Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Origin and Residence Time of Groundwater in the Shallow Coastal Aquifer of Eastern Dahomey Basin, Southwestern Nigeria, Using δ18O and δD Isotopes

Origin and Residence Time of Groundwater in the Shallow Coastal Aquifer of Eastern Dahomey Basin,... Article  Origin and Residence Time of Groundwater in the  Shallow Coastal Aquifer of Eastern Dahomey Basin,  Southwestern Nigeria, Using δ O and δD Isotopes  1,2, 1, 1,3 Jamiu A. Aladejana  *, Robert M. Kalin  *, Ibrahim Hassan  ,   1 2 Philippe Sentenac   and Moshood N. Tijani      Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ, UK;  ibrahim.hassan@strath.ac.uk (I.H.); Philippe.sentenac@strath.ac.uk (P.S.)    Department of Geology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan 200284, Nigeria; mn.tijani@mail.ui.edu.ng (M.N.T)    Department of Civil Engineering, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi 740272, Nigeria  *  Correspondence: jamiu.aladejana@strath.ac.uk (J.A.A.); Robert.Kalin@Strath.ac.uk (R.M.K.);   Tel.: +44‐7717‐651‐171  Received: 20 July 2020; Accepted: 6 November 2020; Published: 10 November 2020  18 2 Abstract:  This  study  employed  stable  isotopes  of δ O  and δ H  in  conjunction  with  other  hydrological parameters to understand the origin, inferred residence time, and seasonal effect of  groundwater in the shallow aquifers of the eastern Dahomey Basin. A total of 230 groundwater  samples (97 in the wet season and 133 in the dry season) were collected from the borehole and  shallow aquifer between May 2017 and April 2018. Groundwater analysis included major ions and  18 2 δ O  and δ H,  isotopes  data  in  precipitation  from  three  selected  Global  Network  of  Isotope  in  Precipitation  (GNIP)  stations  across  West  Africa,  Douala  in  Cameroon,  Cotonou  in  Republic  of  Benin, and Kano in Nigeria were used in comparative analysis. Results of the hydrochemical model  revealed Ca‐HCO3 and Na‐Cl as dominant water types with other mixing water types such as Ca– SO4,  Ca–Cl,  Na–SO4,  and  K–Mg–HCO3,  which  characterised  early  stage  of  groundwater  18 2 transformation as it infiltrates through vadose zone into the aquifer. δ O and δ H precipitation data  from the three stations plotted along with the groundwater samples indicate recent meteoric water  origin, with little effect of evaporation during the dry season. The plot of Total Dissolved Solids  (TDS)  against δ O  showed  clustering  of  the  water  samples  between  the  recharge  and  the  evaporation zone with dry season samples trending towards increased TDS, which is an indication  of the subtle effect of evaporation during this period. Tracing groundwater types along the flow  paths  within  the  basin  is  problematic  and  attributed  to  the  heterogeneity  of  the  aquifer  with  18 2 anthropogenic influences. Moreover, a comparison of the δ O and δ H isotopic compositions of  groundwater and precipitation in the three selected stations, with their respective deuterium excess  (D‐excess) values established low evapotranspiration induced isotope enrichment, which could be  due to higher precipitation and humidity in the region resulting in low isotope fractionation; hence,  little  effect  of  seasonal  variations.  The  study,  therefore,  suggested  groundwater  recharge  in  the  shallow aquifer in the eastern Dahomey Basin is of meteoric origin with a short residence time of  water flows from soils through the vadose zone to the aquifers.  Keywords: hydrogen and oxygen isotopes; groundwater sources; residence time  1. Introduction  Rock‐water  interaction  is  a  process  that  influences  groundwater  chemical  evolution  from  recharge  along  the  flow  paths  through  the  vadose  zone  to  the  phreatic  zones.  Aquifers’  mineral  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980; doi:10.3390/app10227980  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  2  of  22  solubility,  residence  time,  and  intrinsic  chemical  characteristics  of  original  water  determine  how  quickly groundwater quality changes [1,2]. The origin of water also plays a role before continuous  evolution as it flows from the recharge zone downgradient within the geological unit of formations  [3]. Sedimentary basins play a vital role as sources of water supply to meet water demand, especially  in  developing  countries  in  Africa  and  Asia.  Sub‐Saharan  African  countries  depend  mostly  on  groundwater  to  meet  their  daily  water  demand  due  to  infrastructural  failure  and  poor  water  management  [4,5].  Generally,  groundwater  resources  are  under  stress  from  natural  and  human  drivers. Coastal  basins are more susceptible to these  pressures  due to their  proximity to the sea,  increased population, industrialisation, agricultural activities and the effect of global climate change  [6,7]. For coastal basins, the stratigraphical characteristics make aquifers vulnerable to contamination  and pollution [8]. Shallow coastal aquifers in some developing countries have been reported to be  facing various challenges of groundwater quality deterioration, the causes of which are attributed to  both geogenic and anthropogenic influence.  Delineation of the hydrochemical status is usually a complicated and multi‐source process. This  is  a  common  challenge  in  hydrological  basins  characterised  with  municipal,  agricultural,  and  industrial activities. The activities associated with these areas often serve as a source of non‐geogenic  ions  in  groundwater  [9].  These  anthropogenic  ions  and  metals  influence  the  hydrochemical  characteristics  of groundwater.  However,  the  geogenic  processes  such  as  saltwater  intrusion,  sea  spray, and minerals dissolution from rock–water interaction remain the primary source of ions and  metals in groundwater [1,10,11]. In the near‐ocean areas of coastal basins, Na–Cl is commonly the  dominant water type, which is attributed to sea spray or seawater intrusion. In light of this, mineral  dissolution  and  hydrochemical  evolution  of  groundwater  can  be  better  understood  using  stable  isotopes  in  conjunction  with  major  ions.  These  will  provide  an  insight  into  the  hydrochemical  transformation and residence time of groundwater within aquifers of such coastal basin [12–14].  Stable  isotopes  integrated  with  major  ions  in  groundwater  have  been  employed  in  regional  groundwater  studies  at  different  locations  across  the  world.  The  works  of  [2,15–20]  have  demonstrated effectiveness of this approach in understanding recharge pattern, origin and residence  time of groundwater from specific sites to basin‐scale hydrogeological investigations. Most of these  studies  have contributed  vital information and knowledge that  are useful in global groundwater  resource management.  The eastern Dahomey Basin (EDB) is one of the eight  hydrogeological provinces  of Nigeria,  providing  groundwater  demand  for  about  30%  of  the  country’s  population.  Urbanisation,  industrialisation, and agriculture, coupled with the dynamic geology of this basin, continue to pose  a significant challenge to the understanding of its groundwater chemical dynamics [21,22]. In Nigeria,  inadequate pipe‐borne water leaves  individual households to  rely on groundwater from  shallow  boreholes and hand‐dug wells to meet water demand for domestic, agriculture, and other usages  [23,24]. A unique characteristic of this basin is its complex geology and relief with a drainage system  controlled by topography and geology [8]. Most of the major rivers in the basin  flow southward  across  different  geologic  units  and  formations  and  discharge  water  into  lagoons  and  the  ocean.  During the process of groundwater flow from the recharge area at the northern parts (upslope) of the  Basin to recharge major rivers through baseflow or recharging the aquifers, the water interacts with  aquifer materials which alter the chemistry of the water.  Most  of  the  hydrogeologic  studies  in  the  eastern  Dahomey  Basin  are  fragmented,  primarily  focusing on specific sites and locations, with few including stable isotopes. Using a stable isotope  method  that  cut  across  the  entire  EDB  is  necessary  to  advance  the  current  understanding  of  its  regional  hydrogeological  system.  Groundwater  originates  from  local  atmospheric  precipitation  [25,26], and seasonal effect and variations in precipitation are dampened during infiltration, mixing  and  isotope  effects  [27,28].  Although,  some  seasonal  variations  may  exist  depending  on  the  hydrological properties, size and thickness of the vadose zone [20,25]. These variations may cause  distinctions in isotopic compositions of groundwater from precipitation recharge to discharge. The  phenomenon that usually results from selective recharge or isotopic fractionation effects associated  with evapotranspiration and runoff [1,29].  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  3  of  22  Understanding the hydrochemical dynamics at a regional level is critical in the development of  a  sustainable  water  resource  management  regulation  [30].  As  part  of  understanding  the  hydrogeochemical dynamics of shallow coastal aquifers of the eastern Dahomey Basin (EDB), this  18 2 study  aimed  to  apply  stable  environmental  isotopes  of δ O  and δ D  in  combination  with  key  hydrochemical parameters for a conceptual model of how groundwater chemistry changes across  different geological units and formation within the EDB. This model adds to the knowledge required  by  water  professionals  and  policymakers  to  develop  an  effective  strategy  for  water  resources  management and protection for this extensive aquifer.  1.1. Study Area  The eastern Dahomey Basin is administratively located in the South‐Western part of Nigeria. It  is  bordered  to  the  west,  east  and  north  by  the  Republic  of  Benin,  Okitipupa  Ridge,  and  the  Precambrian  Basement  Rocks,  respectively,  while  stretching  south  into  the  Atlantic  Ocean.  Geographically,  the  EDB  is  located  between  Latitudes  2°41’10”  and  4°59’59”  N  and  Longitudes  6°21’13” and 7°52’42” E along the coast of the Gulf of Guinea (Figure1). The Nigerian part of this  basin is known as the eastern Dahomey Basin which underlies the three states of Lagos, Ogun, and  Ondo. The study area is low lying, with several points virtually at or below sea level, which is always  saturated  with  water,  and  prone  to  flooding.  The  highest  elevation,  265  m  above  sea  level,  is  at  Abeokuta town, where the basin thins out into the Precambrian basement rocks [21]. The climate of  the basin is characterised by wet and dry seasons, within the tropical rain forest belt. Precipitation in  this area occurs as rainfall and ranges between 750 and 1000 mm (Figure 1) mostly between April and  October (wet season) and 250 mm and 500 mm between November and March (dry season) [31].  Figure 1. Spatial distribution maps of (a) climate zones in Nigeria, (b) rainfall across Nigeria (adapted  from [32]).  1.2. Geology and Hydrogeology  1.2.1. Geology  The area is a part of the Dahomey Basin which extends from Nigeria to Ghana. The lithological  character of the sediments is a result of transgressions and regressions of the sea since the Cretaceous  age, the transgressions coming from the south. The stratigraphic description of the sediments has  been provided by various authors, including [31,33–35] as presented in Figure 2. The Coastal Plain  Sands (recent—Oligocene) constitute the main aquifer of the area which is exploited through hand‐ dug  wells  and  boreholes.  It  forms  a  multi‐aquifer  system  consisting  of  three  aquifer  horizons  separated by clayey layers [31,36]. Quaternary alluvial sediments cover most of the Lagos coastal  areas and river valleys.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  4  of  22  Figure 2. Map of the study area showing sampling points, contour line, rivers and geology.  1.2.2. Hydrogeology  The hydrostratigraphy of the study area has been explained by several researchers [8,31,37–42].  Depth to the aquifer units varies across the basin. The depth ranges from 5–23 m for the primary  unconfined aquifer while depth to three confined aquifers are in the range of 7–80 m, 63–188 m, and  245–261 m, respectively (Figure 3). The respective thicknesses of these aquifers range from 7–26 m,  6–67 m, 20–143 m, and 61–117 m. The description of these aquifers is presented in stratigraphical  sections along profiles AB and CD, as shown in Figure 3. The aquifers are bounded by intercalation  of shale, tar sands, and layers of sandy clay with relatively low hydraulic conductivity. Two main  aquifer units were identified within the Upper Coal Measures. The depths to the top/thicknesses of  the aquifer units are 9.8 m (1.7 m) and 23 m (5.3 m), respectively. The Nkporo Shale had a thickness  and depth to the top of the only identified aquifer unit as 10 m and 16 m, respectively [39]. At the  northern parts of the study area, the sedimentary rocks of the Abeokuta formation thin‐out on the  Precambrian basement rocks. Most of the wells and boreholes in this area are drilled through the  upper sandy layers into the weathered profile of the Precambrian basement rocks tapping water  through weathered overburden, and sometimes fractured basement rocks, depending on locations  and the weathering status. The regional groundwater flow direction across the basin is north–south  as shown in Figure 3. Though, local groundwater flow direction is north–east and east–west as it  recharges the tributaries to major rivers (River Ogun, Oluwa, and Ose) as baseflow. These rivers flow  approximately southward and ended up in the ocean (Figure 2).  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  5  of  22  Figure  3.  Hydrostratigraphic  section  across:  (a)  profile  line  AB  and  (b)  profile  line  CD,  showing  different aquifer layers in part of the study area.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Field Physicochemical Measurement  Well‐inventories were carried out on a total number of 230 shallow hand‐dug wells, shallow  tube wells, and boreholes from the eastern Dahomey Basin (EDB), 96 in the wet season, and 134 in  the dry season between May 2017 and April 2018. The physicochemical parameters were measured  in  the field  using a  Teckoplus 6‐in‐1  pen‐type  water  quality tester  Model  99720  pH/conductivity  meter capable of measuring total dissolved solids (TDS), salinity, temperature, and redox potential  (Eh/ORP). The depth of the wells and static water level was measured with the aid of a water depth  meter while the coordinates of each sampled well were recorded using Global Positioning System  (GPS). The 230 groundwater samples were collected in three separate sets of 50 ml polypropylene  tubes labelled A, B, and IS. Samples labelled A were acidified to a pH < 2 after collection with 0.4 ml  of concentrated nitric acid (HNO3). Samples B and IS were filtered with a 0.45 μm filter and preserved  in an ice‐packed cooler to keep the samples’ temperature below 4 °C before being transported to the  laboratory for further analysis.  2.2. Laboratory Analysis  (a) Major ions and trace metals analysis: three sets of water samples were analysed. Samples  labelled (A) were prepared by collecting 10 ml of each sample in a centrifuge polyethylene  tube and arranged serially for Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP‐MS) analysis of cations. The  same arrangement was used for the sample set labelled (B) for Ion Chromatography (IC) for  the  anions  analysis  in  the  Environmental  Laboratory,  Department  of  Civil  and  Environmental Engineering, University of Strathclyde. Alkalinity (HCO3−) was determined  using a Digital Titrator (Model: 16900, HACH International, Loveland, CO, USA) and 1.6 N  H2SO4 cartridge.  (b) Stable isotopes analysis in groundwater: samples labelled (IS) were shipped to the Ministry  of  Agriculture,  Irrigation  and  Water  Development  Isotope  Laboratory,  Blantyre,  Malawi  2 18 under a temperature below 4 °C for the stable isotope of δ H and δ O analysis. The analysis  of  groundwater  samples  was  carried  out  following  the  same  method  of  isotope  water  samples as described in [18] and laboratory analysis was conducted in line with International  Standard Procedures with appropriate quantification and validation of results.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  6  of  22  2.3. Regional Precipitation Data  Regional precipitation isotope data was needed for this study to identify any possible deviation  from the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) to characterise local meteoric conditions better. The  closest Global Network of Isotope in Precipitation (GNIP) data stations to the study location in the  eastern Dahomey Basin are Cotonou (Republic of Benin) to the west and Douala (Cameroon) to the  east. The only station in Nigeria is situated in Kano, at the northern savannah region of Nigeria.  Meanwhile,  Cotonou,  and  Douala,  located  along  the  coast  of  West  Africa,  share  similar  climate  conditions  with  the  study  area  (Figure  4).  In  light  of  this,  a  total  of  134  regional  and  annual  18 2 precipitation isotope data of δ O and δ H were collected from the Douala, Cameroon (50), Cotonou,  Republic  of  Benin  (50)  and  Kano,  Nigeria  (33)  meteorological  stations  during  2009–2018.  These  isotope data were downloaded from the GNIP and are presented later in this study. The results are  expressed  as δ‐values  relative  to  V‐SMOW  (Vienna  Standard  Mean  Ocean  Water),  and  the  18 2 measurement precision is 0.01‰ and 0.2‰ for δ O and δ H, respectively.  Figure 4. Map showing the regional Global Network of Isotope in Precipitation (GNIP) stations within  West Africa (adapted from Google Earth Pro).  2.4. Data Analysis and Evaluation  Data  from  the  field  and  laboratory  measurements  were  checked  for  quality  by  correlating  selected major ions from randomly duplicated samples, of which the correlation values are all above  0.9,  indicating  low  to  insignificant  analytical  errors.  Total  dissolved  solids  (TDS),  pH,  electrical  conductivity  (EC)  temperature  and  major  ions  were  analysed  using  Geochemist  Workbench  to  determine groundwater types for the study area. Piper diagrams for both seasons were also plotted  using the same software. Results of water types were used in relation to the major ions for other plots  in Excel. At the same time, the spatial distribution maps of the stable isotopes were generated in  ArcGIS v10.6.  3. Results and Discussion  The result of the physicochemical parameters and stable isotopes are presented in Table 1. The  pH of groundwater samples during the wet and dry season range from 4.0 to 8.1 (average of 5.6) and  3.9 to 8.0 (average of 7) respectively. The pH of groundwater is slightly higher in the wet season  compared to the dry season. TDS ranged from 0.0 to 8500 mg/l (average of 201.8) and 2.3 to 6750 mg/l  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  7  of  22  (average of 236 mg/l) while EC ranges from 0.0 to 12000 μS/cm (average of 295.4 μS/cm) and 5.5 to  10,009 μS/cm  (average  of  352.4)  for  wet  and  dry  seasons  respectively.  The  temperature  of  groundwater ranged from 25.5 to 34.6 °C (average of 39.4 °C) and 26.6 to 37.7 °C (average of 31.2 °C)  during wet and dry seasons, respectively.  Table 1. Statistical summary of physicochemical parameters and stable isotopes in groundwater.  Wet Season  Dry Season  Parameter  Min  Max  Aver  Std Dev  Min  Max  Aver  Std Dev  2+  Ca 0.3  374.0  16.5  41.2  0.2  448.5  21.6  55.2  2+  Mg 0.0  1377.0  18.4  140.4  0.1  1125.0  16.1  102.2  +  Na 0.1  8857.0  106.8  902.8  0.6  10,310.0  112.7  907.4  K   0.1  447.1  10.5  46.2  0.1  590.2  10.1  51.6  HCO3   1.0  028.5  142.3  818.7  1.6  8390.0  139.5  767.6  2+ SO4   0.0  2,210.7  37.0  242.2  0.3  2932.0  39.7  259.8  ‐  Cl 0.1  18,970.2  218.1  1,934.3  0.9  18,833.0  206.3  1677.6  NO3  0.0  258.6  31.8  54.1  0.3  311.9  30.1  54.3  pH  4.0  8.1  5.6  1.0  3.9  8.0  5.6  1.9  TDS  0.0  8500.0  201.8  863.6  2.3  6750.0  235.8  672.7  EC  0.0  12,000.0  295.4  1219.4  5.5  10,009.0  352.4  1002.0  Temp  25.5  34.6  29.4  1.7  26.6  99.9  60.1  28.9  δ H (‰) −32.5  2.3 −13.1  3.6 −19.7  7.5 −12.4  2.8  δ O(‰) −5.2  0.3 −3.0  0.6 −4.0  0.8 −3.0  0.5  D‐excess −0.3  13.8  11.0  1.7  0.9  15.0  11.9  1.6  Major ions and Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) are measured in mg/l, electrical conductivity (EC) in μS/cm and  temperature in °C.  3.1. Hydrochemical Characterisation  Analysis of hydrochemical data using Geochemist’s Work Bench revealed eight hydrochemical  water types, Ca–HCO3, Na–Cl, Na–HCO3, Ca–Cl, B Na–SO4, Ca–SO4, K–Cl and Mg–SO4 across the  geologic units of the basin as presented in Figure 5 and supported by the piper diagrams (Figure 6).  Na–Ca and Ca–HCO3 water types are the dominant water type among the groundwater samples  from the shallow aquifer of the basin. The groundwater types (Figure 5) along the flow paths within  the  basin  provide  clues  to  the  prevailing  hydrochemical  processes  of  mixing  as  large  portion  of  samples clustering in the mixing region of the piper diagram (Figure 6), especially in the wet season.  Figures  7  and  8  present  pie  charts  of  water  type  across  the  geological  units  to  possibly  link  the  prevailing groundwater characteristics in each of the aquifers mineralogy as it plays a vital role in  this regard.  As these water types reflect the mineralogical composition of the basin sediment and rocks, there  is no observed consistency in their pattern of distribution across the geologic units of the study basin.  The lack of a defined distribution pattern could be attributed to the heterogeneous nature of any  typical sedimentary basin.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  8  of  22  Figure 5. Spatial distribution of groundwater types across a different geological unit of the eastern  Dahomey Basin, (a) wet season, (b) dry season.  Figure 6. Piper diagram showing water types: (a) wet season groundwater samples; (b) dry season  groundwater samples; (c) diamond chart for interpretation indicating mixed water types and (I =  permanent hardness, II = temporary hardness, III = saline and IV = alkali carbonate).  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  9  of  22  Figure 7. Pie chart of percentage water type across the geologic units within the basin for the wet  season water samples.  Figure 8. Pie chart of percentage water type across the geologic units within the basin for the dry  season water samples.  The hydrochemical process is complex and dynamic depending on many factors, ranging from  the  groundwater  origin  rock/minerals  weathering  status  and  mineral  composition  of  the  aquifer  [9,20]. The residence time between precipitation and aquifer recharge zones and impact from humans  along the flow paths are compounding factors [19]. Meteoric water is generally dominated by Ca– + + HCO3 or Ca–Mg–HCO3 water types, [29], with Na  and K  additions when water interacts with rock‐ forming minerals, as shown in Equations (1) and (2).  Equation (1).  (1)  𝑙𝐾𝐴𝑖𝑆 𝑂 𝐻 𝐻 𝑂 → 𝐴𝑙 𝑂 2𝐾 4𝐻 𝑂 𝐻𝐶𝑂   Equation (2).  (2)  2𝑁𝑎𝐴𝑙𝑆𝑖 𝑂 2𝐻 𝐶𝑂 2𝐻 𝑂 → 𝐴𝑙 𝑂 2 4𝑆𝑖𝑂 2𝐻𝐶𝑂 𝐻 𝑂   The precipitation/infiltration water carries dissolved gases as it recharges, resulting in a weak  acid of mainly carbonic with minor nitric or sulphuric acids (depending on anthropogenic pollution).  𝑁𝑎 𝑂𝐻 𝑆𝑖 𝑆𝑖 𝑂𝐻 𝑆𝑖 𝐶𝑂 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  10  of  22  Hydrolysis,  acidolysis,  and  oxidation  processes  take  place  as  aquifers  are  recharged  through  the  infiltration of water into soils of the vadose zones [43–45]. Towards the northern part of the eastern  Dahomey  Basin,  the  Precambrian  basement  rocks  are  often  characterised  with  highly  weathered  overburden, which outcropped in few locations around road cuts and mine sites. The weathered  overburden exposures were documented (Figure 9) during field mapping and sampling, which show  impression  of  transformed  feldspar  to  kaolinite  through  the  weathering  process,  as  explained  in  Equations (1) and (2) above. The thick saprolite layer of this profile is highly rich in secondary clay  mineral such as kaolinite (Figure 9) as confirmed in the work of [46]. This could be the possible source  of geogenic ions such as Ca, Na, and K found in groundwater from recharge zones of the basin (Figure  5) and responsible for Ca, Na, and K bicarbonate/sulphate water types observed in this study.  Figure  9.  Weathering  profile  of  Precambrian  basement  rocks  underlying  the  oldest  Abeokuta  formation. (At the northern boundary of the basin from which aquifer recharge of the basin originates  (a) road cut along Abiola Way, Abeokuta, (b) a road cut along Ijebu‐Remo and Agowoye road. The  weathered profile is known for its richness in kaolinite minerals).  3.2. Oxygen and Deuterium Isotopes of Groundwater of EDB  Information on precipitation, evaporation and origin of water can be deduced from the stable  18 2 2 18 isotopes of oxygen (δ O) and hydrogen (δ H) values [2,47,48]. The relationship between δ H and δ O  data is usually plotted in relation to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) defined by the equation:  2 18 18 2 δ H = 8δ O + 10 [20,28]. Stable isotopes of δ O and δ H have been used to understand the origin of  groundwater in the eastern Dahomey Basin and suggested recent groundwater from precipitation  18 2 [49]. In this study, δ O and δ H were used to explain the hydrochemical evolution of water as it flows  from the surface as precipitation and infiltrates into the soil through the vadose zone to the aquifers.  Results from isotopes data of groundwater samples during the wet and dry season show δ O values  range from −5.2 to 0.3‰ and −4 to 0.8‰ with an average value of −3‰, respectively, for both wet and  dry seasons (Table 1). δ H values range from −32 to 2.3‰ and −19 to 7.5‰ with an average value of  −13.1 and −12.4‰ (Table 1), respectively, for wet and dry seasons. In this study, the δD/δ O diagrams  (Figure 10) show that the groundwater for both seasons plotted along a line of lower slope slightly  deviated from the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) is indicative of evaporation. This implies  recent water from precipitation with a slight influence of evaporation [13,49]. A higher evaporation  influence  is  observed  in  the  dry  season  groundwater  samples  with  lower  slope  and  deuterium  intercept values of 5.5 and 4.1 compared to those of wet season with values of 6.1 and 5.2, respectively,  as presented in Figure 10. Figures 11 and 12 show the spatial distribution of δ O and δD for wet and  dry seasons, respectively.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  11  of  22  Figure 10. δD/δ O diagram for: (a) wet season; (b) dry season, groundwater samples.  Figure 11. Spatial distribution map of δ O (‰) for the: (a) wet season; (b) dry season groundwater  samples.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  12  of  22  Figure 12. Spatial distribution map of δ H (‰) for the: (a) wet season; (b) dry season groundwater.  The wet season δD/δ O diagram (Figure 10) showed a more extensive range along the Local  Meteoric Water Line (LMWL), which indicated precipitation dominant, with rapid infiltration into  the  shallow  coastal  aquifers  of  the  basin  [49].  Compared to dry  season  samples  plotted  within  a  shorter/narrow range, which tend towards mixed water with significant influence of evaporation  before infiltrating into the shallow phreatic aquifers of the basin. Integrating precipitation δ H and  δ O isotopes data with groundwater results from the EDB can enhance understanding of the origin  of groundwater given hydrodynamic complexities resulting from the influence of multiple factors  from both geology and environment. Unfortunately, the only station of International Atomic Energy  Agency (IAEA)/World Meteorological Organization (WMO) GNIP sited in Nigeria is in the northern  part in the city of Kano in the Sahel savannah. Due to the different climatic condition around this  station, it is not ideal, relating such data with the coastal zones groundwater isotopes data. δ O and  δD in precipitation from two selected stations, Douala in Cameroon, in the east of EDB, and Cotonou  in the Republic of Benin, and located in the west of the studied basin, were used for evaluations and  analysis. The statistical summary of the isotopes in precipitation data as presented in Table 2, is part  2 18 of the continuous temporal record of monthly mean δ H and δ O for rainfall measurements between  2 18 2009  and 2018. The δ H and δ O isotopes in precipitation  from these selected  GNIP stations are  plotted in δD /δ O diagram (Figure 13) with a view to assess the possible influence of climatic and  2 18 other effects such as altitude and continental factor on both δ H and δ O enrichment/depletion.        Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  13  of  22  Table 2. Summary of the stable isotopes data from the three GNIP stations and groundwater samples.  Isotopes  Minimum  Maximum  Average  Std Dev  Douala GNIP Station n = 50  δ O  −6.14  1.77  −2.54  1.57  δ H  −38.80  17.68 −9.05  11.89  D‐excess  2.60  18.87  11.26  3.70  Cotonou GNIP Station n = 50  δ O  1.82  1.63  −5.53  −2.86  δ H  −36.11  15.76  −11.92  11.74  D‐excess  0.30  17.44  10.99  3.30  Kano GNIP Station  δ O  2.40  2.59  −7.70  −2.92  δ H  −58.30  22.30  −16.30  19.36  D‐excess  −13.38  20.98  7.08  6.69    Groundwater Samples Wet Season n = 97  δ O  −5.2  0.3  −0.3  0.6  δ H  −32.5  2.3  −13.1  3.6  D‐excess  13.8  11.0  1.7  −0.3    Groundwater Samples Dry Season n = 133  δ O  0.8  0.5  −4.0  −3.0  δ H  −19.7  7.5  −12.4  2.8  D‐excess  0.9  15.0  11.9  1.6  The groundwater samples for wet and dry seasons plotted along with the meteoric water line  for Douala (Cameroon), Cotonou (Republic of Benin) and Kano (Nigeria) and presented in Figures  14. The results show the groundwater samples clustering within the boundaries of the three Regional  Meteoric Water Lines (RMWL) with slope values falling below the GMWL (Figure 12). This further  reveals a large number of groundwater samples around the GMWL which indicates that meteoric  water is a significant source of groundwater recharge in the study area. The Regional Meteoric Water  Line (RMWL) characterising coastal precipitation from Cotonou (δD = 7 δ O + 8.0) and Douala (δD =  7.2 δ O + 9.3) are very close to the Global Meteoric Water Line (Figure 13). However, the stable  isotopes data from the Kano station (δD = 7.1δ O + 4.3) which has a slope closer to the GMWL but  with lower δD intercept, indicates a climate effect of the region with relatively higher temperature  and consequently higher evaporation rate with deuterium enrichment.  Figure 13. δD vs. δ18O diagram for the selected regional precipitation data.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  14  of  22  2 18 18 The δ H and δ O data for the groundwater collected during the wet (δD = 6.1δ O + 5.2) and dry  (δD = 5.4δ O + 4.1) seasons are presented in Figures 14. Groundwater from the EDB for both seasons  falls  almost  along  the  same  meteoric  waterline  with  a  slight  difference  in  slopes  and  deuterium  intercepts. The slopes and intercepts of the regression line are lower compared to the GMWL (δD =  8*δ O  +  10)  indicating  the  effect  of  evaporative  enrichment  on  groundwater  driven  by  seasonal  variations in precipitation and temperature.  The results of the stable isotope values of δD, δ O, and D‐excess in precipitation from the three  selected GNIP stations compared with those of the groundwater from the shallow coastal aquifers of  the EDB is presented in Table 2. The results of the wet season groundwater show a range of values  δ O (−5 to 0.3‰), δD (−32 to 2.3‰), and D‐excess (−0.3 to 13.8‰), which are very similar to those of  18 18 Douala δ O (−6.1 to 1.8‰), δD (−38 to 17.6‰), and D‐excess (2.6 to 18.9‰), and Cotonou δ O (−5.5  to 1.8‰), δD (−36 to 15.8‰), and D‐Excess (0.3 to 17.4‰), which could be a result of a similar climatic  condition, especially temperature, humidity, and evaporation. However, the values of stable isotope  of δD, δ O, and D‐excess values for the groundwater samples in the dry season show range values  δ O (−4 to 0.8‰), δD (−19.7 to 7.5‰), and D‐excess (−0.9 to 15‰) with slight deviations from the wet  season data. The observed slight variation is an indication of the evaporation effect, which is also  responsible for the relatively enhanced values of TDS in a dry season’s groundwater samples.  2 18 Figure 14. δ H vs. δ O diagram for selected precipitation data and the groundwater samples: (a) wet  season; (b) dry season.  The  precipitation isotopes  data  from  the  Kano  GNIP  station  in the  northern part  of  Nigeria  (Table 2) with range values of δ O (−7 to 2.4‰), δD (−58.3 to 22.3‰), and D‐excess (−13.4 to 21‰)  showed a wide variation from those of Douala and Cotonou (Figure 13). This variation is probably  due to the elevation effect in addition to the relatively higher elevation and evaporation rate in the  northern part of Nigeria, which is characterised by low annual precipitation, as shown in Figure 1.  The clustering of the groundwater samples around the Douala and Cotonou Regional Meteoric Water  Line (RMWL) and Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) (Figures 13 and 14) affirm meteoric water  that infiltrates the aquifer within a short time      Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  15  of  22  3.3. Tracing the Origin of Groundwater within the EDB Using Deuterium Excess  Deuterium excess (D‐excess) is a useful measure to understand the source of groundwater. The  2 18 D‐excess is defined as D‐excess = δ H − 8δ O [20,28,50]. The D‐excess is a function of prevailing  conditions during primary evaporation, including variation in humidity, ocean surface temperature,  wind speed and, thus, gives information on  the sources of water vapour. The D‐excess does not  change  with  the  change  in  equilibrium  processes  for  any  of  the  phases  while  non‐equilibrium  evaporation leads to a decrease in the D‐excess, which is an indication of an increase in the vapour  phase [18,20,28].  In this study, the D‐excess values for groundwater in the wet season is slightly lower than that  of the dry season. The higher D‐excess in the dry season (Figure 15), is for samples collected between  February and April 2017. During this period, a dry southward wind leads to the recycling of moisture  from the continental recycling along with the rapid evaporation over warmer seawater responsible.  This compares with plots of δ O vs. D‐excess in Figure 16, which also showed the clustering of D‐ excess in relation to rain, sea and brackish water plot from the basin. The diagrams showed that most  of the groundwater of the wet season plotted closer to the precipitation, which is the source of the  groundwater recharge and forms a trend towards the brackish point as evaporation increases.  O vs. D‐excess diagram shows most groundwater samples plot in a region between the  The δ recharge and evaporation zones reflecting young water of meteoric origin at an early transformation  stage through evaporation. This suggests precipitation water moving towards groundwater storage  through  the  vadose  zone  is  rapid.  That  post‐precipitation  evaporation  along  these  paths  is  a  prolonged process, probably due to higher humidity and precipitation that characterised this region.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  16  of  22  Figure  15.  Spatial  distribution  map  of  D‐excess  (‰)  for  the:  (a)  wet  season;  (b)  dry  season  groundwater samples.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  17  of  22  Figure 16. A plot of δ O vs. D‐excess for the groundwater samples: (a) wet season; (b) dry season.  3.4. Description of Conceptual Design of Hydrogeochemical Characterisation of the Shallow Coastal Aquifer  of EDB  The results from this study have established the hydrochemical dynamic and process prevalent  in  the  eastern  Dahomey  Basin,  which  shows  a  subtle  transformation  as  water  moves  from  the  recharge zones in the northern part towards the discharge area in the downstream along the river  channels and flood plains. The clustering of groundwater samples between evaporation and recharge  and along the seawater line δ O vs. D‐excess diagram (Figure 16) confirmed young groundwater in  the basin. The slight variations in the distribution of the δD and δ O values and clustering along the  regional  meteoric  water  line  (RMWL)  and  Global  Meteoric  Water  Line  (GMWL)  with  a  slight  deviation of the dry season groundwater further confirmed the recent water’s short residence time  within the  soil  and  vadose zones  before  recharging the  shallow  coastal  aquifer  of the  basin.  The  information from (a) the geological field observations, (b) groundwater levels, (c) elevation data, (d)  aquifer geometry, (e) hydrochemical evolution, (f) spatial variability of δ O, δD, and D‐excess, (g)  river and static water level, and (h) line of a cross‐section along representative profile were collected  and integrated to develop a conceptual outlook for the prevailing hydrogeological processes within  the eastern Dahomey Basin, with well‐defined boundary conditions of impermeable basement rock  at the north, and the ocean line of the Gulf of Guinea in the south, enclosed by the flow boundary of  the Okitipupa ridge in the east, and extended sedimentary deposits [49]. The flow systems within  this area can be categorised into mainly local, driven by gravity due to the topography of the basin  [38]. Some regional flow relates to the major rivers which cut across the entire basin, with several  tributaries and discharge water into the ocean through the delta plain. The hydrochemical model  shows Na–Cl as a dominant water type followed by Ca–HCO3 with other mixed water types, such as  Ca–Cl, Na–SO4, Na–Cl–HCO3, and Ca–SO4, which typifies an early stage of rock–water interactions  and possible anthropogenic influence.  This conceptual view explains the lateral and vertical variations in groundwater δ O, δD, and  D‐excess concentrations, controlled by factors such as high humidity, static water level within the  basin, and significant anthropogenic influence from urbanisation, industrialisation, and agricultural  irrigation in most parts of the study area. For example, the D‐excess results  show comparatively  shorter residence time for groundwater moving through the vadose zone to the shallow aquifers of  the  basin,  especially  within  the  alluvium  and  coastal  plain  sands  geologic  units  (Figures  16–18).  Observed  hydrochemical  characteristics  across  the  basin  generally  reflect  the  geology  and  mineralogy of the area, while the lack of consistencies in groundwater isotope values and water type  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  18  of  22  distribution could be attributed to heterogeneity and anthropogenic impacts along the flow paths.  Furthermore, as illustrated in the schematic diagram in Figure 18, water recharged in the northern  parts of the basin has to travel deeper as the vadose zone thickness is higher in this area. A certain  amount of this infiltrated water recharges local rivers as baseflow while the remaining one recharges  the groundwater in the shallow aquifers of the basin.  Figure 17. Map of the eastern Dahomey Basin showing contour line of static water level and rivers  drainage  with  profile  line  AB  along  which  the  geological  profile  section  was  generated  for  the  conceptual description of hydrogeochemical characterisation of the shallow aquifers underlying the  eastern Dahomey Basin.  2 18 Figure 18. A sketch of a conceptual description of stable isotopes of δ H and δ O in groundwater  samples along profile line A‐B in North‐South direction of the eastern Dahomey Basin.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  19  of  22  3.5. The Implication for EDB Groundwater Resources Management  Sustainable management of groundwater is critical to achieving access to potable water supply,  food  security,  ecosystem/environmental  protection  and  economic  growth  in  sub‐Saharan  Africa  countries  [51].  Effective  groundwater  resources  management  relies  on  sound  hydrogeological  knowledge and ultimately on the quality of available data and information necessary for accurate  judgement and planning.  In light of this, our study has advanced the available data, information and knowledge required  to understand better the hydrogeology of the eastern Dahomey Basin, Nigeria. A combination of  isotopes, geology, and hydrogeochemical approaches have revealed the groundwater is at an early  stage of geochemical evolution with short residence time. However, the basin has a large volume of  water with variable aquifer hydraulic characteristics. It is therefore pertinent to emphasise the threat  to  its  water  quality  as  short  residence  time,  and  rapid  recharge  will  allow  rapid  ingress  of  contamination. The shallow aquifers of this basin are, thus, described as having a low resilience and  high vulnerability to contamination and pollution from surface water, leakage from septic tanks,  waste  sites,  industrial  pipes,  and  leachates  from  agricultural  waste.  Groundwater  quality  degradation has been identified in part of this basin, especially the urban and agricultural areas by  [21,52].  It is, therefore,  necessary  to  ensure  enforcement  of a  proper  waste  disposal  management  strategy that will protect groundwater within this basin. Policies and urban planning that provide  best practice from industries and agricultural industries are necessary to protect these vital resources.  A review of the existing Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) system is needed to include  threats  imposed  on  groundwater  resources  through  technological  development  in  the  modern  economy.  4. Conclusions  This study was a hydrogeochemical study covering the major towns and cities underlying the  eastern Dahomey Basin using stable isotopes of δ O, δD, and geochemistry. Static water levels were  used to identify the recharge sources and zones, and also characterise groundwater dynamics in  relation to stable isotopes in the shallow coastal aquifers of the basin. Na–Cl is the dominant water  type followed by Ca–HCO3, Na–HCO3, Ca–SO4, and Na–SO4 with other mixing water types, such  as  Ca–Cl,  K–Cl, and Mg–SO4. The dominant of the Na–Cl water  is thought to  have two origins,  namely  sea  spray  and  saltwater  intrusion.  Although  these  water  types  reflect  the  mineralogical  characteristics of the aquifers’ units within the basin, the lack of consistency distributed across the  geologic unit is attributed to the heterogeneity within the aquifers and possible impact of human  activities. Relationship between δ O and δD revealed the wet season groundwater data plots closer  to  the  Global  Meteoric  Water  Line,  while  those  of  the  dry  season  showed  deviation  towards  evaporation. The relationship between the D‐excess and δ O clustered between the recharge and  evaporation  zone.  Comparing  the  results  with  the  regional  precipitation  data  collected  from  the  selected station of GNIP at Douala (Cameroon), Cotonou (Republic of Benin), and Kano (Nigeria)  showed  groundwater  in  the  region  is  dominated  by  localised  young  water  recharge  with  short  residence time (with a slight influence of evapotranspiration), as expected with observed high static  18 2 water tables. The variation of δ O and δ H has no consistent pattern along flow paths is an indication  of the influence of multiple effects of altitude and temperature on the isotopic composition of the  groundwater other than the normal evaporation. This study can help in both understanding aquifer  resilience and vulnerability for developing a groundwater quality monitoring strategy for sustainable  groundwater management in the eastern Dahomey Basin.  Author  Contributions:  Conceptualization,  J.A.A.,  and  R.M.K.  methodology,  J.A.A.  R.M.K.,  M.N.T.  and  P.S.  software, J.A.A. and I.H. validation, J.A.A., R.M.K. and I.H. formal analysis, J.A.A.; investigation, J.A.A. and  M.N.T.; resources, J.A.A. and R.M.K. data curation, J.A.A., R.M.K. and I.H. writing—original draft preparation,  J.A.A.  writing—review  and  editing,  J.A.A.,  R.M.K.,  I.H.,  M.N.T.  and  P.S.  visualization,  J.A.A.  and  I.H.;  supervision, R.M.K. and P.S. project administration, R.M.K. and J.A.A. funding acquisition, J.A.A. and R.M.K.  All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  20  of  22  Funding: This research was funded by the Petroleum Technology and Development Fund (PTDF) under the  Overseas PhD scholarship scheme and supported by the Scottish Government under the Climate Justice Fund  Water Futures Program, awarded to the University of Strathclyde (R.M.K.).  Acknowledgments: The authors would like to gratefully acknowledge Ademola Ologbe, David Akpan, Mara  Knapp, and Tatyana Peshkur for field and laboratory assistance.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Gattacceca, J. C.; Vallet‐Coulomb, C.; Mayer, A.; Claude, C.; Radakovitch, O.; Conchetto, E.; Hamelin, B.  Isotopic  and  Geochemical  Characterization  of  Salinization  in  the  Shallow  Aquifers  of  a  Reclaimed  Subsiding  Zone:  The  Southern  Venice  Lagoon  Coastland.  J.  Hydrol.  2009,  378,  46–61,  doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2009.09.005.  2. Guendouz, A.; Moulla, A. S.; Edmunds, W. M.; Zouari, K.; Shand, P.; Mamou, A. Hydrogeochemical and  Isotopic Evolution of Water in the Complexe Terminal Aquifer in the Algerian Sahara. Hydrogeol. J. 2003,  11, 483–495, doi:10.1007/s10040‐003‐0263‐7.  3. Daniele, L.; Vallejos, Á.; Corbella, M.; Molina, L.; Pulido‐Bosch, A. Hydrogeochemistry and Geochemical  Simulations to Assess Water‐Rock Interactions in Complex Carbonate Aquifers: The Case of Aguadulce  (SE Spain). Appl. Geochemistry 2013, 29, 43–54, doi:10.1016/j.apgeochem.2012.11.011.  4. Kashaigili, J. J. Ground Water Availability and Use in Sub‐Saharan Africa; CGIAR: Montpellier, France, 2012,  doi:10.5337/2012.213.  5. Lapworth, D. J.; Nkhuwa, D. C. W.; Okotto‐Okotto, J.; Pedley, S.; Stuart, M. E.; Tijani, M. N.; Wright, J.  Urban Groundwater Quality in Sub‐Saharan Africa: Current Status and Implications for Water Security  and Public Health. Hydrogeol. J. 2017, 25, 1093–1116, doi:10.1007/s10040‐016‐1516‐6.  6. Edet, A. Hydrogeology and Groundwater Evaluation of a Shallow Coastal Aquifer, Southern Akwa Ibom  State (Nigeria). Appl. Water Sci. 2016, 7, 2397‐2412, doi:10.1007/s13201‐016‐0432‐1.  7. Oke, S. A.; Vermeulen, D.; Gomo, M. Aquifer Vulnerability Assessment of the Dahomey Basin Using the  RTt Method. Environ. Earth Sci. 2016, 75, 1–9, doi:10.1007/s12665‐016‐5792‐1.  8. Aladejana,  J.  A.;  Kalin,  R.  M.;  Sentenac,  P.;  Hassan,  I.  Hydrostratigraphic  Characterisation  of  Shallow  Coastal  Aquifers  of  Eastern  Dahomey  Basin  ,  S  /  W  Nigeria  ,  Using  Integrated  Hydrogeophysical  Approach ; Implication for Saltwater Intrusion. Geoscience 2020, 10, 65, doi:10.3390/geosciences10020065.  9. Hoque, M. A.; Mcarthur, J. M.; Sikdar, P. K.; Ball, J. D.; Molla, T. N. Tracing Recharge to Aquifers beneath  an Asian Megacity with Cl / Br and Stable Isotopes : The Example of Dhaka , Bangladesh. J. Hydrol. 2014,  22, 1549–1560, doi:10.1007/s10040‐014‐1155‐8.  10. Fathy A. Ionic Ratios as Tracers to Assess Seawater Intrusion and to Identify Salinity Sources in Jazan  Coastal Aquifer, Saudi Arabia. Arab. J. Geosci. 2016, 9, 40, doi:10.1007/978‐3‐319‐58538‐3_20‐1.  11. Nwankwoala, H.O.; Ngah, S.A. Salinity dynamics: Trends and vulnerability of aquifers to contamination  in the Niger Delta. Compr. J. Environ. Earth Sci. 2013, 2, 18–25.  12. Mohanty,  A.  K.;  Rao,  V.  V.  S.  G.  Catena  Hydrogeochemical  ,  Seawater  Intrusion  and  Oxygen  Isotope  Studies  on  a  Coastal  Region  in  the  Puri  District  of  Odisha  ,  India.  Catena  2019,  172,  558–571,  doi:10.1016/j.catena.2018.09.010.  13. Lapworth, D. J.; Macdonald, A. M.; Tijani, M. N.; Darling, W. G.; Gooddy, D. C.; Bonsor, H. C. Residence  Times of Shallow Groundwater in West Africa : Implications for Hydrogeology and Resilience to Future  Changes in Climate. Hydrogeol. J. 2013, 21, 673–686, doi:10.1007/s10040‐012‐0925‐4.  14. Kalin,  R.M.;  Long,  A.  Application  of  hydrogeochemical  modelling  for  validation  of  hydrologie  flow  modelling in the Tucson Basin aquifer, Arizona, United States of America. In Mathematical Models and their  Applications to Isotope Studies in Groundwater Hydrology; TECDOC‐777; IAEA: Viena, Austria, 1994; pp 209– 254.  15. Alazard, M.; Boisson, A.; Maréchal, J.; Perrin, J.; Dewandel, B.; Schwarz, T.; Pettenati, M.; Kloppman, W.;  Ahmed, S. Investigation of Recharge Dynamics and Flow Paths in a Fractured Crystalline Aquifer in Semi‐ Arid India Using Borehole Logs: Implications for Managed Aquifer Recharge. Hydrogeol. J. 2015, 35–57,  doi:10.1007/s10040‐015‐1323‐5.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  21  of  22  16. Huneau, F.; Dakoure, D.; Celle‐Jeanton, H.; Vitvar, T.; Ito, M.; Traore, S.; Compaore, N. F.; Jirakova, H.; Le  Coustumer,  P.  Flow  Pattern  and  Residence  Time  of  Groundwater  within  the  South‐Eastern  Taoudeni  Sedimentary Basin (Burkina Faso, Mali). J. Hydrol. 2011, 409, 423–439, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2011.08.043.  17. He, J.; Ma, J.; Zhao, W.; Sun, S. Groundwater Evolution and Recharge Determination of the Quaternary  Aquifer in the Shule River Basin, Northwest China. Hydrogeol. J. 2015, 23, 1745–1759, doi:10.1007/s10040‐ 015‐1311‐9.  18. Banda, L. C.; Rivett, M. O.; Kalin, R. M.; Zavison, A. S. K.; Phiri, P.; Kelly, L.; Chavula, G.; Kapachika, C. C.;  Nkhata, M.; Kamtukule, S.; et al. Water‐Isotope Capacity Building and Demonstration in a Developing  World  Context:  Isotopic  Baseline  and  Conceptualization  of  a  Lake  Malawi  Catchment.  Water  2019,  11,  doi:10.3390/w11122600.  19. Krishnaraj,  S.;  Murugesan,  V.K.V.;  Sabarathinam,  C.;  Paluchamy,  A.;  Ramachandran,  M.  Use  of  hydrochemistry and stable isotopes as tools for groundwater evolution and contamination investigations.  J. Geosci. 2012, 1, 16–25, doi:10.5923/j.geo.20110101.02.  20. Joshi, S. K.; Rai, S. P.; Sinha, R.; Gupta, S.; Densmore, A. L.; Rawat, Y. S.; Shekhar, S. Tracing Groundwater  Recharge Sources in the Northwestern Indian Alluvial Aquifer Using Water Isotopes (Δ18O, Δ2H And3H).  J. Hydrol. 2018, 559 (February), 835–847, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2018.02.056.  21. Aladejana,  J.  A.;  Kalin,  R.  M.;  Sentenac,  P.;  Hassan,  I.  Assessing  the  Impact  of  Climate  Change  on  Groundwater Quality of the Shallow Coastal Aquifer of Eastern Dahomey Basin, Southwestern Nigeria.  Water 2020, 12, 224, doi:10.3390/w12010224.  22. Oke, S.A. Evaluation of the Vulnerability of Selected Aquifer Systems in the Eastern Dahomey Basin, South‐ Western Nigeria. Ph.D. Thesis, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa, 2015.  23. Omole,  D.  O.  Sustainable  Groundwater  Exploitation  in  Nigeria.  J.  Water  Resour.  Ocean  Sci.  2013,  2,  9,  doi:10.11648/j.wros.20130202.11.  24. Ayoade, J. O. Water Resources and their Development in Nigeria Recent Events of Flood, Drought and  Urban  Water  Shortages  as  Well  as  Water  Pollution  in  Nigeria  and  Various  Parts  of  the  World  Have  Underlined the Need for the Rational Planning of Nigeria ’ s Water Reso. Hydrol. Sci. Sci. Hydrol. 1975, 4,  581–591.  25. Ahmed, A.; Clark, I. Groundwater Flow and Geochemical Evolution in the Central Flinders Ranges, South  Australia. Sci. Total Environ. 2016, 572, 837–851, doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.07.123.  26. Shin, W. J.; Park, Y.; Koh, D. C.; Lee, K. S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, Y. Hydrogeochemical and Isotopic Features of the  Groundwater Flow Systems in the Central‐Northern Part of Jeju Island (Republic of Korea). J. Geochemical  Explor. 2017, 175, 99–109, doi:10.1016/j.gexplo.2017.01.004.  27. Peter Bauer‐Gottwein, B.N.; Gondwe, L.C.; Daan, H.; Kgotlhang, L.; Zimmermann, S. Hydrogeophysical  exploration  of  three‐dimensional  salinity  anomalies  with  the  time‐domain  electromagnetic  method  (TDEM). J. Hydrol. 2010, 380, 318–329, doi:10.1007/s12665‐014‐3130‐z.  28. Kalin, R. M. Basic Concepts and Formulations for Isotope‐Geochemical Process Investigations, Procedures  and Methodologies of Geochemical Modelling of Groundwater Systems. In Manual on mathematical models  in isotope hydrology; Y Yurtsever, Ed.; IAEA TECHDOC 910: Vienna, Austria, 1995; pp 155–206.  29. Clark, I.D.; Fritz, P. Environmental Isotopes in Hydrogeology; Lewis Publishers: Boca Raton, FL, USA, 1997.  30. Gagné, S.; Larocque, M.; Pinti, D. L.; Saby, M.; Meyzonnat, G.; Méjean, P. Benefits and Limitations of Using  Isotope‐Derived Groundwater Travel Times and Major Ion Chemistry to Validate a Regional Groundwater  Flow Model: Example from the Centre‐Du‐Québec Region, Canada. Can. Water Resour. J. 2017, 1784, 1–19,  doi:10.1080/07011784.2017.1394801.  31. Oloruntola,  M.  O.;  Adeyemi,  G.  O.;  Bayewu,  O.;  Obasaju,  D.  O.  Hydro‐Geophysical  Mapping  of  Occurrences  and  Lateral  Continuity  of  Aquifers  in  Coastal  and  Landward  Parts  of  Ikorodu,  Lagos,  Southwestern Nigeria. Int. J. Energy Water Resour. 2019, 3, 219–231, doi:10.1007/s42108‐019‐00026‐8.  32. Adelana, S. M. A.; Olasehinde, P. I.; Bale, R. B.; Vrbka, P.; Edet, A. E.; Goni, I. B. An Overview of the Geology  and  Hydrogeology  of  Nigeria.  Q.  J.  Eng.  Geol.  Hydrogeol.  1996,  29,  S1–S12,  doi:10.1144/GSL.QJEGH.1996.029.S1.01.  33. Adegoke,  O.S.;  Omatsola,  M.E.  Tectonic  evolution  and  cretaceous  stratigraphy  of  the  Dahomey  Basin.  Niger. J. Min. Geol. 1981, 18, 130–137.  34. Jones, H.A; Hockey, R. The geology of part of Southwestern Nigeria. GSN Bull. 1964, 225, 229–237.  35. Solomon O. Olabode1, M. Z. M. Depositional Facies and Sequence. Int J. Geosci. 2016, 7, 210–228.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  22  of  22  36. Longe, E. O.; Malomo, S.; Olorunniwo, M. A. Hydrogeology of Lagos Metropolis. J. African Earth Sci. 1987,  6, 163–174, doi:10.1016/0899‐536290058‐3.  37. Longe, E. O. Groundwater Resources Potential in the Coastal Plain Sands Aquifers , Lagos , Nigeria. 2011,  3, 1–7.  38. Offodile, M. E. (1971). The Hydrogeology of Coastal Areas of Southeastern States of Nigeria. J. Min. Geol.  1971, 14, 94–101.  39. Faleye,  E.  T.;  Olorunfemi.  Aquifer  Characterization  and  Groundwater  Potential  Assessment  of  the  Sedimentary Basin of Ondo State 1 2. Ife J. Sci. 2015, 17, 429–439.  Adigun,  E.  O.  Using  Geoelectric  Soundings  for  Estimation  of  Hydraulic  40. Fatoba,  J.  O.;  Omolayo,  S.  D.;  Characteristics of Aquifers in the Coastal Area of Lagos , Southwestern Nigeria. Int. Lett. Nat. Sci. 2014, 11,  30–39, doi:10.18052/www.scipress.com/ILNS.11.30.  41. Adeoti,  L.;  Alile,  O.  M.;  Uchegbulam,  O.  Geophysical  Investigation  of  Saline  Water  Intrusion  into  Freshwater Aquifers: A Case Study of Oniru, Lagos State. Sci. Res. Essays 2010, 5, 248–259.  42. Oteri, A.U.; Atolagbe,  F.P.  Saltwater Intrusion  into  Coastal Aquifers in Nigeria.  In Procceedings of  the  Second International Conference on Saltwater Intrusion and Coastal Aquifers—Monitoring, Modeling, and  Management, Yucatán, México, 30 March–2 April 2003; pp 1–15.  43. Dehnavi, A.; Sarikhani, R.; Nagaraju, D. Hydro Geochemical and Rock Water Interaction Studies in East of  Kurdistan, NW of Iran. Int J Env. Sci Res 2011, 1, 16–22.  44. Fu, C.; Li, X.; Ma, J.; Liu, L.; Gao, M.; Bai, Z. A Hydrochemistry and Multi‐Isotopic Study of Groundwater  Origin and Hydrochemical Evolution in the Middle Reaches of the Kuye River Basin. Appl. Geochem. 2018,  98, 82–93, doi:10.1016/j.apgeochem.2018.08.030.  45. Narany, T. S.; Ramli, M. F.; Aris, A. Z.; Nor, W.; Sulaiman, A.; Juahir, H.; Fakharian, K. Identification of the  Hydrogeochemical  Processes  in  Groundwater  Using  Classic  Integrated  Geochemical  Methods  and  Geostatistical Techniques , in Amol‐Babol Plain, Iran. Sci. World J. 2014, 2014, 1–15.  46. Oli, I.C.; Okeke, O.C.; Abiahu, C.M.G.; Anifowose, F.A.; Fagorite, V.I. A review of the geology and mineral  resources  of  Dahomey  basin,  southwestern  Nigeria.  Int.  J.  Environ.  Sci.  Nat.  Res.  2019,  21,  556055,  doi:10.19080/IJESNR.2019.21.556055.  47. Al‐Charideh,  A.;  Kattaa,  B.  Isotope  Hydrology  of  Deep  Groundwater  in  Syria:  Renewable  and  Non‐ Renewable Groundwater and Paleoclimate Impact. Hydrogeol. J. 2016, 24, 79‐98, doi:10.1007/s10040‐015‐ 1324‐4  48. Carol,  E.;  Kruse,  E.;  Mas‐Pla,  J.  Hydrochemical  and  Isotopical  Evidence  of  Ground  Water  Salinization  Processes  on  the  Coastal  Plain  of  Samborombon  Bay,  Argentina.  J.  Hydrol.  2009,  335–345,  doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2008.11.041.  49. Jamiu, A.A.; Kalin, R.M.; Hassan, I.; Sentenac, P. Hydrogeochemical and isotopic characterization of coastal  groundwater of eastern dahomey basin, southwestern Nigeria. Geosciences 2020, 26, 65.  50. Vengosh, A.; Hening, S.; Ganor, J.; Mayer, B.; Weyhenmeyer, C. E.; Bullen, T. D.; Paytan, A. New Isotopic  Evidence for the Origin of Groundwater from the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer in the Negev, Israel. Appl.  Geochemistry 2007, 22, 1052–1073, doi:10.1016/j.apgeochem.2007.01.005.  51. JICA. The Project for Review and Update of Nigeria National Water Resources; Federal Republic of Nigeria:  Abuja, Nigeria, 2014.  52. Aladejana, J. A.; Kalin, R.M.; Sentenac, P.; Hassan, I. Groundwater Quality Index as a Hydrochemical Tool  for  Monitoring  Saltwater  Intrusion  into  Coastal  Freshwater  Aquifer  of  Eastern  Dahomey  Basin,  Southwestern Nigeria. Under Rev. with Groundw. Sustain. Dev. 2020, 25, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.33589.42723.  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional  affiliations.  © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access  article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution  (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Sciences Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Origin and Residence Time of Groundwater in the Shallow Coastal Aquifer of Eastern Dahomey Basin, Southwestern Nigeria, Using δ18O and δD Isotopes

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/origin-and-residence-time-of-groundwater-in-the-shallow-coastal-RCw2BKY3FB
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2020 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2076-3417
DOI
10.3390/app10227980
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Origin and Residence Time of Groundwater in the  Shallow Coastal Aquifer of Eastern Dahomey Basin,  Southwestern Nigeria, Using δ O and δD Isotopes  1,2, 1, 1,3 Jamiu A. Aladejana  *, Robert M. Kalin  *, Ibrahim Hassan  ,   1 2 Philippe Sentenac   and Moshood N. Tijani      Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ, UK;  ibrahim.hassan@strath.ac.uk (I.H.); Philippe.sentenac@strath.ac.uk (P.S.)    Department of Geology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan 200284, Nigeria; mn.tijani@mail.ui.edu.ng (M.N.T)    Department of Civil Engineering, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi 740272, Nigeria  *  Correspondence: jamiu.aladejana@strath.ac.uk (J.A.A.); Robert.Kalin@Strath.ac.uk (R.M.K.);   Tel.: +44‐7717‐651‐171  Received: 20 July 2020; Accepted: 6 November 2020; Published: 10 November 2020  18 2 Abstract:  This  study  employed  stable  isotopes  of δ O  and δ H  in  conjunction  with  other  hydrological parameters to understand the origin, inferred residence time, and seasonal effect of  groundwater in the shallow aquifers of the eastern Dahomey Basin. A total of 230 groundwater  samples (97 in the wet season and 133 in the dry season) were collected from the borehole and  shallow aquifer between May 2017 and April 2018. Groundwater analysis included major ions and  18 2 δ O  and δ H,  isotopes  data  in  precipitation  from  three  selected  Global  Network  of  Isotope  in  Precipitation  (GNIP)  stations  across  West  Africa,  Douala  in  Cameroon,  Cotonou  in  Republic  of  Benin, and Kano in Nigeria were used in comparative analysis. Results of the hydrochemical model  revealed Ca‐HCO3 and Na‐Cl as dominant water types with other mixing water types such as Ca– SO4,  Ca–Cl,  Na–SO4,  and  K–Mg–HCO3,  which  characterised  early  stage  of  groundwater  18 2 transformation as it infiltrates through vadose zone into the aquifer. δ O and δ H precipitation data  from the three stations plotted along with the groundwater samples indicate recent meteoric water  origin, with little effect of evaporation during the dry season. The plot of Total Dissolved Solids  (TDS)  against δ O  showed  clustering  of  the  water  samples  between  the  recharge  and  the  evaporation zone with dry season samples trending towards increased TDS, which is an indication  of the subtle effect of evaporation during this period. Tracing groundwater types along the flow  paths  within  the  basin  is  problematic  and  attributed  to  the  heterogeneity  of  the  aquifer  with  18 2 anthropogenic influences. Moreover, a comparison of the δ O and δ H isotopic compositions of  groundwater and precipitation in the three selected stations, with their respective deuterium excess  (D‐excess) values established low evapotranspiration induced isotope enrichment, which could be  due to higher precipitation and humidity in the region resulting in low isotope fractionation; hence,  little  effect  of  seasonal  variations.  The  study,  therefore,  suggested  groundwater  recharge  in  the  shallow aquifer in the eastern Dahomey Basin is of meteoric origin with a short residence time of  water flows from soils through the vadose zone to the aquifers.  Keywords: hydrogen and oxygen isotopes; groundwater sources; residence time  1. Introduction  Rock‐water  interaction  is  a  process  that  influences  groundwater  chemical  evolution  from  recharge  along  the  flow  paths  through  the  vadose  zone  to  the  phreatic  zones.  Aquifers’  mineral  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980; doi:10.3390/app10227980  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  2  of  22  solubility,  residence  time,  and  intrinsic  chemical  characteristics  of  original  water  determine  how  quickly groundwater quality changes [1,2]. The origin of water also plays a role before continuous  evolution as it flows from the recharge zone downgradient within the geological unit of formations  [3]. Sedimentary basins play a vital role as sources of water supply to meet water demand, especially  in  developing  countries  in  Africa  and  Asia.  Sub‐Saharan  African  countries  depend  mostly  on  groundwater  to  meet  their  daily  water  demand  due  to  infrastructural  failure  and  poor  water  management  [4,5].  Generally,  groundwater  resources  are  under  stress  from  natural  and  human  drivers. Coastal  basins are more susceptible to these  pressures  due to their  proximity to the sea,  increased population, industrialisation, agricultural activities and the effect of global climate change  [6,7]. For coastal basins, the stratigraphical characteristics make aquifers vulnerable to contamination  and pollution [8]. Shallow coastal aquifers in some developing countries have been reported to be  facing various challenges of groundwater quality deterioration, the causes of which are attributed to  both geogenic and anthropogenic influence.  Delineation of the hydrochemical status is usually a complicated and multi‐source process. This  is  a  common  challenge  in  hydrological  basins  characterised  with  municipal,  agricultural,  and  industrial activities. The activities associated with these areas often serve as a source of non‐geogenic  ions  in  groundwater  [9].  These  anthropogenic  ions  and  metals  influence  the  hydrochemical  characteristics  of groundwater.  However,  the  geogenic  processes  such  as  saltwater  intrusion,  sea  spray, and minerals dissolution from rock–water interaction remain the primary source of ions and  metals in groundwater [1,10,11]. In the near‐ocean areas of coastal basins, Na–Cl is commonly the  dominant water type, which is attributed to sea spray or seawater intrusion. In light of this, mineral  dissolution  and  hydrochemical  evolution  of  groundwater  can  be  better  understood  using  stable  isotopes  in  conjunction  with  major  ions.  These  will  provide  an  insight  into  the  hydrochemical  transformation and residence time of groundwater within aquifers of such coastal basin [12–14].  Stable  isotopes  integrated  with  major  ions  in  groundwater  have  been  employed  in  regional  groundwater  studies  at  different  locations  across  the  world.  The  works  of  [2,15–20]  have  demonstrated effectiveness of this approach in understanding recharge pattern, origin and residence  time of groundwater from specific sites to basin‐scale hydrogeological investigations. Most of these  studies  have contributed  vital information and knowledge that  are useful in global groundwater  resource management.  The eastern Dahomey Basin (EDB) is one of the eight  hydrogeological provinces  of Nigeria,  providing  groundwater  demand  for  about  30%  of  the  country’s  population.  Urbanisation,  industrialisation, and agriculture, coupled with the dynamic geology of this basin, continue to pose  a significant challenge to the understanding of its groundwater chemical dynamics [21,22]. In Nigeria,  inadequate pipe‐borne water leaves  individual households to  rely on groundwater from  shallow  boreholes and hand‐dug wells to meet water demand for domestic, agriculture, and other usages  [23,24]. A unique characteristic of this basin is its complex geology and relief with a drainage system  controlled by topography and geology [8]. Most of the major rivers in the basin  flow southward  across  different  geologic  units  and  formations  and  discharge  water  into  lagoons  and  the  ocean.  During the process of groundwater flow from the recharge area at the northern parts (upslope) of the  Basin to recharge major rivers through baseflow or recharging the aquifers, the water interacts with  aquifer materials which alter the chemistry of the water.  Most  of  the  hydrogeologic  studies  in  the  eastern  Dahomey  Basin  are  fragmented,  primarily  focusing on specific sites and locations, with few including stable isotopes. Using a stable isotope  method  that  cut  across  the  entire  EDB  is  necessary  to  advance  the  current  understanding  of  its  regional  hydrogeological  system.  Groundwater  originates  from  local  atmospheric  precipitation  [25,26], and seasonal effect and variations in precipitation are dampened during infiltration, mixing  and  isotope  effects  [27,28].  Although,  some  seasonal  variations  may  exist  depending  on  the  hydrological properties, size and thickness of the vadose zone [20,25]. These variations may cause  distinctions in isotopic compositions of groundwater from precipitation recharge to discharge. The  phenomenon that usually results from selective recharge or isotopic fractionation effects associated  with evapotranspiration and runoff [1,29].  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  3  of  22  Understanding the hydrochemical dynamics at a regional level is critical in the development of  a  sustainable  water  resource  management  regulation  [30].  As  part  of  understanding  the  hydrogeochemical dynamics of shallow coastal aquifers of the eastern Dahomey Basin (EDB), this  18 2 study  aimed  to  apply  stable  environmental  isotopes  of δ O  and δ D  in  combination  with  key  hydrochemical parameters for a conceptual model of how groundwater chemistry changes across  different geological units and formation within the EDB. This model adds to the knowledge required  by  water  professionals  and  policymakers  to  develop  an  effective  strategy  for  water  resources  management and protection for this extensive aquifer.  1.1. Study Area  The eastern Dahomey Basin is administratively located in the South‐Western part of Nigeria. It  is  bordered  to  the  west,  east  and  north  by  the  Republic  of  Benin,  Okitipupa  Ridge,  and  the  Precambrian  Basement  Rocks,  respectively,  while  stretching  south  into  the  Atlantic  Ocean.  Geographically,  the  EDB  is  located  between  Latitudes  2°41’10”  and  4°59’59”  N  and  Longitudes  6°21’13” and 7°52’42” E along the coast of the Gulf of Guinea (Figure1). The Nigerian part of this  basin is known as the eastern Dahomey Basin which underlies the three states of Lagos, Ogun, and  Ondo. The study area is low lying, with several points virtually at or below sea level, which is always  saturated  with  water,  and  prone  to  flooding.  The  highest  elevation,  265  m  above  sea  level,  is  at  Abeokuta town, where the basin thins out into the Precambrian basement rocks [21]. The climate of  the basin is characterised by wet and dry seasons, within the tropical rain forest belt. Precipitation in  this area occurs as rainfall and ranges between 750 and 1000 mm (Figure 1) mostly between April and  October (wet season) and 250 mm and 500 mm between November and March (dry season) [31].  Figure 1. Spatial distribution maps of (a) climate zones in Nigeria, (b) rainfall across Nigeria (adapted  from [32]).  1.2. Geology and Hydrogeology  1.2.1. Geology  The area is a part of the Dahomey Basin which extends from Nigeria to Ghana. The lithological  character of the sediments is a result of transgressions and regressions of the sea since the Cretaceous  age, the transgressions coming from the south. The stratigraphic description of the sediments has  been provided by various authors, including [31,33–35] as presented in Figure 2. The Coastal Plain  Sands (recent—Oligocene) constitute the main aquifer of the area which is exploited through hand‐ dug  wells  and  boreholes.  It  forms  a  multi‐aquifer  system  consisting  of  three  aquifer  horizons  separated by clayey layers [31,36]. Quaternary alluvial sediments cover most of the Lagos coastal  areas and river valleys.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  4  of  22  Figure 2. Map of the study area showing sampling points, contour line, rivers and geology.  1.2.2. Hydrogeology  The hydrostratigraphy of the study area has been explained by several researchers [8,31,37–42].  Depth to the aquifer units varies across the basin. The depth ranges from 5–23 m for the primary  unconfined aquifer while depth to three confined aquifers are in the range of 7–80 m, 63–188 m, and  245–261 m, respectively (Figure 3). The respective thicknesses of these aquifers range from 7–26 m,  6–67 m, 20–143 m, and 61–117 m. The description of these aquifers is presented in stratigraphical  sections along profiles AB and CD, as shown in Figure 3. The aquifers are bounded by intercalation  of shale, tar sands, and layers of sandy clay with relatively low hydraulic conductivity. Two main  aquifer units were identified within the Upper Coal Measures. The depths to the top/thicknesses of  the aquifer units are 9.8 m (1.7 m) and 23 m (5.3 m), respectively. The Nkporo Shale had a thickness  and depth to the top of the only identified aquifer unit as 10 m and 16 m, respectively [39]. At the  northern parts of the study area, the sedimentary rocks of the Abeokuta formation thin‐out on the  Precambrian basement rocks. Most of the wells and boreholes in this area are drilled through the  upper sandy layers into the weathered profile of the Precambrian basement rocks tapping water  through weathered overburden, and sometimes fractured basement rocks, depending on locations  and the weathering status. The regional groundwater flow direction across the basin is north–south  as shown in Figure 3. Though, local groundwater flow direction is north–east and east–west as it  recharges the tributaries to major rivers (River Ogun, Oluwa, and Ose) as baseflow. These rivers flow  approximately southward and ended up in the ocean (Figure 2).  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  5  of  22  Figure  3.  Hydrostratigraphic  section  across:  (a)  profile  line  AB  and  (b)  profile  line  CD,  showing  different aquifer layers in part of the study area.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Field Physicochemical Measurement  Well‐inventories were carried out on a total number of 230 shallow hand‐dug wells, shallow  tube wells, and boreholes from the eastern Dahomey Basin (EDB), 96 in the wet season, and 134 in  the dry season between May 2017 and April 2018. The physicochemical parameters were measured  in  the field  using a  Teckoplus 6‐in‐1  pen‐type  water  quality tester  Model  99720  pH/conductivity  meter capable of measuring total dissolved solids (TDS), salinity, temperature, and redox potential  (Eh/ORP). The depth of the wells and static water level was measured with the aid of a water depth  meter while the coordinates of each sampled well were recorded using Global Positioning System  (GPS). The 230 groundwater samples were collected in three separate sets of 50 ml polypropylene  tubes labelled A, B, and IS. Samples labelled A were acidified to a pH < 2 after collection with 0.4 ml  of concentrated nitric acid (HNO3). Samples B and IS were filtered with a 0.45 μm filter and preserved  in an ice‐packed cooler to keep the samples’ temperature below 4 °C before being transported to the  laboratory for further analysis.  2.2. Laboratory Analysis  (a) Major ions and trace metals analysis: three sets of water samples were analysed. Samples  labelled (A) were prepared by collecting 10 ml of each sample in a centrifuge polyethylene  tube and arranged serially for Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP‐MS) analysis of cations. The  same arrangement was used for the sample set labelled (B) for Ion Chromatography (IC) for  the  anions  analysis  in  the  Environmental  Laboratory,  Department  of  Civil  and  Environmental Engineering, University of Strathclyde. Alkalinity (HCO3−) was determined  using a Digital Titrator (Model: 16900, HACH International, Loveland, CO, USA) and 1.6 N  H2SO4 cartridge.  (b) Stable isotopes analysis in groundwater: samples labelled (IS) were shipped to the Ministry  of  Agriculture,  Irrigation  and  Water  Development  Isotope  Laboratory,  Blantyre,  Malawi  2 18 under a temperature below 4 °C for the stable isotope of δ H and δ O analysis. The analysis  of  groundwater  samples  was  carried  out  following  the  same  method  of  isotope  water  samples as described in [18] and laboratory analysis was conducted in line with International  Standard Procedures with appropriate quantification and validation of results.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  6  of  22  2.3. Regional Precipitation Data  Regional precipitation isotope data was needed for this study to identify any possible deviation  from the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) to characterise local meteoric conditions better. The  closest Global Network of Isotope in Precipitation (GNIP) data stations to the study location in the  eastern Dahomey Basin are Cotonou (Republic of Benin) to the west and Douala (Cameroon) to the  east. The only station in Nigeria is situated in Kano, at the northern savannah region of Nigeria.  Meanwhile,  Cotonou,  and  Douala,  located  along  the  coast  of  West  Africa,  share  similar  climate  conditions  with  the  study  area  (Figure  4).  In  light  of  this,  a  total  of  134  regional  and  annual  18 2 precipitation isotope data of δ O and δ H were collected from the Douala, Cameroon (50), Cotonou,  Republic  of  Benin  (50)  and  Kano,  Nigeria  (33)  meteorological  stations  during  2009–2018.  These  isotope data were downloaded from the GNIP and are presented later in this study. The results are  expressed  as δ‐values  relative  to  V‐SMOW  (Vienna  Standard  Mean  Ocean  Water),  and  the  18 2 measurement precision is 0.01‰ and 0.2‰ for δ O and δ H, respectively.  Figure 4. Map showing the regional Global Network of Isotope in Precipitation (GNIP) stations within  West Africa (adapted from Google Earth Pro).  2.4. Data Analysis and Evaluation  Data  from  the  field  and  laboratory  measurements  were  checked  for  quality  by  correlating  selected major ions from randomly duplicated samples, of which the correlation values are all above  0.9,  indicating  low  to  insignificant  analytical  errors.  Total  dissolved  solids  (TDS),  pH,  electrical  conductivity  (EC)  temperature  and  major  ions  were  analysed  using  Geochemist  Workbench  to  determine groundwater types for the study area. Piper diagrams for both seasons were also plotted  using the same software. Results of water types were used in relation to the major ions for other plots  in Excel. At the same time, the spatial distribution maps of the stable isotopes were generated in  ArcGIS v10.6.  3. Results and Discussion  The result of the physicochemical parameters and stable isotopes are presented in Table 1. The  pH of groundwater samples during the wet and dry season range from 4.0 to 8.1 (average of 5.6) and  3.9 to 8.0 (average of 7) respectively. The pH of groundwater is slightly higher in the wet season  compared to the dry season. TDS ranged from 0.0 to 8500 mg/l (average of 201.8) and 2.3 to 6750 mg/l  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  7  of  22  (average of 236 mg/l) while EC ranges from 0.0 to 12000 μS/cm (average of 295.4 μS/cm) and 5.5 to  10,009 μS/cm  (average  of  352.4)  for  wet  and  dry  seasons  respectively.  The  temperature  of  groundwater ranged from 25.5 to 34.6 °C (average of 39.4 °C) and 26.6 to 37.7 °C (average of 31.2 °C)  during wet and dry seasons, respectively.  Table 1. Statistical summary of physicochemical parameters and stable isotopes in groundwater.  Wet Season  Dry Season  Parameter  Min  Max  Aver  Std Dev  Min  Max  Aver  Std Dev  2+  Ca 0.3  374.0  16.5  41.2  0.2  448.5  21.6  55.2  2+  Mg 0.0  1377.0  18.4  140.4  0.1  1125.0  16.1  102.2  +  Na 0.1  8857.0  106.8  902.8  0.6  10,310.0  112.7  907.4  K   0.1  447.1  10.5  46.2  0.1  590.2  10.1  51.6  HCO3   1.0  028.5  142.3  818.7  1.6  8390.0  139.5  767.6  2+ SO4   0.0  2,210.7  37.0  242.2  0.3  2932.0  39.7  259.8  ‐  Cl 0.1  18,970.2  218.1  1,934.3  0.9  18,833.0  206.3  1677.6  NO3  0.0  258.6  31.8  54.1  0.3  311.9  30.1  54.3  pH  4.0  8.1  5.6  1.0  3.9  8.0  5.6  1.9  TDS  0.0  8500.0  201.8  863.6  2.3  6750.0  235.8  672.7  EC  0.0  12,000.0  295.4  1219.4  5.5  10,009.0  352.4  1002.0  Temp  25.5  34.6  29.4  1.7  26.6  99.9  60.1  28.9  δ H (‰) −32.5  2.3 −13.1  3.6 −19.7  7.5 −12.4  2.8  δ O(‰) −5.2  0.3 −3.0  0.6 −4.0  0.8 −3.0  0.5  D‐excess −0.3  13.8  11.0  1.7  0.9  15.0  11.9  1.6  Major ions and Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) are measured in mg/l, electrical conductivity (EC) in μS/cm and  temperature in °C.  3.1. Hydrochemical Characterisation  Analysis of hydrochemical data using Geochemist’s Work Bench revealed eight hydrochemical  water types, Ca–HCO3, Na–Cl, Na–HCO3, Ca–Cl, B Na–SO4, Ca–SO4, K–Cl and Mg–SO4 across the  geologic units of the basin as presented in Figure 5 and supported by the piper diagrams (Figure 6).  Na–Ca and Ca–HCO3 water types are the dominant water type among the groundwater samples  from the shallow aquifer of the basin. The groundwater types (Figure 5) along the flow paths within  the  basin  provide  clues  to  the  prevailing  hydrochemical  processes  of  mixing  as  large  portion  of  samples clustering in the mixing region of the piper diagram (Figure 6), especially in the wet season.  Figures  7  and  8  present  pie  charts  of  water  type  across  the  geological  units  to  possibly  link  the  prevailing groundwater characteristics in each of the aquifers mineralogy as it plays a vital role in  this regard.  As these water types reflect the mineralogical composition of the basin sediment and rocks, there  is no observed consistency in their pattern of distribution across the geologic units of the study basin.  The lack of a defined distribution pattern could be attributed to the heterogeneous nature of any  typical sedimentary basin.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  8  of  22  Figure 5. Spatial distribution of groundwater types across a different geological unit of the eastern  Dahomey Basin, (a) wet season, (b) dry season.  Figure 6. Piper diagram showing water types: (a) wet season groundwater samples; (b) dry season  groundwater samples; (c) diamond chart for interpretation indicating mixed water types and (I =  permanent hardness, II = temporary hardness, III = saline and IV = alkali carbonate).  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  9  of  22  Figure 7. Pie chart of percentage water type across the geologic units within the basin for the wet  season water samples.  Figure 8. Pie chart of percentage water type across the geologic units within the basin for the dry  season water samples.  The hydrochemical process is complex and dynamic depending on many factors, ranging from  the  groundwater  origin  rock/minerals  weathering  status  and  mineral  composition  of  the  aquifer  [9,20]. The residence time between precipitation and aquifer recharge zones and impact from humans  along the flow paths are compounding factors [19]. Meteoric water is generally dominated by Ca– + + HCO3 or Ca–Mg–HCO3 water types, [29], with Na  and K  additions when water interacts with rock‐ forming minerals, as shown in Equations (1) and (2).  Equation (1).  (1)  𝑙𝐾𝐴𝑖𝑆 𝑂 𝐻 𝐻 𝑂 → 𝐴𝑙 𝑂 2𝐾 4𝐻 𝑂 𝐻𝐶𝑂   Equation (2).  (2)  2𝑁𝑎𝐴𝑙𝑆𝑖 𝑂 2𝐻 𝐶𝑂 2𝐻 𝑂 → 𝐴𝑙 𝑂 2 4𝑆𝑖𝑂 2𝐻𝐶𝑂 𝐻 𝑂   The precipitation/infiltration water carries dissolved gases as it recharges, resulting in a weak  acid of mainly carbonic with minor nitric or sulphuric acids (depending on anthropogenic pollution).  𝑁𝑎 𝑂𝐻 𝑆𝑖 𝑆𝑖 𝑂𝐻 𝑆𝑖 𝐶𝑂 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  10  of  22  Hydrolysis,  acidolysis,  and  oxidation  processes  take  place  as  aquifers  are  recharged  through  the  infiltration of water into soils of the vadose zones [43–45]. Towards the northern part of the eastern  Dahomey  Basin,  the  Precambrian  basement  rocks  are  often  characterised  with  highly  weathered  overburden, which outcropped in few locations around road cuts and mine sites. The weathered  overburden exposures were documented (Figure 9) during field mapping and sampling, which show  impression  of  transformed  feldspar  to  kaolinite  through  the  weathering  process,  as  explained  in  Equations (1) and (2) above. The thick saprolite layer of this profile is highly rich in secondary clay  mineral such as kaolinite (Figure 9) as confirmed in the work of [46]. This could be the possible source  of geogenic ions such as Ca, Na, and K found in groundwater from recharge zones of the basin (Figure  5) and responsible for Ca, Na, and K bicarbonate/sulphate water types observed in this study.  Figure  9.  Weathering  profile  of  Precambrian  basement  rocks  underlying  the  oldest  Abeokuta  formation. (At the northern boundary of the basin from which aquifer recharge of the basin originates  (a) road cut along Abiola Way, Abeokuta, (b) a road cut along Ijebu‐Remo and Agowoye road. The  weathered profile is known for its richness in kaolinite minerals).  3.2. Oxygen and Deuterium Isotopes of Groundwater of EDB  Information on precipitation, evaporation and origin of water can be deduced from the stable  18 2 2 18 isotopes of oxygen (δ O) and hydrogen (δ H) values [2,47,48]. The relationship between δ H and δ O  data is usually plotted in relation to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) defined by the equation:  2 18 18 2 δ H = 8δ O + 10 [20,28]. Stable isotopes of δ O and δ H have been used to understand the origin of  groundwater in the eastern Dahomey Basin and suggested recent groundwater from precipitation  18 2 [49]. In this study, δ O and δ H were used to explain the hydrochemical evolution of water as it flows  from the surface as precipitation and infiltrates into the soil through the vadose zone to the aquifers.  Results from isotopes data of groundwater samples during the wet and dry season show δ O values  range from −5.2 to 0.3‰ and −4 to 0.8‰ with an average value of −3‰, respectively, for both wet and  dry seasons (Table 1). δ H values range from −32 to 2.3‰ and −19 to 7.5‰ with an average value of  −13.1 and −12.4‰ (Table 1), respectively, for wet and dry seasons. In this study, the δD/δ O diagrams  (Figure 10) show that the groundwater for both seasons plotted along a line of lower slope slightly  deviated from the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) is indicative of evaporation. This implies  recent water from precipitation with a slight influence of evaporation [13,49]. A higher evaporation  influence  is  observed  in  the  dry  season  groundwater  samples  with  lower  slope  and  deuterium  intercept values of 5.5 and 4.1 compared to those of wet season with values of 6.1 and 5.2, respectively,  as presented in Figure 10. Figures 11 and 12 show the spatial distribution of δ O and δD for wet and  dry seasons, respectively.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  11  of  22  Figure 10. δD/δ O diagram for: (a) wet season; (b) dry season, groundwater samples.  Figure 11. Spatial distribution map of δ O (‰) for the: (a) wet season; (b) dry season groundwater  samples.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  12  of  22  Figure 12. Spatial distribution map of δ H (‰) for the: (a) wet season; (b) dry season groundwater.  The wet season δD/δ O diagram (Figure 10) showed a more extensive range along the Local  Meteoric Water Line (LMWL), which indicated precipitation dominant, with rapid infiltration into  the  shallow  coastal  aquifers  of  the  basin  [49].  Compared to dry  season  samples  plotted  within  a  shorter/narrow range, which tend towards mixed water with significant influence of evaporation  before infiltrating into the shallow phreatic aquifers of the basin. Integrating precipitation δ H and  δ O isotopes data with groundwater results from the EDB can enhance understanding of the origin  of groundwater given hydrodynamic complexities resulting from the influence of multiple factors  from both geology and environment. Unfortunately, the only station of International Atomic Energy  Agency (IAEA)/World Meteorological Organization (WMO) GNIP sited in Nigeria is in the northern  part in the city of Kano in the Sahel savannah. Due to the different climatic condition around this  station, it is not ideal, relating such data with the coastal zones groundwater isotopes data. δ O and  δD in precipitation from two selected stations, Douala in Cameroon, in the east of EDB, and Cotonou  in the Republic of Benin, and located in the west of the studied basin, were used for evaluations and  analysis. The statistical summary of the isotopes in precipitation data as presented in Table 2, is part  2 18 of the continuous temporal record of monthly mean δ H and δ O for rainfall measurements between  2 18 2009  and 2018. The δ H and δ O isotopes in precipitation  from these selected  GNIP stations are  plotted in δD /δ O diagram (Figure 13) with a view to assess the possible influence of climatic and  2 18 other effects such as altitude and continental factor on both δ H and δ O enrichment/depletion.        Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  13  of  22  Table 2. Summary of the stable isotopes data from the three GNIP stations and groundwater samples.  Isotopes  Minimum  Maximum  Average  Std Dev  Douala GNIP Station n = 50  δ O  −6.14  1.77  −2.54  1.57  δ H  −38.80  17.68 −9.05  11.89  D‐excess  2.60  18.87  11.26  3.70  Cotonou GNIP Station n = 50  δ O  1.82  1.63  −5.53  −2.86  δ H  −36.11  15.76  −11.92  11.74  D‐excess  0.30  17.44  10.99  3.30  Kano GNIP Station  δ O  2.40  2.59  −7.70  −2.92  δ H  −58.30  22.30  −16.30  19.36  D‐excess  −13.38  20.98  7.08  6.69    Groundwater Samples Wet Season n = 97  δ O  −5.2  0.3  −0.3  0.6  δ H  −32.5  2.3  −13.1  3.6  D‐excess  13.8  11.0  1.7  −0.3    Groundwater Samples Dry Season n = 133  δ O  0.8  0.5  −4.0  −3.0  δ H  −19.7  7.5  −12.4  2.8  D‐excess  0.9  15.0  11.9  1.6  The groundwater samples for wet and dry seasons plotted along with the meteoric water line  for Douala (Cameroon), Cotonou (Republic of Benin) and Kano (Nigeria) and presented in Figures  14. The results show the groundwater samples clustering within the boundaries of the three Regional  Meteoric Water Lines (RMWL) with slope values falling below the GMWL (Figure 12). This further  reveals a large number of groundwater samples around the GMWL which indicates that meteoric  water is a significant source of groundwater recharge in the study area. The Regional Meteoric Water  Line (RMWL) characterising coastal precipitation from Cotonou (δD = 7 δ O + 8.0) and Douala (δD =  7.2 δ O + 9.3) are very close to the Global Meteoric Water Line (Figure 13). However, the stable  isotopes data from the Kano station (δD = 7.1δ O + 4.3) which has a slope closer to the GMWL but  with lower δD intercept, indicates a climate effect of the region with relatively higher temperature  and consequently higher evaporation rate with deuterium enrichment.  Figure 13. δD vs. δ18O diagram for the selected regional precipitation data.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  14  of  22  2 18 18 The δ H and δ O data for the groundwater collected during the wet (δD = 6.1δ O + 5.2) and dry  (δD = 5.4δ O + 4.1) seasons are presented in Figures 14. Groundwater from the EDB for both seasons  falls  almost  along  the  same  meteoric  waterline  with  a  slight  difference  in  slopes  and  deuterium  intercepts. The slopes and intercepts of the regression line are lower compared to the GMWL (δD =  8*δ O  +  10)  indicating  the  effect  of  evaporative  enrichment  on  groundwater  driven  by  seasonal  variations in precipitation and temperature.  The results of the stable isotope values of δD, δ O, and D‐excess in precipitation from the three  selected GNIP stations compared with those of the groundwater from the shallow coastal aquifers of  the EDB is presented in Table 2. The results of the wet season groundwater show a range of values  δ O (−5 to 0.3‰), δD (−32 to 2.3‰), and D‐excess (−0.3 to 13.8‰), which are very similar to those of  18 18 Douala δ O (−6.1 to 1.8‰), δD (−38 to 17.6‰), and D‐excess (2.6 to 18.9‰), and Cotonou δ O (−5.5  to 1.8‰), δD (−36 to 15.8‰), and D‐Excess (0.3 to 17.4‰), which could be a result of a similar climatic  condition, especially temperature, humidity, and evaporation. However, the values of stable isotope  of δD, δ O, and D‐excess values for the groundwater samples in the dry season show range values  δ O (−4 to 0.8‰), δD (−19.7 to 7.5‰), and D‐excess (−0.9 to 15‰) with slight deviations from the wet  season data. The observed slight variation is an indication of the evaporation effect, which is also  responsible for the relatively enhanced values of TDS in a dry season’s groundwater samples.  2 18 Figure 14. δ H vs. δ O diagram for selected precipitation data and the groundwater samples: (a) wet  season; (b) dry season.  The  precipitation isotopes  data  from  the  Kano  GNIP  station  in the  northern part  of  Nigeria  (Table 2) with range values of δ O (−7 to 2.4‰), δD (−58.3 to 22.3‰), and D‐excess (−13.4 to 21‰)  showed a wide variation from those of Douala and Cotonou (Figure 13). This variation is probably  due to the elevation effect in addition to the relatively higher elevation and evaporation rate in the  northern part of Nigeria, which is characterised by low annual precipitation, as shown in Figure 1.  The clustering of the groundwater samples around the Douala and Cotonou Regional Meteoric Water  Line (RMWL) and Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) (Figures 13 and 14) affirm meteoric water  that infiltrates the aquifer within a short time      Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  15  of  22  3.3. Tracing the Origin of Groundwater within the EDB Using Deuterium Excess  Deuterium excess (D‐excess) is a useful measure to understand the source of groundwater. The  2 18 D‐excess is defined as D‐excess = δ H − 8δ O [20,28,50]. The D‐excess is a function of prevailing  conditions during primary evaporation, including variation in humidity, ocean surface temperature,  wind speed and, thus, gives information on  the sources of water vapour. The D‐excess does not  change  with  the  change  in  equilibrium  processes  for  any  of  the  phases  while  non‐equilibrium  evaporation leads to a decrease in the D‐excess, which is an indication of an increase in the vapour  phase [18,20,28].  In this study, the D‐excess values for groundwater in the wet season is slightly lower than that  of the dry season. The higher D‐excess in the dry season (Figure 15), is for samples collected between  February and April 2017. During this period, a dry southward wind leads to the recycling of moisture  from the continental recycling along with the rapid evaporation over warmer seawater responsible.  This compares with plots of δ O vs. D‐excess in Figure 16, which also showed the clustering of D‐ excess in relation to rain, sea and brackish water plot from the basin. The diagrams showed that most  of the groundwater of the wet season plotted closer to the precipitation, which is the source of the  groundwater recharge and forms a trend towards the brackish point as evaporation increases.  O vs. D‐excess diagram shows most groundwater samples plot in a region between the  The δ recharge and evaporation zones reflecting young water of meteoric origin at an early transformation  stage through evaporation. This suggests precipitation water moving towards groundwater storage  through  the  vadose  zone  is  rapid.  That  post‐precipitation  evaporation  along  these  paths  is  a  prolonged process, probably due to higher humidity and precipitation that characterised this region.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  16  of  22  Figure  15.  Spatial  distribution  map  of  D‐excess  (‰)  for  the:  (a)  wet  season;  (b)  dry  season  groundwater samples.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  17  of  22  Figure 16. A plot of δ O vs. D‐excess for the groundwater samples: (a) wet season; (b) dry season.  3.4. Description of Conceptual Design of Hydrogeochemical Characterisation of the Shallow Coastal Aquifer  of EDB  The results from this study have established the hydrochemical dynamic and process prevalent  in  the  eastern  Dahomey  Basin,  which  shows  a  subtle  transformation  as  water  moves  from  the  recharge zones in the northern part towards the discharge area in the downstream along the river  channels and flood plains. The clustering of groundwater samples between evaporation and recharge  and along the seawater line δ O vs. D‐excess diagram (Figure 16) confirmed young groundwater in  the basin. The slight variations in the distribution of the δD and δ O values and clustering along the  regional  meteoric  water  line  (RMWL)  and  Global  Meteoric  Water  Line  (GMWL)  with  a  slight  deviation of the dry season groundwater further confirmed the recent water’s short residence time  within the  soil  and  vadose zones  before  recharging the  shallow  coastal  aquifer  of the  basin.  The  information from (a) the geological field observations, (b) groundwater levels, (c) elevation data, (d)  aquifer geometry, (e) hydrochemical evolution, (f) spatial variability of δ O, δD, and D‐excess, (g)  river and static water level, and (h) line of a cross‐section along representative profile were collected  and integrated to develop a conceptual outlook for the prevailing hydrogeological processes within  the eastern Dahomey Basin, with well‐defined boundary conditions of impermeable basement rock  at the north, and the ocean line of the Gulf of Guinea in the south, enclosed by the flow boundary of  the Okitipupa ridge in the east, and extended sedimentary deposits [49]. The flow systems within  this area can be categorised into mainly local, driven by gravity due to the topography of the basin  [38]. Some regional flow relates to the major rivers which cut across the entire basin, with several  tributaries and discharge water into the ocean through the delta plain. The hydrochemical model  shows Na–Cl as a dominant water type followed by Ca–HCO3 with other mixed water types, such as  Ca–Cl, Na–SO4, Na–Cl–HCO3, and Ca–SO4, which typifies an early stage of rock–water interactions  and possible anthropogenic influence.  This conceptual view explains the lateral and vertical variations in groundwater δ O, δD, and  D‐excess concentrations, controlled by factors such as high humidity, static water level within the  basin, and significant anthropogenic influence from urbanisation, industrialisation, and agricultural  irrigation in most parts of the study area. For example, the D‐excess results  show comparatively  shorter residence time for groundwater moving through the vadose zone to the shallow aquifers of  the  basin,  especially  within  the  alluvium  and  coastal  plain  sands  geologic  units  (Figures  16–18).  Observed  hydrochemical  characteristics  across  the  basin  generally  reflect  the  geology  and  mineralogy of the area, while the lack of consistencies in groundwater isotope values and water type  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  18  of  22  distribution could be attributed to heterogeneity and anthropogenic impacts along the flow paths.  Furthermore, as illustrated in the schematic diagram in Figure 18, water recharged in the northern  parts of the basin has to travel deeper as the vadose zone thickness is higher in this area. A certain  amount of this infiltrated water recharges local rivers as baseflow while the remaining one recharges  the groundwater in the shallow aquifers of the basin.  Figure 17. Map of the eastern Dahomey Basin showing contour line of static water level and rivers  drainage  with  profile  line  AB  along  which  the  geological  profile  section  was  generated  for  the  conceptual description of hydrogeochemical characterisation of the shallow aquifers underlying the  eastern Dahomey Basin.  2 18 Figure 18. A sketch of a conceptual description of stable isotopes of δ H and δ O in groundwater  samples along profile line A‐B in North‐South direction of the eastern Dahomey Basin.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  19  of  22  3.5. The Implication for EDB Groundwater Resources Management  Sustainable management of groundwater is critical to achieving access to potable water supply,  food  security,  ecosystem/environmental  protection  and  economic  growth  in  sub‐Saharan  Africa  countries  [51].  Effective  groundwater  resources  management  relies  on  sound  hydrogeological  knowledge and ultimately on the quality of available data and information necessary for accurate  judgement and planning.  In light of this, our study has advanced the available data, information and knowledge required  to understand better the hydrogeology of the eastern Dahomey Basin, Nigeria. A combination of  isotopes, geology, and hydrogeochemical approaches have revealed the groundwater is at an early  stage of geochemical evolution with short residence time. However, the basin has a large volume of  water with variable aquifer hydraulic characteristics. It is therefore pertinent to emphasise the threat  to  its  water  quality  as  short  residence  time,  and  rapid  recharge  will  allow  rapid  ingress  of  contamination. The shallow aquifers of this basin are, thus, described as having a low resilience and  high vulnerability to contamination and pollution from surface water, leakage from septic tanks,  waste  sites,  industrial  pipes,  and  leachates  from  agricultural  waste.  Groundwater  quality  degradation has been identified in part of this basin, especially the urban and agricultural areas by  [21,52].  It is, therefore,  necessary  to  ensure  enforcement  of a  proper  waste  disposal  management  strategy that will protect groundwater within this basin. Policies and urban planning that provide  best practice from industries and agricultural industries are necessary to protect these vital resources.  A review of the existing Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) system is needed to include  threats  imposed  on  groundwater  resources  through  technological  development  in  the  modern  economy.  4. Conclusions  This study was a hydrogeochemical study covering the major towns and cities underlying the  eastern Dahomey Basin using stable isotopes of δ O, δD, and geochemistry. Static water levels were  used to identify the recharge sources and zones, and also characterise groundwater dynamics in  relation to stable isotopes in the shallow coastal aquifers of the basin. Na–Cl is the dominant water  type followed by Ca–HCO3, Na–HCO3, Ca–SO4, and Na–SO4 with other mixing water types, such  as  Ca–Cl,  K–Cl, and Mg–SO4. The dominant of the Na–Cl water  is thought to  have two origins,  namely  sea  spray  and  saltwater  intrusion.  Although  these  water  types  reflect  the  mineralogical  characteristics of the aquifers’ units within the basin, the lack of consistency distributed across the  geologic unit is attributed to the heterogeneity within the aquifers and possible impact of human  activities. Relationship between δ O and δD revealed the wet season groundwater data plots closer  to  the  Global  Meteoric  Water  Line,  while  those  of  the  dry  season  showed  deviation  towards  evaporation. The relationship between the D‐excess and δ O clustered between the recharge and  evaporation  zone.  Comparing  the  results  with  the  regional  precipitation  data  collected  from  the  selected station of GNIP at Douala (Cameroon), Cotonou (Republic of Benin), and Kano (Nigeria)  showed  groundwater  in  the  region  is  dominated  by  localised  young  water  recharge  with  short  residence time (with a slight influence of evapotranspiration), as expected with observed high static  18 2 water tables. The variation of δ O and δ H has no consistent pattern along flow paths is an indication  of the influence of multiple effects of altitude and temperature on the isotopic composition of the  groundwater other than the normal evaporation. This study can help in both understanding aquifer  resilience and vulnerability for developing a groundwater quality monitoring strategy for sustainable  groundwater management in the eastern Dahomey Basin.  Author  Contributions:  Conceptualization,  J.A.A.,  and  R.M.K.  methodology,  J.A.A.  R.M.K.,  M.N.T.  and  P.S.  software, J.A.A. and I.H. validation, J.A.A., R.M.K. and I.H. formal analysis, J.A.A.; investigation, J.A.A. and  M.N.T.; resources, J.A.A. and R.M.K. data curation, J.A.A., R.M.K. and I.H. writing—original draft preparation,  J.A.A.  writing—review  and  editing,  J.A.A.,  R.M.K.,  I.H.,  M.N.T.  and  P.S.  visualization,  J.A.A.  and  I.H.;  supervision, R.M.K. and P.S. project administration, R.M.K. and J.A.A. funding acquisition, J.A.A. and R.M.K.  All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  20  of  22  Funding: This research was funded by the Petroleum Technology and Development Fund (PTDF) under the  Overseas PhD scholarship scheme and supported by the Scottish Government under the Climate Justice Fund  Water Futures Program, awarded to the University of Strathclyde (R.M.K.).  Acknowledgments: The authors would like to gratefully acknowledge Ademola Ologbe, David Akpan, Mara  Knapp, and Tatyana Peshkur for field and laboratory assistance.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Gattacceca, J. C.; Vallet‐Coulomb, C.; Mayer, A.; Claude, C.; Radakovitch, O.; Conchetto, E.; Hamelin, B.  Isotopic  and  Geochemical  Characterization  of  Salinization  in  the  Shallow  Aquifers  of  a  Reclaimed  Subsiding  Zone:  The  Southern  Venice  Lagoon  Coastland.  J.  Hydrol.  2009,  378,  46–61,  doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2009.09.005.  2. Guendouz, A.; Moulla, A. S.; Edmunds, W. M.; Zouari, K.; Shand, P.; Mamou, A. Hydrogeochemical and  Isotopic Evolution of Water in the Complexe Terminal Aquifer in the Algerian Sahara. Hydrogeol. J. 2003,  11, 483–495, doi:10.1007/s10040‐003‐0263‐7.  3. Daniele, L.; Vallejos, Á.; Corbella, M.; Molina, L.; Pulido‐Bosch, A. Hydrogeochemistry and Geochemical  Simulations to Assess Water‐Rock Interactions in Complex Carbonate Aquifers: The Case of Aguadulce  (SE Spain). Appl. Geochemistry 2013, 29, 43–54, doi:10.1016/j.apgeochem.2012.11.011.  4. Kashaigili, J. J. Ground Water Availability and Use in Sub‐Saharan Africa; CGIAR: Montpellier, France, 2012,  doi:10.5337/2012.213.  5. Lapworth, D. J.; Nkhuwa, D. C. W.; Okotto‐Okotto, J.; Pedley, S.; Stuart, M. E.; Tijani, M. N.; Wright, J.  Urban Groundwater Quality in Sub‐Saharan Africa: Current Status and Implications for Water Security  and Public Health. Hydrogeol. J. 2017, 25, 1093–1116, doi:10.1007/s10040‐016‐1516‐6.  6. Edet, A. Hydrogeology and Groundwater Evaluation of a Shallow Coastal Aquifer, Southern Akwa Ibom  State (Nigeria). Appl. Water Sci. 2016, 7, 2397‐2412, doi:10.1007/s13201‐016‐0432‐1.  7. Oke, S. A.; Vermeulen, D.; Gomo, M. Aquifer Vulnerability Assessment of the Dahomey Basin Using the  RTt Method. Environ. Earth Sci. 2016, 75, 1–9, doi:10.1007/s12665‐016‐5792‐1.  8. Aladejana,  J.  A.;  Kalin,  R.  M.;  Sentenac,  P.;  Hassan,  I.  Hydrostratigraphic  Characterisation  of  Shallow  Coastal  Aquifers  of  Eastern  Dahomey  Basin  ,  S  /  W  Nigeria  ,  Using  Integrated  Hydrogeophysical  Approach ; Implication for Saltwater Intrusion. Geoscience 2020, 10, 65, doi:10.3390/geosciences10020065.  9. Hoque, M. A.; Mcarthur, J. M.; Sikdar, P. K.; Ball, J. D.; Molla, T. N. Tracing Recharge to Aquifers beneath  an Asian Megacity with Cl / Br and Stable Isotopes : The Example of Dhaka , Bangladesh. J. Hydrol. 2014,  22, 1549–1560, doi:10.1007/s10040‐014‐1155‐8.  10. Fathy A. Ionic Ratios as Tracers to Assess Seawater Intrusion and to Identify Salinity Sources in Jazan  Coastal Aquifer, Saudi Arabia. Arab. J. Geosci. 2016, 9, 40, doi:10.1007/978‐3‐319‐58538‐3_20‐1.  11. Nwankwoala, H.O.; Ngah, S.A. Salinity dynamics: Trends and vulnerability of aquifers to contamination  in the Niger Delta. Compr. J. Environ. Earth Sci. 2013, 2, 18–25.  12. Mohanty,  A.  K.;  Rao,  V.  V.  S.  G.  Catena  Hydrogeochemical  ,  Seawater  Intrusion  and  Oxygen  Isotope  Studies  on  a  Coastal  Region  in  the  Puri  District  of  Odisha  ,  India.  Catena  2019,  172,  558–571,  doi:10.1016/j.catena.2018.09.010.  13. Lapworth, D. J.; Macdonald, A. M.; Tijani, M. N.; Darling, W. G.; Gooddy, D. C.; Bonsor, H. C. Residence  Times of Shallow Groundwater in West Africa : Implications for Hydrogeology and Resilience to Future  Changes in Climate. Hydrogeol. J. 2013, 21, 673–686, doi:10.1007/s10040‐012‐0925‐4.  14. Kalin,  R.M.;  Long,  A.  Application  of  hydrogeochemical  modelling  for  validation  of  hydrologie  flow  modelling in the Tucson Basin aquifer, Arizona, United States of America. In Mathematical Models and their  Applications to Isotope Studies in Groundwater Hydrology; TECDOC‐777; IAEA: Viena, Austria, 1994; pp 209– 254.  15. Alazard, M.; Boisson, A.; Maréchal, J.; Perrin, J.; Dewandel, B.; Schwarz, T.; Pettenati, M.; Kloppman, W.;  Ahmed, S. Investigation of Recharge Dynamics and Flow Paths in a Fractured Crystalline Aquifer in Semi‐ Arid India Using Borehole Logs: Implications for Managed Aquifer Recharge. Hydrogeol. J. 2015, 35–57,  doi:10.1007/s10040‐015‐1323‐5.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  21  of  22  16. Huneau, F.; Dakoure, D.; Celle‐Jeanton, H.; Vitvar, T.; Ito, M.; Traore, S.; Compaore, N. F.; Jirakova, H.; Le  Coustumer,  P.  Flow  Pattern  and  Residence  Time  of  Groundwater  within  the  South‐Eastern  Taoudeni  Sedimentary Basin (Burkina Faso, Mali). J. Hydrol. 2011, 409, 423–439, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2011.08.043.  17. He, J.; Ma, J.; Zhao, W.; Sun, S. Groundwater Evolution and Recharge Determination of the Quaternary  Aquifer in the Shule River Basin, Northwest China. Hydrogeol. J. 2015, 23, 1745–1759, doi:10.1007/s10040‐ 015‐1311‐9.  18. Banda, L. C.; Rivett, M. O.; Kalin, R. M.; Zavison, A. S. K.; Phiri, P.; Kelly, L.; Chavula, G.; Kapachika, C. C.;  Nkhata, M.; Kamtukule, S.; et al. Water‐Isotope Capacity Building and Demonstration in a Developing  World  Context:  Isotopic  Baseline  and  Conceptualization  of  a  Lake  Malawi  Catchment.  Water  2019,  11,  doi:10.3390/w11122600.  19. Krishnaraj,  S.;  Murugesan,  V.K.V.;  Sabarathinam,  C.;  Paluchamy,  A.;  Ramachandran,  M.  Use  of  hydrochemistry and stable isotopes as tools for groundwater evolution and contamination investigations.  J. Geosci. 2012, 1, 16–25, doi:10.5923/j.geo.20110101.02.  20. Joshi, S. K.; Rai, S. P.; Sinha, R.; Gupta, S.; Densmore, A. L.; Rawat, Y. S.; Shekhar, S. Tracing Groundwater  Recharge Sources in the Northwestern Indian Alluvial Aquifer Using Water Isotopes (Δ18O, Δ2H And3H).  J. Hydrol. 2018, 559 (February), 835–847, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2018.02.056.  21. Aladejana,  J.  A.;  Kalin,  R.  M.;  Sentenac,  P.;  Hassan,  I.  Assessing  the  Impact  of  Climate  Change  on  Groundwater Quality of the Shallow Coastal Aquifer of Eastern Dahomey Basin, Southwestern Nigeria.  Water 2020, 12, 224, doi:10.3390/w12010224.  22. Oke, S.A. Evaluation of the Vulnerability of Selected Aquifer Systems in the Eastern Dahomey Basin, South‐ Western Nigeria. Ph.D. Thesis, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa, 2015.  23. Omole,  D.  O.  Sustainable  Groundwater  Exploitation  in  Nigeria.  J.  Water  Resour.  Ocean  Sci.  2013,  2,  9,  doi:10.11648/j.wros.20130202.11.  24. Ayoade, J. O. Water Resources and their Development in Nigeria Recent Events of Flood, Drought and  Urban  Water  Shortages  as  Well  as  Water  Pollution  in  Nigeria  and  Various  Parts  of  the  World  Have  Underlined the Need for the Rational Planning of Nigeria ’ s Water Reso. Hydrol. Sci. Sci. Hydrol. 1975, 4,  581–591.  25. Ahmed, A.; Clark, I. Groundwater Flow and Geochemical Evolution in the Central Flinders Ranges, South  Australia. Sci. Total Environ. 2016, 572, 837–851, doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.07.123.  26. Shin, W. J.; Park, Y.; Koh, D. C.; Lee, K. S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, Y. Hydrogeochemical and Isotopic Features of the  Groundwater Flow Systems in the Central‐Northern Part of Jeju Island (Republic of Korea). J. Geochemical  Explor. 2017, 175, 99–109, doi:10.1016/j.gexplo.2017.01.004.  27. Peter Bauer‐Gottwein, B.N.; Gondwe, L.C.; Daan, H.; Kgotlhang, L.; Zimmermann, S. Hydrogeophysical  exploration  of  three‐dimensional  salinity  anomalies  with  the  time‐domain  electromagnetic  method  (TDEM). J. Hydrol. 2010, 380, 318–329, doi:10.1007/s12665‐014‐3130‐z.  28. Kalin, R. M. Basic Concepts and Formulations for Isotope‐Geochemical Process Investigations, Procedures  and Methodologies of Geochemical Modelling of Groundwater Systems. In Manual on mathematical models  in isotope hydrology; Y Yurtsever, Ed.; IAEA TECHDOC 910: Vienna, Austria, 1995; pp 155–206.  29. Clark, I.D.; Fritz, P. Environmental Isotopes in Hydrogeology; Lewis Publishers: Boca Raton, FL, USA, 1997.  30. Gagné, S.; Larocque, M.; Pinti, D. L.; Saby, M.; Meyzonnat, G.; Méjean, P. Benefits and Limitations of Using  Isotope‐Derived Groundwater Travel Times and Major Ion Chemistry to Validate a Regional Groundwater  Flow Model: Example from the Centre‐Du‐Québec Region, Canada. Can. Water Resour. J. 2017, 1784, 1–19,  doi:10.1080/07011784.2017.1394801.  31. Oloruntola,  M.  O.;  Adeyemi,  G.  O.;  Bayewu,  O.;  Obasaju,  D.  O.  Hydro‐Geophysical  Mapping  of  Occurrences  and  Lateral  Continuity  of  Aquifers  in  Coastal  and  Landward  Parts  of  Ikorodu,  Lagos,  Southwestern Nigeria. Int. J. Energy Water Resour. 2019, 3, 219–231, doi:10.1007/s42108‐019‐00026‐8.  32. Adelana, S. M. A.; Olasehinde, P. I.; Bale, R. B.; Vrbka, P.; Edet, A. E.; Goni, I. B. An Overview of the Geology  and  Hydrogeology  of  Nigeria.  Q.  J.  Eng.  Geol.  Hydrogeol.  1996,  29,  S1–S12,  doi:10.1144/GSL.QJEGH.1996.029.S1.01.  33. Adegoke,  O.S.;  Omatsola,  M.E.  Tectonic  evolution  and  cretaceous  stratigraphy  of  the  Dahomey  Basin.  Niger. J. Min. Geol. 1981, 18, 130–137.  34. Jones, H.A; Hockey, R. The geology of part of Southwestern Nigeria. GSN Bull. 1964, 225, 229–237.  35. Solomon O. Olabode1, M. Z. M. Depositional Facies and Sequence. Int J. Geosci. 2016, 7, 210–228.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7980  22  of  22  36. Longe, E. O.; Malomo, S.; Olorunniwo, M. A. Hydrogeology of Lagos Metropolis. J. African Earth Sci. 1987,  6, 163–174, doi:10.1016/0899‐536290058‐3.  37. Longe, E. O. Groundwater Resources Potential in the Coastal Plain Sands Aquifers , Lagos , Nigeria. 2011,  3, 1–7.  38. Offodile, M. E. (1971). The Hydrogeology of Coastal Areas of Southeastern States of Nigeria. J. Min. Geol.  1971, 14, 94–101.  39. Faleye,  E.  T.;  Olorunfemi.  Aquifer  Characterization  and  Groundwater  Potential  Assessment  of  the  Sedimentary Basin of Ondo State 1 2. Ife J. Sci. 2015, 17, 429–439.  Adigun,  E.  O.  Using  Geoelectric  Soundings  for  Estimation  of  Hydraulic  40. Fatoba,  J.  O.;  Omolayo,  S.  D.;  Characteristics of Aquifers in the Coastal Area of Lagos , Southwestern Nigeria. Int. Lett. Nat. Sci. 2014, 11,  30–39, doi:10.18052/www.scipress.com/ILNS.11.30.  41. Adeoti,  L.;  Alile,  O.  M.;  Uchegbulam,  O.  Geophysical  Investigation  of  Saline  Water  Intrusion  into  Freshwater Aquifers: A Case Study of Oniru, Lagos State. Sci. Res. Essays 2010, 5, 248–259.  42. Oteri, A.U.; Atolagbe,  F.P.  Saltwater Intrusion  into  Coastal Aquifers in Nigeria.  In Procceedings of  the  Second International Conference on Saltwater Intrusion and Coastal Aquifers—Monitoring, Modeling, and  Management, Yucatán, México, 30 March–2 April 2003; pp 1–15.  43. Dehnavi, A.; Sarikhani, R.; Nagaraju, D. Hydro Geochemical and Rock Water Interaction Studies in East of  Kurdistan, NW of Iran. Int J Env. Sci Res 2011, 1, 16–22.  44. Fu, C.; Li, X.; Ma, J.; Liu, L.; Gao, M.; Bai, Z. A Hydrochemistry and Multi‐Isotopic Study of Groundwater  Origin and Hydrochemical Evolution in the Middle Reaches of the Kuye River Basin. Appl. Geochem. 2018,  98, 82–93, doi:10.1016/j.apgeochem.2018.08.030.  45. Narany, T. S.; Ramli, M. F.; Aris, A. Z.; Nor, W.; Sulaiman, A.; Juahir, H.; Fakharian, K. Identification of the  Hydrogeochemical  Processes  in  Groundwater  Using  Classic  Integrated  Geochemical  Methods  and  Geostatistical Techniques , in Amol‐Babol Plain, Iran. Sci. World J. 2014, 2014, 1–15.  46. Oli, I.C.; Okeke, O.C.; Abiahu, C.M.G.; Anifowose, F.A.; Fagorite, V.I. A review of the geology and mineral  resources  of  Dahomey  basin,  southwestern  Nigeria.  Int.  J.  Environ.  Sci.  Nat.  Res.  2019,  21,  556055,  doi:10.19080/IJESNR.2019.21.556055.  47. Al‐Charideh,  A.;  Kattaa,  B.  Isotope  Hydrology  of  Deep  Groundwater  in  Syria:  Renewable  and  Non‐ Renewable Groundwater and Paleoclimate Impact. Hydrogeol. J. 2016, 24, 79‐98, doi:10.1007/s10040‐015‐ 1324‐4  48. Carol,  E.;  Kruse,  E.;  Mas‐Pla,  J.  Hydrochemical  and  Isotopical  Evidence  of  Ground  Water  Salinization  Processes  on  the  Coastal  Plain  of  Samborombon  Bay,  Argentina.  J.  Hydrol.  2009,  335–345,  doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2008.11.041.  49. Jamiu, A.A.; Kalin, R.M.; Hassan, I.; Sentenac, P. Hydrogeochemical and isotopic characterization of coastal  groundwater of eastern dahomey basin, southwestern Nigeria. Geosciences 2020, 26, 65.  50. Vengosh, A.; Hening, S.; Ganor, J.; Mayer, B.; Weyhenmeyer, C. E.; Bullen, T. D.; Paytan, A. New Isotopic  Evidence for the Origin of Groundwater from the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer in the Negev, Israel. Appl.  Geochemistry 2007, 22, 1052–1073, doi:10.1016/j.apgeochem.2007.01.005.  51. JICA. The Project for Review and Update of Nigeria National Water Resources; Federal Republic of Nigeria:  Abuja, Nigeria, 2014.  52. Aladejana, J. A.; Kalin, R.M.; Sentenac, P.; Hassan, I. Groundwater Quality Index as a Hydrochemical Tool  for  Monitoring  Saltwater  Intrusion  into  Coastal  Freshwater  Aquifer  of  Eastern  Dahomey  Basin,  Southwestern Nigeria. Under Rev. with Groundw. Sustain. Dev. 2020, 25, doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.33589.42723.  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional  affiliations.  © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access  article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution  (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). 

Journal

Applied SciencesMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Nov 10, 2020

There are no references for this article.