Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Observer Design for Nonlinear Invertible System from the View of Both Local and Global Levels

Observer Design for Nonlinear Invertible System from the View of Both Local and Global Levels Article  Observer Design for Nonlinear Invertible System  from the View of Both Local and Global Levels  1 1 1 2 1, Mei Zhang  , Qin‐mu Wu  , Xiang‐ping Chen  , Boutaïeb Dahhou   and Ze‐tao Li  *    Electrical Engineering School, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025, China; mzhang3@gzu.edu.cn (M.Z.);  qmwu@gzu.edu.cn (Q.W.); ee.xpchen@gzu.edu.cn (X.‐p.C.)    University de Toulouse, UPS, LAAS, F‐31400 Toulouse, France; boutaib.dahhou@laas.fr  *  Correspondence: ztli@gzu.edu.cn  Received: 22 September 2020; Accepted: 4 November 2020; Published: 10 November 2020  Abstract: This paper emphasizes the importance of the influences of local dynamics on the global  dynamics of a control system. By considering an actuator as an individual, nonlinear subsystem  connected with a nonlinear process subsystem in cascade, a structure of interconnected nonlinear  systems is proposed which allows for global and local supervision properties of the interconnected  systems. To achieve this purpose, a kind of interconnected observer design method is investigated,  and the convergence is studied. One major difficulty is that a state observation can only rely on the  global system output at the terminal boundary. This is because the connection point between the  two  subsystems  is  considered  unable  to  be  measured,  due  to  physical  or  economic  reasons.  Therefore, the aim of the interconnected observer is to estimate the state vector of each subsystem  and the unmeasurable connection point. Specifically, the output used in the observer of the actuator  subsystem is replaced by the estimation of the process subsystem observer, while the estimation of  this  interconnection  is  treated  like  an  additional  state  in  the  observer  design  of  the  process  subsystem. Expression for this new state is achieved by calculating the derivatives of the output  equation of the actuator subsystem. Numerical simulations confirm the effectiveness and robustness  of the proposed observer, which highlight the significance of the work compared with state‐of‐the‐ art methods.  Keywords:  interconnected  nonlinear  system;  states  estimation;  left  invertibility;  local  dynamics;  process subsystem; actuator subsystem; unknown interconnection  1. Introduction  A modern system often consists of a series of interconnected dynamical units (sensors, actuators  and system components) and, therefore, very complicated dynamics are exhibited [1]. Technological  advances mean that these units themselves are dynamic systems and exhibit complicated dynamics.  Therefore, a modern control system can be viewed as composed of dynamic subsystems connected  in  a  series.  In  all  situations,  the  global  plant  can  be  analyzed  at  different  levels—down  to  the  component level—to estimate the reliability of the whole plant.  In recent years, the topic of observer design for separate nonlinear systems has been widely  discussed  in  the  literature,  like  high‐gain  observers  [2–4],  sliding  mode  observers  [5,6],  adaptive  observers [7–9], and unknown input observers (UIOs) [10–12]. These methodologies are typically  centralized monitoring systems where intelligence is either at the system level or at the field device  level of the processing plant. For the former, it aims at monitoring plant dynamics from the viewpoint  of a global system, like in [13–15]. In these methods, the dynamics of subcomponents (i.e., actuators)  are  often  neglected.  They  are,  generally  speaking,  treated  as  constants  in  the  input  or  output  coefficient matrix (function) of the process system model. For the latter, it focuses on the field device  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966; doi:10.3390/app10227966  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  2  of  23  level, aiming at analyzing the internal dynamics of a specific subcomponent while the influences of  local internal dynamics on the global dynamics are neglected, like in [3,16].  However, centralized observers may not be suitable for modern control systems. On one hand,  a  modern  control  system  is  in  fact  an  interconnected  system,  while  the  centralized  observer  just  enables an individual component to monitor internal dynamics locally. However, the dynamics of  the field devices can cause significant disturbances to the global process and influence the quality of  the final product [17,18]. On the other hand, due to uneconomical measurement costs or physical  environment factors such as high temperature, it is impossible to measure the state or partial state,  such as in [19,20]. To overcome these difficulties, an effective way is to decompose the system into  several interconnected subsystems so that the observer can be decentralized in each subsystem. In  this  way,  it  allows  the  analysis  of  less  complex  subcomponents  to  study  the  characteristics  of  interconnected systems.  The last few decades have also witnessed significant improvements in dynamic networks which  consist  of  a  number  of  interconnected  units,  like  in  [1,21–24].  A  typical  approach  is  to  design  distributed observers for each subsystem using the internal information of each subsystem, and then  all the observers are aggregated to form the total estimator [25–27]. For instance, in [26], an observer  was designed for the whole system from the separate synthesis of observers for each subsystem,  assuming that for each of these separate designs, the states from the other subsystem were available.  In [27], an observer for each subsystem was proposed, using the state estimation of the previous  subsystem.  In  addition,  a  quasi‐input‐to‐state  stability  and  input‐to‐state  dynamical  stability  (ISS/ISDS)  reduced‐order  observer  for  the  whole  system  was  designed,  considering  the  interconnections of quasi‐ISS/ISDS reduced‐order observers for each subsystem. A major challenge  for these methods is the availability of the measurement of the interconnections between subsystems.  Therefore,  it  is  interesting  to  consider  the  problem  of  whether  we  can  prove  that,  under  some  conditions,  the  effect  in  lower  subsystems  can  be  distinguished  from  higher  subsystems,  thus  avoiding full measurements of the local subsystem. For example, in this work, the interconnection is  the output of the actuator, and it is not economical or realistic to measure its output. Contributions  dealing  with  the  state  observation  problem  for  interconnected  systems  subjected  to  unknown  interconnections have received less extensive treatment in the literature. In [28], a promising method  to  solve  the  state  observation  problem  of  nonlinear  systems  modeled  by  ODE‐PDE  series  was  proposed.  A  similar  problem  was  also  studied  in  [29],  where  the  interconnected  system  was  composed of a nonlinear system and a linear system.  In this paper, the problem of state estimation for interconnected nonlinear dynamic systems is  studied.  An  interconnected  system  consists  of  two  nonlinear  dynamic  subsystems,  and  the  interconnection point is unknown. Thus, one major difficulty is that state observation can only rely  on the output of the terminal subsystem, making existing observers useless. Therefore, the problem  considered here is that the output of the nonlinear system cannot be measured directly, while part of  the state measurement of the second nonlinear system can be obtained. Two issues are highlighted  here. Firstly, it is assumed that the measurement value used by the observer of the former subsystem  is unmeasurable, and the solution is to replace it with the estimated value of the observer of the latter  subsystem. Secondly, in the latter subsystem, the estimated interconnection provided for the former  subsystem is regarded as an additional state to form a new, extended subsystem. The expression of  the new state is obtained by calculating the derivative of the output equation of the former subsystem.  The contribution of this paper mainly lies in its emphasis of the importance of the influences of  local internal dynamics (actuator) on the global dynamics of a control system. A method is proposed  to distinguish the influence of low subsystems in higher subsystems, even if the full measurement of  local subsystems cannot be realized. Thus, the goal of the design methodology is to enable or simplify  observer design for systems that are otherwise difficult to handle by allowing the designer to focus  on a smaller, nonlinear subsystem. That is to say, we mainly focus on observing, for example, how  the change of an internal parameter at the local level affects the global output at the global level. As  a result, both local and global dynamics supervision is achieved, as well as analysis of the influences  of local internal dynamics on the global dynamics.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  3  of  23  The rest of the paper is organized as follows. Problem formulation is introduced in Section 2,  where the type of dynamic units of the interconnected system is explained, and the main objective is  introduced.  Section  3  contains  all  the  results  for  the  observer  design,  with  respect  to  the  interconnected systems. Some numerical simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness  of the proposed methods in Section 4. Finally, a conclusion is made in Section 5.  2. Motivations and Problem Formulations  The  problem  of  state  observation  is  investigated  for  an  interconnected  nonlinear  system,  modeled by two cascaded nonlinear dynamical subsystems: the process and the actuator subsystems.  As shown in Figure 1, an interconnected nonlinear system structure is proposed by considering both  the actuator and the process as individual dynamic subsystems connected in cascade. The aim is to  accurately estimate the state vector of both subsystems, as well as the interconnection. As a result,  both local and global dynamics supervision are realized, and analysis of the influence of local internal  dynamics on global dynamics is achieved.  ∑ Physical system ∑ (u , x) ∑ (u,  x ,) u u 𝒂 𝒂 𝑦 Actuator Subs Process Subs Figure 1. Structure of an interconnected system.  A dynamic process subsystem is proposed in an input affine form:  x f x g x u , x t x ∑ :   (1)  y x where  x∈ℜ   is the state of the process subsystem,  y∈ℜ   is the output of the global system, which  is also the output of the process subsystem,  u ∈ℜ   is the input of the process subsystem, which is  also the output of the actuator subsystem,  u   is assumed to be inaccessible, and  f and g  are smooth  vector fields on  ℜ .  The actuator subsystem is described as  x f x ,u x t x ∑ :   (2)  u h x ,u where  x ∈ℜ   is the state,  u ∈ ℜ   is the input and constant parameter to be monitored,  u ∈ R   is  the  output of the actuator  subsystem, which is also  the input  of the  process subsystem,  f   is the  smooth vector field on  ℜ , and  h   is the smooth vector field on  ℜ .  Considering  the  interconnected  system  described  by  Equations  (1)  and  (2),  it  is  required  to  monitor the performance of the interconnected system from the perspective of a single subsystem  and the whole system; that is, it is required to describe the cause and effect relationships between the  subsystem variables and global system output y, thus providing advanced predictive maintenance  techniques in an operating plant. The left invertibility of the interconnected system is then required  for ensuring that the impact of local variables on the global level is distinguishable. The property of  distinguishability of the two inputs or parameters refers to their capacity to generate different output  signals for a given input signal.  One way to achieve this purpose is to propose observers for each of the subsystems and the  whole  network.  However,  the  main  difficulty  is  that  the  connection  point  between  the  two  subsystems  cannot  be  measured.  This  is  because  the  interconnection  point  is  the  output  of  the  actuator subsystem, and online measurement is difficult to achieve due to physical or uneconomical  reasons. In addition, the measured value could be unreliable, due to its rough operation environment.  Therefore, the state observation in this work can only rely on the global system output (i.e., the  process state at the terminal boundary). As shown in Figure 1, the particular aim of our design is to  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  4  of  23  accurately estimate the state vectors  x  and  x   of each subsystem online, as well as the unmeasured  interconnection vector u .  3. Observer Design  The structure of the proposed interconnected observer is shown in Figure 2. It is a two‐stage  interconnected observer system, consisting of an actuator and a process state estimator. The actuator  state estimator deals with estimating the states of the actuator subsystem, where the major challenge  is that the output is inaccessible. Aiding the actuator, the process state estimator is a coordinator that  extends  the  interconnection  as  an  additional  state  of  the  process  subsystem.  This  process  state  estimator generates an input sequence which is applied to the actuator subsystem. Then, the overall  observer  estimates  the  states  and  interconnections  of  the  interconnected  system  by  using  the  estimates of the two estimators.  ∑ Physical system u u 𝒂 𝑦 ∑ (u , x) ∑ (u,  x ,) 𝒂 Interconnected Observer u u, x̂ ,x ,y process state estimator u, x u, u ,x actuator state estimator Figure 2. Structure of the proposed interconnected observer.  The  main  idea  of  the  interconnected  observer  design  is  as  follows.  In  the  first  aspect,  the  unknown interconnection is extended as new states of the process subsystem, where the expression  can be achieved via derivatives of the output expression of the actuator subsystem, thus forming a  new  process  subsystem.  Then,  for  the  state  estimation  of  each  subsystem  of  the  interconnected  system,  the  state  estimation  of  one  subsystem  is  realized  by  the  state  estimation  of  the  other  subsystem, and the global estimator is formed by the set of both observers. Specifically, it is assumed  that an existing observer is already available for the actuator subsystem ∑ , where the measured  output is u , while the observer is implemented using an estimate of  u , denoted by  u . In order to  obtain this estimate, the state space of the process subsystem ∑   is extended to include  u   as an  additional  state.  By  calculating  the  derivatives  of  the  value  u   of  the  actuator  subsystem,  the  expression of the time derivatives of  u   is obtained; it is a function of u, with derivatives of u and x .  In summation, for the studied interconnected nonlinear systems, an interconnected observer design  method is proposed by combining both actuator and process subsystem state estimators.  3.1. Observer Design for the Interconnected System  3.1.1. Interconnected System Extension  For the interconnected system described by Equations (1) and (2), in order to facilitate analysis,  the unknown interconnection  u   is extended as a new state  x :  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  5  of  23  x :≜ u   (3)  x ≔ u To get a function for  x , inspired by the work proposed in [29], let us derivate the output  u   in  Equation (2) to get the following function:  ∂h ∂h x : u ε u, u ,x u, x u u, x f u, x   (4)  ∂u ∂x where the function ε u, u ,x   is with respect to the time derivative of the output  u   in Equation (2).  We can define Assumption 1 as follows: For any function  u∈𝒰 t, x ∈𝒜 .𝒞ℜ ,ℜ , there exists  a real constant satisfied by γ :  ‖ε u, u ,x ε u, u ,x ‖ γ ‖x x ‖   (5)  Assumption 1. It refers to the global Lipchitz‐type condition of function 𝜀 , although this condition seems  restrictive, becomes much lower since 𝑢   and 𝑢   are bounded, which is usually the case in physical situations.  Moreover,  this  boundedness  can  be found  by  introducing  saturation  in the  argument  of  h .  According to [29], if  u  and  h   belong to a compact set 𝔘 , 𝔜 , then the global Lipchitz‐type condition  of function ε  can be replaced by local smoothness by using saturations.  Thus, a new interconnected system is constituted of ∑ :∑ ∑ x :  x f x g x x x ε u, u ,x ∑ : x f x ,u   (6)  y x ⎩x t x ; x t x ; x h x ,u where the input of the system is  u, the output is  y, and  x   is an unmeasured state.  xx ξ ξ Let ξ , ξ x . Thus, the above system becomes  ξ f ξ ,ξ ,u ξ f ξ ,u ∑ :   (7)  y h ξ h ξ f ξ g ξ ξ h ξ ξ ̅ ̅ where  f ξ ,ξ ,u : ,  f ξ ,u : f ξ ,u , and  : .  ε u, u ,ξ h ξ h x ,u The above system can be divided into two subsystems:  ξ f ξ ,ξ ,u Σ :   (8)  y h ξ where i 1, 2   and 𝚤  ̅ denotes the complementary index of  i  (i.e.,  i,𝚤 ̅ 1, 2 ).  3.1.2. State Estimator Design for the New Process Subsystem  The following system can be viewed as a transformed form of the process subsystem described  in Equation (1):  ξ f ξ ,ξ ,u Σ :   (9)  y ξ f ξ g ξ ξ where  f ξ ,ξ ,u : .  ε u, u ,ξ The new process subsystem in Equation (9) can be expressed as follows:  ξ G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u ,ξ Σ :   (10)  y Cξ Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  6  of  23  0g ξ f ξ where  G ξ ,F ξ ,  C I 0 ,ε u, u ,ξ 0 ε u, u ,ξ ,  and  I   is  the  00 0 n n  identity matrix.  As demonstrated in [30], supposing that the following assumptions related to the boundedness  of the states, signals, and functions are satisfied, an extended, high‐gain observer for the system in  Equation (10) can be formed.  Assumption  2.  It  states  that  there  exist  finite  real  numbers 𝜚 , 𝜏   with  0𝜚𝜏 ,  and  that  𝜚 𝐼 𝐹 𝜉 𝐹 𝜉 𝜏 𝐼 .  Assumption 3. Is that 𝐹 𝜉   is a global Lipchitz, with respect to 𝜉 , locally and uniformly with respect  to u.  Assumption 4. It states that 𝑔 𝜉   is a global Lipchitz with respect to 𝜉 .  Then, an extended, high‐gain observer for the system in Equation (10) can be given as  ξ G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u ,ξ Λ ξ S C Cξ y Σ :   (11)  y Cξ I0 where  H ξ :Λ ξ S C   is  the  gain  function  and  Λ ξ : ,  S   is  the  unique  0g ξ symmetric positive definite matrix, satisfying the following algebraic Lyapunov equation:  θS A S S A C C 0  (12)  0I where  A ,θ 0  is a parameter defined by Equation (12), and the solution is  1 1 I I θ θ S   (13)  1 2 I I θ θ Then, the gain of the estimator can be given by  2θI H ξ Λ ξ S C   (14)  θ g ξ The state estimation error is expressed as  e t ξ t ξ t   (15)  Then, by subtracting the corresponding Equations (10) and (11), the following error dynamics  can be obtained:  e G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u,ξ H ξ Cξ y G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u,ξ   (16)  Assumption 5. Is that for any 𝑢∈𝔘 𝑡 ,𝑒 ∈𝒜 .𝒞ℜ ,ℜ , there exists a continuously differentiable  function 𝑉 , and the positive constants 𝛼 ,𝛽 ,𝛾 ,𝛾   satisfy the following:  𝑎 𝛾 𝑒 𝑉 𝑡 ,𝑒 𝛾 𝑒 𝑏 𝑡 ,𝑒 𝑡 ,𝑒 𝑒 𝛼 𝑒 .  (17)  𝑐 𝑡 ,𝑒 𝛽 𝑒 Theorem  1.  It  states  that  if  Assumption  1  and  Assumption  5  are  satisfied  by  properly  choosing  a  relatively high‐gain tuner parameter 𝜃   such that the following conditions are met: (1) if  𝜉 𝜉   converges  to  0,  then  make 𝜃 ,  and  (2)  if  𝜉 𝜉   is  bounded  by  𝑒 ̃ ,  then  choose  a  value  for  𝜃   such  that  𝜃 𝛼 𝜂 0.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  7  of  23  Then, the system in Equation (11) becomes a converging observer for the system described in  Equation (10), which is a transformed form of the process subsystem described in Equation (1).  The proof is given in Appendix A.  3.1.3. State Estimator Design for the New Actuator Subsystem    as  a  transformed  form  of  the  actuator  subsystem  described  in  Equation  (18)  can  be  viewed Equation (2):  ξ f ξ ,u Σ :   (18)  y h ξ ,u where  f ξ ,u : f ξ ,u .  A convergence observer can be designed for the system in Equation (18) as follows:  ξ f ξ ,u κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ y Σ :   (19)  ℊ Θ ξ ,u,ℊ where κ   and Θ   are  smooth  gain  functions,  with  respect  to  their  arguments,  the  state  variable  ℊ ,ξ   belongs to ℜ Θ , and Θ   is a subset of  ℜ , which is positively invariant by the second  equation of (19).  The state estimation error is defined as  e :ξ t ξ t   (20)  Then,  by  subtracting  the  corresponding  Equations  (18)  and  (19),  we  get  the  following  error  dynamics:  ̅ ̅ e t,e f ξ ,u f ξ ,u κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ y   (21)  where Κ u,ξ ,y :κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ y .  In order to formulate a solution to the convergence of the above observer, we need to follow  Assumption 6, with respect to the error Lyapunov function introduced in [26]. This error Lyapunov  function shows the equivalence of the existence of an error Lyapunov function and the existence of a  converging observer.  Assumption 6. Is that for any 𝑢∈𝔘 𝑡 ,𝑒 ∈𝒜 .𝒞ℜ ,ℜ , there exists a continuously differentiable  function 𝑉   and positive constants 𝛼 , 𝛽 , 𝛾 , 𝛾   to satisfy  a γ ‖e ‖ V t,e γ ‖e ‖ b t, e t, e e α ‖e ‖ .  (22)  ⎪ c t,e β ‖e ‖ The  observer  defined  by  Equation  (19)  is  a  converging  observer  if  Assumption  6  is  satisfied.  However, the  observer in  Equation  (19)  can  only  be  realized  when  the  output  y   is  measurable,  which is not the case. Due to this,  y   in our design represents the output of the actuator subsystem.  It is assumed to be unmeasured and, therefore,  y   must be replaced by an estimate  y   using the  available measurements.  Fortunately, that estimation of  y   is available in the process subsystem observer in Equation  (11). By substituting  u   for  y , we can now implement the observer in Equation (19) for an actuator  subsystem as  ξ f ξ ,u κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ y Σ :   (23)  ℊ Θ ξ ,u,ℊ where Κ u,ξ ,y :κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ y .  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  8  of  23  The estimation error is produced again by subtracting the corresponding equation in Equations  (18) and (23), and the new error dynamics are achieved as follows:  ̅ ̅ e t,e f ξ ,u f ξ ,u Κ u,ξ ,y ̅ ̅ f ξ ,u f ξ ,u Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y (24)  e t,e Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y   In order to ensure the stability of the error dynamics in Equation (24), an assumption is required  with respect to the sensitivity of Κ u,ξ ,y , with changes of  y .  Assumption 7. It provides a sufficient condition for achieving this purpose, stating that for any 𝑢∈ 𝔘 , 𝑡 ,𝜉 ,𝑦 ∈𝒜 .𝒞ℜ ,ℜ , there exists a real constant  𝛾   to satisfy  Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y γ ‖y y ‖.  (25)  Similar to Assumption 1, Assumption 7 implies a global Lipchitz‐type condition on function Κ   such that, in a physical problem,  u, y   are bounded. Therefore, it can also be replaced by a local  smoothness condition.  In  addition  to  asking  that  the  state  estimation  error  e   converge  to  0  in  the  absence  of  disturbances, we want it to still converge to 0 if a disturbance is present, but converge to 0 and remain  bounded  if  the  disturbance  is  bounded.  Therefore,  Assumption  7  implies  that  the  definition  of  e t, e   in (24) is not affected.  In  particular,  since  output  y ,  used  in  the  observer  in  Equation  (23),  is  in  fact  a  virtual  measurement which is estimated by the output of the process subsystem, an estimation error becomes  unavoidable. This estimation error can be viewed as a bounded disturbance to the real output of the  actuator subsystem  y . Therefore, the basic problem addressed in this work is the design of nonlinear  observers that possesses robustness to the disturbance affecting the real output.  Theorem 2. It says that if Assumptions 6 and 7 are satisfied, then the observer described in Equation (23)  is a converging observer for the actuator subsystem described in Equation (18).  The proof is given in Appendix B.  3.1.4. Interconnected Observer  The interconnected observer for the studied interconnected system by the system in Equations  (11) and (23) is constituted as follows:  ξ G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u ,ξ Λ ξ S C Cξ y ∑ :   (26)  ξ f ξ ,u κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ ξ where the virtual measurement  y   in Equation (23) is replaced by the estimation ξ . The observer  estimation errors satisfy the following equation:  e tξ t ξ t,e tξ t ξ t   (27)  3.2. Interconnected Observer Analysis  The observer in Equation (26) has been designed so that the dynamics of the corresponding error  system in Equation (27) are governed as follows:  e t,e G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u ,ξ H ξ Cξ y G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u ,ξ   (28)  e t,e e t,e Κ u,ξ ,h ξ Κ u,ξ ,ξ To  analyze  the  system  in  Equation  (28),  our  purpose  is  to  study  the  stability  of  the  error  dynamics.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  9  of  23  Theorem 3. If Assumptions 1–7 are satisfied, then a relatively high value of 𝜃   can be chosen such that  1 𝜂 , and the error dynamics governed in Equation (28) are convergent.  Proof. The objective is to analyze the stability of the error dynamics. To achieve this purpose, by  using  V   and  V ,  defined  in  the  proof  of  Theorems  1  and  2,  the  following  Lyapunov  function  candidate is constructed:  V t,e ,e V t,e V t,e   (29)  Then, the time derivation of  V t, e ,e   yields  V t,e ,e ∂V ∂V ∂V ∂V ∂V (30)  t, e t, e e t, e t, e t, e e t, e t, e Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,ξ   ∂t ∂e ∂t ∂e ∂e Let us analyze the different terms on the right side of Equation (30), starting with term 1 and  using results in the proof of Theorem 1:  ∂V ∂V V t,e t,e t,e e t,e ∂t ∂e (31)  θη V V ξ ξ   In turn, by using results in the proof of Theorem 2, then term 2 on the right side of Equation (30)  develops as follows:  ∂V ∂V ∂V V e t,e t,e e t,e t,e Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,ξ ∂t ∂e ∂e (32)  α V η V ξ ξ   Then, the overall inequality yields  V t,e ,e α V η V V θη V V V   (33)  ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ Now, set V α V ,  V θη V , and V V V .  Let us assume that  ς min α , θη     In this case,  (34)  V 2ς𝑉   It should also be noted that  ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ V V 2 V V (35)  2 α θη V V   Thus,  V V V   (36)  2 α θη It is easy to get that inequality in Equation (33) to yield the following:  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  10  of  23  1 η ∗ ∗ V e ,e V η V 2 α θη 1 η 1 η V (37)  2 α θη 1 η 2ς 1 η V   2 α θη Now, it suffices to choose a value of  θ   such that  1 η 0.  This ends the proof. □  4. Simulations  Numerical simulations were performed to validate that the interconnected observer given by  Equation (26) can be implemented for monitoring the performance of an interconnected system. A  case  study  was  developed  on  an  intensified  heat  exchanger  (IHEX).  The  pilot  consisted  of  three  process plates sandwiched between five utility plates. Two pneumatic control valves were used to  control the utility and process fluid. More relative information could be found in [17]. Moreover, the  outlet fluid flow rates of the control valves were assumed to be unmeasured to ensure a realistic  simulation.  Therefore,  during  the  course  of  the  simulation  work,  the  proposed  observers  were  designed for estimating unmeasured inlet fluid flows and monitoring the performance of the IHEX.  4.1. System Modelling  4.1.1. Actuator Subsystem Modelling  The pneumatic control valve is used to act as an actuator in this system. By applying Bernoulli’s  continuous flow law of incompressible fluids, we have  ∆P (38)  F C f X   sg where F is the flow rate (m s ), ∆P  is the fluid pressure drop across the valve (Pa),  sg  is the specific  gravity of the fluid and equals 1 for pure water, X is the valve opening percentage,  C   is the valve  coefficient, and f(X) is the flow characteristic which is defined as the relationship between the valve  capacity and fluid traveling through the valve. In [3], a pneumatic control valve had a dynamic model  as follows:  d X dX (39)  m μ kX p A   dt dt dp A dX p p   (40)  dt 𝑉 A 𝑋 dt where  A   is  the  diaphragm  area  on  which  the  pneumatic  pressure  acts,  p   is  the  pneumatic  pressure, m is the mass of the control valve stem, μ  is the friction of the valve stem,  k  is the spring  compliance, X is the stem displacement or percentage opening of the valve,    is the command  pressure, and  p   is the air pressure. The following definitions also apply:  dX dX x x x x x x x     X p X p dt dt ∆ ∆ u u u ,  u F F C X C X     𝐶𝑉𝑃 𝐶𝑉𝑃 𝐶𝑉𝑃 𝐶𝑉𝑃 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  11  of  23  ∆P ∆P c c c c c c C 0     C 00 C 0 sg sg where  p ,p ,  X ,X ,  , ,  ∆P ,  and ∆P   correspond  to  p ,X, ,  and  ∆P  in  Equations  (36)–(38),  respectively,  and  subscripts  one  and  two  represent  two  different  control  valves.  The  actuator subsystem is then described as  x x k μ A ⎪ x x x x m m m A A p x x u x x p u x ⎪ 𝑉 A x 𝑉 A x x x   (41)  k μ A x x x x m m m A A p x x u x x p u x 𝑉 A x 𝑉 A x ⎩ 𝑦𝐶𝑥 4.1.2. Process Subsystem Modelling  The IHEX can be modeled based on the mass and energy balances, which describe the evolution  of characteristic values such as temperature, mass, composition, and pressure. Considering the heat  exchanger system taken from [17], the dynamic equation governing the heat balance of the fluids is  given by  UA 1 T T T T T F   (42)  ρ c V V UA 1 T T T T T F   (43)  ρ c V V where  ρ ,ρ   are the densities of the fluids (in  kg m ),  V , V   are the volumes of the fluids (in  m ),  c ,c are  the  specific  heats  of  the  fluids  (in  J kg K ),  U  is  the  overall  heat  transfer  coefficient (in  J m K s ), A is the reaction area (in  m ),  F ,F   are the mass flow rates of the  fluids (in  kg s ), and  T ,T   are the inlet temperatures of the fluids.  If the state vector is defined as  x x ,x T ,T , the control input as  u u ,u F ,F , and the output vector as  y y ,y T ,T , then the above two equations can be  rewritten as  x f x g x u   (44)  y h x, u T T f x where  f x ,  g x g ,g , and  y x ,y f x T T x .  By using Equation (34), a function for the derivatives for  u   is obtained:  ∂h ∂h u ε u, u,x u, x u u, x f u, x ∂u ∂x (45)  ∆P ∆P ∆P A ∆P x u  C 0 C 0 C C sg sg sg m sg 𝐶𝑉𝑃 𝐶𝑉𝑃 𝐶𝑉𝑃 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  12  of  23  If  the  state  vector  is  defined  as  x x ,x T ,T ,  the  unmeasured  state  as  x x ,x u ,u F , F ,   and  the  output  vector  as  y y ,y T ,T ,  then  Equations (44) and (45) can be rewritten as  x G x x g x ,u   (46)  x ε u, u ,x y x x x where  G x   and  f x .  x x 4.2. Observer Design  4.2.1. Observer 1 for the Actuator Subsystem  In this model, outputs were considered as unmeasured and were substituted by its estimation  proposed in Observer 2, then an extended high‐gain observer of the form in Equation (26) for the  system in Equation (41) is given by  ∆P x x k C x x sg k μ A ∆P ⎪ x x x x k C x x m m m sg A A p ∆P x x u x x p u x k C x x V A x V A x sg (47)  ∆P ⎪ x x k C x x sg k μ A ∆P x x x x k C x x m m m sg A A p ∆P ⎪x x u x x p u x k C x x V A x V A x sg 4.2.2. Observer 2 for the Process Subsystem  It  should  be  noted  that  the  original  system  in  Equation  (45)  has  been  augmented  with  the  differential  equation  u ε u, u ,x ;  that  is  to  say,  the  unknown  inputs  are  treated  like  an  unmeasured state. Then, it is possible to design an observer of the form in Equation (26) for the system  in Equation (46) as follows:  h A T x ⎧ x x ρ C V ⎛ V ⎞ ⎛ ⎞ ⎪ 2θ x x y y ⎪ ⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟ h A 2θ T x 0 x x V ρ C V ⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠ h A   (48)  θ x x ρ C V A ⎛ ⎞ ∆P ∆P ∆P A ∆P x C 0 C 0 x C C u y y ⎜ ⎟ sg sg m sg m sg h A θ x x ρ C V ⎪ ⎝ ⎠ ⎩ y x Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  13  of  23  4.3. Numerical Simulations  In order to test the performance of the proposed observers, two numerical simulations were  carried out. Considering the actuator and process models given by Equations (44) and (46), Observer  1 in Equation (47) and Observer 2 in Equation (48) were designed for estimating unmeasured inlet  flows  F , F   and monitoring the performance of the final products  T ,T . Available measurements  involve the inlet–outlet temperatures of the hex reactor and the pneumatic pressure  p ,p   of the  actuators.  Two  cases  were  considered.  In  Case  1,  constant  inlet  flows  F , F   were  considered  in  both  fluids. By contrast, in Case 2,  F , F   were considered to be time varying. Observers 1 and 2 were  simulated with respect to the actuator and process subsystems, using the values corresponding to an  IHEX system from [17]. The parameters in the process subsystem were as follows:  hA 214.8 W K ,V 2.685 10 m ,V 1.141 10 m , and the inlet temperatures  T   and  T   were  76 ℃  and  15 ℃, respectively. The parameters in the actuator subsystem were as follows: m = 2 kg,  A   =  0.029 m , μ 1500 Ns/m, k = 6089 Ns/m, Pc for the utility fluid was 1 MPa (1.2 Mpa for the process  fluid), and the pressure drop ∆P  in the utility fluid was 0.6 MPa (60 KPa in the process fluid).  In  order  to  illustrate  the  robustness,  external  disturbances  and  measurement  noise  were  considered. Suppose the output measurement is corrupted by a colored noise. In addition to noise,  no error is assumed in measuring  T and T . Moreover, to compare the effectiveness of the proposed  method with other existing ones, we employed a typical unknown input observer (UIO) in [31] to  show the differences.  4.3.1. Case 1: Both Fluid Flow Rates  F , F   Are Constant  The objective of this simulation was to prove the convergence of the observers in a common  situation where both fluid flow rates remained constant over a long time. The computed inlet flow  rate of the utility fluid  F   was  4.22 10 m s , and the inlet flow rate of the process fluid  F   was  a constant  4.17 10 m s . The computed value meant the expected true values of the actuators.  The initial conditions of the process model were  T 80 ℃ and T 20 ℃, respectively, and for the  observers they were  T T 30. The discrepancies between the initial conditions of the process  and those of the observers were reasonable and realistic, considering that the temperature was a  process variable that could be easily measured. In order to evaluate the observer performance against  uncertainties of the knowledge of the fluid flow rate, the initial value of the estimates were  F F 0  in  both  observers.  This  assumption  represented  a  relatively  rough  situation  in  the  practical  engineering world. However, simulation results showed encouraging results. The tuning parameters  were  k k 100, k k 0.15  (for Observer 1) and θ 80  (for Observer 2).  The results are reported in Figures 3 and 4. In Figure 3, the dashed curves correspond to the  estimates using Observer 1, and the solid lines are the measured temperatures. It can be seen that,  whether noise‐free or noise‐corrupted, the convergence of the estimated  T and T   values proved to  be  fast  (in  several  seconds).  It  is  not  surprising  because,  actually,  T and T   were  the  measured  outputs of the overall system.  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure 3. Output of the process fluid temperature  T . The solid line is the measured value, and the  dashed line is estimated by Observer 1. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐ corrupted case.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  14  of  23  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure 4. Output of the utility fluid temperature  T . The solid line is the measured value, and the  dashed line is estimated by Observer 1. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐ corrupted case.  The main contribution of the proposed method is the capacity that, besides states, it can estimate  the  unknown  connection  of  an  interconnected  system  by  the  final  measured  outputs,  where  the  unknown connection represents the inlet fluid flow rate  F , F   in the IHEX system. Figures 5 and 6  give the encouraging results. Figure 5 shows the computation and estimation of the process fluid  flow rate  F , using a UIO and Observer 2. Figure 6 is the results for the utility fluid flow rate  F . As  expected,  F and F   follow  different  trajectories  before  they  converge  toward  the  true  value  (computed value) in a relatively short transient period, whether or not noise exists. However, the  convergence speed of the proposed method is obviously faster than that of the UIO. In addition, the  proposed observer was more robust with noise. For  F , as shown in Figure 5, if no noise was present,  after less than 5 s, the three curves overlapped. Compared with the curve of the UIO on the dashed,  dotted line, the curve of the proposed Observer 2 in dashed, dotted line only needed less than 1 s to  track the simulated curve of the solid line. Moreover, from Figure 5, we can see that the curve of the  UIO in the dashed line was significantly more affected by noise than that of Observer 2 in the dashed,  dotted line. The similar results are shown in Figure 6 with respect to  F . According to Figure 6, it  took about 1.5 s for the three curves to be overlapped, while for the curve of Observer 2 on the dashed  line, less than 0.5 s was taken. The impact of noise is relatively obvious on the curve of the UIO, while  for the curve of Observer 2, the influence was less significant.  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure  5.  The  computation  and  estimation  of  the  process  fluid  flow  rate F .  The  solid  line  is  the  computed value; the dashed line is estimated by the unknown input observer (UIO); and the dashed,  dotted  line is  estimated  by Observer  2.  (a)  represents  Noise‐free  case  while  (b)  represents  Noise‐ corrupted case.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  15  of  23  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure  6.  The  computation  and  estimation  of  the  utility  fluid  flow  rate  F .  The  solid  line  is  the  computed value; the dashed line is estimated by the UIO; and the dashed, dotted line is estimated by  Observer 2. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐corrupted case.  In both fluids, these differences were caused by their varied initial values. However, it is proven  that  if  adequate  values  of  the  tuning  parameters  k  and  θ  are  selected,  no  matter  the  degree  of  deviation  of  the  initial  value  of  F and F   from  the  simulated  values  in  the  system  model,  convergences are guaranteed. Larger values of these tuning parameters ensure a smaller convergence  time, while smaller values have the opposite effect. However, large tuning values should be avoided,  since  the  observer  may  become  too  sensitive  to  measurement  noise  in  real‐time  applications.  According to the above analysis, we can readily conclude that the proposed interconnected observer  works effectively and robustly for the designed purposes with proper tuning parameters.  4.3.2. Case 2: The Fluid Flow Rates Vary Due to Parameter Changes  The present computations were executed to get an accurate screening of the variation of the  observer estimate by corroborating if they were in agreement with the simulated fluid flow rates  which  underwent  either  an  abrupt  change  or  a  gradual  variation  due  to,  for  example,  aging  or  erosion.  The  parameter  effects  were  taken  into  account  in  the  following  way.  Initial  values  of F 4.22 10 m s   and  F 4.17 10 m s   are considered, followed by an abrupt change of  F   at 80 s. The reason for this change is the variation of parameter ∆P, with the value changing from  0.6 MPa to 0.4 Mpa. Several factors can be attributed to this kind of variation, such as valve clogging  or  an  unexpected  pressure  drop  across  the  control  valves.  After  that,  at  t  =  150  s,  F   began  to  deteriorate due to an increase of the spring compliance  k   in the process fluid actuator. One main  reason contributing to this change is erosion. Because of erosion, the gland packing of the valve may  loosen, which leads to stem vibration. In the simulation, a value of 1000  nm   was added to the  spring compliance k . This simulation was carried out using the same constants used in the previous  simulation and the same values of  T   and  T , as well as  T and T , were used. The initial conditions  of both observers, as well as the observer parameters (k ,k , k , k , and θ) were the same as the  previous ones. These variations are illustrated in Figures 7–10.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  16  of  23  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure 7. Outlet temperature of the process fluid  T . The solid line is the measured value, and the  dashed line is estimated by Observer 1. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐ corrupted case.  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure 8. Outlet temperature of the utility fluid  T . The solid line is the measured value, and the  dashed line is estimated by Observer 1. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐ corrupted case.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  17  of  23  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure  9.  The  computation  and  estimation  of  the  process  fluid  flow  rate F .  The  solid  line  is  the  computed value; the dashed line is estimated by the UIO; and the dashed, dotted line is estimated by  Observer 2. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐corrupted case.  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure  10.  The  computation  and  estimation  of  the  utility  fluid  flow  rate  F .  The  solid  line  is  the  computed value; the dashed line is estimated by the UIO; and the dashed, dotted line is estimated by  Observer 2. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐corrupted case.  As shown in Figures 7 and 8, whether in a noise‐free or noise‐corrupted situation, the estimated  outlet fluid temperatures  T and T   on the dashed line can better track the curve of the measurements  T and T   on the solid line after a short transient time. At 80 s, both curves decreased unexpectedly  and finally stabilized at a new level. A drop of 0.2 ℃  was observed. Shortly after, at t = 150 s, another  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  18  of  23  drop happened, and a new stable level was expected with a 0.9 ℃  reduction. These decreases imply  the influences of parameter changes in the fluid actuators, and no further variations illustrate the  occurrence of additional changes. A similar result was obtained in the estimated  T   of the utility  fluid  in  Figure  8.  It  is  shown  that,  due  to  changes  of  ∆P and k ,  the  measured  T   dropped  0.2  ℃ and 0.5 ℃  at 80 s and 150 s, respectively. The estimated  T on the dashed line tracks  T   after the  observer converges.  The  simulation  curves  indicate  that  the  proposed  observer  was  effective  at  tracking  system  performance.  However,  it  is  shown  that,  because  of  noise,  the  drops  caused  by  local  parameter  changes at 80 s could not be visually observed on the global output directly. In order to analyze the  influence of these changes, we have to detect it through the local dynamics supervision. Therefore, it  is very meaningful to monitor both the local and global dynamics of a control system.  It can be seen from Figure 9 that, in a noise‐free situation, two estimate curves on the dashed line  and  the  dashed,  dotted  line  converge  to  the  simulated  value  F   of  the  solid  line  quickly  after  a  transient response. The dashed line is the estimated process fluid flow rate  F   produced by the UIO,  and the dashed, dotted line was generated by Observer 2. Later, at 150 s, there was an unexpected  drop by the simulated  F   on the solid line. Fortunately, both estimate curves responded quickly to  this variation, and the curve of the UIO took 1.5 s to track  F   again, while the curve of Observer 2  converged more quickly than that of the UIO. The decrease implies parameter changes in the process  fluid actuator, which satisfy the assumption that  k   changes at t = 150 s. When it comes to the noise‐ corrupted situation, the curve of the UIO was significantly affected by the noise, although a drop at  150 s can still be observed. Luckily, the curve of Observer 2 was relatively robust to the noise, as it  converged to the simulated value of the solid line with a minor difference compared with the noise‐ free situation.  Figure 10 demonstrates the results for the utility fluid. The same results were obtained in a noise‐ free situation at a time of 80 s. As expected, the simulated  F   of the solid line jumped due to the  change of ∆P . The estimated value of  F   of the dashed line by the UIO and the dashed, dotted line  by Observer 2 track well with the value of  F   on the solid line. Just as with the process fluid situation,  the convergence speed of Observer 2 was faster than that of the UIO. If measurements were corrupted  by noise, the curve of Observer 2 was not obviously influenced. Conversely, the curve of the UIO was  greatly impacted.  To  sum  up,  obviously,  the  proposed  interconnected  observer  is  effective,  even  when  the  unknown connection is varying in time simultaneously. Therefore, the proposed observer proves its  ability  to  monitor  the  performance  of  interconnected  systems  and  to  estimate  unknown  interconnections.  5. Conclusions  The goal of the design methodology presented in this paper was to enable or simplify observer  design  for  systems  that  are  otherwise  difficult  to  handle  by  allowing  the  designer  to  focus  on  a  smaller, nonlinear subsystem. That is to say, we mainly focused on observing, for example, how the  change of an internal parameter at the local level affects the global output at the global level.  An  interconnected  observer  is  designed  to  estimate  both  the  state  and  unmeasured  interconnection at the local and global levels. As a result, both local and global dynamics can be  observed,  as  well  as  the  influence  of  local  dynamics  on  global  dynamics.  In  particular,  the  interconnection is not supposed to be accessible to measurement. In order to achieve this purpose,  firstly, an existing observer is extended to estimate the states of the actuator subsystem. Particularly,  the information of the actuator subsystem output is substituted by their estimates, achieved by the  observer of the process subsystem. Secondly, a kind of extended, high‐gain observer is produced to  estimate the states of the process subsystem, which is subjected to a precise unknown input. The  unknown input is considered a new state of the process subsystem, and it is expressed as a function  of  the  inputs,  derivatives  of  the  inputs,  and  the  states  of  the  actuator  subsystem.  Thus,  an  interconnected  observer  is  proposed  by  using  the  estimates  of  the  states  and  the  unmeasured  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  19  of  23  interconnection,  and  the  convergence  is  investigated.  Finally,  satisfactory  simulation  results  are  obtained to confirm the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.  In this paper, it is clear that the physical motivation for the decomposition of a control system  into the actuator and the process parts is physically motivated. In this respect, for control analysis  purposes, the condition for decomposition of an independent control system may be the target of  future investigations, like the inverted pendulum on a cart. Another open question worth addressing  is  the  demonstration  of  stability  and  sensitivity  of  the  estimation  error,  like  the  use  of  ISS  to  investigate the stability of the estimation error in [32].  Author  Contributions:  M.Z.  and  Z.‐t.L.  conceived  and  designed  the  study.  M.Z.  and  Q.W.  performed  the  observer design, carried out simulations, and wrote the original draft. B.D. and X.‐p.C. reviewed and edited the  manuscript. All authors read and approved the manuscript. All authors have read and agreed to the published  version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, Grant No. 62003106  and No. 5186070133, Talent Project of GZU (2018) 02. Key Lab construction project of Guizhou Province (2016)  5103.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  Abbreviations  The following abbreviations are used in this manuscript:  ISS  input‐to‐state stability  ISDS  input‐to‐state dynamical stability  UIO  unknown input observer  IHEX  intensified heat exchanger  Appendix A  Proof of Theorem 1. Before preceding the convergence proof of the observer, one introduces the  following notations:  S ∆ S ∆   where  I 0 S S   and ∆     0 I To proof Theorem 1, the estimation error is introduced as  e t ξ t ξ t .  Then, subtracting corresponding Equations (10) and (11), one gets the following error dynamics:  1 1 T e G ξ ξ F ξ ε ̅ u, u ,ξ Λ ξ S C Cξ y G ξ ξ F ξ 11 1 11 1 θ 1 ε ̅ u, u ,ξ   G ξ Λ ξ S C C e G ξ G ξ ξ F ξ F ξ e t,e     11 1 11 where  e t, e ε u, u ,ξ ε u, u ,ξ .  By setting  e ∆ Λ ξ e , one can then get  e t θ A S C C e Λ ξ Λ ξ e ∆ Λ ξ F ξ F ξ ∆ Λ ξ G ξ ξ G ξ ξ ∆ Λ ξ e t,e   1 11 1 To  analyze  the  dynamics  of  the  error  system,  the  following  positive  Lyapunov  function  candidate is considered:  V t,e e S e   Convergence of the observer is described by the time derivation of  V t, e . Then, we obtain  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  20  of  23  V t,e 2e S e   θ 2e S 𝐴 e 2e C Ce 2e S Λ ξ Λ ξ e 2e S ∆ Λ ξ F ξ F ξ 2e S ∆ Λ ξ G ξ G ξ ξ 2e S ∆ Λ ξ e t, e   11 1 θ V θ Ce 2e S Λ ξ Λ ξ e 2e S ∆ Λ ξ F ξ F ξ 2e S ∆ Λ ξ G ξ G ξ ξ 2e S ∆ Λ ξ e t, e   11 1 θ V 2 S e Λ ξ Λ ξ e 2 S e Λ ξ ∆ F ξ F ξ 2 S e ∆ Λ ξ G ξ G ξ ξ S e G ξ ‖e t, e ‖  11 1 θ V 2μ S e e 2ρ S e ∆ F ξ F ξ 2τγ 2 S e ∆ Λ ξ G ξ G ξ ξ S e ξ ξ   11 1 2 where μ sup Λ ξ Λ ξ , ρ  is the upper boundary of  Λ ξ , ‖e t, e ‖γ ξ ξ ,  as  proposed  in  Assumption  1,  and  τ  is  a  finite  real  number  with  0ϱτ ,  such  that  ϱ I F ξ F ξ τ I , as given in Assumptions 2–4.  11 11 Then, we have  ∆ F ξ F ξ f ξ f ξ σ e     11 11 where σ  denotes the Lipchitz constants of  f ξ .  Similarly, we have  ∆ Λ ξ G ξ G ξ ξ g ξ g ξ ξ ϵ e     11 1 11 12 where the positive constant ϵ  denotes the boundary of ξ .  Thus, we get the following:  V t,e θ V η V V ξ ξ   V t,e θ V η V V ξ ξ     θ η V V ξ ξ     where  η 2μ 2ρσ 2ϵξ S   and  ξ S λ S λ ⁄ S , η 2τγ λ S . λ S   (resp. λ S ) is the largest (resp. the smallest) eigenvalue of λ S .  Thus, the following hold true:  1. if  ξ ξ   converges to 0, it results in  V t, e θ η V . Then, by taking θθ η ,  the negative of the right side of the above inequality is obtained;  2. if  ξ ξ   is bounded by  e , it results in  V t, e θη V . Then, by choosing  ∗ ∗ θθ   such that  θ η 0, the negative of the right side of the above inequality is  obtained.  That ends the proof.□  Appendix B  Proof of Theorem 2. In order to show that the system described in Equation (23) represents a  converging  observer  for  the  system  in  Equation  (18),  we  need  to  make  its  corresponding  error  dynamics in Equation (24) coincide with Assumption 6, which has been proven to be a condition for  the existence of a converging observer.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  21  of  23  ̅ ̅ e t,e f ξ ,u f ξ ,u Κ u,ξ ,y   ̅ ̅ f ξ ,u f ξ ,u Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y   e t,e Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y   Therefore, by computing the time derivation of  V   with respect to the trajectory  e   in Equation  (24), using Assumptions 6 and 7, it follows that  ∂V ∂V ∂V V t,e t,e t,e e t,e t,e Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y     ∂t ∂e ∂e α ‖e ‖ β γ ‖e ‖‖y y ‖  α ‖e ‖ η ‖e ‖‖y y ‖    where  η β γ .  Since  the  output  y   used  in  the  observer  in  Equation  (23)  is  in  fact  a  virtual  measurement which is estimated by the output of the process subsystem, it is in fact ξ , ξ .  ‖ ‖ ‖ ‖ V t,e α e η e ξ ξ     12 12 Thus, the right side of this inequality is negative if the following conditions are met:  1. α β γ   and  ξ ξ   is bounded by  e , resulting in  V t, e α η ‖e ‖ ;  2 12 12 2. ξ ξ   converges to 0, resulting in  V t, e α ‖e ‖ .  12 12 This ends the proof.□  References  1. Yang, J.; Zhu, F.; Yu, K.; Bu, X. Observer‐based state estimation and unknown input reconstruction for  nonlinear complex dynamical systems. Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simul. 2015, 20, 927–939.  2. Gauthier,  J.;  Hammouri,  H.;  Othman,  S.  A  simple  observer  for  nonlinear  systems  applications  to  bioreactors. IEEE Trans. Autom. Control. 1992, 37, 875–880.  3. Bartyś, M.; Patton, R.; Syfert, M.; Heras, S.D.L.; Quevedo, J. Introduction to the DAMADICS actuator FDI  benchmark study. Control. Eng. Pr. 2006, 14, 577–596.  4. Moreno, J.A.; Alvarez, J. On the estimation problem of a class of continuous bioreactors with unknown  input. J. Process. Control. 2015, 30, 34–49.  5. De Persis, C.; Isidori, A. A geometric approach to nonlinear fault detection and isolation. IEEE Trans. Autom.  Control. 2001, 45, 853–865.  6. Zhu, F. State estimation and unknown input reconstruction via both reduced‐order and high‐order sliding  mode observers. J. Process. Control. 2012, 22, 296–302.  7. Besançon, G. Remarks on nonlinear adaptive observer design. Syst. Control. Lett. 2000, 41, 271–280.  8. Vijay, P.; Tadé, M.O.; Ahmed, K.; Utikar, R.; Pareek, V.K. Simultaneous estimation of states and inputs in  a planar solid oxide fuel cell using nonlinear adaptive observer design. J. Power Sources 2014, 248, 1218– 1233.  9. Li,  Z.;  Dahhou,  B.  A  new  fault  isolation  and  identification  method  for  nonlinear  dynamic  systems:  Application to a fermentation process. Appl. Math. Model. 2008, 32, 2806–2830.  10. Pan,  S.;  Xiao,  D.;  Xing,  S.;  Law,  S.;  Du,  P.;  Li,  Y.  A  general  extended  Kalman  filter  for  simultaneous  estimation of system and unknown inputs. Eng. Struct. 2016, 109, 85–98.  11. Manaa,  I.;  Barhoumi,  N.;  M’,  F.;  Sahli,  N.  Unknown  inputs  observers  design  for  a  class  of  nonlinear  switched systems. Int. J. Model. Identif. Control. 2015, 23, 45.  12. Besançon, G.; Munteanu, I. Control strategy for state and input observer design. Syst. Control. Lett. 2015,  85, 118–122.  13. Guo, S.; Zhu, F. Actuator fault detection and interval reconstruction based on interval observers. IFAC‐ PapersOnLine 2017, 50, 5061–5066.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  22  of  23  14. Buciakowski, M.; Witczak, M.; Puig, V.; Rotondo, D.; Nejjari, F.; Korbicz, J. A bounded‐error approach to  simultaneous state and actuator fault estimation for a class of nonlinear systems. J. Process. Control. 2017,  52, 14–25.  15. Vijay, P.; Tadé, M.O. An adaptive non‐linear observer for the estimation of temperature distribution in the  planar solid oxide fuel cell. J. Process. Control. 2013, 23, 429–443.  16. Marzat,  J.; Piet‐Lahanier,  H.; Damongeot,  F.;  Walter, É.  Fault  diagnosis  for  nonlinear  aircraft  based  on  control‐induced redundancy. In Proceedings of the SysTol 2010: Conference on Control and Fault‐Tolerant  Systems, Nice, France, 6–8 October 2010; pp. 119–124.  17. Théron,  F.;  Anxionnaz‐Minvielle,  Z.;  Cabassud,  M.;  Gourdon,  C.;  Tochon,  P.  Characterization  of  the  performances of an innovative heat‐exchanger/reactor. Chem. Eng. Process. Process. Intensif. 2014, 82, 30–41.  18. Zhang, M.; Li, Z.‐T.; Cabassud, M.; Dahhou, B. Root cause analysis of actuator fault based on invertibility  of interconnected system. Int. J. Model. Identif. Control. 2017, 27, 256.  19. Zou,  T.;  Wu,  S.;  Zhang,  R.  Improved  state  space  model  predictive  fault‐tolerant  control  for  injection  molding batch processes with partial actuator faults using GA optimization. ISA Trans. 2018, 73, 147–153.  20. Kadlec, P.; Gabrys, B.; Strandt, S. Data‐driven Soft Sensors in the process industry. Comput. Chem. Eng. 2009,  33, 795–814.  21. Boccaletti, S.; Latora, V.; Moreno, Y.; Chavez, M.; Hwang, D. Complex networks: Structure and dynamics.  Phys. Rep. 2006, 424, 175–308.  22. Keliris, C.; Polycarpou, M.M.; Parisini, T. A robust nonlinear observer‐based approach for distributed fault  detection of input–output interconnected systems. Automatica 2015, 53, 408–415.  23. Gao, N.; Darouach, M.; Alma, M.; Voos, H. Decentralized dynamic‐observer‐based control for large scale  nonlinear uncertain systems. In Proceedings of the 2015 American Control Conference (ACC), Chicago, IL,  USA, 1–3 July 2015; pp. 4131–4136.  24. Li, Y.; Sanfelice, R.G. Interconnected Observers for Robust Decentralized Estimation With Performance  Guarantees and Optimized Connectivity Graph. IEEE Trans. Control. Netw. Syst. 2015, 3, 1–11.  25. Chakrabarty, A.; Sundaram, S.; Corless, M.J.; Buzzard, G.T.; Żak, S.H.; Rundell, A.E. Distributed unknown  input  observers  for  interconnected  nonlinear  systems.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2016  American  Control  Conference (ACC), Boston, MA, USA, 6–8 July 2016; pp. 101–106.  26. Besançon, G.; Hammouri, H. On observer design for interconnected systems. J. Math. Syst. Estim. Control  1998, 8, 1–26.  27. Dashkovskiy, S.; Naujok, L. Quasi‐ISS/ISDS observers for interconnected systems and applications. Syst.  Control. Lett. 2015, 77, 11–21.  28. hmed‐Ali, T.; Giri, F.; Krstic, M.; Lamnabhi‐Lagarrigue, F. Observer design for a class of nonlinear ODE– PDE cascade systems. Syst. Control. Lett. 2015, 83, 19–27.  29. Grip, H.F.; Saberi, A.; Johansen, T.A. Observers for interconnected nonlinear and linear systems. Automatica  2012, 48, 1339–1346.  30. Farza, M.; Busawon, K.; Hammouri, H. Simple nonlinear observers for on‐line estimation of kinetic rates  in bioreactors. Automatica 1998, 34, 301–318.  31. Zhang, M.; Li, Z.‐T.; Cabassud, M.; Dahhou, B. Unknown input reconstruction: A comparison of system  inversion and sliding mode observer based techniques. In the Proceedings of the CCC2017 (2017 Chinese  Control Conference), Daian, China, 26–27 July 2017; pp. 7172–7177.  32. Alessandri, A.; Bagnerini, P.; Cianci, R. State observation for Lipchitz nonlinear dynamical systems basen  on Lyapunov functions and functionals. Mathematics 2020, 8, 1424.  Publisherʹs Note: MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional  affiliations.  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional  affiliations.  © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access  article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution  (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  23  of  23  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Sciences Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Observer Design for Nonlinear Invertible System from the View of Both Local and Global Levels

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/observer-design-for-nonlinear-invertible-system-from-the-view-of-both-nJYs4upSBf
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2020 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2076-3417
DOI
10.3390/app10227966
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Observer Design for Nonlinear Invertible System  from the View of Both Local and Global Levels  1 1 1 2 1, Mei Zhang  , Qin‐mu Wu  , Xiang‐ping Chen  , Boutaïeb Dahhou   and Ze‐tao Li  *    Electrical Engineering School, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025, China; mzhang3@gzu.edu.cn (M.Z.);  qmwu@gzu.edu.cn (Q.W.); ee.xpchen@gzu.edu.cn (X.‐p.C.)    University de Toulouse, UPS, LAAS, F‐31400 Toulouse, France; boutaib.dahhou@laas.fr  *  Correspondence: ztli@gzu.edu.cn  Received: 22 September 2020; Accepted: 4 November 2020; Published: 10 November 2020  Abstract: This paper emphasizes the importance of the influences of local dynamics on the global  dynamics of a control system. By considering an actuator as an individual, nonlinear subsystem  connected with a nonlinear process subsystem in cascade, a structure of interconnected nonlinear  systems is proposed which allows for global and local supervision properties of the interconnected  systems. To achieve this purpose, a kind of interconnected observer design method is investigated,  and the convergence is studied. One major difficulty is that a state observation can only rely on the  global system output at the terminal boundary. This is because the connection point between the  two  subsystems  is  considered  unable  to  be  measured,  due  to  physical  or  economic  reasons.  Therefore, the aim of the interconnected observer is to estimate the state vector of each subsystem  and the unmeasurable connection point. Specifically, the output used in the observer of the actuator  subsystem is replaced by the estimation of the process subsystem observer, while the estimation of  this  interconnection  is  treated  like  an  additional  state  in  the  observer  design  of  the  process  subsystem. Expression for this new state is achieved by calculating the derivatives of the output  equation of the actuator subsystem. Numerical simulations confirm the effectiveness and robustness  of the proposed observer, which highlight the significance of the work compared with state‐of‐the‐ art methods.  Keywords:  interconnected  nonlinear  system;  states  estimation;  left  invertibility;  local  dynamics;  process subsystem; actuator subsystem; unknown interconnection  1. Introduction  A modern system often consists of a series of interconnected dynamical units (sensors, actuators  and system components) and, therefore, very complicated dynamics are exhibited [1]. Technological  advances mean that these units themselves are dynamic systems and exhibit complicated dynamics.  Therefore, a modern control system can be viewed as composed of dynamic subsystems connected  in  a  series.  In  all  situations,  the  global  plant  can  be  analyzed  at  different  levels—down  to  the  component level—to estimate the reliability of the whole plant.  In recent years, the topic of observer design for separate nonlinear systems has been widely  discussed  in  the  literature,  like  high‐gain  observers  [2–4],  sliding  mode  observers  [5,6],  adaptive  observers [7–9], and unknown input observers (UIOs) [10–12]. These methodologies are typically  centralized monitoring systems where intelligence is either at the system level or at the field device  level of the processing plant. For the former, it aims at monitoring plant dynamics from the viewpoint  of a global system, like in [13–15]. In these methods, the dynamics of subcomponents (i.e., actuators)  are  often  neglected.  They  are,  generally  speaking,  treated  as  constants  in  the  input  or  output  coefficient matrix (function) of the process system model. For the latter, it focuses on the field device  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966; doi:10.3390/app10227966  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  2  of  23  level, aiming at analyzing the internal dynamics of a specific subcomponent while the influences of  local internal dynamics on the global dynamics are neglected, like in [3,16].  However, centralized observers may not be suitable for modern control systems. On one hand,  a  modern  control  system  is  in  fact  an  interconnected  system,  while  the  centralized  observer  just  enables an individual component to monitor internal dynamics locally. However, the dynamics of  the field devices can cause significant disturbances to the global process and influence the quality of  the final product [17,18]. On the other hand, due to uneconomical measurement costs or physical  environment factors such as high temperature, it is impossible to measure the state or partial state,  such as in [19,20]. To overcome these difficulties, an effective way is to decompose the system into  several interconnected subsystems so that the observer can be decentralized in each subsystem. In  this  way,  it  allows  the  analysis  of  less  complex  subcomponents  to  study  the  characteristics  of  interconnected systems.  The last few decades have also witnessed significant improvements in dynamic networks which  consist  of  a  number  of  interconnected  units,  like  in  [1,21–24].  A  typical  approach  is  to  design  distributed observers for each subsystem using the internal information of each subsystem, and then  all the observers are aggregated to form the total estimator [25–27]. For instance, in [26], an observer  was designed for the whole system from the separate synthesis of observers for each subsystem,  assuming that for each of these separate designs, the states from the other subsystem were available.  In [27], an observer for each subsystem was proposed, using the state estimation of the previous  subsystem.  In  addition,  a  quasi‐input‐to‐state  stability  and  input‐to‐state  dynamical  stability  (ISS/ISDS)  reduced‐order  observer  for  the  whole  system  was  designed,  considering  the  interconnections of quasi‐ISS/ISDS reduced‐order observers for each subsystem. A major challenge  for these methods is the availability of the measurement of the interconnections between subsystems.  Therefore,  it  is  interesting  to  consider  the  problem  of  whether  we  can  prove  that,  under  some  conditions,  the  effect  in  lower  subsystems  can  be  distinguished  from  higher  subsystems,  thus  avoiding full measurements of the local subsystem. For example, in this work, the interconnection is  the output of the actuator, and it is not economical or realistic to measure its output. Contributions  dealing  with  the  state  observation  problem  for  interconnected  systems  subjected  to  unknown  interconnections have received less extensive treatment in the literature. In [28], a promising method  to  solve  the  state  observation  problem  of  nonlinear  systems  modeled  by  ODE‐PDE  series  was  proposed.  A  similar  problem  was  also  studied  in  [29],  where  the  interconnected  system  was  composed of a nonlinear system and a linear system.  In this paper, the problem of state estimation for interconnected nonlinear dynamic systems is  studied.  An  interconnected  system  consists  of  two  nonlinear  dynamic  subsystems,  and  the  interconnection point is unknown. Thus, one major difficulty is that state observation can only rely  on the output of the terminal subsystem, making existing observers useless. Therefore, the problem  considered here is that the output of the nonlinear system cannot be measured directly, while part of  the state measurement of the second nonlinear system can be obtained. Two issues are highlighted  here. Firstly, it is assumed that the measurement value used by the observer of the former subsystem  is unmeasurable, and the solution is to replace it with the estimated value of the observer of the latter  subsystem. Secondly, in the latter subsystem, the estimated interconnection provided for the former  subsystem is regarded as an additional state to form a new, extended subsystem. The expression of  the new state is obtained by calculating the derivative of the output equation of the former subsystem.  The contribution of this paper mainly lies in its emphasis of the importance of the influences of  local internal dynamics (actuator) on the global dynamics of a control system. A method is proposed  to distinguish the influence of low subsystems in higher subsystems, even if the full measurement of  local subsystems cannot be realized. Thus, the goal of the design methodology is to enable or simplify  observer design for systems that are otherwise difficult to handle by allowing the designer to focus  on a smaller, nonlinear subsystem. That is to say, we mainly focus on observing, for example, how  the change of an internal parameter at the local level affects the global output at the global level. As  a result, both local and global dynamics supervision is achieved, as well as analysis of the influences  of local internal dynamics on the global dynamics.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  3  of  23  The rest of the paper is organized as follows. Problem formulation is introduced in Section 2,  where the type of dynamic units of the interconnected system is explained, and the main objective is  introduced.  Section  3  contains  all  the  results  for  the  observer  design,  with  respect  to  the  interconnected systems. Some numerical simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness  of the proposed methods in Section 4. Finally, a conclusion is made in Section 5.  2. Motivations and Problem Formulations  The  problem  of  state  observation  is  investigated  for  an  interconnected  nonlinear  system,  modeled by two cascaded nonlinear dynamical subsystems: the process and the actuator subsystems.  As shown in Figure 1, an interconnected nonlinear system structure is proposed by considering both  the actuator and the process as individual dynamic subsystems connected in cascade. The aim is to  accurately estimate the state vector of both subsystems, as well as the interconnection. As a result,  both local and global dynamics supervision are realized, and analysis of the influence of local internal  dynamics on global dynamics is achieved.  ∑ Physical system ∑ (u , x) ∑ (u,  x ,) u u 𝒂 𝒂 𝑦 Actuator Subs Process Subs Figure 1. Structure of an interconnected system.  A dynamic process subsystem is proposed in an input affine form:  x f x g x u , x t x ∑ :   (1)  y x where  x∈ℜ   is the state of the process subsystem,  y∈ℜ   is the output of the global system, which  is also the output of the process subsystem,  u ∈ℜ   is the input of the process subsystem, which is  also the output of the actuator subsystem,  u   is assumed to be inaccessible, and  f and g  are smooth  vector fields on  ℜ .  The actuator subsystem is described as  x f x ,u x t x ∑ :   (2)  u h x ,u where  x ∈ℜ   is the state,  u ∈ ℜ   is the input and constant parameter to be monitored,  u ∈ R   is  the  output of the actuator  subsystem, which is also  the input  of the  process subsystem,  f   is the  smooth vector field on  ℜ , and  h   is the smooth vector field on  ℜ .  Considering  the  interconnected  system  described  by  Equations  (1)  and  (2),  it  is  required  to  monitor the performance of the interconnected system from the perspective of a single subsystem  and the whole system; that is, it is required to describe the cause and effect relationships between the  subsystem variables and global system output y, thus providing advanced predictive maintenance  techniques in an operating plant. The left invertibility of the interconnected system is then required  for ensuring that the impact of local variables on the global level is distinguishable. The property of  distinguishability of the two inputs or parameters refers to their capacity to generate different output  signals for a given input signal.  One way to achieve this purpose is to propose observers for each of the subsystems and the  whole  network.  However,  the  main  difficulty  is  that  the  connection  point  between  the  two  subsystems  cannot  be  measured.  This  is  because  the  interconnection  point  is  the  output  of  the  actuator subsystem, and online measurement is difficult to achieve due to physical or uneconomical  reasons. In addition, the measured value could be unreliable, due to its rough operation environment.  Therefore, the state observation in this work can only rely on the global system output (i.e., the  process state at the terminal boundary). As shown in Figure 1, the particular aim of our design is to  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  4  of  23  accurately estimate the state vectors  x  and  x   of each subsystem online, as well as the unmeasured  interconnection vector u .  3. Observer Design  The structure of the proposed interconnected observer is shown in Figure 2. It is a two‐stage  interconnected observer system, consisting of an actuator and a process state estimator. The actuator  state estimator deals with estimating the states of the actuator subsystem, where the major challenge  is that the output is inaccessible. Aiding the actuator, the process state estimator is a coordinator that  extends  the  interconnection  as  an  additional  state  of  the  process  subsystem.  This  process  state  estimator generates an input sequence which is applied to the actuator subsystem. Then, the overall  observer  estimates  the  states  and  interconnections  of  the  interconnected  system  by  using  the  estimates of the two estimators.  ∑ Physical system u u 𝒂 𝑦 ∑ (u , x) ∑ (u,  x ,) 𝒂 Interconnected Observer u u, x̂ ,x ,y process state estimator u, x u, u ,x actuator state estimator Figure 2. Structure of the proposed interconnected observer.  The  main  idea  of  the  interconnected  observer  design  is  as  follows.  In  the  first  aspect,  the  unknown interconnection is extended as new states of the process subsystem, where the expression  can be achieved via derivatives of the output expression of the actuator subsystem, thus forming a  new  process  subsystem.  Then,  for  the  state  estimation  of  each  subsystem  of  the  interconnected  system,  the  state  estimation  of  one  subsystem  is  realized  by  the  state  estimation  of  the  other  subsystem, and the global estimator is formed by the set of both observers. Specifically, it is assumed  that an existing observer is already available for the actuator subsystem ∑ , where the measured  output is u , while the observer is implemented using an estimate of  u , denoted by  u . In order to  obtain this estimate, the state space of the process subsystem ∑   is extended to include  u   as an  additional  state.  By  calculating  the  derivatives  of  the  value  u   of  the  actuator  subsystem,  the  expression of the time derivatives of  u   is obtained; it is a function of u, with derivatives of u and x .  In summation, for the studied interconnected nonlinear systems, an interconnected observer design  method is proposed by combining both actuator and process subsystem state estimators.  3.1. Observer Design for the Interconnected System  3.1.1. Interconnected System Extension  For the interconnected system described by Equations (1) and (2), in order to facilitate analysis,  the unknown interconnection  u   is extended as a new state  x :  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  5  of  23  x :≜ u   (3)  x ≔ u To get a function for  x , inspired by the work proposed in [29], let us derivate the output  u   in  Equation (2) to get the following function:  ∂h ∂h x : u ε u, u ,x u, x u u, x f u, x   (4)  ∂u ∂x where the function ε u, u ,x   is with respect to the time derivative of the output  u   in Equation (2).  We can define Assumption 1 as follows: For any function  u∈𝒰 t, x ∈𝒜 .𝒞ℜ ,ℜ , there exists  a real constant satisfied by γ :  ‖ε u, u ,x ε u, u ,x ‖ γ ‖x x ‖   (5)  Assumption 1. It refers to the global Lipchitz‐type condition of function 𝜀 , although this condition seems  restrictive, becomes much lower since 𝑢   and 𝑢   are bounded, which is usually the case in physical situations.  Moreover,  this  boundedness  can  be found  by  introducing  saturation  in the  argument  of  h .  According to [29], if  u  and  h   belong to a compact set 𝔘 , 𝔜 , then the global Lipchitz‐type condition  of function ε  can be replaced by local smoothness by using saturations.  Thus, a new interconnected system is constituted of ∑ :∑ ∑ x :  x f x g x x x ε u, u ,x ∑ : x f x ,u   (6)  y x ⎩x t x ; x t x ; x h x ,u where the input of the system is  u, the output is  y, and  x   is an unmeasured state.  xx ξ ξ Let ξ , ξ x . Thus, the above system becomes  ξ f ξ ,ξ ,u ξ f ξ ,u ∑ :   (7)  y h ξ h ξ f ξ g ξ ξ h ξ ξ ̅ ̅ where  f ξ ,ξ ,u : ,  f ξ ,u : f ξ ,u , and  : .  ε u, u ,ξ h ξ h x ,u The above system can be divided into two subsystems:  ξ f ξ ,ξ ,u Σ :   (8)  y h ξ where i 1, 2   and 𝚤  ̅ denotes the complementary index of  i  (i.e.,  i,𝚤 ̅ 1, 2 ).  3.1.2. State Estimator Design for the New Process Subsystem  The following system can be viewed as a transformed form of the process subsystem described  in Equation (1):  ξ f ξ ,ξ ,u Σ :   (9)  y ξ f ξ g ξ ξ where  f ξ ,ξ ,u : .  ε u, u ,ξ The new process subsystem in Equation (9) can be expressed as follows:  ξ G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u ,ξ Σ :   (10)  y Cξ Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  6  of  23  0g ξ f ξ where  G ξ ,F ξ ,  C I 0 ,ε u, u ,ξ 0 ε u, u ,ξ ,  and  I   is  the  00 0 n n  identity matrix.  As demonstrated in [30], supposing that the following assumptions related to the boundedness  of the states, signals, and functions are satisfied, an extended, high‐gain observer for the system in  Equation (10) can be formed.  Assumption  2.  It  states  that  there  exist  finite  real  numbers 𝜚 , 𝜏   with  0𝜚𝜏 ,  and  that  𝜚 𝐼 𝐹 𝜉 𝐹 𝜉 𝜏 𝐼 .  Assumption 3. Is that 𝐹 𝜉   is a global Lipchitz, with respect to 𝜉 , locally and uniformly with respect  to u.  Assumption 4. It states that 𝑔 𝜉   is a global Lipchitz with respect to 𝜉 .  Then, an extended, high‐gain observer for the system in Equation (10) can be given as  ξ G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u ,ξ Λ ξ S C Cξ y Σ :   (11)  y Cξ I0 where  H ξ :Λ ξ S C   is  the  gain  function  and  Λ ξ : ,  S   is  the  unique  0g ξ symmetric positive definite matrix, satisfying the following algebraic Lyapunov equation:  θS A S S A C C 0  (12)  0I where  A ,θ 0  is a parameter defined by Equation (12), and the solution is  1 1 I I θ θ S   (13)  1 2 I I θ θ Then, the gain of the estimator can be given by  2θI H ξ Λ ξ S C   (14)  θ g ξ The state estimation error is expressed as  e t ξ t ξ t   (15)  Then, by subtracting the corresponding Equations (10) and (11), the following error dynamics  can be obtained:  e G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u,ξ H ξ Cξ y G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u,ξ   (16)  Assumption 5. Is that for any 𝑢∈𝔘 𝑡 ,𝑒 ∈𝒜 .𝒞ℜ ,ℜ , there exists a continuously differentiable  function 𝑉 , and the positive constants 𝛼 ,𝛽 ,𝛾 ,𝛾   satisfy the following:  𝑎 𝛾 𝑒 𝑉 𝑡 ,𝑒 𝛾 𝑒 𝑏 𝑡 ,𝑒 𝑡 ,𝑒 𝑒 𝛼 𝑒 .  (17)  𝑐 𝑡 ,𝑒 𝛽 𝑒 Theorem  1.  It  states  that  if  Assumption  1  and  Assumption  5  are  satisfied  by  properly  choosing  a  relatively high‐gain tuner parameter 𝜃   such that the following conditions are met: (1) if  𝜉 𝜉   converges  to  0,  then  make 𝜃 ,  and  (2)  if  𝜉 𝜉   is  bounded  by  𝑒 ̃ ,  then  choose  a  value  for  𝜃   such  that  𝜃 𝛼 𝜂 0.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  7  of  23  Then, the system in Equation (11) becomes a converging observer for the system described in  Equation (10), which is a transformed form of the process subsystem described in Equation (1).  The proof is given in Appendix A.  3.1.3. State Estimator Design for the New Actuator Subsystem    as  a  transformed  form  of  the  actuator  subsystem  described  in  Equation  (18)  can  be  viewed Equation (2):  ξ f ξ ,u Σ :   (18)  y h ξ ,u where  f ξ ,u : f ξ ,u .  A convergence observer can be designed for the system in Equation (18) as follows:  ξ f ξ ,u κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ y Σ :   (19)  ℊ Θ ξ ,u,ℊ where κ   and Θ   are  smooth  gain  functions,  with  respect  to  their  arguments,  the  state  variable  ℊ ,ξ   belongs to ℜ Θ , and Θ   is a subset of  ℜ , which is positively invariant by the second  equation of (19).  The state estimation error is defined as  e :ξ t ξ t   (20)  Then,  by  subtracting  the  corresponding  Equations  (18)  and  (19),  we  get  the  following  error  dynamics:  ̅ ̅ e t,e f ξ ,u f ξ ,u κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ y   (21)  where Κ u,ξ ,y :κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ y .  In order to formulate a solution to the convergence of the above observer, we need to follow  Assumption 6, with respect to the error Lyapunov function introduced in [26]. This error Lyapunov  function shows the equivalence of the existence of an error Lyapunov function and the existence of a  converging observer.  Assumption 6. Is that for any 𝑢∈𝔘 𝑡 ,𝑒 ∈𝒜 .𝒞ℜ ,ℜ , there exists a continuously differentiable  function 𝑉   and positive constants 𝛼 , 𝛽 , 𝛾 , 𝛾   to satisfy  a γ ‖e ‖ V t,e γ ‖e ‖ b t, e t, e e α ‖e ‖ .  (22)  ⎪ c t,e β ‖e ‖ The  observer  defined  by  Equation  (19)  is  a  converging  observer  if  Assumption  6  is  satisfied.  However, the  observer in  Equation  (19)  can  only  be  realized  when  the  output  y   is  measurable,  which is not the case. Due to this,  y   in our design represents the output of the actuator subsystem.  It is assumed to be unmeasured and, therefore,  y   must be replaced by an estimate  y   using the  available measurements.  Fortunately, that estimation of  y   is available in the process subsystem observer in Equation  (11). By substituting  u   for  y , we can now implement the observer in Equation (19) for an actuator  subsystem as  ξ f ξ ,u κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ y Σ :   (23)  ℊ Θ ξ ,u,ℊ where Κ u,ξ ,y :κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ y .  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  8  of  23  The estimation error is produced again by subtracting the corresponding equation in Equations  (18) and (23), and the new error dynamics are achieved as follows:  ̅ ̅ e t,e f ξ ,u f ξ ,u Κ u,ξ ,y ̅ ̅ f ξ ,u f ξ ,u Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y (24)  e t,e Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y   In order to ensure the stability of the error dynamics in Equation (24), an assumption is required  with respect to the sensitivity of Κ u,ξ ,y , with changes of  y .  Assumption 7. It provides a sufficient condition for achieving this purpose, stating that for any 𝑢∈ 𝔘 , 𝑡 ,𝜉 ,𝑦 ∈𝒜 .𝒞ℜ ,ℜ , there exists a real constant  𝛾   to satisfy  Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y γ ‖y y ‖.  (25)  Similar to Assumption 1, Assumption 7 implies a global Lipchitz‐type condition on function Κ   such that, in a physical problem,  u, y   are bounded. Therefore, it can also be replaced by a local  smoothness condition.  In  addition  to  asking  that  the  state  estimation  error  e   converge  to  0  in  the  absence  of  disturbances, we want it to still converge to 0 if a disturbance is present, but converge to 0 and remain  bounded  if  the  disturbance  is  bounded.  Therefore,  Assumption  7  implies  that  the  definition  of  e t, e   in (24) is not affected.  In  particular,  since  output  y ,  used  in  the  observer  in  Equation  (23),  is  in  fact  a  virtual  measurement which is estimated by the output of the process subsystem, an estimation error becomes  unavoidable. This estimation error can be viewed as a bounded disturbance to the real output of the  actuator subsystem  y . Therefore, the basic problem addressed in this work is the design of nonlinear  observers that possesses robustness to the disturbance affecting the real output.  Theorem 2. It says that if Assumptions 6 and 7 are satisfied, then the observer described in Equation (23)  is a converging observer for the actuator subsystem described in Equation (18).  The proof is given in Appendix B.  3.1.4. Interconnected Observer  The interconnected observer for the studied interconnected system by the system in Equations  (11) and (23) is constituted as follows:  ξ G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u ,ξ Λ ξ S C Cξ y ∑ :   (26)  ξ f ξ ,u κ ℊ ,ξ h ξ ξ where the virtual measurement  y   in Equation (23) is replaced by the estimation ξ . The observer  estimation errors satisfy the following equation:  e tξ t ξ t,e tξ t ξ t   (27)  3.2. Interconnected Observer Analysis  The observer in Equation (26) has been designed so that the dynamics of the corresponding error  system in Equation (27) are governed as follows:  e t,e G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u ,ξ H ξ Cξ y G ξ ξ F ξ ε u, u ,ξ   (28)  e t,e e t,e Κ u,ξ ,h ξ Κ u,ξ ,ξ To  analyze  the  system  in  Equation  (28),  our  purpose  is  to  study  the  stability  of  the  error  dynamics.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  9  of  23  Theorem 3. If Assumptions 1–7 are satisfied, then a relatively high value of 𝜃   can be chosen such that  1 𝜂 , and the error dynamics governed in Equation (28) are convergent.  Proof. The objective is to analyze the stability of the error dynamics. To achieve this purpose, by  using  V   and  V ,  defined  in  the  proof  of  Theorems  1  and  2,  the  following  Lyapunov  function  candidate is constructed:  V t,e ,e V t,e V t,e   (29)  Then, the time derivation of  V t, e ,e   yields  V t,e ,e ∂V ∂V ∂V ∂V ∂V (30)  t, e t, e e t, e t, e t, e e t, e t, e Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,ξ   ∂t ∂e ∂t ∂e ∂e Let us analyze the different terms on the right side of Equation (30), starting with term 1 and  using results in the proof of Theorem 1:  ∂V ∂V V t,e t,e t,e e t,e ∂t ∂e (31)  θη V V ξ ξ   In turn, by using results in the proof of Theorem 2, then term 2 on the right side of Equation (30)  develops as follows:  ∂V ∂V ∂V V e t,e t,e e t,e t,e Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,ξ ∂t ∂e ∂e (32)  α V η V ξ ξ   Then, the overall inequality yields  V t,e ,e α V η V V θη V V V   (33)  ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ Now, set V α V ,  V θη V , and V V V .  Let us assume that  ς min α , θη     In this case,  (34)  V 2ς𝑉   It should also be noted that  ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ V V 2 V V (35)  2 α θη V V   Thus,  V V V   (36)  2 α θη It is easy to get that inequality in Equation (33) to yield the following:  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  10  of  23  1 η ∗ ∗ V e ,e V η V 2 α θη 1 η 1 η V (37)  2 α θη 1 η 2ς 1 η V   2 α θη Now, it suffices to choose a value of  θ   such that  1 η 0.  This ends the proof. □  4. Simulations  Numerical simulations were performed to validate that the interconnected observer given by  Equation (26) can be implemented for monitoring the performance of an interconnected system. A  case  study  was  developed  on  an  intensified  heat  exchanger  (IHEX).  The  pilot  consisted  of  three  process plates sandwiched between five utility plates. Two pneumatic control valves were used to  control the utility and process fluid. More relative information could be found in [17]. Moreover, the  outlet fluid flow rates of the control valves were assumed to be unmeasured to ensure a realistic  simulation.  Therefore,  during  the  course  of  the  simulation  work,  the  proposed  observers  were  designed for estimating unmeasured inlet fluid flows and monitoring the performance of the IHEX.  4.1. System Modelling  4.1.1. Actuator Subsystem Modelling  The pneumatic control valve is used to act as an actuator in this system. By applying Bernoulli’s  continuous flow law of incompressible fluids, we have  ∆P (38)  F C f X   sg where F is the flow rate (m s ), ∆P  is the fluid pressure drop across the valve (Pa),  sg  is the specific  gravity of the fluid and equals 1 for pure water, X is the valve opening percentage,  C   is the valve  coefficient, and f(X) is the flow characteristic which is defined as the relationship between the valve  capacity and fluid traveling through the valve. In [3], a pneumatic control valve had a dynamic model  as follows:  d X dX (39)  m μ kX p A   dt dt dp A dX p p   (40)  dt 𝑉 A 𝑋 dt where  A   is  the  diaphragm  area  on  which  the  pneumatic  pressure  acts,  p   is  the  pneumatic  pressure, m is the mass of the control valve stem, μ  is the friction of the valve stem,  k  is the spring  compliance, X is the stem displacement or percentage opening of the valve,    is the command  pressure, and  p   is the air pressure. The following definitions also apply:  dX dX x x x x x x x     X p X p dt dt ∆ ∆ u u u ,  u F F C X C X     𝐶𝑉𝑃 𝐶𝑉𝑃 𝐶𝑉𝑃 𝐶𝑉𝑃 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  11  of  23  ∆P ∆P c c c c c c C 0     C 00 C 0 sg sg where  p ,p ,  X ,X ,  , ,  ∆P ,  and ∆P   correspond  to  p ,X, ,  and  ∆P  in  Equations  (36)–(38),  respectively,  and  subscripts  one  and  two  represent  two  different  control  valves.  The  actuator subsystem is then described as  x x k μ A ⎪ x x x x m m m A A p x x u x x p u x ⎪ 𝑉 A x 𝑉 A x x x   (41)  k μ A x x x x m m m A A p x x u x x p u x 𝑉 A x 𝑉 A x ⎩ 𝑦𝐶𝑥 4.1.2. Process Subsystem Modelling  The IHEX can be modeled based on the mass and energy balances, which describe the evolution  of characteristic values such as temperature, mass, composition, and pressure. Considering the heat  exchanger system taken from [17], the dynamic equation governing the heat balance of the fluids is  given by  UA 1 T T T T T F   (42)  ρ c V V UA 1 T T T T T F   (43)  ρ c V V where  ρ ,ρ   are the densities of the fluids (in  kg m ),  V , V   are the volumes of the fluids (in  m ),  c ,c are  the  specific  heats  of  the  fluids  (in  J kg K ),  U  is  the  overall  heat  transfer  coefficient (in  J m K s ), A is the reaction area (in  m ),  F ,F   are the mass flow rates of the  fluids (in  kg s ), and  T ,T   are the inlet temperatures of the fluids.  If the state vector is defined as  x x ,x T ,T , the control input as  u u ,u F ,F , and the output vector as  y y ,y T ,T , then the above two equations can be  rewritten as  x f x g x u   (44)  y h x, u T T f x where  f x ,  g x g ,g , and  y x ,y f x T T x .  By using Equation (34), a function for the derivatives for  u   is obtained:  ∂h ∂h u ε u, u,x u, x u u, x f u, x ∂u ∂x (45)  ∆P ∆P ∆P A ∆P x u  C 0 C 0 C C sg sg sg m sg 𝐶𝑉𝑃 𝐶𝑉𝑃 𝐶𝑉𝑃 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  12  of  23  If  the  state  vector  is  defined  as  x x ,x T ,T ,  the  unmeasured  state  as  x x ,x u ,u F , F ,   and  the  output  vector  as  y y ,y T ,T ,  then  Equations (44) and (45) can be rewritten as  x G x x g x ,u   (46)  x ε u, u ,x y x x x where  G x   and  f x .  x x 4.2. Observer Design  4.2.1. Observer 1 for the Actuator Subsystem  In this model, outputs were considered as unmeasured and were substituted by its estimation  proposed in Observer 2, then an extended high‐gain observer of the form in Equation (26) for the  system in Equation (41) is given by  ∆P x x k C x x sg k μ A ∆P ⎪ x x x x k C x x m m m sg A A p ∆P x x u x x p u x k C x x V A x V A x sg (47)  ∆P ⎪ x x k C x x sg k μ A ∆P x x x x k C x x m m m sg A A p ∆P ⎪x x u x x p u x k C x x V A x V A x sg 4.2.2. Observer 2 for the Process Subsystem  It  should  be  noted  that  the  original  system  in  Equation  (45)  has  been  augmented  with  the  differential  equation  u ε u, u ,x ;  that  is  to  say,  the  unknown  inputs  are  treated  like  an  unmeasured state. Then, it is possible to design an observer of the form in Equation (26) for the system  in Equation (46) as follows:  h A T x ⎧ x x ρ C V ⎛ V ⎞ ⎛ ⎞ ⎪ 2θ x x y y ⎪ ⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟ h A 2θ T x 0 x x V ρ C V ⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠ h A   (48)  θ x x ρ C V A ⎛ ⎞ ∆P ∆P ∆P A ∆P x C 0 C 0 x C C u y y ⎜ ⎟ sg sg m sg m sg h A θ x x ρ C V ⎪ ⎝ ⎠ ⎩ y x Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  13  of  23  4.3. Numerical Simulations  In order to test the performance of the proposed observers, two numerical simulations were  carried out. Considering the actuator and process models given by Equations (44) and (46), Observer  1 in Equation (47) and Observer 2 in Equation (48) were designed for estimating unmeasured inlet  flows  F , F   and monitoring the performance of the final products  T ,T . Available measurements  involve the inlet–outlet temperatures of the hex reactor and the pneumatic pressure  p ,p   of the  actuators.  Two  cases  were  considered.  In  Case  1,  constant  inlet  flows  F , F   were  considered  in  both  fluids. By contrast, in Case 2,  F , F   were considered to be time varying. Observers 1 and 2 were  simulated with respect to the actuator and process subsystems, using the values corresponding to an  IHEX system from [17]. The parameters in the process subsystem were as follows:  hA 214.8 W K ,V 2.685 10 m ,V 1.141 10 m , and the inlet temperatures  T   and  T   were  76 ℃  and  15 ℃, respectively. The parameters in the actuator subsystem were as follows: m = 2 kg,  A   =  0.029 m , μ 1500 Ns/m, k = 6089 Ns/m, Pc for the utility fluid was 1 MPa (1.2 Mpa for the process  fluid), and the pressure drop ∆P  in the utility fluid was 0.6 MPa (60 KPa in the process fluid).  In  order  to  illustrate  the  robustness,  external  disturbances  and  measurement  noise  were  considered. Suppose the output measurement is corrupted by a colored noise. In addition to noise,  no error is assumed in measuring  T and T . Moreover, to compare the effectiveness of the proposed  method with other existing ones, we employed a typical unknown input observer (UIO) in [31] to  show the differences.  4.3.1. Case 1: Both Fluid Flow Rates  F , F   Are Constant  The objective of this simulation was to prove the convergence of the observers in a common  situation where both fluid flow rates remained constant over a long time. The computed inlet flow  rate of the utility fluid  F   was  4.22 10 m s , and the inlet flow rate of the process fluid  F   was  a constant  4.17 10 m s . The computed value meant the expected true values of the actuators.  The initial conditions of the process model were  T 80 ℃ and T 20 ℃, respectively, and for the  observers they were  T T 30. The discrepancies between the initial conditions of the process  and those of the observers were reasonable and realistic, considering that the temperature was a  process variable that could be easily measured. In order to evaluate the observer performance against  uncertainties of the knowledge of the fluid flow rate, the initial value of the estimates were  F F 0  in  both  observers.  This  assumption  represented  a  relatively  rough  situation  in  the  practical  engineering world. However, simulation results showed encouraging results. The tuning parameters  were  k k 100, k k 0.15  (for Observer 1) and θ 80  (for Observer 2).  The results are reported in Figures 3 and 4. In Figure 3, the dashed curves correspond to the  estimates using Observer 1, and the solid lines are the measured temperatures. It can be seen that,  whether noise‐free or noise‐corrupted, the convergence of the estimated  T and T   values proved to  be  fast  (in  several  seconds).  It  is  not  surprising  because,  actually,  T and T   were  the  measured  outputs of the overall system.  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure 3. Output of the process fluid temperature  T . The solid line is the measured value, and the  dashed line is estimated by Observer 1. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐ corrupted case.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  14  of  23  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure 4. Output of the utility fluid temperature  T . The solid line is the measured value, and the  dashed line is estimated by Observer 1. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐ corrupted case.  The main contribution of the proposed method is the capacity that, besides states, it can estimate  the  unknown  connection  of  an  interconnected  system  by  the  final  measured  outputs,  where  the  unknown connection represents the inlet fluid flow rate  F , F   in the IHEX system. Figures 5 and 6  give the encouraging results. Figure 5 shows the computation and estimation of the process fluid  flow rate  F , using a UIO and Observer 2. Figure 6 is the results for the utility fluid flow rate  F . As  expected,  F and F   follow  different  trajectories  before  they  converge  toward  the  true  value  (computed value) in a relatively short transient period, whether or not noise exists. However, the  convergence speed of the proposed method is obviously faster than that of the UIO. In addition, the  proposed observer was more robust with noise. For  F , as shown in Figure 5, if no noise was present,  after less than 5 s, the three curves overlapped. Compared with the curve of the UIO on the dashed,  dotted line, the curve of the proposed Observer 2 in dashed, dotted line only needed less than 1 s to  track the simulated curve of the solid line. Moreover, from Figure 5, we can see that the curve of the  UIO in the dashed line was significantly more affected by noise than that of Observer 2 in the dashed,  dotted line. The similar results are shown in Figure 6 with respect to  F . According to Figure 6, it  took about 1.5 s for the three curves to be overlapped, while for the curve of Observer 2 on the dashed  line, less than 0.5 s was taken. The impact of noise is relatively obvious on the curve of the UIO, while  for the curve of Observer 2, the influence was less significant.  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure  5.  The  computation  and  estimation  of  the  process  fluid  flow  rate F .  The  solid  line  is  the  computed value; the dashed line is estimated by the unknown input observer (UIO); and the dashed,  dotted  line is  estimated  by Observer  2.  (a)  represents  Noise‐free  case  while  (b)  represents  Noise‐ corrupted case.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  15  of  23  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure  6.  The  computation  and  estimation  of  the  utility  fluid  flow  rate  F .  The  solid  line  is  the  computed value; the dashed line is estimated by the UIO; and the dashed, dotted line is estimated by  Observer 2. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐corrupted case.  In both fluids, these differences were caused by their varied initial values. However, it is proven  that  if  adequate  values  of  the  tuning  parameters  k  and  θ  are  selected,  no  matter  the  degree  of  deviation  of  the  initial  value  of  F and F   from  the  simulated  values  in  the  system  model,  convergences are guaranteed. Larger values of these tuning parameters ensure a smaller convergence  time, while smaller values have the opposite effect. However, large tuning values should be avoided,  since  the  observer  may  become  too  sensitive  to  measurement  noise  in  real‐time  applications.  According to the above analysis, we can readily conclude that the proposed interconnected observer  works effectively and robustly for the designed purposes with proper tuning parameters.  4.3.2. Case 2: The Fluid Flow Rates Vary Due to Parameter Changes  The present computations were executed to get an accurate screening of the variation of the  observer estimate by corroborating if they were in agreement with the simulated fluid flow rates  which  underwent  either  an  abrupt  change  or  a  gradual  variation  due  to,  for  example,  aging  or  erosion.  The  parameter  effects  were  taken  into  account  in  the  following  way.  Initial  values  of F 4.22 10 m s   and  F 4.17 10 m s   are considered, followed by an abrupt change of  F   at 80 s. The reason for this change is the variation of parameter ∆P, with the value changing from  0.6 MPa to 0.4 Mpa. Several factors can be attributed to this kind of variation, such as valve clogging  or  an  unexpected  pressure  drop  across  the  control  valves.  After  that,  at  t  =  150  s,  F   began  to  deteriorate due to an increase of the spring compliance  k   in the process fluid actuator. One main  reason contributing to this change is erosion. Because of erosion, the gland packing of the valve may  loosen, which leads to stem vibration. In the simulation, a value of 1000  nm   was added to the  spring compliance k . This simulation was carried out using the same constants used in the previous  simulation and the same values of  T   and  T , as well as  T and T , were used. The initial conditions  of both observers, as well as the observer parameters (k ,k , k , k , and θ) were the same as the  previous ones. These variations are illustrated in Figures 7–10.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  16  of  23  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure 7. Outlet temperature of the process fluid  T . The solid line is the measured value, and the  dashed line is estimated by Observer 1. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐ corrupted case.  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure 8. Outlet temperature of the utility fluid  T . The solid line is the measured value, and the  dashed line is estimated by Observer 1. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐ corrupted case.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  17  of  23  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure  9.  The  computation  and  estimation  of  the  process  fluid  flow  rate F .  The  solid  line  is  the  computed value; the dashed line is estimated by the UIO; and the dashed, dotted line is estimated by  Observer 2. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐corrupted case.  (a) Noise‐free  (b) Noise‐corrupted  Figure  10.  The  computation  and  estimation  of  the  utility  fluid  flow  rate  F .  The  solid  line  is  the  computed value; the dashed line is estimated by the UIO; and the dashed, dotted line is estimated by  Observer 2. (a) represents Noise‐free case while (b) represents Noise‐corrupted case.  As shown in Figures 7 and 8, whether in a noise‐free or noise‐corrupted situation, the estimated  outlet fluid temperatures  T and T   on the dashed line can better track the curve of the measurements  T and T   on the solid line after a short transient time. At 80 s, both curves decreased unexpectedly  and finally stabilized at a new level. A drop of 0.2 ℃  was observed. Shortly after, at t = 150 s, another  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  18  of  23  drop happened, and a new stable level was expected with a 0.9 ℃  reduction. These decreases imply  the influences of parameter changes in the fluid actuators, and no further variations illustrate the  occurrence of additional changes. A similar result was obtained in the estimated  T   of the utility  fluid  in  Figure  8.  It  is  shown  that,  due  to  changes  of  ∆P and k ,  the  measured  T   dropped  0.2  ℃ and 0.5 ℃  at 80 s and 150 s, respectively. The estimated  T on the dashed line tracks  T   after the  observer converges.  The  simulation  curves  indicate  that  the  proposed  observer  was  effective  at  tracking  system  performance.  However,  it  is  shown  that,  because  of  noise,  the  drops  caused  by  local  parameter  changes at 80 s could not be visually observed on the global output directly. In order to analyze the  influence of these changes, we have to detect it through the local dynamics supervision. Therefore, it  is very meaningful to monitor both the local and global dynamics of a control system.  It can be seen from Figure 9 that, in a noise‐free situation, two estimate curves on the dashed line  and  the  dashed,  dotted  line  converge  to  the  simulated  value  F   of  the  solid  line  quickly  after  a  transient response. The dashed line is the estimated process fluid flow rate  F   produced by the UIO,  and the dashed, dotted line was generated by Observer 2. Later, at 150 s, there was an unexpected  drop by the simulated  F   on the solid line. Fortunately, both estimate curves responded quickly to  this variation, and the curve of the UIO took 1.5 s to track  F   again, while the curve of Observer 2  converged more quickly than that of the UIO. The decrease implies parameter changes in the process  fluid actuator, which satisfy the assumption that  k   changes at t = 150 s. When it comes to the noise‐ corrupted situation, the curve of the UIO was significantly affected by the noise, although a drop at  150 s can still be observed. Luckily, the curve of Observer 2 was relatively robust to the noise, as it  converged to the simulated value of the solid line with a minor difference compared with the noise‐ free situation.  Figure 10 demonstrates the results for the utility fluid. The same results were obtained in a noise‐ free situation at a time of 80 s. As expected, the simulated  F   of the solid line jumped due to the  change of ∆P . The estimated value of  F   of the dashed line by the UIO and the dashed, dotted line  by Observer 2 track well with the value of  F   on the solid line. Just as with the process fluid situation,  the convergence speed of Observer 2 was faster than that of the UIO. If measurements were corrupted  by noise, the curve of Observer 2 was not obviously influenced. Conversely, the curve of the UIO was  greatly impacted.  To  sum  up,  obviously,  the  proposed  interconnected  observer  is  effective,  even  when  the  unknown connection is varying in time simultaneously. Therefore, the proposed observer proves its  ability  to  monitor  the  performance  of  interconnected  systems  and  to  estimate  unknown  interconnections.  5. Conclusions  The goal of the design methodology presented in this paper was to enable or simplify observer  design  for  systems  that  are  otherwise  difficult  to  handle  by  allowing  the  designer  to  focus  on  a  smaller, nonlinear subsystem. That is to say, we mainly focused on observing, for example, how the  change of an internal parameter at the local level affects the global output at the global level.  An  interconnected  observer  is  designed  to  estimate  both  the  state  and  unmeasured  interconnection at the local and global levels. As a result, both local and global dynamics can be  observed,  as  well  as  the  influence  of  local  dynamics  on  global  dynamics.  In  particular,  the  interconnection is not supposed to be accessible to measurement. In order to achieve this purpose,  firstly, an existing observer is extended to estimate the states of the actuator subsystem. Particularly,  the information of the actuator subsystem output is substituted by their estimates, achieved by the  observer of the process subsystem. Secondly, a kind of extended, high‐gain observer is produced to  estimate the states of the process subsystem, which is subjected to a precise unknown input. The  unknown input is considered a new state of the process subsystem, and it is expressed as a function  of  the  inputs,  derivatives  of  the  inputs,  and  the  states  of  the  actuator  subsystem.  Thus,  an  interconnected  observer  is  proposed  by  using  the  estimates  of  the  states  and  the  unmeasured  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  19  of  23  interconnection,  and  the  convergence  is  investigated.  Finally,  satisfactory  simulation  results  are  obtained to confirm the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.  In this paper, it is clear that the physical motivation for the decomposition of a control system  into the actuator and the process parts is physically motivated. In this respect, for control analysis  purposes, the condition for decomposition of an independent control system may be the target of  future investigations, like the inverted pendulum on a cart. Another open question worth addressing  is  the  demonstration  of  stability  and  sensitivity  of  the  estimation  error,  like  the  use  of  ISS  to  investigate the stability of the estimation error in [32].  Author  Contributions:  M.Z.  and  Z.‐t.L.  conceived  and  designed  the  study.  M.Z.  and  Q.W.  performed  the  observer design, carried out simulations, and wrote the original draft. B.D. and X.‐p.C. reviewed and edited the  manuscript. All authors read and approved the manuscript. All authors have read and agreed to the published  version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, Grant No. 62003106  and No. 5186070133, Talent Project of GZU (2018) 02. Key Lab construction project of Guizhou Province (2016)  5103.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  Abbreviations  The following abbreviations are used in this manuscript:  ISS  input‐to‐state stability  ISDS  input‐to‐state dynamical stability  UIO  unknown input observer  IHEX  intensified heat exchanger  Appendix A  Proof of Theorem 1. Before preceding the convergence proof of the observer, one introduces the  following notations:  S ∆ S ∆   where  I 0 S S   and ∆     0 I To proof Theorem 1, the estimation error is introduced as  e t ξ t ξ t .  Then, subtracting corresponding Equations (10) and (11), one gets the following error dynamics:  1 1 T e G ξ ξ F ξ ε ̅ u, u ,ξ Λ ξ S C Cξ y G ξ ξ F ξ 11 1 11 1 θ 1 ε ̅ u, u ,ξ   G ξ Λ ξ S C C e G ξ G ξ ξ F ξ F ξ e t,e     11 1 11 where  e t, e ε u, u ,ξ ε u, u ,ξ .  By setting  e ∆ Λ ξ e , one can then get  e t θ A S C C e Λ ξ Λ ξ e ∆ Λ ξ F ξ F ξ ∆ Λ ξ G ξ ξ G ξ ξ ∆ Λ ξ e t,e   1 11 1 To  analyze  the  dynamics  of  the  error  system,  the  following  positive  Lyapunov  function  candidate is considered:  V t,e e S e   Convergence of the observer is described by the time derivation of  V t, e . Then, we obtain  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  20  of  23  V t,e 2e S e   θ 2e S 𝐴 e 2e C Ce 2e S Λ ξ Λ ξ e 2e S ∆ Λ ξ F ξ F ξ 2e S ∆ Λ ξ G ξ G ξ ξ 2e S ∆ Λ ξ e t, e   11 1 θ V θ Ce 2e S Λ ξ Λ ξ e 2e S ∆ Λ ξ F ξ F ξ 2e S ∆ Λ ξ G ξ G ξ ξ 2e S ∆ Λ ξ e t, e   11 1 θ V 2 S e Λ ξ Λ ξ e 2 S e Λ ξ ∆ F ξ F ξ 2 S e ∆ Λ ξ G ξ G ξ ξ S e G ξ ‖e t, e ‖  11 1 θ V 2μ S e e 2ρ S e ∆ F ξ F ξ 2τγ 2 S e ∆ Λ ξ G ξ G ξ ξ S e ξ ξ   11 1 2 where μ sup Λ ξ Λ ξ , ρ  is the upper boundary of  Λ ξ , ‖e t, e ‖γ ξ ξ ,  as  proposed  in  Assumption  1,  and  τ  is  a  finite  real  number  with  0ϱτ ,  such  that  ϱ I F ξ F ξ τ I , as given in Assumptions 2–4.  11 11 Then, we have  ∆ F ξ F ξ f ξ f ξ σ e     11 11 where σ  denotes the Lipchitz constants of  f ξ .  Similarly, we have  ∆ Λ ξ G ξ G ξ ξ g ξ g ξ ξ ϵ e     11 1 11 12 where the positive constant ϵ  denotes the boundary of ξ .  Thus, we get the following:  V t,e θ V η V V ξ ξ   V t,e θ V η V V ξ ξ     θ η V V ξ ξ     where  η 2μ 2ρσ 2ϵξ S   and  ξ S λ S λ ⁄ S , η 2τγ λ S . λ S   (resp. λ S ) is the largest (resp. the smallest) eigenvalue of λ S .  Thus, the following hold true:  1. if  ξ ξ   converges to 0, it results in  V t, e θ η V . Then, by taking θθ η ,  the negative of the right side of the above inequality is obtained;  2. if  ξ ξ   is bounded by  e , it results in  V t, e θη V . Then, by choosing  ∗ ∗ θθ   such that  θ η 0, the negative of the right side of the above inequality is  obtained.  That ends the proof.□  Appendix B  Proof of Theorem 2. In order to show that the system described in Equation (23) represents a  converging  observer  for  the  system  in  Equation  (18),  we  need  to  make  its  corresponding  error  dynamics in Equation (24) coincide with Assumption 6, which has been proven to be a condition for  the existence of a converging observer.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  21  of  23  ̅ ̅ e t,e f ξ ,u f ξ ,u Κ u,ξ ,y   ̅ ̅ f ξ ,u f ξ ,u Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y   e t,e Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y   Therefore, by computing the time derivation of  V   with respect to the trajectory  e   in Equation  (24), using Assumptions 6 and 7, it follows that  ∂V ∂V ∂V V t,e t,e t,e e t,e t,e Κ u,ξ ,y Κ u,ξ ,y     ∂t ∂e ∂e α ‖e ‖ β γ ‖e ‖‖y y ‖  α ‖e ‖ η ‖e ‖‖y y ‖    where  η β γ .  Since  the  output  y   used  in  the  observer  in  Equation  (23)  is  in  fact  a  virtual  measurement which is estimated by the output of the process subsystem, it is in fact ξ , ξ .  ‖ ‖ ‖ ‖ V t,e α e η e ξ ξ     12 12 Thus, the right side of this inequality is negative if the following conditions are met:  1. α β γ   and  ξ ξ   is bounded by  e , resulting in  V t, e α η ‖e ‖ ;  2 12 12 2. ξ ξ   converges to 0, resulting in  V t, e α ‖e ‖ .  12 12 This ends the proof.□  References  1. Yang, J.; Zhu, F.; Yu, K.; Bu, X. Observer‐based state estimation and unknown input reconstruction for  nonlinear complex dynamical systems. Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simul. 2015, 20, 927–939.  2. Gauthier,  J.;  Hammouri,  H.;  Othman,  S.  A  simple  observer  for  nonlinear  systems  applications  to  bioreactors. IEEE Trans. Autom. Control. 1992, 37, 875–880.  3. Bartyś, M.; Patton, R.; Syfert, M.; Heras, S.D.L.; Quevedo, J. Introduction to the DAMADICS actuator FDI  benchmark study. Control. Eng. Pr. 2006, 14, 577–596.  4. Moreno, J.A.; Alvarez, J. On the estimation problem of a class of continuous bioreactors with unknown  input. J. Process. Control. 2015, 30, 34–49.  5. De Persis, C.; Isidori, A. A geometric approach to nonlinear fault detection and isolation. IEEE Trans. Autom.  Control. 2001, 45, 853–865.  6. Zhu, F. State estimation and unknown input reconstruction via both reduced‐order and high‐order sliding  mode observers. J. Process. Control. 2012, 22, 296–302.  7. Besançon, G. Remarks on nonlinear adaptive observer design. Syst. Control. Lett. 2000, 41, 271–280.  8. Vijay, P.; Tadé, M.O.; Ahmed, K.; Utikar, R.; Pareek, V.K. Simultaneous estimation of states and inputs in  a planar solid oxide fuel cell using nonlinear adaptive observer design. J. Power Sources 2014, 248, 1218– 1233.  9. Li,  Z.;  Dahhou,  B.  A  new  fault  isolation  and  identification  method  for  nonlinear  dynamic  systems:  Application to a fermentation process. Appl. Math. Model. 2008, 32, 2806–2830.  10. Pan,  S.;  Xiao,  D.;  Xing,  S.;  Law,  S.;  Du,  P.;  Li,  Y.  A  general  extended  Kalman  filter  for  simultaneous  estimation of system and unknown inputs. Eng. Struct. 2016, 109, 85–98.  11. Manaa,  I.;  Barhoumi,  N.;  M’,  F.;  Sahli,  N.  Unknown  inputs  observers  design  for  a  class  of  nonlinear  switched systems. Int. J. Model. Identif. Control. 2015, 23, 45.  12. Besançon, G.; Munteanu, I. Control strategy for state and input observer design. Syst. Control. Lett. 2015,  85, 118–122.  13. Guo, S.; Zhu, F. Actuator fault detection and interval reconstruction based on interval observers. IFAC‐ PapersOnLine 2017, 50, 5061–5066.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  22  of  23  14. Buciakowski, M.; Witczak, M.; Puig, V.; Rotondo, D.; Nejjari, F.; Korbicz, J. A bounded‐error approach to  simultaneous state and actuator fault estimation for a class of nonlinear systems. J. Process. Control. 2017,  52, 14–25.  15. Vijay, P.; Tadé, M.O. An adaptive non‐linear observer for the estimation of temperature distribution in the  planar solid oxide fuel cell. J. Process. Control. 2013, 23, 429–443.  16. Marzat,  J.; Piet‐Lahanier,  H.; Damongeot,  F.;  Walter, É.  Fault  diagnosis  for  nonlinear  aircraft  based  on  control‐induced redundancy. In Proceedings of the SysTol 2010: Conference on Control and Fault‐Tolerant  Systems, Nice, France, 6–8 October 2010; pp. 119–124.  17. Théron,  F.;  Anxionnaz‐Minvielle,  Z.;  Cabassud,  M.;  Gourdon,  C.;  Tochon,  P.  Characterization  of  the  performances of an innovative heat‐exchanger/reactor. Chem. Eng. Process. Process. Intensif. 2014, 82, 30–41.  18. Zhang, M.; Li, Z.‐T.; Cabassud, M.; Dahhou, B. Root cause analysis of actuator fault based on invertibility  of interconnected system. Int. J. Model. Identif. Control. 2017, 27, 256.  19. Zou,  T.;  Wu,  S.;  Zhang,  R.  Improved  state  space  model  predictive  fault‐tolerant  control  for  injection  molding batch processes with partial actuator faults using GA optimization. ISA Trans. 2018, 73, 147–153.  20. Kadlec, P.; Gabrys, B.; Strandt, S. Data‐driven Soft Sensors in the process industry. Comput. Chem. Eng. 2009,  33, 795–814.  21. Boccaletti, S.; Latora, V.; Moreno, Y.; Chavez, M.; Hwang, D. Complex networks: Structure and dynamics.  Phys. Rep. 2006, 424, 175–308.  22. Keliris, C.; Polycarpou, M.M.; Parisini, T. A robust nonlinear observer‐based approach for distributed fault  detection of input–output interconnected systems. Automatica 2015, 53, 408–415.  23. Gao, N.; Darouach, M.; Alma, M.; Voos, H. Decentralized dynamic‐observer‐based control for large scale  nonlinear uncertain systems. In Proceedings of the 2015 American Control Conference (ACC), Chicago, IL,  USA, 1–3 July 2015; pp. 4131–4136.  24. Li, Y.; Sanfelice, R.G. Interconnected Observers for Robust Decentralized Estimation With Performance  Guarantees and Optimized Connectivity Graph. IEEE Trans. Control. Netw. Syst. 2015, 3, 1–11.  25. Chakrabarty, A.; Sundaram, S.; Corless, M.J.; Buzzard, G.T.; Żak, S.H.; Rundell, A.E. Distributed unknown  input  observers  for  interconnected  nonlinear  systems.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2016  American  Control  Conference (ACC), Boston, MA, USA, 6–8 July 2016; pp. 101–106.  26. Besançon, G.; Hammouri, H. On observer design for interconnected systems. J. Math. Syst. Estim. Control  1998, 8, 1–26.  27. Dashkovskiy, S.; Naujok, L. Quasi‐ISS/ISDS observers for interconnected systems and applications. Syst.  Control. Lett. 2015, 77, 11–21.  28. hmed‐Ali, T.; Giri, F.; Krstic, M.; Lamnabhi‐Lagarrigue, F. Observer design for a class of nonlinear ODE– PDE cascade systems. Syst. Control. Lett. 2015, 83, 19–27.  29. Grip, H.F.; Saberi, A.; Johansen, T.A. Observers for interconnected nonlinear and linear systems. Automatica  2012, 48, 1339–1346.  30. Farza, M.; Busawon, K.; Hammouri, H. Simple nonlinear observers for on‐line estimation of kinetic rates  in bioreactors. Automatica 1998, 34, 301–318.  31. Zhang, M.; Li, Z.‐T.; Cabassud, M.; Dahhou, B. Unknown input reconstruction: A comparison of system  inversion and sliding mode observer based techniques. In the Proceedings of the CCC2017 (2017 Chinese  Control Conference), Daian, China, 26–27 July 2017; pp. 7172–7177.  32. Alessandri, A.; Bagnerini, P.; Cianci, R. State observation for Lipchitz nonlinear dynamical systems basen  on Lyapunov functions and functionals. Mathematics 2020, 8, 1424.  Publisherʹs Note: MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional  affiliations.  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional  affiliations.  © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access  article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution  (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7966  23  of  23 

Journal

Applied SciencesMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Nov 10, 2020

There are no references for this article.