; Deveugele, M.; Pype, P. Determinants of physician–patient communi‐ cation: The role of language, education and ethnicity. Patient Educ. Couns. 2019, 102, 776–781, doi:10.1016/j.pec.2018.11.006.  25. Riedl, D.; Schüßler, G. The influence of doctor‐patient communication on health outcomes: A systematic review. Z. Psychosom.  Med. Psychother. 2017, 63, 131–150, doi:10.13109/zptm.2017.63.2.131.  26. Hitawala, A.; Flores, M.; Alomari, M.; Kumar, S.; Padbidri, V.; Muthukuru, S.; Rahman, S.; Alomari, A.; Khazaaleh, S.; Gopala‐ Krishna, K.V.; et al. Improving Physician‐patient and Physician‐nurse Communication and Overall Satisfaction Rates: A Quality  Improvement Project. Cureus 2020, 12, e7776, doi:10.7759/cureus.7776.  27. Kee, J.W.Y.; Khoo, H.S.; Lim, I.; Koh, M.Y.H. Communication Skills in Patient‐Doctor Interactions: Learning from Patient Com‐ plaints. Health Prof. Educ. 2018, 4, 97–106, doi:10.1016/j.hpe.2017.03.006.  28. Navarro, J. What Every BODY Is Saying; HarperCollins: New York, NY, USA, 2008; pp. 1–15.  29. Kassam‐Adams, N.; Butler, L. What Do Clinicians Caring for Children Need to Know about Pediatric Medical Traumatic Stress  and the Ethics of Trauma‐Informed Approaches? AMA J. Ethics 2017, 19, 793–801, doi:10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.8.pfor1‐ 1708.  30. Derksen, F.; Bensing, J.; Lagro‐Janssen, A. Effectiveness of empathy in general practice: A systematic review. Br. J. Gen. Pract.  2013, 63, e76–e84, doi:10.3399/bjgp13x660814.  31. Neubauer, B.E.; Witkop, C.T.; Varpio, L. How phenomenology can help us learn from the experiences of others. Perspect. Med.  Educ. 2019, 8, 90–97, doi:10.1007/s40037‐019‐0509‐2.  32. Greenhalgh, T. Cultural Contexts of Health: The Use of Narrative Research in the Health Sector; Health Evidence Network Synthesis  Report; WHO Regional Office for Europe: Copenhagen, Denmark, 2016.  33. Barello, S.; Graffigna, G. Caring for health professionals in the COVID‐19 pandemic emergency: Toward an “epidemic of em‐ pathy” in healthcare. Front. Psychol. 2020, 11, 1431, doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01431.  34. West, C.P.; Dyrbye, L.N.; Shanafelt, T.D. Physician burnout: Contributors, consequences and solutions. J. Intern. Med. 2018, 283,  516–529, doi:10.1111/joim.12752.  35. Malterud, K.; Siersma, V.D.; Guassora, A.D. Sample Size in Qualitative Interview Studies: Guided by Information Power. Qual  Health Res. 2016, 26, 1753–1760, doi:10.1177/1049732315617444.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behavioral Sciences Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Using Appreciative Inquiry to Explore Effective Medical Interviews

Behavioral Sciences , Volume 11 (9) – Aug 24, 2021

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/using-appreciative-inquiry-to-explore-effective-medical-interviews-B9mDEs0aG7
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2021 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2076-328X
DOI
10.3390/bs11090116
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Using Appreciative Inquiry to Explore Effective   Medical Interviews  Masud Khawaja  University of the Fraser Valley, Abbotsford, BC V2S 7M8, Canada; masud.khawaja@ufv.ca   Abstract: The objective of this study was to uncover the elements of successful medical interviews  so that they can be easily shared with health educators, learners, and practitioners. The medical  interview is still considered the most effective diagnostic tool available to physicians today, despite  decades of rapid advancements in medical technology. When the physician‐patient interaction is  successful, outcomes are improved. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted using an Apprecia‐ tive Inquiry approach, which seeks to uncover strengths from positive experiences. The inquiry  sought to identify the elements that comprise the participating physicians’ most successful patient  interviews. Subsequent qualitative analysis revealed eight themes: social support, mutual respect,  trust, active listening, relationships, nonverbal cues, empathy, and confidentiality. These themes do  not each exist separately or in a vacuum from one another; they are in fact strongly interconnected  and equally important. For instance, if a physician and a patient cannot at least maintain mutual  respect, then building a relationship, or even trust, is impossible. Given the qualitative nature of this  study, future quantitative research should seek to validate the results. As patients assume a more  participatory role in modern medical encounters, communication and other soft skills will be key in  satisfying patients and improving their medical outcomes.  Keywords: doctor‐patient relationship; social support; empathy; trust; active listening; nonverbal  cues; mutual respect; confidentiality; treatment adherence   Citation: Khawaja, M. Using   Appreciative Inquiry to Explore   Effective Medical Interviews.   Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116.  1. Introduction  https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11090116  Throughout the rise of modern medicine in the nineteenth century, the medical in‐ terview has long remained a physician’s most effective tool for both rapport‐building and  Academic Editor: Scott D. Lane  diagnosis [1]. Even in today’s high‐tech world, this human‐to‐human interaction remains  central to therapeutic relationships. Evidence suggests that in 90% of cases, physicians  Received: 30 June 2021  reach an accurate diagnosis during a medical interview alone [2]. Thus, thorough inter‐ Accepted: 17 August 2021  views where both parties participate in the conversation, result in better health outcomes  Published: 24 August 2021  for the patient [3]. Effective conversation is not unilateral, and the forces that moved med‐ icine away from paternalism are to thank for improved, participatory interview processes.  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  neu‐ tral  with  regard  to  jurisdictional  In partnership with their physicians, patients are now playing a more active role in their  claims in published maps and institu‐ diagnosis and treatment, leaving them more satisfied and with an increased likelihood of  tional affiliations.  treatment adherence [4]. Given these benefits, physicians cannot let the opportunity to  make partners out of patients go to waste. As the medical professional in the relationship,  it is the responsibility of the physician to facilitate these collaborative outcomes [5].   Such a partnership may not occur naturally if the physician is not adept at interview‐ Copyright: © 2021 by the author. Li‐ ing techniques. For truly effective interviews, a strength‐based approach is best utilized  censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  as  it  can  generate  positive,  effective,  and  sustainable  results  [6].  Whatever  diagnostic  This article  is an open access article  method is chosen, it should never be considered an alternative to honest and open com‐ distributed under the terms and con‐ munication. Health educators have identified physician dependence on technology as a  ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ significant impediment to effective and informative patient dialogue [7]. Should this dis‐ tribution (CC BY) license (http://crea‐ ruption impact the diagnosis process, physician‐patient relationships are sure to suffer.  tivecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11090116  www.mdpi.com/journal/behavsci  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  2  of  10  When patients are dissatisfied with a medical experience, they are ultimately less likely to  trust their physician [8]. Degradation of this crucial relational facet is further damaged if  ineffective communication is translated as a lack of transparency [9]. Thus, any barriers to  participatory and transparent communication must be identified and eliminated to pro‐ mote a trusting relationship that improves patient outcomes.  Since the onset of the COVID‐19 pandemic, it has become increasingly apparent that  mastery of clinical interview skills is needed to overcome new communicative challenges.  Thus, physicians must now adapt their communicative skills to build meaningful rela‐ tionships with patients even in the absence of physical meetings. With the patient in mind,  this study was envisaged to determine the commonalities of the most effective medical  interviews. Uncovering these elements will not only reveal barriers to effective physician‐ patient  communication,  but  more  importantly,  indicate  what  is  required  for  excellent  medical encounters to occur. This qualitative study investigates effective medical inter‐ views through the lens of physicians’ experiences, focusing on the techniques that they  found most advantageous. The aim of this study is to understand and share these insights  in such a way that they are easily integrated into future practice, which will ultimately  improve the patient experience.   2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Method  When evaluating the quality of medical interviews, a deficit‐based approach is typi‐ cally employed [10]. This approach examines poor experiences to identify the elements  which lead to dissatisfaction and to generate recommendations that remedy the issues.  For instance, a physician may find that an interview went poorly due to a patient refusing  to discuss symptoms in favor of details that are of less diagnostic value. Based on this  analysis, methods to refocus the discussion toward medically relevant details will likely  be suggested [11,12]. However, this dated method of analysis ultimately robs both the  participants  and  the  analyst  of  rich  discussion.  Further,  deficit‐based  analyses  can  be  counterproductive: for example, students who employ a deficit‐based approach, where  they focus on their weaknesses and attempt to improve upon them, face worse academic  outcomes than their peers who practice the opposite strategy [13]. In general, people will  perform better when they seek to build upon strengths rather than just eradicate weak‐ nesses.   This  study,  therefore,  employs  a  strength‐based  positive  psychology  approach,  which focuses on the conditions that contribute to optimal results [14]. Specifically, an  Appreciative Inquiry (AI) interview method was chosen, which uncovers elements that  result in a positive experience, rather than focusing on what went wrong in a negative  experience [15]. AI is grounded in social constructionist epistemology, which utilizes a  positive perspective to understand transformational change. This method was chosen for  the study because it provides the necessary foundation to explore what makes for best  practices in medical interviewing, rather than taking a more traditional, negative, prob‐ lem‐solving approach [16]. In doing so, physicians can deeply relate to and better diag‐ nose their patients by learning the positive elements that optimize medical interviewing  skills. The emergent recommendations do not attempt to remediate failures, but rather  share what works well and how to replicate positive experiences.  2.2. Participants  A convenience sample of six clinical faculty members was used for this study. They  were generally specialists working in one of two teaching hospitals. Participants were ma‐ jority male (83.33%), with an age range of 35 to 65 years (mean age: 51.67 years). Partici‐ pant interviews were not anonymized or recorded, and a notetaker was present alongside  the principal investigator for all interviews.   Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  3  of  10  2.3. Interview Process  A semi‐structured interview method was used. Each physician was asked about their  best interview experience, as determined by their own assessment. Where needed during  the interview, follow‐up questions were asked to fully understand the elements (actions  by physician, actions by patients, emotions felt by physician) present and if they contrib‐ uted to the outcome. They were further asked what exactly made it so successful, and how  medical training can be adapted so that such interactions can become the norm. The aim  of this line of probing was to elicit information about the specific elements that made those  experiences so successful; this method also ensured themes could be easily identified dur‐ ing the subsequent thematic analysis process.  2.4. Thematic Analysis    Braun and Clarke’s six steps [17] were followed to thematically analyze the interview  transcripts, as recorded by the notetaker. Three researchers conducted the analysis inde‐ pendently and then shared the findings, which helped in triangulation of the results. The  entire process involved the following phases: familiarize oneself with the data, generate  code data, form themes, examine and review themes, name the themes, and uncover ex‐ emplars [17]. Researchers firstly read the transcripts several times to become familiar with  the data. Then code data was generated by noting where similar discussions took place  within the interviews. Code data was subsequently refined into themes. During this stage,  data was mapped out and compared against the initial code data to ensure themes were  consistent and unique in the dataset. The themes were then labeled, and details added for  an accurate understanding of each of them.  3. Results  Eight  themes  emerged  from  the  thematic  analytical  process  (see  Table  1).  These  themes provide insight into what makes an effective medical interview. They are social  support, mutual respect, trust, active listening, relationships, nonverbal cues, empathy,  and confidentiality. Each theme was deemed important from the participating physicians’  perspectives.   Table 1. Eight themes found in effective medical interviews.  Theme  Physician Action   Probe patient to determine support network.  Social Support   Connect patient with social support when appropriate.   If unavailable, provide other options.   Avoid overuse of medical jargon.  Mutual Respect   Be aware of eye contact and body language.   Address patient by name.   Demonstrate professionalism.  Trust   Encourage open communication.   Adapt environment to meet patient needs.   Eliminate communication barriers.  Relationship   Be honest and encourage honesty from patient.   Listen carefully and repeat back to patient.  Active Listening   Use positive body language.   Minimize environmental distractions.   Assess patient’s cues.  Nonverbal Cues   Pay attention for signs of abuse or trauma.   Be cognizant of nonverbal cues in self.   Display genuine empathy for patient.  Empathy   Self‐assess for signs of burnout and excessive stress.  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  4  of  10   Reassure patient of privacy.  Confidentiality   Address patient’s concerns.  Physicians indicated that the availability of social support within a patient’s network  was essential for treatment adherence and success. In addition to minding physiological  needs, according to a participating physician, “Family and friends should be used to aug‐ ment the care that can be provided to the patient.” Physicians often probed patients about  the availability of such social resources. Elderly patients represent an especially vulnera‐ ble demographic when these resources are lacking. In one case, following probing by a  physician, a gravely ill elderly patient revealed that he had no remaining family except  for an estranged son. In this case, the physician stated that they “decided to be proactive  and instructed nursing staff to contact the son.” The outcome was not only medically ben‐ eficial for the patient, but the physician also remarked that it “brought a lasting and posi‐ tive change in the patient’s life.” In a similar case, a patient facing a serious illness was not  ready to accept the diagnosis and the physician felt that social support was required to  move forward with the medical treatment. A patient’s family member was contacted with  the patient’s consent, bridging a communicative gap that allowed for treatment to begin.  Taking the extra step to ensure patients are supported socially is only one way to  show they are more than just a disease entity. This, and many other acts, display mutual  respect. “One should not refer to the patient by his/her disease status,” said one physician.  Opportunities to show patients you care for them can make a world of difference. Regard‐ ing a dying patient, conflicted about their death, one physician stated, “I lent my ears to  listen to his grief. The catharsis that he had after relating his story, was something that  according to him none of the other physicians had offered him.” This act of compassionate  listening afforded a dying man some peace. To establish any relationship, mutual respect  is of essence.  The overuse of medical terminology is counter to the idea of mutual respect. This sen‐ timent was succinctly expressed by one participant during the investigation, “Healthcare  professionals should not use medical jargon which patients would be unable to under‐ stand.” Patients’ level of medical understanding will vary; physicians should be attuned  to determining this level and adjust accordingly. Though subtle, this type of adjustment  is invaluable as the physician is able to communicate unique respect to each of their pa‐ tients.  Transparency, mutual respect and trust were found to be inextricably linked during  the semi‐structured interviews. One participant described “the act of wholeheartedly wel‐ coming  the  patient,  handshake,  frank,  and  open  communication”  as  key  to  creating  a  transparent, trusting environment. This demeanour communicates many things to the pa‐ tient. One physician who managed to connect with a closed‐off patient remarked that “an  atmosphere must be created in which the patients can speak of their deep‐seated appre‐ hensions and desires.” In line with this notion, a male physician noted that he chose to  have a female nurse as a chaperone in the room after noticing a female patient’s discom‐ fort when discussing abortion. This adjustment helped ease the patient and enhanced the  communicative process. By changing the environment, the patient was more comfortable  communicating openly, resulting in a smoother interview process. Speaking further about  this situation, the physician mentioned that “the behavior and demeanor of the doctor is  central to the development of [a] trusting relationship.”  Strong relationships result in better treatment adherence and patient outcomes. Once  rapport is built during the medical interview, this ‘caring link’ will comfort patients as  they undergo medical treatment. Again, creating an open environment is necessary for  the patient to relieve themselves of “deep‐seated apprehensions.” Physicians must utilize  different approaches when conducting medical interviews to foster strong relationships,  tailoring their methods to the patient’s particular situation. Some patients may need spe‐ cific accommodations, such as one described by a physician alluding to a patient who did  not fluently speak the language in which the communication was taking place, “Hand  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  5  of  10  gestures and sign language can sometimes be used as an alternative if a translator is not  readily available.” Whatever barriers that may exist, physicians should seek to overcome  such challenges, where possible, to provide equitable medical treatment for all patients  and overcome factors that inhibit relationship development.  Active listening is another key facet of many of the themes discussed. Without it, mu‐ tual respect is not displayed, relationships are not built, and trust will not flourish. One  physician explained, “Physicians must not be preoccupied with something else or anxious  when interacting with patients.” Physicians must make a patient feel heard. Moreover,  they must remain present, both physically and emotionally, when communicating with  patients. Active listening can be displayed in many ways. For example, a simple nod of  the head demonstrates to the patient that they are understood. Poor listening habits may  include focusing on a computer screen while the patient is explaining medical issues or  pausing the interview to take a phone call. These behaviors tell the patient that they are  not the physician’s top priority at that moment.  Nonverbal cues are related to the idea of active listening. The interviews uncovered  the need for physicians to observe and interpret patient body language, including physical  demeanor, gestures, and facial expressions. As explained by one participant, “A physician  should be observant enough to get cues from the patient’s body language and eye move‐ ment.” Physicians can also use nonverbal cues to improve communication. During one  interview,  a  participant  made  the following  statement,  “[A  patient]  should  regard the  physician as a friend and healer and not as a superior being.” Physicians can adapt their  body language to indicate friendliness by facing the patient directly, sitting down instead  of standing, and kneeling beside or at the eye level of young children. If the physician is  frowning, the patient may assume they said something wrong. Just as the patient’s non‐ verbal cues influence physician perceptions, the opposite is also true; adjusting verbal  tone and body language based on the patient’s reaction is a valuable skill. In short, if a  patient seems uncomfortable, physicians should be cognizant of such signals and make  changes. In the physician‐patient relationship, the onus to adjust is on the physician as  they are the skilled care‐provider. Patients are not uniform but rather complex individuals  requiring personalized approaches, especially if something is noticeably amiss in their  behavior. Each patient brings unique needs and characteristics, and physicians must con‐ tinually  communicate  both  verbally  and  nonverbally  with  patients  to  adapt  to  those  needs.  A study participant commented that “it is imperative that learning the techniques to  empathize with patients be made an integral element of medical training.” Empathy re‐ quires that physicians relate to their patients and genuinely understand the emotions that  they are feeling. In this way, patients can be better comforted, allowing for enhanced com‐ munication  during  medical  interviews.  Participants  explained  that  a  physician  must  demonstrate that they are always acting in the patient’s best interest. For example, one  physician  made  the  following  statement,  “Going the  extra  mile  certainly  paid  off and  helped improve the patient’s quality of life.”  In another interview, by empathizing with a terminally ill patient, the physician was  able to give him the courage to face challenges that lay ahead, resulting in a positive ex‐ perience amid a bleak prognosis. Patients often lack a complete understanding of a given  medical process, so empathy is required to recognize if there is some confusion; the pro‐ cess can then be explained in a different way to help ease anxiety resulting from the con‐ fusion. Physicians can express empathy by being supportive, providing comfort and feed‐ back, and keeping patients informed regularly. Such empathetic communication strength‐ ens the physician‐patient relationship.   The theme of confidentiality also emerged in the interviews, with one participant not‐ ing that “privacy and confidentiality of the physician‐patient relationship must be main‐ tained.” Patients who do not trust their physician to maintain confidentiality may with‐ hold crucial information, potentially affecting proper diagnosis and treatment. For exam‐ ple, if  patients  do not inform  physicians  about their  socioeconomic  conditions, then it  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  6  of  10  could  potentially  result  in  treatment  non‐adherence  if  expensive  medications  are  pre‐ scribed in the absence of insurance. During medical interviews, it may be necessary for  physicians to communicate that all information will be kept private if the patient appears  uneasy regarding this matter.  Assuring the patient of confidentiality may also help to minimize dishonesty. Dis‐ honesty is a continual barrier to both effective communication and accurate diagnosis.  Patients may lie for various reasons, including fear of their information being shared out‐ side of the physician‐patient relationship. For example, a teen may lie about sexual activ‐ ity for fear of a parent finding out. The physician must overcome this challenge by com‐ municating the importance of trust and confidentiality in the relationship. Honesty is an  essential component of the medical relationship, and when extended it will be well recip‐ rocated.  4. Discussion  All of the themes identified are interconnected with one another. Failure in one re‐ gard is doubtlessly failure in another, or many. The inability to build a relationship with  a patient may stem from any number of failures related to skills pertinent to one of these  themes. Therefore, equal credence should be afforded to all of them. Over the past few  decades, the public’s overall trust in medical professionals has declined [18]. This signals  a need to search for ways to improve patient satisfaction, as was the aim of this study.  The first theme revealed that social support is a requisite for successful treatment.  This result was echoed in Turan et al.’s [19] study, which found that treatment adherence  positively correlates with social support. Furthermore, it is known that patients with little  or no social support are at a notable disadvantage compared to those patients that already  have a strong social network [20]. The patients who experienced a lack of social support  in this study were all elderly, but younger patients could experience the same void. When  support is lacking, healthcare workers can act as a surrogate social supporter [21]. During  the COVID‐19 pandemic, the elderly demographic has been hit particularly hard in terms  of isolation; this highlights the need for supportive healthcare workers, now more than  ever before.  When necessary, a physician may also assist a patient in strengthening that network  if it is lacking. This was the case in two of the interviews. However, physicians must tread  carefully, or they risk overstepping social norms and devastating the physician‐patient  relationship. In particular, family relationships can be complex, and it may prove inap‐ propriate to contact the patient’s family in some situations. Thus, determining the availa‐ bility of social support in a medical interview is a critical yet hazard‐prone step. Figure 1  is based on the content of the interviews, encompasses the theme, and offers a general  procedure for navigating this situation.  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  7  of  10  Figure 1. Framework flowchart for assessing patient support network.  Trust was observed to be interconnected with other themes and is known to be foun‐ dational to successful medical interactions with patients [22]. Physicians must communi‐ cate that they are competent and well‐informed to establish trust. Professionalism is one  such tool to facilitate this outcome [22]. However, in displaying professionalism, commu‐ nication should never be hindered. As previously stated, overreliance on medical jargon  will impair the conveyance of mutual respect. Studies also support the notion that com‐ munication stemming from a trusting relationship can reduce laboratory tests required to  reach a diagnosis [18]. Likewise, related to trust and addressed as a theme, confidentiality  will also result in better experiences for patients [23]. Moreover, research on patient com‐ munication increasingly emphasizes adaptation based on individual needs [24]. Failing to  do so could result in poor communication or understanding, with consequent worse out‐ comes [25]. All these factors are a lot to balance for anyone, but skillfully integrating all  the themes discussed stands to improve interactions with patients.  Patient satisfaction in general is associated with better communication during medi‐ cal encounters [26]. Likewise, the patient will view interactions poorly when active listen‐ ing skills are not employed [27]. This sentiment was shared in the physician interviews.  In the realm of listening and communication, physicians need to recognize signs of dis‐ comfort through adept empathy skills and by knowing patients well enough to see when  their nonverbal behavior differs from the norm [28]. This is particularly important for vul‐ nerable patients. For example, a person being abused by a partner or parent may exhibit  different nonverbal cues depending on whether the abuser is also in the room. When the  physician recognizes such cues, they can act in a trauma‐informed way to preserve the  physician‐patient relationship [29]. Furthermore, research indicates that empathetic inter‐ actions are beneficial for all types of patients, not just those with terminal illnesses [30].  This may help build trust and create a sense of confidence.  AI was the chosen methodology for this study as its focus is to enact positive change  for organizations. Working toward this change differentiates it from other methods of in‐ quiry. Phenomenology, for instance, seeks a similar outcome of deciphering an experi‐ ence, but lacks the underlying motivation to change organizations [31]. A narrative style  is strong when seeking to capture many details and captivate the audience [32]. However,  the experience captured with AI is not something that can be readily imparted. A measure  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  8  of  10  of  analysis  is  needed  to  distill  experiences  into  their  most  transferable  elements  of  knowledge, where consensus has deemed them important. The aim of this study was to  uncover these elements so they may be easily shared. Thus, AI was a suitable choice to  fulfill this objective.  Physicians cannot rely solely on medical knowledge or technology for successful pa‐ tient interactions. Medical interviews are used not only to diagnose issues quickly but also  to increase patient satisfaction. The results of this study signal a need to maintain soft  skills, such as empathy, alongside medical expertise. Doing so may prove especially ad‐ vantageous  for  assessing  and  supporting  patients’  mental  health.  The  COVID‐19  pan‐ demic and social distancing protocols have frayed social support networks for many. This  change is contrary to one of the most prominent themes of patients’ need for social sup‐ port. This is especially important for individuals who demonstrate mental health disor‐ ders and mental illness. For over a year now, isolation has become standard in our West‐ ern society, which has negatively impacted many people’s mental health. Unfortunately,  as the threat of COVID‐19 subsides, regaining social support may prove difficult for some,  leading to sustained mental health issues. Physicians can support patients’ mental health  by engaging in both social and medical topics during the medical interview, and suggest‐ ing avenues for treatment if mental health issues are present.  However, connecting with patients in this manner may come at a mental health cost  for physicians themselves. Like their patients, physicians have also experienced a mental  health  toll  during  the  pandemic,  leading  to  increased  stress  and  burnout  symptoms.  Workplace stress and burnout have long been attributed to high‐empathy careers and  tempering in this area may be required if stressors unduly burden physicians [33]. Work‐ ing with many patients with serious issues can weigh heavily on a physician, especially if  they take excessive personal responsibility for patients’ well‐being. Thus, it is beneficial  to partake in stress and burnout avoidance training programs to ensure a healthy work  environment. Such training should educate physicians to take responsibility for patient  outcomes without feeling unnecessarily responsible for factors beyond their control, such  as terminal illnesses. The best outcomes for patients will be out of reach if burnout impairs  work quality. Physicians must learn to self‐assess and take individual or organizational  steps to deal with symptoms of burnout, if present [34].  Strengths, Limitations, and Future Research  This study may be limited in its generalizability for several reasons. As physicians  were asked to evoke their own best experience and describe it in a conversational style,  results were vulnerable to distortion due to social‐desirability bias; especially since the  conversation relates to the physician’s own medical interviewing prowess. The sampling  method also limits this study; however, this is offset to some degree by the narrow aim of  the  study  and  by  the  established  interview  method  delivered  by  a  credentialed  inter‐ viewer [35]. The topic could benefit from future quantitative or mixed‐methods studies.  Mental health, psychological trauma, and other ailments also represent rich quarries of  analysis to determine how cognitive patterns and behaviors affect patient communication  in medical settings. Larger studies regarding complex medical issues, both physical and  psychological, will provide further insight into how medical interviews can be navigated  in difficult cases. Barriers to face‐to‐face communication, such as during the COVID‐19  pandemic, may also be specifically analyzed, to determine how physical boundaries have  affected relationships between physicians and patients. By exploring these areas, new in‐ formation  can  emerge,  resulting  in  more  comprehensive  medical  interviews  and  im‐ proved patient outcomes.  5. Conclusions  As technology pervades our lives evermore, soft skills such as communication must  never degrade through neglect. At the same time, opportunities to harness technology as  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  9  of  10  a communicative advantage, and not a barrier, should be carefully considered. Using tech‐ nology to augment the power of an effective medical interview can assist physicians in  fine‐tuning their skills. The theme of nonverbal cues indicates the importance of reading  and communicating body language. Facial recognition technology may help physicians  identify minute, nonverbal cues that signify discomfort. Artificial intelligence may be able  to score levels of empathy recorded in a conversation, as a training and evaluation tool.  Further analysis  will  reveal  new  pathways  to  improved  communication,  but  more  re‐ search is required. The opportunities are limitless and the benefits to patients much the  same. A proper balance between physician skills and technological advancements must  constantly  be  maintained,  with  the  latter  never  overtaking  and  causing  the  former  to  lapse. The themes outlined in this study provide a basis for future exploration on a larger  scale using novel methodologies in effective interview mechanics. However, one standard  method will never fit every unique patient, so a keen aptitude for adaptation should for‐ ever be honed to continuously improve therapeutic relationships.  Funding: This research received no external funding.  Institutional Review Board Statement: The study was conducted according to the guidelines of the  Declaration of Helsinki and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Civil Hospital, Department of  Health (4129).  Informed Consent Statement: Informed consent  was  obtained  from all subjects involved  in the  study.  Data Availability Statement: Restrictions apply to the availability of data. Data was obtained from  physicians and are available from the author if authorized by the physicians.  Conflicts of Interest: The author declares no conflict of interest.  References  1. Gebru, A. Patient Centered Communication: A Synoptic Review of the State of the Art. Ethiop. Med. J. 2020, 58, 263–269. Avail‐ able online: https://www.emjema.org/index.php/EMJ/article/view/1622 (accessed on 5 March 2021).  2. Hasnain, M.; Bordage, G.; Connell, K.; Sinacore, J. History‐taking behaviors associated with diagnostic competence of clerks:  An exploratory study. Acad. Med. 2001, 76, S14–S17, doi:10.1097/00001888‐200110001‐00006.  3. Rocque, R.; Levesque, A.; Leanza, Y. Patient participation in medical consultations: The experience of patients from various  ethnolinguistic backgrounds. J. Patient Exp. 2019, 6, 19–30, doi:10.35680/2372‐0247.1352.  4. Timmermans, S. The Engaged Patient: The Relevance of Patient–Physician Communication for Twenty‐First‐Century Health. J.  Health Soc. Behav. 2020, 6, 259–273, doi:10.1177/0022146520943514.  5. Honavar,  S.G.  Patient–physician  relationship—Communication  is  the  key.  Indian  J.  Ophthalmol.  2018,  66,  1527–1528,  doi:10.4103/ijo.ijo_1760_18.  6. Herrick, C.; Stoneham, D. Unleashing A Positive Revolution in Medicine: The Power of Appreciative Inquiry. UMA Bulletin  2005,  52,  8–10.  Available  online:  http://www.positiveimpactllc.com/downloads/Utah‐Med‐Bulletin‐‐A‐Positive‐Revolution‐‐ The‐Power‐of‐Appreciative‐Inquiry‐‐Herrick‐Stoneham.pdf (accessed on 2 December 2020).  7. Pealing, L.; Tempest, H.V.; Howick, J. Technology: A help or hindrance to empathic healthcare? J. R. Soc. Med. 2018, 111, 390– 393, doi:10.1177/0141076818790669.  8. Harbishettar, V.; Krishna, K.R.; Srinivasa, P.; Gowda, M. The enigma of doctor‐patient relationship. Indian J. Psychiatry 2019, 61,  776–781, doi:10.4103/psychiatry.indianjpsychiatry_196_17.  9. Seshadri, K. Doctor–Patient Communication. In Effective Medical Communication: The A, B, C, D, E of It, 1st ed.; Parija, S., Adkoli,  B., Eds.; Springer: Singapore, 2020; pp. 49–61, doi:10.1007/978‐981‐15‐3409‐6_5.  10. Skelly, K.; Weerasinghe, S.; Daly, J.; Rosenbaum, M. Impact of Medical Scribe Experiences on Subsequent Medical Student  Learning. Med. Sci. Educ. 2021, 31, 1149–1156, doi:10.1007/s40670‐021‐01291‐1.  11. Hunter, K. Seven Patients, Physicians, and Red Parakeets: Narrative Incommensurability. In Doctors’ Stories, 1st ed.; Princeton  University Press: Princeton, NJ, USA, 2021; pp. 123–147, doi:10.1515/9780691214726‐010.  12. Froehlich, A.; Siebrits, A.; Kotze, C. e‐Health: How Evolving Space Technology is Driving Remote Healthcare in Support of  SDGs. In Space Supporting Africa: Studies in Space Policy, 1st ed.; Froehlich, A., Siebrits, A., Eds.; Springer: Cham, Switzerland,  2021; Volume 27, pp. 91–185, doi:10.1007/978‐3‐030‐61780‐6_2.  13. Hiemstra, D.; Van Yperen, N.W. The effects of strength‐based versus deficit‐based self‐regulated learning strategies on students’  effort intentions. Motiv. Emot. 2015, 39, 656–668, doi:10.1007/s11031‐015‐9488‐8.  Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 116  10  of  10  14. Waters, L.; Algoe, S.B.; Dutton, J.; Emmons, R.; Fredrickson, B.L.; Heaphy, E.; Moskowitz, J.T.; Neff, K.; Niemiec, R.; Pury, C.; et  al.  Positive  psychology  in  a  pandemic:  Buffering,  bolstering,  and  building  mental  health.  J.  Posit.  Psychol.  2021,  1–21,  doi:10.1080/17439760.2021.1871945.  15. Berg,  M.E.;  Karlsen,  J.T.  An  evaluation  of  management  training  and  coaching.  J.  Workplace  Learn.  2012,  24,  177–199,  doi:10.1108/13665621211209267.  16. Dinning, A.; Cooper, J.; Taylor, K.; Damas, R.; Hailes, L. ‘Knowing why we do what we do’‐Establishing a unit practice council to  improve evidence‐based nursing practice in acute medicine using appreciative inquiry. FoNS Improv. Insights 2014, 10, 1. Available  online: https://www.proquest.com/openview/2665c6b430474383c266442b729b81c8/1?pq‐origsite=gscholar&cbl=2030537 (accessed on  20 March 2021).  17. Braun, V.; Clarke, V. Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qual. Res. Psychol. 2006, 3, 77–101, doi:10.1191/1478088706qp063oa.  18. Khullar, D. Building trust in health care—why, where, and how. JAMA 2019, 322, 507–509, doi:10.1001/jama.2019.4892.  19. Turan, G.B.; Aksoy, M.; Çiftçi, B. Effect of social support on the treatment adherence of hypertension patients. J. Vasc. Nurs.  2019, 37, 46–51, doi:10.1016/j.jvn.2018.10.005.  20. Maldonado, J.R. Why It is Important to Consider Social Support When Assessing Organ Transplant Candidates? Am. J. Bioeth.  2019, 19, 1–8, doi:10.1080/15265161.2019.1671689.  21. Paz‐Soldán, V.A.; Alban, R.E.; Jones, C.D.; Oberhelman, R.A. The provision of and need for social support among adult and  pediatric patients with tuberculosis in Lima, Peru: A qualitative study. BMC Health Serv. Res. 2013, 13, 290, doi:10.1186/1472‐ 6963‐13‐290.  22. Nickel, P.; Frank, L. Trust in Medicine. In The Routledge Handbook of Trust and Philosophy; Routledge: New York, NY, USA, 2020,  doi:10.4324/9781315542294‐28.  23. Baghaei, R.; Iranagh, S.R.; Ghasemzadeh, N.; Moradi, Y. Observation of Patients’ Privacy by Physicians and Nurses and Its  Relationship with Patient Satisfaction. Hosp. Top. 2021, 1–8, doi:10.1080/00185868.2021.1877096.  24. Aelbrecht, K.; Hanssens, L.; Detollenaere, J.; Willems, S.; Deveugele, M.; Pype, P. Determinants of physician–patient communi‐ cation: The role of language, education and ethnicity. Patient Educ. Couns. 2019, 102, 776–781, doi:10.1016/j.pec.2018.11.006.  25. Riedl, D.; Schüßler, G. The influence of doctor‐patient communication on health outcomes: A systematic review. Z. Psychosom.  Med. Psychother. 2017, 63, 131–150, doi:10.13109/zptm.2017.63.2.131.  26. Hitawala, A.; Flores, M.; Alomari, M.; Kumar, S.; Padbidri, V.; Muthukuru, S.; Rahman, S.; Alomari, A.; Khazaaleh, S.; Gopala‐ Krishna, K.V.; et al. Improving Physician‐patient and Physician‐nurse Communication and Overall Satisfaction Rates: A Quality  Improvement Project. Cureus 2020, 12, e7776, doi:10.7759/cureus.7776.  27. Kee, J.W.Y.; Khoo, H.S.; Lim, I.; Koh, M.Y.H. Communication Skills in Patient‐Doctor Interactions: Learning from Patient Com‐ plaints. Health Prof. Educ. 2018, 4, 97–106, doi:10.1016/j.hpe.2017.03.006.  28. Navarro, J. What Every BODY Is Saying; HarperCollins: New York, NY, USA, 2008; pp. 1–15.  29. Kassam‐Adams, N.; Butler, L. What Do Clinicians Caring for Children Need to Know about Pediatric Medical Traumatic Stress  and the Ethics of Trauma‐Informed Approaches? AMA J. Ethics 2017, 19, 793–801, doi:10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.8.pfor1‐ 1708.  30. Derksen, F.; Bensing, J.; Lagro‐Janssen, A. Effectiveness of empathy in general practice: A systematic review. Br. J. Gen. Pract.  2013, 63, e76–e84, doi:10.3399/bjgp13x660814.  31. Neubauer, B.E.; Witkop, C.T.; Varpio, L. How phenomenology can help us learn from the experiences of others. Perspect. Med.  Educ. 2019, 8, 90–97, doi:10.1007/s40037‐019‐0509‐2.  32. Greenhalgh, T. Cultural Contexts of Health: The Use of Narrative Research in the Health Sector; Health Evidence Network Synthesis  Report; WHO Regional Office for Europe: Copenhagen, Denmark, 2016.  33. Barello, S.; Graffigna, G. Caring for health professionals in the COVID‐19 pandemic emergency: Toward an “epidemic of em‐ pathy” in healthcare. Front. Psychol. 2020, 11, 1431, doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01431.  34. West, C.P.; Dyrbye, L.N.; Shanafelt, T.D. Physician burnout: Contributors, consequences and solutions. J. Intern. Med. 2018, 283,  516–529, doi:10.1111/joim.12752.  35. Malterud, K.; Siersma, V.D.; Guassora, A.D. Sample Size in Qualitative Interview Studies: Guided by Information Power. Qual  Health Res. 2016, 26, 1753–1760, doi:10.1177/1049732315617444. 

Journal

Behavioral SciencesMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Aug 24, 2021

Keywords: doctor-patient relationship; social support; empathy; trust; active listening; nonverbal cues; mutual respect; confidentiality; treatment adherence

There are no references for this article.