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Special Issue “Computational Methods for Fracture”

Special Issue “Computational Methods for Fracture” applied sciences Editorial Timon Rabczuk Institut für Strukturmechanik, Bauhaus University Weimar, Marienstrasse 15, 99423 Weimar, Germany; timon.rabczuk@uni-weimar.de Received: 19 August 2019; Accepted: 20 August 2019; Published: 21 August 2019 The prediction of fracture and material failure is of major importance for the safety and reliability of engineering structures and the ecient design of novel materials. Experimental testing is often cumbersome, expensive and, in certain cases, unfeasible, for instance in civil engineering when it is not possible to test the structures in the laboratory. Therefore, computational modeling of fracture and failure of engineering systems and materials has been the focus of research for many years, and there has been tremendous advancements in the past two decades with methods such as the Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM) developed in 1999, peridynamics (2000), the cracking particles method (2004) and phase field models (2009). There has also been a great deal of e ort made in developing multiscale methods for the design of new materials, such as the Extended Bridging Domain Method or the MAD method. The main focus of this book is computational methods for fracture. However, articles concerning issues related to validation, uncertainty quantification, large-scale engineering applications and constitutive modeling are also addressed. This book o ers a collection of 17 scientific papers about computational modeling of fracture [1–17]. Some manuscripts propose new computational methods or the improvement of existing cutting-edge methods for fracture. Other manuscripts apply state-of-the-art methods to challenging problems in engineering and materials science. These contributions can be classified into two categories: 1. Methods which treat the crack as strong discontinuity, such as peridynamics, scaled boundary elements or specific versions of the smoothed finite element methods applied to fracture; 2. Continuous approaches to fracture based on, for instance, phase field models or continuum damage mechanics. On the other hand, this book also o ers a wide application range where state-of-the-art techniques are employed to solve challenging engineering problems including fractures in rock, glass, and concrete. Larger systems are also studied, including subway stations due to fire, arch dams and concrete decks. References 1. Gou, Y.; Cai, Y.; Zhu, H. A Simple High-Order Shear Deformation Triangular Plate Element with Incompatible Polynomial Approximation. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 975. [CrossRef] 2. Schreter, M.; Neuner, M.; Hofstetter, G. Evaluation of the Implicit Gradient-Enhanced Regularization of a Damage-Plasticity Rock Model. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 1004. [CrossRef] 3. Li, J.; Gao, X.; Fu, X.; Wu, C.; Lin, G. A Nonlinear Crack Model for Concrete Structure Based on an Extended Scaled Boundary Finite Element Method. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 1067. [CrossRef] 4. Díaz, R.; Wang, H.; Mang, H.; Yuan, Y.; Pichler, B. Numerical Analysis of a Moderate Fire inside a Segment of a Subway Station. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2116. [CrossRef] 5. Bian, P.; Liu, T.; Qing, H.; Gao, C. 2D Micromechanical Modeling and Simulation of Ta-Particles Reinforced Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2192. [CrossRef] 6. Freimanis, A.; Kaewunruen, S. Peridynamic Analysis of Rail Squats. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2299. [CrossRef] Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 3455; doi:10.3390/app9173455 www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 3455 2 of 2 7. Chen, X.; Xie, W.; Xiao, Y.; Chen, Y.; Li, X. Progressive Collapse Analysis of SRC Frame-RC Core Tube Hybrid Structure. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2316. [CrossRef] 8. Oucif, C.; Mauludin, L. Continuum Damage-Healing and Super Healing Mechanics in Brittle Materials: A State-of-the-Art Review. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2350. [CrossRef] 9. Bhowmick, S.; Liu, G. Three Dimensional CS-FEM Phase-Field Modeling Technique for Brittle Fracture in Elastic Solids. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2488. [CrossRef] 10. Lin, P.; Wei, P.; Wang, W.; Huang, H. Cracking Risk and Overall Stability Analysis of Xulong High Arch Dam: A Case Study. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2555. [CrossRef] 11. Ma, H.; Shi, X.; Zhang, Y. Long-Term Behaviour of Precast Concrete Deck Using Longitudinal Prestressed Tendons in Composite I-Girder Bridges. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2598. [CrossRef] 12. Zhu, Y.; Wang, X.; Deng, S.; Chen, W.; Shi, Z.; Xue, L.; Lv, M. Grouting Process Simulation Based on 3D Fracture Network Considering Fluid–Structure Interaction. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 667. [CrossRef] 13. Bahmani, B.; Abedi, R.; Clarke, P. A Stochastic Bulk Damage Model Based on Mohr-Coulomb Failure Criterion for Dynamic Rock Fracture. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 830. [CrossRef] 14. Cheng, P.; Zhuang, X.; Zhu, H.; Li, Y. The Construction of Equivalent Particle Element Models for Conditioned Sandy Pebble. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 1137. [CrossRef] 15. Onoda, M. Topological Photonic Media and the Possibility of Toroidal Electromagnetic Wavepackets. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 1468. [CrossRef] 16. Yang, Y.; Chu, S.; Chen, H. Prediction of Shape Change for Fatigue Crack in a Round Bar Using Three-Parameter Growth Circles. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 1751. [CrossRef] 17. Egger, A.; Pillai, U.; Agathos, K.; Kakouris, E.; Chatzi, E.; Aschroft, I.; Triantafyllou, S. Discrete and Phase Field Methods for Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics: A Comparative Study and State-of-the-Art Review. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 2436. [CrossRef] © 2019 by the author. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Sciences Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Special Issue “Computational Methods for Fracture”

Applied Sciences , Volume 9 (17) – Aug 21, 2019

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Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2019 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated
ISSN
2076-3417
DOI
10.3390/app9173455
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Abstract

applied sciences Editorial Timon Rabczuk Institut für Strukturmechanik, Bauhaus University Weimar, Marienstrasse 15, 99423 Weimar, Germany; timon.rabczuk@uni-weimar.de Received: 19 August 2019; Accepted: 20 August 2019; Published: 21 August 2019 The prediction of fracture and material failure is of major importance for the safety and reliability of engineering structures and the ecient design of novel materials. Experimental testing is often cumbersome, expensive and, in certain cases, unfeasible, for instance in civil engineering when it is not possible to test the structures in the laboratory. Therefore, computational modeling of fracture and failure of engineering systems and materials has been the focus of research for many years, and there has been tremendous advancements in the past two decades with methods such as the Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM) developed in 1999, peridynamics (2000), the cracking particles method (2004) and phase field models (2009). There has also been a great deal of e ort made in developing multiscale methods for the design of new materials, such as the Extended Bridging Domain Method or the MAD method. The main focus of this book is computational methods for fracture. However, articles concerning issues related to validation, uncertainty quantification, large-scale engineering applications and constitutive modeling are also addressed. This book o ers a collection of 17 scientific papers about computational modeling of fracture [1–17]. Some manuscripts propose new computational methods or the improvement of existing cutting-edge methods for fracture. Other manuscripts apply state-of-the-art methods to challenging problems in engineering and materials science. These contributions can be classified into two categories: 1. Methods which treat the crack as strong discontinuity, such as peridynamics, scaled boundary elements or specific versions of the smoothed finite element methods applied to fracture; 2. Continuous approaches to fracture based on, for instance, phase field models or continuum damage mechanics. On the other hand, this book also o ers a wide application range where state-of-the-art techniques are employed to solve challenging engineering problems including fractures in rock, glass, and concrete. Larger systems are also studied, including subway stations due to fire, arch dams and concrete decks. References 1. Gou, Y.; Cai, Y.; Zhu, H. A Simple High-Order Shear Deformation Triangular Plate Element with Incompatible Polynomial Approximation. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 975. [CrossRef] 2. Schreter, M.; Neuner, M.; Hofstetter, G. Evaluation of the Implicit Gradient-Enhanced Regularization of a Damage-Plasticity Rock Model. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 1004. [CrossRef] 3. Li, J.; Gao, X.; Fu, X.; Wu, C.; Lin, G. A Nonlinear Crack Model for Concrete Structure Based on an Extended Scaled Boundary Finite Element Method. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 1067. [CrossRef] 4. Díaz, R.; Wang, H.; Mang, H.; Yuan, Y.; Pichler, B. Numerical Analysis of a Moderate Fire inside a Segment of a Subway Station. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2116. [CrossRef] 5. Bian, P.; Liu, T.; Qing, H.; Gao, C. 2D Micromechanical Modeling and Simulation of Ta-Particles Reinforced Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2192. [CrossRef] 6. Freimanis, A.; Kaewunruen, S. Peridynamic Analysis of Rail Squats. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2299. [CrossRef] Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 3455; doi:10.3390/app9173455 www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 3455 2 of 2 7. Chen, X.; Xie, W.; Xiao, Y.; Chen, Y.; Li, X. Progressive Collapse Analysis of SRC Frame-RC Core Tube Hybrid Structure. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2316. [CrossRef] 8. Oucif, C.; Mauludin, L. Continuum Damage-Healing and Super Healing Mechanics in Brittle Materials: A State-of-the-Art Review. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2350. [CrossRef] 9. Bhowmick, S.; Liu, G. Three Dimensional CS-FEM Phase-Field Modeling Technique for Brittle Fracture in Elastic Solids. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2488. [CrossRef] 10. Lin, P.; Wei, P.; Wang, W.; Huang, H. Cracking Risk and Overall Stability Analysis of Xulong High Arch Dam: A Case Study. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2555. [CrossRef] 11. Ma, H.; Shi, X.; Zhang, Y. Long-Term Behaviour of Precast Concrete Deck Using Longitudinal Prestressed Tendons in Composite I-Girder Bridges. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2598. [CrossRef] 12. Zhu, Y.; Wang, X.; Deng, S.; Chen, W.; Shi, Z.; Xue, L.; Lv, M. Grouting Process Simulation Based on 3D Fracture Network Considering Fluid–Structure Interaction. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 667. [CrossRef] 13. Bahmani, B.; Abedi, R.; Clarke, P. A Stochastic Bulk Damage Model Based on Mohr-Coulomb Failure Criterion for Dynamic Rock Fracture. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 830. [CrossRef] 14. Cheng, P.; Zhuang, X.; Zhu, H.; Li, Y. The Construction of Equivalent Particle Element Models for Conditioned Sandy Pebble. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 1137. [CrossRef] 15. Onoda, M. Topological Photonic Media and the Possibility of Toroidal Electromagnetic Wavepackets. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 1468. [CrossRef] 16. Yang, Y.; Chu, S.; Chen, H. Prediction of Shape Change for Fatigue Crack in a Round Bar Using Three-Parameter Growth Circles. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 1751. [CrossRef] 17. Egger, A.; Pillai, U.; Agathos, K.; Kakouris, E.; Chatzi, E.; Aschroft, I.; Triantafyllou, S. Discrete and Phase Field Methods for Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics: A Comparative Study and State-of-the-Art Review. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 2436. [CrossRef] © 2019 by the author. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Journal

Applied SciencesMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Aug 21, 2019

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