Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Surface Plasmon Resonance Dependent Third-Order Optical Nonlinearities of Silver Nanoplates

Surface Plasmon Resonance Dependent Third-Order Optical Nonlinearities of Silver Nanoplates Communication  Surface Plasmon Resonance Dependent Third‐Order Optical  Nonlinearities of Silver Nanoplates  1 1, 1 1 2 Marcello Condorelli  , Vittorio Scardaci  *, Mario Pulvirenti  , Luisa D’Urso  , Fortunato Neri  ,   1 2 Giuseppe Compagnini   and Enza Fazio      Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Catania, Viale A.Doria 6, 95125 Catania, Italy;  marcello.condorelli@unict.it (M.C.); mario.pulvirenti@phd.unict.it (M.P.); ldurso@unict.it (L.D.);  gcompagnini@unict.it (G.C.)    Dipartimento di Scienze Matematiche e Informatiche, Scienze Fisiche e Scienze della Terra,   Università di Messina,1‐98122 Messina, Italy; fortunato.neri@unime.it (F.N.); enza.fazio@unime.it (E.F.)  *  Correspondence: vittorio.scardaci@unict.it  Abstract: A systematic study of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR)‐dependent nonlinear optical  response of Ag nanoplates is presented and discussed. The Ag nanoplates were synthesized using  the  well‐known  seed‐mediated  growth  method.  By  performing  the  z‐scan  method  with  a  nanosecond laser (532 nm, 5 ns), the optical nonlinearities of the Ag nanoplates, prepared tuning  the SPR contribution in the 400–1000 nm range, were determined. The results showed a SPR‐related  competition between the saturable absorption and reverse saturable absorption mechanisms, while  the nonlinear refraction changed from self‐defocusing to self‐focusing. Furthermore, the scattering  effects contribute to determine the nature of the optical limiting response. The observed SPR‐tunable  third order optical nonlinearities make Ag nanoplates a suitable candidate to be used in different  fields, i.e., laser pulse generation, optical limiting, or bio‐imaging applications.  Keywords: Ag nanoplates; laser irradiation; metallic nanostructures; surface plasmon resonance;  Citation: Condorelli, M.; Scardaci,  nonlinear optical absorption; nonlinear scattering; nonlinear refractive index  V.; Pulvirenti, M.; D’Urso, L.; Neri,  F.; Compagnini, G.; Fazio, E. Surface  Plasmon Resonance Dependent  Third‐Order Optical Nonlinearities  of Silver Nanoplates. Photonics 2021,  1. Introduction  8, 299. https://doi.org/10.3390/  In the last decade, metal nanoparticles (NPs) have been at the center of significant  photonics8080299  research and development efforts due to their peculiar optical properties, arising from the  unique interaction of their conduction electrons with electric fields. Such interaction is the  Received: 19 June 2021  well‐known surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and is tightly dependent on the size and  Accepted: 23 July 2021  shape  of  the  NPs,  as  well  as  their  surrounding  medium  [1].  In  addition,  noble  metal  Published: 27 July 2021  anisotropic NPs, differently from the spherical ones, exhibit multiple surface plasmon  resonances, mainly due to their shaped tips, which contribute to enhance the electric field  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  by lightning rods effects, in turn resulting in a very high enhancement of metal optical  neutral with  regard  to jurisdictional  properties  [2].  Potential  breakthrough  applications  have  been  found  for  such kinds  of  claims  in  published  maps  and  institutional affiliations.  materials in a wide range of fields, including sensing, biology, electronics, and catalysis  [3–5].   Recently, the attention has also focused on optoelectronic and photonic applications,  due to their excellent third‐order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, in terms of a large  Copyright:  ©  2021  by  the  authors.  third‐order nonlinear susceptibility, an ultrafast relaxation time, the suitable modulation  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  depth, and the saturation intensity of the noble metal NPs. Their plasmonic‐driven NLO  This article  is an open access article  properties  make  them  excellent  saturable  absorbers,  which  are  the  key  elements  of  distributed  under  the  terms  and  passively Q‐switched or mode‐locked pulsed lasers [6–10].  conditions of the Creative Commons  Third‐order NLO properties have been previously studied in plasmonic gold and  Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  silver  nanomaterials  [11–15].  However,  no  systematic  investigation  has  been  made  on  (https://creativecommons.org/license materials according to their size and shape, with SPR spanning a wide spectral range in  s/by/4.0/).  Photonics 2021, 8, 299. https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8080299  www.mdpi.com/journal/photonics  Photonics 2021, 8, 299  2  of  10  the visible and NIR. In previous works [8,9], we demonstrated the generation of dual‐ wavelength Q‐switched and mode‐locked pulses in Yb‐doped all‐fiber lasers at 1 μm by  using Ag nanoplates (NPTs)‐based SA, for achieving stable and low‐cost pulsed lasers  that could be used for spectroscopy and ultrafast photonics. Here, taking these results into  account,  we  have  broadened  the  study  of  the  nonlinear  response  of  Ag  NPTs,  investigating materials having an SPR that spans across the visible range and beyond.  Using the z‐scan method, we have, thus, investigated NLO properties both close and far  from the laser excitation (532 nm). The origin of the effective absorptive nonlinearity is  discussed based on combined nonlinear absorption in NPTs, nonlinear scattering, and  changes in the nonlinear refractive index triggered by NPT‐mediated light absorption. In  view of further potential applications, including biomedical diagnostics and therapy, the  high  selectiveness  of  the  SPR  of  Ag  NPTs,  as  well  as  their  corresponding  optical  nonlinearities,  can  be  strongly  significant  for  laser‐induced  biomedical  photothermal  processes.  In  this  direction,  several  efforts  have  been  conducted  to  study  the  energy  absorption  mechanisms  in  metallic  spherical  NPs,  but  an  in‐depth  description  of  the  nonlinear  optical  absorption  mechanism  for  Ag  NPTs  has  not  yet  been  carried  out.  Furthermore, previous reports on Ag nanoparticles generally focused on the nonlinear  characteristics  of  the  materials  excited  by  a  laser  wavelength  near  the  resonance  absorption peak. Here, we characterized the NLO response of Ag NPT colloids, prepared  using  an  optimized  seed‐mediated  growth  method,  and  characterized  by  the  SPR  changing from 485 to 925 nm, thus covering the full visible spectrum and a small portion  of the near IR.  2. Materials and Methods  Ag NPTs are  synthesized by the well‐known  seed‐mediated  growth method [16].  Briefly,  spherical  Ag  nanoparticles,  or  seeds,  are  obtained  by  a  reduction  of  Ag   (in  solution as AgNO3) by NaBH4 in presence of trisodium citrate as stabilizer under stirring  and cooling. After that, to grow seeds into NPTs, a set volume of the seed’s solution is  3. The volume  added to a solution containing further citrate, hydrazine, and further AgNO of seed’s solution regulates the final size of the NPTs and, thus, the plasmon resonance  position.  Optical  absorption  measurements  were  performed  using  a  Cary  60  UV–Vis  spectrophotometer by Agilent Technologies. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images  were acquired by a ZEISS SUPRA 55 VP FE‐SEM system. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)  images  were  acquired  using  a  Witech  Alpha  300  RS  instrument,  while  Scanning  Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) images were obtained using a Zeiss‐Gemini 2  electron microscope, operating at an acceleration voltage 30 kV, and a working distance  of 4 mm.  The Z‐scan technique, which was discovered by Bahae et al. [17], is the most widely  used  method  for  indirectly  measuring  NLO  properties.  In  this  technique,  the  spatial  distortion  caused  by  a  Gaussian  beam’s  profile  in  the  far‐field  zone  mostly  during  movement of a sample around the focusing of laser beam focus is investigated. In this  work,  NLO  properties  were  determined  using  a  pulsed  Nd:YAG  laser  (532  nm  wavelength, 5 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz repetition rate). The repetition rate of the laser was  10 Hz, which was low enough to avoid thermal effect [18] and 1‐cm‐thick sample cuvette  was  moved  along the  focused  beam.  The  incident laser  beam  was  divided  by  a  beam  splitter into the following two portions: 20% of the reflected beam is sent to a first detector  (D1) and represents the input signal, while the remaining 80%, focused by a 300‐mm lens  into the quartz cuvette, represents the transmitted power, which is measured by a second  detector  (D2).  Moreover,  the  scattered  light  was  simultaneously  collected  by  a  third  detector (D3) mounted at 90° with respect to the laser propagation direction (Figure 1a).  The  optical  limiting  (OL)  threshold  data  were  collected  by  the  dual  power  meter  performing  nonlinear  transmittance  measurements  as  a  function  of  the  input  fluence  (Figure 1b). After that, we determined the non‐linear refractive index n2, the non‐linear    Photonics 2021, 8, 299  3  of  10  absorption coefficient β, and the 90° scattering efficiency S in the open and closed aperture  configurations. These measurements were carried out keeping the laser fluence constant  −2 at 0.5 J cm  in the focal region and by moving the sample along the axis of the incident  beam (i.e., z‐direction) with respect to the focal point. Really, each z position corresponds  to  an  input  fluence  of  ,  where  Ein  is  the  input  laser  pulse  energy  [19].  The  transmittance was calculated by dividing the energy through the sample by that of the  input sample. In the closed aperture configuration, a finite aperture (d = 500 μm) was  placed  300  mm  away  from  the  focal  point  (Figure  1a).  The  experimental  set‐up  was  −7 2 standardized using toluene, which yielded n2 = 6.2 × 10  cm /GW and a negligibly small  −3 (3) −14 (3) value of β = 2.5 × 10  cm/GW corresponding to Re{χ } = 3.5 × 10  esu and Im{χ } = 8.8 ×  −16 10  esu, respectively.  Figure 1. (a) Schematics of the z‐scan setup. (b) Nonlinear transmittance values as a function the  input fluence to determine the OL threshold.  3. Results and Discussion  We prepared a wide range of Ag NPT solutions with SPR from 485 to 925 nm, thus  covering the full visible spectrum and a small portion of the near IR. Figure 2a shows the  extinction spectra of such solutions. Each spectrum exhibits one main feature, the in‐plane  dipole plasmonic mode, the position of which we will use to identify the sample (e.g.,  sample #485 nm). The other important feature appearing in all the spectra is the out‐of‐ plane quadrupole mode at 335 nm, which is distinctive for anisotropic Ag nanoparticles  [20]. Other features that appear in some of the spectra are the in‐plane quadrupole and  the out‐of‐plane dipole modes below 400 nm [21]. Figure 3 shows representative SEM,  AFM, and STEM images of the samples #534 and #925 nm. NPTs have a mainly triangular  shape, with the tips truncated or rounded. Hexagonal and round NPTs are also present in  the mixture. For sample #534 nm, the NPT size is in the range 70–90 nm, while the NPT  size is in the 120–160 nm range for sample #925 nm. A direct proportionality between SPR  and NPT size was observed (Figure. 2b).     Photonics 2021, 8, 299  4  of  10  Figure 2. Optical absorption spectra from Ag NPT solutions prepared by seed‐mediated growth  and tested for NLO properties (a); SPR vs. NPTs size measured using AFM (b).  Figure 3. Representative SEM (a), AFM (b), and STEM (c) images from Ag NPT samples #534 and  #925 nm.  The  open  transmittance  curve  of  the  sample  #485  nm  (those  with  the  SPR  peak  centered at 485 nm) shows a symmetrical minimum in the focus region (see Figure 4a).  This behavior implies that the mechanism that mainly determines its OL response is the  nonlinear absorption mechanism (the dip is a feature characteristic of a reverse saturable  absorption  mechanism).  First,  the  nearly  symmetrical  profile  with  respect  to  the  focal  point satisfies the following condition: ΔZp−v ∼ 1.7∙z0 where z0 = kw0 /2 is the diffraction  length of the beam, k = 2π/λ is the wave vector, w0 is the beam waist radius, and k is the  laser  wavelength.  The  occurrence  of  the  above  value  confirms  the  presence  of  cubic  nonlinearity  and  a  small  phase  distortion.  Furthermore,  a  prefocal  transmittance  maximum (peak) followed by a post‐focal transmittance minimum (valley) is observed in  the closed/open feature (see Figure 4b). The observed closed/open feature indicates a self‐ defocusing  effect,  as  expected  for  most  of  the  dispersive  materials,  and  is  mainly  a  signature of negative refractive nonlinearity. No scattering signal has been collected (not  shown); hence, the nature of the OL response is effectively determined by the change of  the refractive index. Then, z‐scan experiments have been carried out on Ag samples with  a SPR just above 500 nm (namely samples #534, #597, #656 nm), in resonance with the laser  excitation  (532  nm).  As  shown  in  Figure  5a,  the  signal  collected  along  the  beam  propagation direction (open configuration) is characterized by an increased transmittance  symmetrical peak near the focus position (z = 0). This behavior implies that the mechanism  that mainly determines the OL response is the Saturable Absorption (SA) one. In this case,    Photonics 2021, 8, 299  5  of  10  the scattering contribution is also absent (Figure 5c), while the refractive index change  contributes  to  determining  the  nature  of  the  OL  response  (Figure  6b).  However,  the  closed/open aperture features are different from those observed in all the other samples  (Figure 6). In this case, a prefocal transmittance minimum (valley) is followed by a post  focal transmittance maximum (peak), indicating a  positive sign of  the refractive index  change (Figure 6b).  Figure 4. Z‐scan profile in open (a) and closed/open (b) configurations for the sample #485 nm.  Figure 5. Z‐scan profiles in open (a,b) and scattering (c,d) configurations for the samples #534,  #597, and #656 nm as well as for the samples #750, #812, and #925 nm.  For the samples #750, #812, and #925nm, the scattering signal decreases in the focus  region, showing a dip that reaches a minimum value around 0.6 (Figure 5d), while the  signal  collected  along  the  beam  propagation  direction  (open  configuration)  is  characterized by an increased transmittance symmetrical peak (Figure 5b) near the focus  position (z = 0). These trends indicate that the reduced scattering contribution affects the    Photonics 2021, 8, 299  6  of  10  transmittance increase and, ultimately, the OL response of these samples. Moreover, a  change of the refractive index is found (Figure 6c).  A  quantitative  evaluation  of  NLO  parameters  was  carried  out  according  to  the  following theoretical considerations. The total absorption coefficient is described by the  following relation [22]:  𝛼 I 𝛽 I  (1) 1 I/I where α0, I, Is, and β are the linear absorption coefficient, laser intensity, saturation  intensity, and nonlinear absorption coefficient, respectively. The laser intensity is  defined as follows:  I   z (2) where I0 is the laser intensity at the focus. Hence, Eq. (1) can be rewritten as follows:  𝛼 𝛽 I 𝛼 I   1 1 (3) 1 I The normalized transmittance is, thus, defined as follows:  𝛽 I L (4) T z   m 1 Figure 6. Z‐scan profiles in the closed/open aperture configuration.  1 e where L   and Leff expresses the effective length.   The relation between absorption and transmission is also expressed by the following  relation:  (5) T z 1𝛼 I L   therefore, the normalized transmission can be expressed by the following equation:  L L 𝛼 𝛽 I T z 1   1 z /z 1 (6) 1 I Photonics 2021, 8, 299  7  of  10  −1 This latter equation is used to fit the experimental data, where α0 = 0.0458 m  and Leff  =  0.01  m.  Then,  from  the  fitting  parameters,  we  estimated  the  nonlinear  absorption  (3) coefficient β, the nonlinear refractive index n2, the third order nonlinear susceptibility χ ,  and, therefore, the molecular second‐order hyperpolarizability Γ could be measured using  the following formulas [17]:  2√2 (7) 𝛽 ∆T  I 1 exp 𝛼 L /𝛼 ΔT n   (8) 2πI L 0.406 1 s χ Re χ Imχ   (9) cn Re χ n   (10) 120π 4n k cn 𝛽 𝛼 n (11) Im χ   120π 2k 2kn Reχ Imχ (12) Γ   N L 3 4 where Nc is the molecular number density in cm  and L  is the correction Lorentz local  2 4 field‐factor, approximated using [(n0 +2)/3]  for isotropic liquid media.  2 2 The transmittance is given by the following: S = 1 – exp[(−2ra )/(w0 )] where ra denotes  the beam radius at the aperture in the linear regime and w0 is the beam waist radius. With  β known, the z‐scan with aperture S < 1 can be used to determine the coefficient n2. In this  case, the closed/ open z‐scan transmittance can be reproduced considering a geometry‐ independent normalized transmittance as follows:  2ρ x 2x 3ρ T 1 Δϕ  (13) x 9 x 1 where  x  =  z/z0  is  the  relative  coordinate, ΔΦ  is  the  parameter  that  determines  the  normalized  transmission  near  the  focal  plane  as  a  result  of  nonlinear  refraction, ΔΦ  =  kγI0Leff, γ is the nonlinear refractive index, and ρ = β/2kγ. Finally, knowing β, the nonlinear  scattering coefficient αs was estimated, taking into account that the transmitted intensity  through the sample is given by the following:  dI (14) 𝛼 I𝛽 I   dz From  the  fitting  results,  the  nonlinear  absorption  coefficient β  and  n2  values  for  −11 −18 2 sample #485 nm are found as follows: 1.2 × 10  cm/W and −4.1 × 10  cm /W, respectively.  On the other hand, a negative β sign is found for the samples #534, #597, and #656 nm and  −9 −10 −11 are equal to −1.9 × 10  cm/W, −7.6 × 10  cm/W, and −5.2 × 10  cm/W. For these samples,  the coefficient of nonlinear refraction was determined from the fitting to be of the order  −18  2 of 5.8 × 10 cm /W. In all these sample, no significant scattering contribution was found.  Finally, for the samples #750, #810, #925 nm, the scattering effects determine the NLO  −1 response.  The  estimated  values  of αs  range  from  4.57  to  5.18  cm .  Moreover,  for  the  samples #750, #810, and #925 nm (with an average size of 100 nm and an SPR band rather  broadened than the other cases), a negative sign of n2 was found, as in the sample #485  nm.  The  change  of  the  sign  of  the  refractive  index  could  be  due  to  NPT  orientation,  alignment and aggregation under the external highly intense electric field, used during  the z‐scan measurements, and/or to a “thermal lensing effect” at the focal point. In this  latter case, the change in the refractive index usually follows the beam shape, thus forming  a  lens  within  the  medium.  However,  on  a  nanosecond  time  scale,  refractive‐index  variations  that  are  due  to  the  expansion  of  the  medium  generated  by  local  heating  𝛼𝛽 Photonics 2021, 8, 299  8  of  10  (absorptive mode) or by compression that is due to the electromagnetic field of the laser  beam (electrostrictive mode), described by the well‐known acoustic‐wave law [23], are  highly transient.   On the overall, a clear correlation between the SPR change and the OL trend has been  observed.  Specifically,  when  the  samples  show  an  SPR  in  resonance  with  the  laser  excitation used to perform Z‐scan measurements, an SA mechanism occurs while, far from  the  532  nm  excitation  source,  the  refractive  index  change  and/or  the  scattering  effects  contribute  to  the  OL  response.  As  shown  in  Figure  7,  the  NLO  response  is  SPR  wavelength‐dependent;  as  a  function  of  SPR  position,  the  molecular  second‐order  hyperpolarizability Γ rises going from the sample #485 nm up to sample #597 nm, to then  decreases  in  the  next  two  samples  (#656–#750  nm)  following  the  linear  extinction  efficiency.  The  molecular  second‐order  hyperpolarizability Γ  (as  well  as  the  linear  extinction  values)  slightly  increases  again  in  the  samples  with  the  SPR  located  at  the  highest wavelengths. Nevertheless, for these samples (#812–#925 nm), the Γ values are  significantly lower than those estimated for the samples (#534 and #597 nm) whose SPR is  in resonance with the laser excitation used for the z‐scan measurements (see Figure 7).  The wavelength‐dependence of the optical nonlinear absorption in Au‐Ag nanoparticles  is already reported in reference [24]. However, in our case, the scattering effects are also  analyzed.  Figure 7. Trends of the SPR extinction (blue symbols) and the molecular second‐order  hyperpolarizability Γ (red symbols) values as a function of SPR position.  A possible interpretation of this behavior is that each of the nonlinear processes (SA,  scattering,  and  self‐focusing/defocusing)  dominates  in  a  different  intensity  range,  resulting  in  an  NLO  response  strongly  affected  by  SPR  parameters  (intensity  and  position),  which,  in  turn,  depends  on  the  NPT  size  and  distribution.  Specifically,  a  pronounced photoinduced NPT aggregation and reorientation could have taken place at  a  higher  energy  density  (in  the  focal  region).  As  already  discussed  in  reference  [25],  studying the NLO mechanisms of Ag@ZnO nanocolloids, the presence of a non‐uniform  field  in  the  focal  region,  where  there  is  a  strong  intensity  gradient,  facilitates  the  aggregation/trapping  of  the  nanostructures  and  mainly  induces  the  alignment  of  the    Photonics 2021, 8, 299  9  of  10  asymmetrical particles [26]. Again this explanation is  in good agreement with  what  is  reported in reference [27], where the results of finite difference time‐domain simulations  have allowed the OL behavior of plasmonic nanostructures to be modelled as the result  of an effective nonlinear extinction process, which is enhanced by the near‐field plasmonic  effects via the locally magnified electric fields. As described by Liberman et al. [27], the  combination of experimental results and simulations suggests that the enhanced OL in Au  and  Ag  is  consistent  with,  and,  indeed,  may  result  from,  plasmonic  effects.  While  nanourchins do possess a complex geometry, they offer flexibility in manipulating the  position  and  the  strength  of  plasmonic  resonances  via  spine  length  manipulation.  Furthermore,  because  of  the  multiplicity  of  the  spines,  urchins  have  an  increased  probability of favorable alignment with the incident electric fields, as compared to simpler  shapes  such  as  nanorods.  In  light  of  this,  we  are  reasonably  convinced  that  a  similar  explanation  may  apply  to  explain  the  activation  of  a  “tuned”  NLO  mechanism  with  respect to others in well‐defined SPR conditions for the NPTs we investigated. Ultimately,  this evidence is certainly preliminary and must also be analyzed further with appropriate  theoretical models. Nevertheless, the possibility of tuning the NLO mechanisms by acting  on the plasmonic properties of NPTs is highly interesting and makes Ag NPTs promising  agents, not only for photonics and OL applications but also for bio‐imaging, to study the  interactions between nanomaterials and live cells.  4. Conclusions  The features of the nonlinear optical response of Ag NPTs, prepared using the seed‐ mediated growth method and characterized by the SPR changing from 485 to 925 nm,  have  been  studied.  It  has  shown  a  SPR‐related  competition  between  the  SA  and  RSA  mechanisms, while self‐defocusing and self‐focusing dynamic lens formation occurs as  well as significant scattering effects, all the mechanisms contribute to determine the nature  of the OL response. An assumption was made about the occurrence affecting the SPR‐ tunable optical third‐order nonlinearities of the synthesized Ag NPTs.   Author  Contributions:  Conceptualization,  V.S.  and  E.F.;  methodology,  E.F.,  M.C.,  and  M.P.;  validation, L.D., F.N., and G.C.; formal analysis, E.F., M.C., and M.P.; investigation, E.F., M.C., and  M.P.; writing—original draft preparation, E.F.; writing—review and editing, V.S.; supervision, F.N.  and G.C.; funding acquisition, G.C. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of  the manuscript.   Funding:  The authors  gratefully  acknowledge  Ministero  della  Università  e  della  Ricerca‐MIUR‐ (Project ARS01_00519‐BEST4U) and the Bionanotech Research and Innovation Tower (BRIT).  Data  Availability  Statement:  Data  presented  in  this  paper  are  available  on  request  from  the  corresponding authors.  Acknowledgments:  The  authors  acknowledge  G.F.  Indelli  for  the  support  during  AFM  measurements.   Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Trugler, A. Optical Properties of Metallic Nanoparticles; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2016.  2. Reguera,  J.;  Langer,  J.;  Jiménez  de  Aberasturi,  D.;  Liz‐Marzán,  L.M.  Anisotropic  metal  nanoparticles  for  surface  enhanced  Raman scattering. Chem. Soc. Rev. 2017, 46, 3866–3885, doi:10.1039/C7CS00158D.  3. Vanden Bout, D.A. Metal Nanoparticles:  Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications Edited by Daniel L. Feldheim (North  Carolina State University) and Colby A. Foss, Jr. (Georgetown University). Marcel Dekker, Inc.:  New York and Basel. 2002. x+  338 pp. $150.00. ISBN:  0‐8247‐0604‐8. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 7874–7875, doi:10.1021/ja015381a.  4. Capek,  I.  Noble  Metal  Nanoparticles:  Preparation,  Composite  Nanostructures,  Biodecoration  and  Collective  Properties;  Springer:  Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2017.  5. Tao, F. (Ed.) Metal Nanoparticles for Catalysis: Advances and Applications; Royal Society of Chemistry: Cambridge, UK, 2014.  6. Jiang, T.; Kang, Z.; Qin, G.S.; Zhou, J.; Qin, W.P. Low mode‐locking threshold induced by surface plasmon field enhancement  of gold nanoparticles. Opt. Express 2013, 21, 27992–28000, doi:10.1364/oe.21.027992.    Photonics 2021, 8, 299  10  of  10  7. Kang, Z.; Guo, X.; Jia, Z.; Xu, Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, D.; Qin, G.; Qin, W. Gold nanorods as saturable absorbers for all‐fiber passively  Q‐switched erbium‐doped fiber laser. Opt. Mater. Express 2013, 3, 1986–1991, doi:10.1364/OME.3.001986.  8. Fu, B.; Wang, P.; Li, Y.; Condorelli, M.; Fazio, E.; Sun, J.; Xu, L.; Scardaci, V.; Compagnini, G. Passively Q‐switched Yb‐doped  all‐fiber laser based on Ag nanoplates as saturable absorber. Nanophotonics 2020, 9, 3873–3880, doi:10.1515/nanoph‐2020‐0015.  9. Fu, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, P.; Condorelli, M.; Pulvirenti, M.; Fazio, E.; Shang, C.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Compagnini, G.; et al. Nonlinear  Optical Properties of Ag Nanoplates Plasmon Resonance and Applications in Ultrafast Photonics. J. Lightwave Technol. 2021, 39,  2084–2090.  10. Kim, K.‐H.; Griebner, U.; Herrmann, J. Theory of passive mode locking of solid‐state lasers using metal nanocomposites as slow  saturable absorbers. Opt. Lett. 2012, 37, 1490–1492, doi:10.1364/OL.37.001490.  11. Elim, H.I.; Yang, J.; Lee, J.‐Y.; Mi, J.; Ji, W. Observation of saturable and reverse‐saturable absorption at longitudinal surface  plasmon resonance in gold nanorods. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2006, 88, 083107, doi:10.1063/1.2177366.  12. Gurudas, U.; Brooks, E.; Bubb, D.M.; Heiroth, S.; Lippert, T.; Wokaun, A. Saturable and reverse saturable absorption in silver  nanodots at 532 nm using picosecond laser pulses. J. Appl. Phys. 2008, 104, 073107, doi:10.1063/1.2990056.  13. Kim, K.‐H.; Husakou, A.; Herrmann, J. Linear and nonlinear optical characteristics of composites containing metal nanoparticles  with different sizes and shapes. Opt. Express 2010, 18, 7488–7496, doi:10.1364/OE.18.007488.  14. Zheng,  C.;  Chen,  W.;  Ye,  X.;  Cai,  S.;  Xiao,  X.  Fabricating  silver  nanoplate/hybrid  silica  gel  glasses  and  investigating  their  nonlinear optical absorption behavior. Opt. Mater. 2014, 36, 982–987, doi:10.1016/j.optmat.2014.01.006.  15. Chen, F.; Cheng, J.; Dai, S.; Xu, Z.; Ji, W.; Tan, R.; Zhang, Q. Third‐order optical nonlinearity at 800 and 1300 nm in bismuthate  glasses doped with silver nanoparticles. Opt. Express 2014, 22, 13438–13447, doi:10.1364/OE.22.013438.  16. Compagnini, G.; Condorelli, M.; Fragala, M.; Scardaci, V.; Tinnirello, I.; Puglisi, O.; Neri, F.; Fazio, E. Growth Kinetics and  Sensing Features of Colloidal Silver Nanoplates. J. Nanomater. 2019, doi:10.1155/2019/7084731.  17. Sheik‐Bahae, M.; Said, A.A.; Wei, T.; Hagan, D.J.; Stryland, E.W.V. Sensitive measurement of optical nonlinearities using a single  beam. IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 1990, 26, 760–769, doi:10.1109/3.53394.  18. Liaros,  N.;  Fourkas,  J.T.  The  Characterization  of  Absorptive  Nonlinearities.  Laser  Photonics  Rev.  2017,  11,  1700106,  doi:10.1002/lpor.201700106.  19. Chattopadhyay, M.; Kumbhakar, P.; Sarkar, R.; Mitra, A.K. Enhanced three‐photon absorption and nonlinear refraction in ZnS  and Mn2+ doped ZnS quantum dots. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2009, 95, 163115, doi:10.1063/1.3254186.  20. Bohren, C.F.; Huffman, D.R. Absorption and Scattering of Light by Small Particles; Wiley: 1998.  21. Wu, C.; Zhou, X.; Wei, J. Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance of Silver Nanotriangles Synthesized by a Versatile Solution  Reaction. Nanoscale Res. Lett. 2015, 10, 1–6, doi:10.1186/s11671‐015‐1058‐1.  22. Gao, Y.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Liu, H.; Wang, Y.; Chang, Q.; Jiao, W.; Song, Y. Saturable absorption and reverse saturable absorption  in platinum nanoparticles. Opt. Commun. 2005, 251, 429–433, doi:10.1016/j.optcom.2005.03.003.  23. Kovsh, D.I.; Yang, S.; Hagan, D.J.; Van Stryland, E.W. Nonlinear optical beam propagation for optical limiting. Appl. Opt. 1999,  38, 5168–5180, doi:10.1364/AO.38.005168.  24. Wang,  J.;  Shao,  Y.;  Chen,  C.;  Wu,  W.;  Kong,  D.;  Gao,  Y.  Wavelength‐Dependent  Optical  Nonlinear  Absorption  of  Au‐Ag  Nanoparticles. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 3072, doi:10.3390/app11073072.  25. Fazio, E.; D’Urso, L.; Santangelo, S.; Saija, R.; Compagnini, G.; Neri, F. The activation of non‐linear optical response in Ag@ZnO  nanocolloids  under  an  external  highly  intense  electric  field.  Nuovo  Cim.  C  Colloq.  Commun.  Phys.  2016,  39,  1–16,  doi:10.1393/ncc/i2016‐16307‐9.  26. Saija, R.; Denti, P.; Borghese, F. Optical force and torque on single and aggregated spheres: The trapping issue. In The Mie Theory;  Springer Series in Optical Sciences; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2012; Volume 169, pp. 157–192, doi:10.1007/978‐3‐ 642‐28738‐1_6.  27. Liberman, V.; Rothschild, M.; Bakr, O.M.; Stellacci, F. Optical limiting with complex plasmonic nanoparticles. J. Opt. 2010, 12,  065001, doi:10.1088/2040‐8978/12/6/065001.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Photonics Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Surface Plasmon Resonance Dependent Third-Order Optical Nonlinearities of Silver Nanoplates

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/surface-plasmon-resonance-dependent-third-order-optical-nonlinearities-MOmjJMCaS0
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2021 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2304-6732
DOI
10.3390/photonics8080299
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Communication  Surface Plasmon Resonance Dependent Third‐Order Optical  Nonlinearities of Silver Nanoplates  1 1, 1 1 2 Marcello Condorelli  , Vittorio Scardaci  *, Mario Pulvirenti  , Luisa D’Urso  , Fortunato Neri  ,   1 2 Giuseppe Compagnini   and Enza Fazio      Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Catania, Viale A.Doria 6, 95125 Catania, Italy;  marcello.condorelli@unict.it (M.C.); mario.pulvirenti@phd.unict.it (M.P.); ldurso@unict.it (L.D.);  gcompagnini@unict.it (G.C.)    Dipartimento di Scienze Matematiche e Informatiche, Scienze Fisiche e Scienze della Terra,   Università di Messina,1‐98122 Messina, Italy; fortunato.neri@unime.it (F.N.); enza.fazio@unime.it (E.F.)  *  Correspondence: vittorio.scardaci@unict.it  Abstract: A systematic study of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR)‐dependent nonlinear optical  response of Ag nanoplates is presented and discussed. The Ag nanoplates were synthesized using  the  well‐known  seed‐mediated  growth  method.  By  performing  the  z‐scan  method  with  a  nanosecond laser (532 nm, 5 ns), the optical nonlinearities of the Ag nanoplates, prepared tuning  the SPR contribution in the 400–1000 nm range, were determined. The results showed a SPR‐related  competition between the saturable absorption and reverse saturable absorption mechanisms, while  the nonlinear refraction changed from self‐defocusing to self‐focusing. Furthermore, the scattering  effects contribute to determine the nature of the optical limiting response. The observed SPR‐tunable  third order optical nonlinearities make Ag nanoplates a suitable candidate to be used in different  fields, i.e., laser pulse generation, optical limiting, or bio‐imaging applications.  Keywords: Ag nanoplates; laser irradiation; metallic nanostructures; surface plasmon resonance;  Citation: Condorelli, M.; Scardaci,  nonlinear optical absorption; nonlinear scattering; nonlinear refractive index  V.; Pulvirenti, M.; D’Urso, L.; Neri,  F.; Compagnini, G.; Fazio, E. Surface  Plasmon Resonance Dependent  Third‐Order Optical Nonlinearities  of Silver Nanoplates. Photonics 2021,  1. Introduction  8, 299. https://doi.org/10.3390/  In the last decade, metal nanoparticles (NPs) have been at the center of significant  photonics8080299  research and development efforts due to their peculiar optical properties, arising from the  unique interaction of their conduction electrons with electric fields. Such interaction is the  Received: 19 June 2021  well‐known surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and is tightly dependent on the size and  Accepted: 23 July 2021  shape  of  the  NPs,  as  well  as  their  surrounding  medium  [1].  In  addition,  noble  metal  Published: 27 July 2021  anisotropic NPs, differently from the spherical ones, exhibit multiple surface plasmon  resonances, mainly due to their shaped tips, which contribute to enhance the electric field  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  by lightning rods effects, in turn resulting in a very high enhancement of metal optical  neutral with  regard  to jurisdictional  properties  [2].  Potential  breakthrough  applications  have  been  found  for  such kinds  of  claims  in  published  maps  and  institutional affiliations.  materials in a wide range of fields, including sensing, biology, electronics, and catalysis  [3–5].   Recently, the attention has also focused on optoelectronic and photonic applications,  due to their excellent third‐order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, in terms of a large  Copyright:  ©  2021  by  the  authors.  third‐order nonlinear susceptibility, an ultrafast relaxation time, the suitable modulation  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  depth, and the saturation intensity of the noble metal NPs. Their plasmonic‐driven NLO  This article  is an open access article  properties  make  them  excellent  saturable  absorbers,  which  are  the  key  elements  of  distributed  under  the  terms  and  passively Q‐switched or mode‐locked pulsed lasers [6–10].  conditions of the Creative Commons  Third‐order NLO properties have been previously studied in plasmonic gold and  Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  silver  nanomaterials  [11–15].  However,  no  systematic  investigation  has  been  made  on  (https://creativecommons.org/license materials according to their size and shape, with SPR spanning a wide spectral range in  s/by/4.0/).  Photonics 2021, 8, 299. https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8080299  www.mdpi.com/journal/photonics  Photonics 2021, 8, 299  2  of  10  the visible and NIR. In previous works [8,9], we demonstrated the generation of dual‐ wavelength Q‐switched and mode‐locked pulses in Yb‐doped all‐fiber lasers at 1 μm by  using Ag nanoplates (NPTs)‐based SA, for achieving stable and low‐cost pulsed lasers  that could be used for spectroscopy and ultrafast photonics. Here, taking these results into  account,  we  have  broadened  the  study  of  the  nonlinear  response  of  Ag  NPTs,  investigating materials having an SPR that spans across the visible range and beyond.  Using the z‐scan method, we have, thus, investigated NLO properties both close and far  from the laser excitation (532 nm). The origin of the effective absorptive nonlinearity is  discussed based on combined nonlinear absorption in NPTs, nonlinear scattering, and  changes in the nonlinear refractive index triggered by NPT‐mediated light absorption. In  view of further potential applications, including biomedical diagnostics and therapy, the  high  selectiveness  of  the  SPR  of  Ag  NPTs,  as  well  as  their  corresponding  optical  nonlinearities,  can  be  strongly  significant  for  laser‐induced  biomedical  photothermal  processes.  In  this  direction,  several  efforts  have  been  conducted  to  study  the  energy  absorption  mechanisms  in  metallic  spherical  NPs,  but  an  in‐depth  description  of  the  nonlinear  optical  absorption  mechanism  for  Ag  NPTs  has  not  yet  been  carried  out.  Furthermore, previous reports on Ag nanoparticles generally focused on the nonlinear  characteristics  of  the  materials  excited  by  a  laser  wavelength  near  the  resonance  absorption peak. Here, we characterized the NLO response of Ag NPT colloids, prepared  using  an  optimized  seed‐mediated  growth  method,  and  characterized  by  the  SPR  changing from 485 to 925 nm, thus covering the full visible spectrum and a small portion  of the near IR.  2. Materials and Methods  Ag NPTs are  synthesized by the well‐known  seed‐mediated  growth method [16].  Briefly,  spherical  Ag  nanoparticles,  or  seeds,  are  obtained  by  a  reduction  of  Ag   (in  solution as AgNO3) by NaBH4 in presence of trisodium citrate as stabilizer under stirring  and cooling. After that, to grow seeds into NPTs, a set volume of the seed’s solution is  3. The volume  added to a solution containing further citrate, hydrazine, and further AgNO of seed’s solution regulates the final size of the NPTs and, thus, the plasmon resonance  position.  Optical  absorption  measurements  were  performed  using  a  Cary  60  UV–Vis  spectrophotometer by Agilent Technologies. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images  were acquired by a ZEISS SUPRA 55 VP FE‐SEM system. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)  images  were  acquired  using  a  Witech  Alpha  300  RS  instrument,  while  Scanning  Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) images were obtained using a Zeiss‐Gemini 2  electron microscope, operating at an acceleration voltage 30 kV, and a working distance  of 4 mm.  The Z‐scan technique, which was discovered by Bahae et al. [17], is the most widely  used  method  for  indirectly  measuring  NLO  properties.  In  this  technique,  the  spatial  distortion  caused  by  a  Gaussian  beam’s  profile  in  the  far‐field  zone  mostly  during  movement of a sample around the focusing of laser beam focus is investigated. In this  work,  NLO  properties  were  determined  using  a  pulsed  Nd:YAG  laser  (532  nm  wavelength, 5 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz repetition rate). The repetition rate of the laser was  10 Hz, which was low enough to avoid thermal effect [18] and 1‐cm‐thick sample cuvette  was  moved  along the  focused  beam.  The  incident laser  beam  was  divided  by  a  beam  splitter into the following two portions: 20% of the reflected beam is sent to a first detector  (D1) and represents the input signal, while the remaining 80%, focused by a 300‐mm lens  into the quartz cuvette, represents the transmitted power, which is measured by a second  detector  (D2).  Moreover,  the  scattered  light  was  simultaneously  collected  by  a  third  detector (D3) mounted at 90° with respect to the laser propagation direction (Figure 1a).  The  optical  limiting  (OL)  threshold  data  were  collected  by  the  dual  power  meter  performing  nonlinear  transmittance  measurements  as  a  function  of  the  input  fluence  (Figure 1b). After that, we determined the non‐linear refractive index n2, the non‐linear    Photonics 2021, 8, 299  3  of  10  absorption coefficient β, and the 90° scattering efficiency S in the open and closed aperture  configurations. These measurements were carried out keeping the laser fluence constant  −2 at 0.5 J cm  in the focal region and by moving the sample along the axis of the incident  beam (i.e., z‐direction) with respect to the focal point. Really, each z position corresponds  to  an  input  fluence  of  ,  where  Ein  is  the  input  laser  pulse  energy  [19].  The  transmittance was calculated by dividing the energy through the sample by that of the  input sample. In the closed aperture configuration, a finite aperture (d = 500 μm) was  placed  300  mm  away  from  the  focal  point  (Figure  1a).  The  experimental  set‐up  was  −7 2 standardized using toluene, which yielded n2 = 6.2 × 10  cm /GW and a negligibly small  −3 (3) −14 (3) value of β = 2.5 × 10  cm/GW corresponding to Re{χ } = 3.5 × 10  esu and Im{χ } = 8.8 ×  −16 10  esu, respectively.  Figure 1. (a) Schematics of the z‐scan setup. (b) Nonlinear transmittance values as a function the  input fluence to determine the OL threshold.  3. Results and Discussion  We prepared a wide range of Ag NPT solutions with SPR from 485 to 925 nm, thus  covering the full visible spectrum and a small portion of the near IR. Figure 2a shows the  extinction spectra of such solutions. Each spectrum exhibits one main feature, the in‐plane  dipole plasmonic mode, the position of which we will use to identify the sample (e.g.,  sample #485 nm). The other important feature appearing in all the spectra is the out‐of‐ plane quadrupole mode at 335 nm, which is distinctive for anisotropic Ag nanoparticles  [20]. Other features that appear in some of the spectra are the in‐plane quadrupole and  the out‐of‐plane dipole modes below 400 nm [21]. Figure 3 shows representative SEM,  AFM, and STEM images of the samples #534 and #925 nm. NPTs have a mainly triangular  shape, with the tips truncated or rounded. Hexagonal and round NPTs are also present in  the mixture. For sample #534 nm, the NPT size is in the range 70–90 nm, while the NPT  size is in the 120–160 nm range for sample #925 nm. A direct proportionality between SPR  and NPT size was observed (Figure. 2b).     Photonics 2021, 8, 299  4  of  10  Figure 2. Optical absorption spectra from Ag NPT solutions prepared by seed‐mediated growth  and tested for NLO properties (a); SPR vs. NPTs size measured using AFM (b).  Figure 3. Representative SEM (a), AFM (b), and STEM (c) images from Ag NPT samples #534 and  #925 nm.  The  open  transmittance  curve  of  the  sample  #485  nm  (those  with  the  SPR  peak  centered at 485 nm) shows a symmetrical minimum in the focus region (see Figure 4a).  This behavior implies that the mechanism that mainly determines its OL response is the  nonlinear absorption mechanism (the dip is a feature characteristic of a reverse saturable  absorption  mechanism).  First,  the  nearly  symmetrical  profile  with  respect  to  the  focal  point satisfies the following condition: ΔZp−v ∼ 1.7∙z0 where z0 = kw0 /2 is the diffraction  length of the beam, k = 2π/λ is the wave vector, w0 is the beam waist radius, and k is the  laser  wavelength.  The  occurrence  of  the  above  value  confirms  the  presence  of  cubic  nonlinearity  and  a  small  phase  distortion.  Furthermore,  a  prefocal  transmittance  maximum (peak) followed by a post‐focal transmittance minimum (valley) is observed in  the closed/open feature (see Figure 4b). The observed closed/open feature indicates a self‐ defocusing  effect,  as  expected  for  most  of  the  dispersive  materials,  and  is  mainly  a  signature of negative refractive nonlinearity. No scattering signal has been collected (not  shown); hence, the nature of the OL response is effectively determined by the change of  the refractive index. Then, z‐scan experiments have been carried out on Ag samples with  a SPR just above 500 nm (namely samples #534, #597, #656 nm), in resonance with the laser  excitation  (532  nm).  As  shown  in  Figure  5a,  the  signal  collected  along  the  beam  propagation direction (open configuration) is characterized by an increased transmittance  symmetrical peak near the focus position (z = 0). This behavior implies that the mechanism  that mainly determines the OL response is the Saturable Absorption (SA) one. In this case,    Photonics 2021, 8, 299  5  of  10  the scattering contribution is also absent (Figure 5c), while the refractive index change  contributes  to  determining  the  nature  of  the  OL  response  (Figure  6b).  However,  the  closed/open aperture features are different from those observed in all the other samples  (Figure 6). In this case, a prefocal transmittance minimum (valley) is followed by a post  focal transmittance maximum (peak), indicating a  positive sign of  the refractive index  change (Figure 6b).  Figure 4. Z‐scan profile in open (a) and closed/open (b) configurations for the sample #485 nm.  Figure 5. Z‐scan profiles in open (a,b) and scattering (c,d) configurations for the samples #534,  #597, and #656 nm as well as for the samples #750, #812, and #925 nm.  For the samples #750, #812, and #925nm, the scattering signal decreases in the focus  region, showing a dip that reaches a minimum value around 0.6 (Figure 5d), while the  signal  collected  along  the  beam  propagation  direction  (open  configuration)  is  characterized by an increased transmittance symmetrical peak (Figure 5b) near the focus  position (z = 0). These trends indicate that the reduced scattering contribution affects the    Photonics 2021, 8, 299  6  of  10  transmittance increase and, ultimately, the OL response of these samples. Moreover, a  change of the refractive index is found (Figure 6c).  A  quantitative  evaluation  of  NLO  parameters  was  carried  out  according  to  the  following theoretical considerations. The total absorption coefficient is described by the  following relation [22]:  𝛼 I 𝛽 I  (1) 1 I/I where α0, I, Is, and β are the linear absorption coefficient, laser intensity, saturation  intensity, and nonlinear absorption coefficient, respectively. The laser intensity is  defined as follows:  I   z (2) where I0 is the laser intensity at the focus. Hence, Eq. (1) can be rewritten as follows:  𝛼 𝛽 I 𝛼 I   1 1 (3) 1 I The normalized transmittance is, thus, defined as follows:  𝛽 I L (4) T z   m 1 Figure 6. Z‐scan profiles in the closed/open aperture configuration.  1 e where L   and Leff expresses the effective length.   The relation between absorption and transmission is also expressed by the following  relation:  (5) T z 1𝛼 I L   therefore, the normalized transmission can be expressed by the following equation:  L L 𝛼 𝛽 I T z 1   1 z /z 1 (6) 1 I Photonics 2021, 8, 299  7  of  10  −1 This latter equation is used to fit the experimental data, where α0 = 0.0458 m  and Leff  =  0.01  m.  Then,  from  the  fitting  parameters,  we  estimated  the  nonlinear  absorption  (3) coefficient β, the nonlinear refractive index n2, the third order nonlinear susceptibility χ ,  and, therefore, the molecular second‐order hyperpolarizability Γ could be measured using  the following formulas [17]:  2√2 (7) 𝛽 ∆T  I 1 exp 𝛼 L /𝛼 ΔT n   (8) 2πI L 0.406 1 s χ Re χ Imχ   (9) cn Re χ n   (10) 120π 4n k cn 𝛽 𝛼 n (11) Im χ   120π 2k 2kn Reχ Imχ (12) Γ   N L 3 4 where Nc is the molecular number density in cm  and L  is the correction Lorentz local  2 4 field‐factor, approximated using [(n0 +2)/3]  for isotropic liquid media.  2 2 The transmittance is given by the following: S = 1 – exp[(−2ra )/(w0 )] where ra denotes  the beam radius at the aperture in the linear regime and w0 is the beam waist radius. With  β known, the z‐scan with aperture S < 1 can be used to determine the coefficient n2. In this  case, the closed/ open z‐scan transmittance can be reproduced considering a geometry‐ independent normalized transmittance as follows:  2ρ x 2x 3ρ T 1 Δϕ  (13) x 9 x 1 where  x  =  z/z0  is  the  relative  coordinate, ΔΦ  is  the  parameter  that  determines  the  normalized  transmission  near  the  focal  plane  as  a  result  of  nonlinear  refraction, ΔΦ  =  kγI0Leff, γ is the nonlinear refractive index, and ρ = β/2kγ. Finally, knowing β, the nonlinear  scattering coefficient αs was estimated, taking into account that the transmitted intensity  through the sample is given by the following:  dI (14) 𝛼 I𝛽 I   dz From  the  fitting  results,  the  nonlinear  absorption  coefficient β  and  n2  values  for  −11 −18 2 sample #485 nm are found as follows: 1.2 × 10  cm/W and −4.1 × 10  cm /W, respectively.  On the other hand, a negative β sign is found for the samples #534, #597, and #656 nm and  −9 −10 −11 are equal to −1.9 × 10  cm/W, −7.6 × 10  cm/W, and −5.2 × 10  cm/W. For these samples,  the coefficient of nonlinear refraction was determined from the fitting to be of the order  −18  2 of 5.8 × 10 cm /W. In all these sample, no significant scattering contribution was found.  Finally, for the samples #750, #810, #925 nm, the scattering effects determine the NLO  −1 response.  The  estimated  values  of αs  range  from  4.57  to  5.18  cm .  Moreover,  for  the  samples #750, #810, and #925 nm (with an average size of 100 nm and an SPR band rather  broadened than the other cases), a negative sign of n2 was found, as in the sample #485  nm.  The  change  of  the  sign  of  the  refractive  index  could  be  due  to  NPT  orientation,  alignment and aggregation under the external highly intense electric field, used during  the z‐scan measurements, and/or to a “thermal lensing effect” at the focal point. In this  latter case, the change in the refractive index usually follows the beam shape, thus forming  a  lens  within  the  medium.  However,  on  a  nanosecond  time  scale,  refractive‐index  variations  that  are  due  to  the  expansion  of  the  medium  generated  by  local  heating  𝛼𝛽 Photonics 2021, 8, 299  8  of  10  (absorptive mode) or by compression that is due to the electromagnetic field of the laser  beam (electrostrictive mode), described by the well‐known acoustic‐wave law [23], are  highly transient.   On the overall, a clear correlation between the SPR change and the OL trend has been  observed.  Specifically,  when  the  samples  show  an  SPR  in  resonance  with  the  laser  excitation used to perform Z‐scan measurements, an SA mechanism occurs while, far from  the  532  nm  excitation  source,  the  refractive  index  change  and/or  the  scattering  effects  contribute  to  the  OL  response.  As  shown  in  Figure  7,  the  NLO  response  is  SPR  wavelength‐dependent;  as  a  function  of  SPR  position,  the  molecular  second‐order  hyperpolarizability Γ rises going from the sample #485 nm up to sample #597 nm, to then  decreases  in  the  next  two  samples  (#656–#750  nm)  following  the  linear  extinction  efficiency.  The  molecular  second‐order  hyperpolarizability Γ  (as  well  as  the  linear  extinction  values)  slightly  increases  again  in  the  samples  with  the  SPR  located  at  the  highest wavelengths. Nevertheless, for these samples (#812–#925 nm), the Γ values are  significantly lower than those estimated for the samples (#534 and #597 nm) whose SPR is  in resonance with the laser excitation used for the z‐scan measurements (see Figure 7).  The wavelength‐dependence of the optical nonlinear absorption in Au‐Ag nanoparticles  is already reported in reference [24]. However, in our case, the scattering effects are also  analyzed.  Figure 7. Trends of the SPR extinction (blue symbols) and the molecular second‐order  hyperpolarizability Γ (red symbols) values as a function of SPR position.  A possible interpretation of this behavior is that each of the nonlinear processes (SA,  scattering,  and  self‐focusing/defocusing)  dominates  in  a  different  intensity  range,  resulting  in  an  NLO  response  strongly  affected  by  SPR  parameters  (intensity  and  position),  which,  in  turn,  depends  on  the  NPT  size  and  distribution.  Specifically,  a  pronounced photoinduced NPT aggregation and reorientation could have taken place at  a  higher  energy  density  (in  the  focal  region).  As  already  discussed  in  reference  [25],  studying the NLO mechanisms of Ag@ZnO nanocolloids, the presence of a non‐uniform  field  in  the  focal  region,  where  there  is  a  strong  intensity  gradient,  facilitates  the  aggregation/trapping  of  the  nanostructures  and  mainly  induces  the  alignment  of  the    Photonics 2021, 8, 299  9  of  10  asymmetrical particles [26]. Again this explanation is  in good agreement with  what  is  reported in reference [27], where the results of finite difference time‐domain simulations  have allowed the OL behavior of plasmonic nanostructures to be modelled as the result  of an effective nonlinear extinction process, which is enhanced by the near‐field plasmonic  effects via the locally magnified electric fields. As described by Liberman et al. [27], the  combination of experimental results and simulations suggests that the enhanced OL in Au  and  Ag  is  consistent  with,  and,  indeed,  may  result  from,  plasmonic  effects.  While  nanourchins do possess a complex geometry, they offer flexibility in manipulating the  position  and  the  strength  of  plasmonic  resonances  via  spine  length  manipulation.  Furthermore,  because  of  the  multiplicity  of  the  spines,  urchins  have  an  increased  probability of favorable alignment with the incident electric fields, as compared to simpler  shapes  such  as  nanorods.  In  light  of  this,  we  are  reasonably  convinced  that  a  similar  explanation  may  apply  to  explain  the  activation  of  a  “tuned”  NLO  mechanism  with  respect to others in well‐defined SPR conditions for the NPTs we investigated. Ultimately,  this evidence is certainly preliminary and must also be analyzed further with appropriate  theoretical models. Nevertheless, the possibility of tuning the NLO mechanisms by acting  on the plasmonic properties of NPTs is highly interesting and makes Ag NPTs promising  agents, not only for photonics and OL applications but also for bio‐imaging, to study the  interactions between nanomaterials and live cells.  4. Conclusions  The features of the nonlinear optical response of Ag NPTs, prepared using the seed‐ mediated growth method and characterized by the SPR changing from 485 to 925 nm,  have  been  studied.  It  has  shown  a  SPR‐related  competition  between  the  SA  and  RSA  mechanisms, while self‐defocusing and self‐focusing dynamic lens formation occurs as  well as significant scattering effects, all the mechanisms contribute to determine the nature  of the OL response. An assumption was made about the occurrence affecting the SPR‐ tunable optical third‐order nonlinearities of the synthesized Ag NPTs.   Author  Contributions:  Conceptualization,  V.S.  and  E.F.;  methodology,  E.F.,  M.C.,  and  M.P.;  validation, L.D., F.N., and G.C.; formal analysis, E.F., M.C., and M.P.; investigation, E.F., M.C., and  M.P.; writing—original draft preparation, E.F.; writing—review and editing, V.S.; supervision, F.N.  and G.C.; funding acquisition, G.C. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of  the manuscript.   Funding:  The authors  gratefully  acknowledge  Ministero  della  Università  e  della  Ricerca‐MIUR‐ (Project ARS01_00519‐BEST4U) and the Bionanotech Research and Innovation Tower (BRIT).  Data  Availability  Statement:  Data  presented  in  this  paper  are  available  on  request  from  the  corresponding authors.  Acknowledgments:  The  authors  acknowledge  G.F.  Indelli  for  the  support  during  AFM  measurements.   Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Trugler, A. Optical Properties of Metallic Nanoparticles; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2016.  2. Reguera,  J.;  Langer,  J.;  Jiménez  de  Aberasturi,  D.;  Liz‐Marzán,  L.M.  Anisotropic  metal  nanoparticles  for  surface  enhanced  Raman scattering. Chem. Soc. Rev. 2017, 46, 3866–3885, doi:10.1039/C7CS00158D.  3. Vanden Bout, D.A. Metal Nanoparticles:  Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications Edited by Daniel L. Feldheim (North  Carolina State University) and Colby A. Foss, Jr. (Georgetown University). Marcel Dekker, Inc.:  New York and Basel. 2002. x+  338 pp. $150.00. ISBN:  0‐8247‐0604‐8. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 7874–7875, doi:10.1021/ja015381a.  4. Capek,  I.  Noble  Metal  Nanoparticles:  Preparation,  Composite  Nanostructures,  Biodecoration  and  Collective  Properties;  Springer:  Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2017.  5. Tao, F. (Ed.) Metal Nanoparticles for Catalysis: Advances and Applications; Royal Society of Chemistry: Cambridge, UK, 2014.  6. Jiang, T.; Kang, Z.; Qin, G.S.; Zhou, J.; Qin, W.P. Low mode‐locking threshold induced by surface plasmon field enhancement  of gold nanoparticles. Opt. Express 2013, 21, 27992–28000, doi:10.1364/oe.21.027992.    Photonics 2021, 8, 299  10  of  10  7. Kang, Z.; Guo, X.; Jia, Z.; Xu, Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, D.; Qin, G.; Qin, W. Gold nanorods as saturable absorbers for all‐fiber passively  Q‐switched erbium‐doped fiber laser. Opt. Mater. Express 2013, 3, 1986–1991, doi:10.1364/OME.3.001986.  8. Fu, B.; Wang, P.; Li, Y.; Condorelli, M.; Fazio, E.; Sun, J.; Xu, L.; Scardaci, V.; Compagnini, G. Passively Q‐switched Yb‐doped  all‐fiber laser based on Ag nanoplates as saturable absorber. Nanophotonics 2020, 9, 3873–3880, doi:10.1515/nanoph‐2020‐0015.  9. Fu, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, P.; Condorelli, M.; Pulvirenti, M.; Fazio, E.; Shang, C.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Compagnini, G.; et al. Nonlinear  Optical Properties of Ag Nanoplates Plasmon Resonance and Applications in Ultrafast Photonics. J. Lightwave Technol. 2021, 39,  2084–2090.  10. Kim, K.‐H.; Griebner, U.; Herrmann, J. Theory of passive mode locking of solid‐state lasers using metal nanocomposites as slow  saturable absorbers. Opt. Lett. 2012, 37, 1490–1492, doi:10.1364/OL.37.001490.  11. Elim, H.I.; Yang, J.; Lee, J.‐Y.; Mi, J.; Ji, W. Observation of saturable and reverse‐saturable absorption at longitudinal surface  plasmon resonance in gold nanorods. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2006, 88, 083107, doi:10.1063/1.2177366.  12. Gurudas, U.; Brooks, E.; Bubb, D.M.; Heiroth, S.; Lippert, T.; Wokaun, A. Saturable and reverse saturable absorption in silver  nanodots at 532 nm using picosecond laser pulses. J. Appl. Phys. 2008, 104, 073107, doi:10.1063/1.2990056.  13. Kim, K.‐H.; Husakou, A.; Herrmann, J. Linear and nonlinear optical characteristics of composites containing metal nanoparticles  with different sizes and shapes. Opt. Express 2010, 18, 7488–7496, doi:10.1364/OE.18.007488.  14. Zheng,  C.;  Chen,  W.;  Ye,  X.;  Cai,  S.;  Xiao,  X.  Fabricating  silver  nanoplate/hybrid  silica  gel  glasses  and  investigating  their  nonlinear optical absorption behavior. Opt. Mater. 2014, 36, 982–987, doi:10.1016/j.optmat.2014.01.006.  15. Chen, F.; Cheng, J.; Dai, S.; Xu, Z.; Ji, W.; Tan, R.; Zhang, Q. Third‐order optical nonlinearity at 800 and 1300 nm in bismuthate  glasses doped with silver nanoparticles. Opt. Express 2014, 22, 13438–13447, doi:10.1364/OE.22.013438.  16. Compagnini, G.; Condorelli, M.; Fragala, M.; Scardaci, V.; Tinnirello, I.; Puglisi, O.; Neri, F.; Fazio, E. Growth Kinetics and  Sensing Features of Colloidal Silver Nanoplates. J. Nanomater. 2019, doi:10.1155/2019/7084731.  17. Sheik‐Bahae, M.; Said, A.A.; Wei, T.; Hagan, D.J.; Stryland, E.W.V. Sensitive measurement of optical nonlinearities using a single  beam. IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 1990, 26, 760–769, doi:10.1109/3.53394.  18. Liaros,  N.;  Fourkas,  J.T.  The  Characterization  of  Absorptive  Nonlinearities.  Laser  Photonics  Rev.  2017,  11,  1700106,  doi:10.1002/lpor.201700106.  19. Chattopadhyay, M.; Kumbhakar, P.; Sarkar, R.; Mitra, A.K. Enhanced three‐photon absorption and nonlinear refraction in ZnS  and Mn2+ doped ZnS quantum dots. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2009, 95, 163115, doi:10.1063/1.3254186.  20. Bohren, C.F.; Huffman, D.R. Absorption and Scattering of Light by Small Particles; Wiley: 1998.  21. Wu, C.; Zhou, X.; Wei, J. Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance of Silver Nanotriangles Synthesized by a Versatile Solution  Reaction. Nanoscale Res. Lett. 2015, 10, 1–6, doi:10.1186/s11671‐015‐1058‐1.  22. Gao, Y.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Liu, H.; Wang, Y.; Chang, Q.; Jiao, W.; Song, Y. Saturable absorption and reverse saturable absorption  in platinum nanoparticles. Opt. Commun. 2005, 251, 429–433, doi:10.1016/j.optcom.2005.03.003.  23. Kovsh, D.I.; Yang, S.; Hagan, D.J.; Van Stryland, E.W. Nonlinear optical beam propagation for optical limiting. Appl. Opt. 1999,  38, 5168–5180, doi:10.1364/AO.38.005168.  24. Wang,  J.;  Shao,  Y.;  Chen,  C.;  Wu,  W.;  Kong,  D.;  Gao,  Y.  Wavelength‐Dependent  Optical  Nonlinear  Absorption  of  Au‐Ag  Nanoparticles. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 3072, doi:10.3390/app11073072.  25. Fazio, E.; D’Urso, L.; Santangelo, S.; Saija, R.; Compagnini, G.; Neri, F. The activation of non‐linear optical response in Ag@ZnO  nanocolloids  under  an  external  highly  intense  electric  field.  Nuovo  Cim.  C  Colloq.  Commun.  Phys.  2016,  39,  1–16,  doi:10.1393/ncc/i2016‐16307‐9.  26. Saija, R.; Denti, P.; Borghese, F. Optical force and torque on single and aggregated spheres: The trapping issue. In The Mie Theory;  Springer Series in Optical Sciences; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2012; Volume 169, pp. 157–192, doi:10.1007/978‐3‐ 642‐28738‐1_6.  27. Liberman, V.; Rothschild, M.; Bakr, O.M.; Stellacci, F. Optical limiting with complex plasmonic nanoparticles. J. Opt. 2010, 12,  065001, doi:10.1088/2040‐8978/12/6/065001. 

Journal

PhotonicsMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Jul 27, 2021

Keywords: Ag nanoplates; laser irradiation; metallic nanostructures; surface plasmon resonance; nonlinear optical absorption; nonlinear scattering; nonlinear refractive index

There are no references for this article.