Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Plastic–Concrete Waterproof Walls of an Underground Granary Subject to Combined Bending Moment and Water Pressure

Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Plastic–Concrete Waterproof Walls of an... ·  Article  Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Plastic–Concrete  Waterproof Walls of an Underground Granary Subject to   Combined Bending Moment and Water Pressure  Hao Zhang, Kaiyi Han, Jinping Yang * and Lei Chen  School of Civil Engineering, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450001, China;   zzbright@163.com (H.Z.); 2020920390@stu.haut.edu.cn (K.H.); chenleihe2008@163.com (L.C.)  *  Correspondence: jping_yang@haut.edu.cn; Tel.: +86‐0371‐67758681  Abstract:  To  investigate  the  mechanical  properties  of  plastic–concrete  silo  walls  in  practice,  the  mechanical  properties  and  failure  mechanism  under  the  combined  bending  moment  and  water  pressure  were  analyzed  through  the  uniform  loading  test,  water  pressure  test,  and  numerical  analysis. The influence of the connecting plate spacing, radius, and the waterproof plate thickness  on the water pressure‐bearing capacity were analyzed. The test results show that the chemical ad‐ hesive force exists between the waterproof plate and concrete and can resist 20 kPa. The displace‐ ment and strain of the waterproof plate increases significantly with the increment in water pres‐ sure. When the water pressure reached 85 kPa, the specimen was damaged due to shear failure.  The established numerical model was validated by the test results. The numerical analysis results  show  that  the  specimen  failure  mainly  depends  on  the  bolt  strength  when  the  thickness  of  the  Citation: Zhang, H.; Han, K.;   waterproof plate is greater than 14 mm or the radius of the connecting plate is greater than 60 mm.  Yang, J.; Chen, L. Experimental and  The  relation  between  the  design  parameters  and  the  water  pressure‐bearing  capacity  was  pro‐ Numerical Investigation of Plas‐ tic–Concrete Waterproof Walls of an  posed.  Compared  with  the waterproof  plate  thickness,  the  connecting  plate  spacing and  radius  Underground Granary Subject to  have greater influence on the water pressure‐bearing capacity.  Combined Bending Moment and  Water Pressure. Buildings 2022, 12,  Keywords: underground granary; plastic‐concrete wall; uniform loading test; water pressure test;  893. https://doi.org/10.3390/  numerical analysis  buildings12070893  Academic Editors: Hongyuan Fang,  Baosong Ma, Qunfang Hu, Xin Feng,  Niannian Wang, Cong Zeng and  1. Introduction  Hongfang Lu  Underground granaries have a long application history in China [1]. Because they  are built underground, they have the advantages of airtightness, low temperature, low  Received: 28 May 2022  Accepted: 20 June 2022  storage cost, no requirement for fumigation, avoidance of pollution, etc. [2,3]. Compared  Published: 24 June 2022  with above‐ground granaries, they also have the advantages of requiring less space, be‐ ing concealed, and preventing fires [4,5]. In recent years, many scholars have devoted  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  themselves  to  the  study  of  new  underground  granaries,  among  which  large  diameter  neutral with regard to  jurisdictional  reinforced concrete underground granaries have become representative of modern un‐ claims  in  published  maps  and  derground granaries, and are notable for their achievements [6].  institutional affiliations.  Concrete  structures  are  widely  used  in  engineering,  and  have  the  advantages  of  good modularity, integrity, and durability [7–10]. Similarly, the cast‐in‐place reinforced  concrete underground silo is also an attractive structural form of the underground silo  Copyright:  ©  2022  by  the  authors.  [11]. However, the issue of ensuring these silos are waterproof and moisture‐proof still  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  restricts their extensive application and promotion [12,13]. Polypropylene plastic is wa‐ This article is  an open  access article  terproof, corrosion‐resistant, easy to construct, non‐toxic and harmless [14], and meets  distributed  under  the  terms  and  conditions of the Creative Commons  food storage standards. In [15], the authors presented a plastic–concrete waterproof sys‐ Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  tem with polypropylene plastic (PP) as the lining material. The waterproof system inte‐ (https://creativecommons.org/license grated the construction of the structure and ensured it was waterproof, and solved the  s/by/4.0/).  problems  associated  with  the  difficulty  in  repairing  the  waterproof  roll  material  and  Buildings 2022, 12, 893. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12070893  www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  2  of  24  coating construction in the reinforced concrete structure. However, in order to ensure the  safety of plastic–concrete silos, it is still necessary to carry out a composite stress analysis  of the bending moment and water pressure on the silo wall. This has not been proposed  in previous studies, e.g., ref. [15].  In order to improve the water resistance and durability of cast‐in‐place reinforced  concrete underground silos from the perspective of applied science [16–19], and to im‐ prove  the  quality  of  internal  grain  storage,  improving  silo  performance  from  the  per‐ spective of concrete materials is a popular research topic. Poonyakan et al. [20] improved  low thermal conductivity concrete using plastic wastes. Kromoser et al. [21] proposed a  novel thin‐walled CFRP‐reinforced UHPC beam based on second‐generation implants.  Flores‐Johnson et al. [22] presented fiber‐reinforced foamed concrete with a shaking table  test.  Al‐Fakih  et  al.  [23]  studied  the  rubberized  concrete  through  numerical  analysis;  however, only the vertical loading was considered. Lee et al. [24] theoretically proposed  thin‐walled UHPC flanges. Kozłowski et al. [25] studied the shear behavior of AAC ma‐ sonry unit walls. These studies indicate that, in order to more accurately obtain the ma‐ terial properties of concrete structures, it is necessary to conduct model tests [26–28].  In addition, it is also necessary to fully study the static characteristics of cast‐in‐place  reinforced concrete underground silos prior to their designing [29–31]. Static properties  include  tensile,  compression,  bending,  and  shear  properties  [32–34].  Mastering  these  static characteristics is required to ensure the safety of the designed underground bunker  [35,36]. More complex stress modes, such as simultaneous compression and bending, are  also lacking research. In addition to the above model tests, it is also necessary to under‐ taken relevant numerical simulation and numerical model verification [37,38].  Furthermore, to ensure that cast‐in‐place reinforced concrete underground silos are  more  sustainable  [39–43]—that  is,  have  better  waterproof  and  moisture‐proof  perfor‐ mance  and  provide  better  protection  for  grain  storage,  as  examined  in  this  study  [44–47]—it is necessary to carry out waterproof research on concrete structures [48–50].  Apay et al. [51] investigated the influence of waterproof and water‐repellent admixtures  on the permeability and compressive strength of concrete. Su et al. [52] presented a re‐ view of the composite behavior of the waterproofing membrane interface. Chuai et al.  [53]  proposed  mechanical  properties  of  a  prefabricated  underground  silo  steel  plate  concrete wall. Pisova et al. [54] studied spray‐applied waterproofing membranes. How‐ ever, there is still a lack of research on the composite stress analysis of the bending mo‐ ment and water pressure of the plastic–concrete wall of underground granaries.  To fill the aforementioned gap, in this study, based on previous references, poly‐ propylene plastic–concrete composite silo wall specimens were designed for an under‐ ground  granary  polypropylene  plastic–concrete  waterproof  system.  In  addition,  the  uniformly distributed load test and water pressure load composite test were undertaken  on the silo wall specimens, to simulate their stress state in real applications. The defor‐ mation, strain evolution, failure mode, and failure mechanism of the specimen under the  combined action of the bending moment and water pressure were analyzed. Based on the  experimental results, the numerical model was established and the parameters affecting  the design of the silo wall were analyzed. This can provide an example for the design of  the silo wall of underground granary.  2. Experimental Design  2.1. Test Specimen Design and Manufacture  The test specimen was composed of a polypropylene plastic (PP) waterproof plate, a  PP bolt, a PP connecting plate, and a concrete plate. The PP connecting plate and PP wa‐ terproof plate were connected by a weld, and the PP bolt and PP connecting plate were  connected by the thread and weld. The structure of the test specimen is shown in Figure  1. The dimensions of the square section of PP waterproof plate are 1800 mm × 1800 mm.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  3  of  24  Five rows and five columns of PP connecting plates were arranged inside the specimen,  and the central spacing of the PP connecting plates was 300 mm.  Figure 1. Schematic diagram of test specimen.  In order to take full advantage of the pull‐out force of the bolt, the diameter of the PP  bolt was 30 mm, its length was 100 mm, and the whole length of the surface of the bolt  was covered in turning wire. According to the standard [55,56] of the ordinary thread,  the diameter, and the pitch series, in the experiment, the thread height was 0.3 mm and  the pitch distance was 1.5 mm. The diameter of the PP connecting plate was 100 mm, and  the thickness was 20 mm. In order to enhance the weld strength, the welds of six poly‐ propylene plastic electrodes were utilized to connect the waterproof plate and the con‐ necting plate. The thickness of the waterproof plate, of 10 mm, was selected to be practi‐ cal  and  economical.  Plastic  formwork  was  arranged  around  the  waterproof  plates  as  pouring formwork.  In  addition, a  waterproof  plastic  plate  was  included.  The  plastic  template, water‐ proof plastic plate, and the PP waterproof plate were connected by welding. In order to  allow water to flow into the specimen, the method of embedding reinforcement was used  to reserve a water injection channel in the specimen. After the concrete was set, the em‐ bedded  reinforcement  was  extracted,  and  the  plastic  plate  and  plastic  template  were  blocked by planting reinforcement glue. The internal steel mesh of the specimen was ar‐ ranged using HRB400 double‐layer rebar of  8 mm diameter with 200  mm  space. Four  hooks with a  diameter  of 16  mm were embedded in  the corners of the  specimen. The  thickness of the concrete protective layer was set to 40 mm, and the concrete strength was  C40.  2.2. Test Device  The specimen was placed on a supporting roller having a span of 1500 mm, and the  center line of the roller was 150 mm from the edge of the specimen. A movable hinge  support and fixed hinge support were each fixed on one side. The test loading was di‐ vided  into  two  stages:  uniform  loading  and  water  pressure  loading.  In  the  uniform  loading stage, a cast iron weight was used for graded loading; the pressure was increased  by 3.79 kN/m , which was maintained for 15 min at each stage, and remained unchanged  after sequential loading to 21.21 kN/m . A hydrostatic water pressure press was used for  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  4  of  24  water pressure loading, which was composed of a pressure pump, pressure control host,  and computer control system.  During the water pressure loading, the water pressure was increased by 10 kPa from  an initial value of 10 kPa. The pressure was maintained for 3 min at each stage, and the  displacement and strain were recorded. The schematic diagram of specimen loading is  presented in Figure 2.  Figure 2. Schematic diagram of test loading.  2.3. Test Method  In order to assess the strain distribution of specimens under the combined action of  the bending moment and water pressure, 80 strain measuring points, numbered Y1‐4 to  Y25‐3,  were  arranged  at  the  weld  joints  inside  the  PP  waterproof  plate.  Forty  strain  measuring points were arranged in the middle of the span of the two nodes on the out‐ side of the PP waterproof plate, numbered YL‐1 to YL‐40. Sixteen strain measuring points  were arranged in the middle of the four‐node span, numbered YS‐1 to YS‐16. Ten strain  gauges, numbered YC‐1 to YC‐10, were arranged on the concrete surface, as illustrated in  Figure 3.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  5  of  24  YL-1 YL-2 YL-3 YL-4 Y1-4 Y2-4 Y3-4 Y4-4 Y2-3 Y3-3 Y4-3 Y5-3 YL-5 YL-6 YL-7 YL-8 YL-9 Y1-2 Y2-2 Y3-2 Y4-2 Y5-2 Y6-1 Y7-1 Y8-1 Y9-1 Y10-1 YL-10 YL-11 YL-12 YL-13 Y6-4 Y7-4 Y8-4 Y9-4 Y7-3 Y8-3 Y9-3 Y10-3 YL-14 YL-15 YL-16 YL-17 YL-18 Y6-2 Y7-2 Y8-2 Y9-2 Y10-2 Y11-1 Y12-1 Y13-1 Y14-1 Y15-1 YL-19 YL-20 YL-21 YL-22 Y11-4 Y12-4 Y13-4 Y14-4 Y12-3 Y13-3 Y14-3 Y15-3 YL-23 YL-24 YL-25 YL-26 YL-27 Y11-2 Y12-2 Y13-2 Y14-2 Y15-2 Y16-1 Y17-1 Y18-1 Y19-1 Y20-1 YL-28 YL-29 YL-30 YL-31 Y16-4 Y17-4 Y18-4 Y19-4 Y17-3 Y18-3 Y19-3 Y20-3 YL-32 YL-33 YL-34 YL-35 YL-36 Y16-2 Y17-2 Y18-2 Y19-2 Y20-2 Y21-1 Y22-1 Y23-1 Y24-1 Y25-1 YL-37 YL-38 YL-39 YL-40 Y21-4 Y22-4 Y23-4 Y24-4 Y22-3 Y23-3 Y24-3 Y25-3     (a)  (b)  YS-1 YS-2 YS-3 YS-4 YC-1 YC-2 YS-5 YS-7 YS-8 YS-6 YC-3 YC-4 YC-5 YC-6 YS-11 YS-9 YS-10 YS-12 YC-7 YC-8 YS-13 YS-14 YS-15 YS-16 YC-9 YC-10     (c)  (d)  Figure 3. Layout of strain measuring points: (a) two‐node mid‐span strain measuring point; (b)  strain measuring point at the weld; (c) four‐node mid‐span strain measuring point; (d) concrete  strain measuring point.  Furthermore, to measure the maximum displacement and the displacement at the  joints  of  the  PP  waterproof  plate,  and  to  explore  the  displacement  change  rule  of  the  specimen, 25 displacement measuring points were arranged at the outer joints of the PP  waterproof plate, numbered WJ‐1 to WJ‐25, and 16 displacement measuring points were  arranged at the middle of the four‐node span, numbered WS‐1 to WS‐16, as shown in  Figure 4.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  6  of  24  WJ-1 WJ-2 WJ-3 WJ-4 WJ-5 WS-2 WS-3 WS-4 WS-1 WJ-6 WJ-7 WJ-8 WJ-9 WJ-10 WS-5 WS-6 WS-7 WS-8 WJ-11 WJ-12 WJ-13 WJ-14 WJ-15 WS-12 WS-9 WS-10 WS-11 WJ-16 WJ-17 WJ-18 WJ-19 WJ-20 WS-13 WS-14 WS-15 WS-16 WJ-21 WJ-22 WJ-23 WJ-24 WJ-25 Figure 4. Layout of displacement measuring points.  3. Test Results Analysis  3.1. Failure Mode  The  test  loading  was  divided  into  two  stages:  uniform  load  loading  and  water  pressure loading. In the stage of uniform load loading, the deformation of the specimen  was small, in general. When the target load was 21.21 kN/m , the load pressure was kept  unchanged. Then, when the pressure was increased to 76 kPa, the No. WJ‐20 node was  damaged, and the water pressure in the specimen dropped to 63 kPa at that time. When  the  water  pressure  was  loaded  to  85 kPa,  the PP waterproof  plate  was  damaged.  The  failure  position  of  the  specimen  is  shown  in  Figure  5a.  The  waterproof  plate  at  node  WJ‐19  was  cut,  as  presented in  Figure  5b;  the  weld  between  the  connecting  plate and  waterproof plate at this node was torn, although the bolts and the connecting plate were  well‐connected.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  7  of  24      (a)  (b)  Figure 5. Schematic diagram of specimen damage: (a) destruction of the waterproof plate; (b) node  destruction.  The damage to the PP waterproof plate can be explained as follows. At that moment,  because of the uneven distribution of water pressure, stripping occurred in the plastic  stud slip of the WJ‐13 node. The waterproof plate and concrete were first located near the  water  concentration,  and  the  force  of  the  near  node  increased,  which  led  to  the  weld  tearing failure of the WJ‐19 node. After the destruction of the WJ‐19 node, with the in‐ crease in water pressure, the weld stress of the nearby nodes increased again, leading to  the failure of the WJ‐20 node. After the two nodes were damaged, the span of the wa‐ terproof plate increased, resulting in the increment in its deformation. Finally, the shear  failure of the PP waterproof plate occurred.  According  to  the  test  results,  when  the  PP  waterproof  plate  was  damaged,  the  pressure of the plastic–concrete composite silo wall specimen was 85 kPa. The slip of the  plastic bolt in concrete had a great influence on the internal force of the plastic member.  The joint weld strength determined the bearing capacity of the plastic waterproof plate.  By increasing the joint weld strength, the water pressure‐bearing capacity of the silo wall  specimen could be improved.  3.2. Load–Displacement Relationship  3.2.1. Load–Displacement Curve of the Node  The displacement at each node increased linearly with the increase in uniform dis‐ tributed load. When the load reached the maximum value of 21.21 kN/m , the maximum  displacement of 1.25 mm appeared at No. WJ‐23. The displacement–load curve is shown  in Figure 6a.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  8  of  24  (a)  (b)  Figure 6. Node displacement–load: (a) displacement–uniform load;  (b) displacement–water pres‐ sure.  When the water pressure was less than 20 kPa, the displacement at most nodes did  not change significantly with the increase in the water pressure. When the water pressure  reached 20 kPa, the displacement of the WJ‐13 node increased with the increase in the  water pressure, and they showed a linear relationship. The water–displacement curve is  shown in Figure 6b.  When the water pressure reached 76 kPa, the maximum displacement of the WJ‐13  node was 4.58 mm, and the displacement of WJ‐19 and WJ‐20 nodes was 7.32 and 7.29  mm, respectively. Comprehensive analysis showed that, in the process of water pressure  loading, the plastic stud of the WJ‐13 node slipped in the concrete, the waterproof plate  near the  node  and  concrete  was  peeled  off,  the  water flow  was concentrated,  and the  stress on the nearby node increased, leading to the weld tear and failure of the WJ‐19  node. The results also showed that the distribution of water pressure was not uniform, in  general,  and  the  strength  of  the  joint  weld  had  a  significant  effect  on  the  water  pres‐ sure‐bearing capacity of specimens.  3.2.2. Four‐Node Mid‐Span Load–Displacement Relationship  The displacement of the measuring point of the four‐node span of the specimen in‐ creased with the increase in the uniform distributed load, and showed a linear relation‐ ship.  When  the  maximum  load  reached  21.21  kN/m ,  the  maximum  displacement  ap‐ peared at the measuring point of WS‐13, with a value of 1.59 mm, as shown in Figure 7a.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  9  of  24  (a)  (b)  Figure  7.  Four‐node  mid‐span  displacement–load:  (a)  displacement–uniform  load;  (b)  displace‐ ment–water pressure.  When the water pressure was less than 20 kPa, its displacement did not change sig‐ nificantly; when the water pressure was greater than 20 kPa, its displacement increased  with the  increase  in the water  pressure;  when the  water  pressure  reached  76  kPa, the  maximum  displacement  appeared  at  WS‐16  with  a  maximum  value  of  12.66  mm,  as  presented in Figure 7b.  Therefore,  during  the  water  pressure  loading,  because  of  the  chemical  adhesive  force between the PP waterproof plate and the concrete, when the water pressure was  low, displacement of each measuring point resulted in no obvious change. With the in‐ crease in water pressure, the PP waterproof plate and concrete were stripped, the meas‐ uring  point displacement  began  to  change, the  water  pressure reached  the maximum,  and the weld of the WJ‐19 node was damaged, causing the displacement of the measur‐ ing point WS‐16. The results showed that the chemical adhesive force between the PP  waterproof plate and the concrete could resist part of the water pressure.  3.3. Strain–Load Relationship  3.3.1. Mid‐Span Strain–Load Relationship of Two Nodes  Under the uniform distributed load, the mid‐span strain of the two nodes increased  with the increase in load, and they had a linear relationship. When the load was 21.21  kN/m , the maximum strain was 0.000172, which was located at the measurement point  YL‐21, as shown in Figure 8a. In the process of water pressure loading, when the water  pressure was less than 20 kPa, the strain changed slightly. When the water pressure was  larger than 20 kPa, the strain linearly increased with the increasing water pressure. As the  water pressure reached 76 kPa, the maximum strain of 0.008 occurred at the measure‐ ment point YL‐15, as presented in Figure 8b.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  10  of  24  (a)  (b)  Figure 8. Mid‐span strain–load at two nodes: (a) strain–uniform load; (b) strain–water pressure.  3.3.2. Mid‐Span Strain–Load Relationship of Four Nodes  Under  the  uniform  distributed  load,  the  mid‐span  strain  of  four  nodes  increased  with  the  increase  in  load.  When  the  uniform  distributed  load  was  increased  to  21.21  kN/m , the maximum strain was 0.000146, which was located at the measurement point  YS‐5, as shown in Figure 9a. When the water pressure was less than 20 kPa, the strain  changed little; when the water pressure was larger than 20 kPa, the strain increased with  the  increase  in  the  water  pressure,  indicating  a  linear  relationship.  When  the  water  pressure was loaded to 76 kPa, the maximum strain was 0.0035, which was located at the  measurement point YS‐2, as illustrated in Figure 9b.  (a)  (b)  Figure 9. Four‐node mid‐span strain–load: (a) strain–uniform load; (b) strain–water pressure.  3.3.3. Nodal Strain–Load Relationship  Under the uniform distributed load, the strain of the waterproof plate at the joint  weld increased with the increase in load. When the uniform load was increased to 21.21  kN/m , the maximum strain  appeared  at Y23‐4, with a value  of 0.000152, as shown in  Figure 10a. When the water pressure was larger than 20 kPa, the strain increased with the  increase in the water pressure. When the water pressure reached 76 kPa, the strain at the  measuring point Y19‐3 increased sharply, by 0.002676, as presented in Figure 10b. Com‐ Buildings 2022, 12, 893  11  of  24  prehensive  analysis  shows  that  the  joint  strain  distribution  was  not  uniform  and  the  stress  state  was  complex  when  the  water  pressure  was  loaded.  This  was  because  the  strain measuring point was located near the weld, and the stress concentration generated  at the weld had a great influence on the measuring point.  (a)  (b)  Figure 10. Nodal strain–load relationship: (a) strain–uniform load; (b) strain–water pressure.  3.3.4. Concrete Surface Strain–Load Relationship  Under the uniform distributed load, the surface strain of concrete increased with the  increase  in  load.  When  the  load  was  21.21  kN/m ,  the  strain  at  each  measuring  point  reached the maximum value, which was 0.000124, located at YC‐5, as shown in Figure  11a. During the stage of water pressure loading, the concrete surface was always under  pressure. However, the strain on the concrete surface changed little, and the influence of  water pressure on the concrete was very small and could even be ignored, as indicated in  Figure 11b.  (a)  (b)  Figure 11. Concrete strain–load curve: (a) strain–uniform load; (b) strain–water pressure.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  12  of  24  4. Numerical Modeling  4.1. Constitutive Relation of Materials  In  the  numerical  analysis,  the  material  properties  of  polypropylene  plastics  were  measured according to [57]. The sample is presented in Figure 12, and the stress–strain  curve obtained through the tensile test is shown in Figure 13. The elastic modulus Pois‐ son ratio, tensile yield stress, and tensile yield strain are 1430 MPa, 0.48, 21.5 MPa, and  3.7%, respectively.  Figure 12. Test specimens of PP.  Figure 13. PP stress–strain relationship.  The concrete damaged plastic damage model was implemented in ABAQUS. The  relationship between the uni‐axial compression and uni‐axial tensile stress–strain curve  was selected according to [58]. The main parameters of concrete are shown in Table 1.  The ideal elastic‐plastic model was selected for the steel constitutive model, for which the  elastic modulus is 2.1 × 10  MPa and Poisson’s ratio is 0.3.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  13  of  24  Table 1. Concrete material parameters.  Characteristic  Parameter  Expansion angle α  36.31°  Eccentricity c  0.1  Fb0/fc0  1.16  Shape factor K  0.667  Viscosity parameter μ  0.0005  Poisson’s ratio ϑ  0.2  4.2. Cell Selection and Meshing  In order to ensure the accuracy of the numerical results, an eight‐node linear hexa‐ hedron linear reduction integral element (C3D8R) was used for the PP waterproof plate,  PP connecting plate, PP bolt, plastic formwork, watertight plastic plate, and concrete; and  the truss element (T3D2) was used for the steel mesh. The grid size of the PP waterproof  plate and plastic template was 40 mm, and the grid size of the waterproof plastic plate  was 20 mm, as shown in Figure 14a. The grid size of the PP stud and PP connecting plate  was 14 mm, as presented in Figure 14b. As the stress of concrete and steel mesh was not  the focus of this analysis, the grid sizes of concrete and steel mesh were 60 and 40 mm,  respectively. The concrete mesh division is illustrated in Figure 14c.  (a)  (b)  (c)  Figure 14. Meshing: (a) mesh division of PP waterproof plate; (b) meshing of pegs and connecting  plates; (c) concrete meshing.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  14  of  24  4.3. Load Application and Boundary Conditions  In the numerical model, the loading form of the force was adopted, and the concrete  surface was uniformly loaded and graded to provide the uniform load. Since the water  pressure action cannot be accurately predicted in the test, the inner waterproof plate was  graded by loading with the most unfavorable uniform load to provide water pressure  action. According to the supporting mode of the specimen in the test, X‐ and Z‐ direc‐ tional  displacement  constraints,  rotation  constraints,  and  Y‐directional  displacement  constraints were applied at 150 mm from the bottom of the specimen to the left edge, and  X‐ and Z‐directional rotational constraints and Y‐ and Z‐directional displacement con‐ straints were applied at 150 mm from the bottom of the specimen to the right edge.  4.4. Contact Simulation  In ABAQUS, the contact unit was used to simulate the contact interface between the  concrete and plastic formwork, and the normal direction of the contact surface was the  hard contact. PP pegs and steel mesh were embedded into the concrete through the em‐ bedment,  and  the  PP  connecting  plate  was  connected  to  the  plastic  waterproof  plate  through the tie.  5. Numerical Model Validation  5.1. Comparison of Load–Displacement Curves  In the uniformly distributed loading stage, the mean values of the mid‐span node  displacement test and corresponding simulated values of the specimens increased with  the increase in load. Furthermore, their variation trends were consistent and their relative  differences ranged from −8.71% to 4.78%, indicating that the numerical analysis results  were in good agreement with the test results, as can be seen in Figure 15a.  (a)  (b)  Figure 15. Displacement comparison: (a) comparison of uniform loading stage; (b) comparison of  water pressure loading stages.  In the water pressure loading stage, due to the water pressure distribution in the  test, the displacement of the four nodes was selected for comparison and analysis; these  displacements grew significantly, as shown in Figure 15b.  During the water pressure loading process, the simulation value was greater than  the  value  in  the  experiment.  When  the  water  pressure  was  greater  than  20  kPa,  both  values showed the same trend, having a relative difference between −18% and 145%. The  main reasons for this are as follows: in the numerical analysis, the water pressure was  loaded according to the most unfavorable loading of the water pressure; it was also as‐ sumed that the waterproof plate is under uniform pressure, and size values for loading  were the same as those for the water pressure test. However, in the actual test, the direc‐ tion of flow of the injection between the waterproof plate and the concrete was randomly  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  15  of  24  distributed, and the size of the water area on the waterproof plate also varied randomly  and was unpredictable. Therefore, during the water pressure loading stage, the size and  mode of numerical loading were inconsistent with those of the test loading, leading to a  large relative difference between the numerical simulation value and the test value, alt‐ hough the overall trends were consistent.  5.2. Comparison of Load–Strain Curves  Under the combined action of the bending moment and water pressure, the tensile  stress of the waterproof plate near the weld joint of the specimen was large. The strain of  the measuring point Y9‐1 at the weld joint was selected for comparative analysis.  Under the uniformly distributed load, the test values and the corresponding simu‐ lation  values  increased  with  the  load,  and  both  showed  a linear  growth  trend,  whose  relative difference was between −0.1% and 17%. Generally, they are in good agreement,  as shown in Figure 16a. The relative difference is mainly due to the fact that the test point  was close to the plastic weld seam of the strain, which had a greater influence on the  measuring point of stress concentration.  (a)  (b)  Figure 16. Strain comparison: (a) comparison of uniform loading stage; (b) comparison of water  pressure loading stages.  In the water pressure loading stages, the early stage of the load simulation had a  value  greater  than  the  test  values.  With  the  increase  in  water  pressure,  the  test  value  gradually became greater than the simulation value. The values showed the same varia‐ tion trend, and the relative difference was between −47.7% and 17%, as shown in Figure  16b. This difference was mainly because of the stress concentration caused by the node  welds, and the difference in the water pressure loading method between the numerical  simulation and the experiment.  Through the above comparative analysis, it can be seen that numerical parameters  selected in this paper, such as constitutive relation, contact relation, and boundary con‐ dition, can better simulate the loading process of the specimen of the silo wall. The mod‐ eling method adopted in numerical is effective, and lays a foundation for the parameter  analysis in next section.  6. Design Parameter Analysis  Based on the verified parameters of the numerical model, 14 numerical models were  established  to  analyze  the  design  parameters  of  plastic–concrete  composite  bin  wall  specimens, including the spacing and radius of the connecting plate and the thickness of  the waterproof plate.  in the test, in the following mod‐ As the direction of water flow cannot be predicted  els, the loaded water pressure was applied uniformly under the most unfavorable con‐ dition. The selection of the numerical design parameters and the main results are listed in  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  16  of  24  Table 2. In each model, a parameter was changed according to the basic model, while the  other parameters were left unchanged.  Table 2. Design parameters and main results.  PP Connec‐ PP Water‐ Numerical  PP Connecting  Water Pres‐ Peak Dis‐ tion Plate  proof Plate  Model  Plate Radius  sure‐Bearing  placement  Spacing  Thickness  Number  (mm)  Capacity (kPa)  (mm)  (mm)  (mm)  PCW‐R40  40  230  22.18  PCW‐R50  50  300  22.09  PCW‐R60  300  10  60  380  22.01  PCW‐R70  70  400  20.84  PCW‐R80  80  420  19.12  PCW‐B8  8  240  24.63  PCW‐B10  10  300  24.28  PCW‐B12  12  350  22.28  300  50  PCW‐B14  14  380  21.91  PCW‐B16  16  350  21.71  PCW‐B18  18  360  20.88  PCW‐D200  200  650  13.04  PCW‐D250  250  450  19.18  PCW‐D300  300  10  50  300  22.09  PCW‐D350  350  200  25.94  PCW‐D400  400  150  28.68  Note: PCW is the abbreviation of plastic–concrete wall; R in R40 means connecting plate radius, 40  means radius of 40 mm; B8 means waterproof plate thickness, 8 means thickness of 8 mm; D200  means D means connecting plate spacing, 200 means spacing of 200 mm.  The influence of the connection plate spacing, radius, and waterproof plate thick‐ nesses on the internal force were investigated under the combined bending moment and  water pressure. The four‐node mid‐span displacement at WS‐7 and the Mises stress at  WJ‐13 were selected for comparison.  6.1. Connecting Plate Spacing  Under  the  compound  action  of  the  bending  moment  and  water  pressure,  the  mid‐span displacement of each specimen at the four joints increased with the increase in  the water pressure at different connecting plate spacings. When the stress of the water‐ proof plate at the joints reached the yield stress of 21.5 MPa, for different connecting plate  spacings  of  200,  250,  300,  350,  and  400  mm,  the  maximum  displacements  were  13.04,  19.18, 22.09, 25.94, and 28.68 mm, respectively. The maximum mid‐span displacement of  four  nodes  increased  with  the  increase  in  the  spacing  between  the  connecting  plates.  When  the  spacing  was  increased  from  200  to  400  mm,  the  displacement  increased  by  119.9%, as presented in Figure 17a.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  17  of  24  (a)  (b)  (c)   Figure 17. Different connecting plate spacing: (a) displacement comparison; (b) stress comparison;  (c) d‐P diagram.  The stress of the waterproof plate at the mid‐span joint of each specimen increased  with the increase in the water pressure, and the two others both increased linearly. When  the  stress  value  reached  the  PP  yield  stress  of  21.5  MPa,  the  water  pressure  of  each  specimen reached its bearing capacity, as shown in Figure 17b.  Corresponding to different connecting plate spacings of 200, 250, 300, 350, and 400  mm, the water pressure‐bearing capacity of each specimen was 650, 450, 300, 200, and 150  kPa,  respectively.  When  the  spacing  increased  from  200  to  400  mm,  the  water  pres‐ sure‐bearing capacity decreased by 76.9%. The relationship between the connecting plate  spacing and water pressure‐bearing capacity is shown in Figure 17c.  It can be seen from Figure 17 that the water pressure‐bearing capacity P and con‐ necting plate spacing d have a nonlinear relationship, and their functional relationship  can be obtained by fitting as follows:  −2.011 P = 2.812e7d   (1) where  P is the water pressure‐bearing  capacity, and  d is the spacing  between PP con‐ necting plate.  The results show that when the radius of the connecting plate and the thickness of  the waterproof plate are constant, the distance between the connecting plate has a sig‐ nificant influence on the water pressure‐bearing capacity and the corresponding maxi‐ Buildings 2022, 12, 893  18  of  24  mum  displacement  of  the  specimen.  In  practical  engineering  design,  by  reducing  the  distance between the connecting plates, the water pressure‐bearing capacity and stiffness  of the specimen can be effectively improved.  6.2. Connecting Plate Radius  Under  the  combined  action  of  the  bending  moment  and  water  pressure,  the  mid‐span  displacement  of  four  joints  of  each  specimen  increased  with  the  increase  in  water pressure under different connecting plate radii. For different connecting plate radii  of 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 mm, the maximum displacements were 21.18, 22.09, 22.01, 20.84,  and 19.12 mm, respectively.  When  the  mid‐span  displacement  of  the  four  joints  reached  the  maximum  value,  and the connection radius was less than or equal to 60 mm, the waterproof plate stress at  the mid‐span joints reached the PP yield stress. When the connection radius was greater  than 60 mm, the PP stud yielded before the waterproof plate. The maximum mid‐span  displacement of the four nodes decreased as the radius of the connecting plate increased.  When the radius increased from 40 to 80 mm, the displacement decreased by 9.7%, as il‐ lustrated in Figure 18a.  (a)  (b)  (c)   Figure 18. Different connecting plate radii: (a) displacement comparison; (b) stress comparison; (c)  r‐P diagram.  The stress of the waterproof plate at the mid‐span joint of each specimen increased  linearly with the increase in water pressure. For different connecting plate radii of 40, 50,  60, 70, and 80 mm, the water pressure‐bearing capacity of each specimen was 230, 300,  380, 400, and 420 kPa, respectively. When the radius increased from 40 to 80 mm, the  water pressure‐bearing capacity increased by 65.2%. When the radius of the connecting  plate was less than or equal to 60 mm, and the water pressure of the specimen reached its  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  19  of  24  water pressure‐bearing capacity, the stress at the joints of the waterproof plate reached  the PP yield stress. When the radius of the connecting plate was greater than 60 mm, and  the water pressure of the specimen reached its water pressure‐bearing capacity, the stress  at the joints of the waterproof plate did not reach its yield stress. At this time, the PP bolt  in the specimen reached the yield before the waterproof plate, leading to the failure of the  specimen. The relation between the radius of the connecting plate and the water pres‐ sure‐bearing capacity is shown in Figure 18c.  It can be seen from Figure 18 that the water pressure‐bearing capacity P has a non‐ linear  relationship  with the  radius  of the  connecting  plate  r,  and  the  function  relation  between them can be obtained by fitting as follows:  P = −330.571 + 18.514r − 0.114r   (2) where r is the radius of the PP connecting plate.  The  results  show  that  when  the  connection  plate  spacing  and  waterproof  plate  thickness are constant, the connecting plate radius of specimen has a greater influence on  the hydrostatic‐bearing capacity and the corresponding maximum displacement. When  the connecting plate radius is greater than 60 mm, the stud strength of specimen becomes  the main control factor of damage. When increasing the radius of the connection plate in  the engineering design, to improve the hydrostatic‐bearing capacity of the specimens, it  is necessary to enhance the strength of the stud at the same time.  6.3. Thickness of Waterproof Plate  Under  the  compound  action  of  the  bending  moment  and  water  pressure,  the  mid‐span  displacement  of  four  joints  of  each  specimen  increased  with  the  increase  in  water pressure under different thicknesses of the waterproof plate, i.e., 8, 10, 12, 14, 16,  and 18 mm. The maximum displacements were 24.63, 24.24, 22.28, 21.91, 21.71, and 20.88  mm, respectively. When the mid‐span displacement of the four joints reached the max‐ imum value and the thickness of the waterproof plate was less than or equal to 14 mm,  the  stress  at  the  joints  of  the  waterproof  plate  reached  the  PP  yield  stress.  When  the  thickness of the waterproof plate was greater than 14 mm, the PP bolt yielded before the  waterproof  plate.  The  maximum  mid‐span  displacement  of  the  four  nodes  decreased  with the increase in the plate thickness. When the plate thickness increased from 8 to 18  mm, the displacement decreased by 11%, as shown in Figure 19a.  (a)  (b)  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  20  of  24  (c)   Figure 19. Different thicknesses of waterproof plate: (a) displacement comparison; (b) stress com‐ parison; (c) b‐P diagram.  The stress of the waterproof plate at the mid‐span joint of the specimen increased  with the increase in water pressure, and they both increased linearly. For different plate  thicknesses of 8, 10, 12, and 14 mm, when the stress at the joints of waterproof plates  reached the yield stress, the water pressure‐bearing capacity of specimens reached 240,  300, 350, and 380 kPa, respectively. For different plate thicknesses of 16 and 18 mm, the  stud  reached  the  yield  stress  earlier  than  the  waterproof  plate,  and  the  water  pres‐ sure‐bearing capacity of the specimens was 350 and 360 kPa, respectively. The relation  between the thickness of the waterproof plate and the water pressure‐bearing capacity is  given in Figure 19c.  It can be seen from Figure 19 that the relation between the water pressure‐bearing  capacity P and the thickness of the waterproof plate b is nonlinear, and the function rela‐ tion between them can be obtained by fitting as follows:  P = −215.214 + 77.303b − 2.545b   (3) where b is the thickness of the PP waterproof plate.  The results show that the thickness of the waterproof plate has a great influence on  the  water  pressure‐bearing  capacity  and  the  corresponding  maximum  displacement,  when the radius and spacing of the connecting plate are constant. When the thickness of  waterproof  plate  is  greater  than  14  mm,  the  specimen  failure  depends  on  the  bolt  strength. Therefore, the water pressure‐bearing capacity can be improved by increasing  the bolt strength in practical engineering.  6.4. Parameter Sensitivity Analysis  Taking  the  water  pressure‐bearing  capacity  of  the  plastic–concrete  composite  silo  wall specimens as the dependent variable, multiple linear regression analysis was con‐ ducted with the spacing d of the connecting plates, radius R of the connecting plates, and  thickness B of the waterproof plates as independent variables. The obtained regression  parameters are summarized in Table 3.  Table 3. Regression parameters.  Regression Coef‐ Project  Coefficient  Standard Error  T‐Statistic  Significance  ficients (Beat)  Constant  788.303  120.865 ‐  6.552  0.000  d −2.500  0.279 −0.874 −8.969  0.000 *  r  4.074  1.216  0.330  3.350  0.006 *  b  7.775  4.377  0.175  1.776  0.101 **  Note: At the significance level of 0.05, * means significant, ** means not significant.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  21  of  24  As can be seen from Table 3, the best values of connection plate spacing, connection  plate radius, and waterproof plate thickness were −0.874, 0.330, and 0.175, respectively,  indicating that the connection plate spacing has the greatest (and negative) correlation  with the  water  pressure‐bearing  capacity  of the  specimen,  followed  by  the  connection  plate radius, which has a positive correlation; the waterproof plate thickness has a small  influence on the water pressure‐bearing capacity of the specimen. It can be seen from the  significance that the connecting plate spacing and its radius are significant, whereas the  thickness  of  the  waterproof  plate  is  not.  Based  on  the  load  design  value,  the  distance  between the connecting plates should be reduced, or the radius of the connecting plates  should be increased to improve the water pressure‐bearing capacity of the specimens.  7. Conclusions  In this study, the internal force, deformation, failure mechanism, and water pres‐ sure‐bearing capacity of the plastic–concrete composite silo wall under the combined ac‐ tion of the bending moment and water pressure were examined by means of uniform  loading and water pressure loading tests and numerical analysis. The following conclu‐ sions can be drawn:  (1) During  the  uniform  loading  stage,  the  plastic  plate  and  concrete  in  the  plas‐ tic–concrete composite specimen worked together through the plastic bolt, and the  displacement and strain of the waterproof plate increased linearly with the increase  in  the  load;  however,  their  values  were  changed  little.  During  the  stage  of  water  pressure  loading,  under  the  compound  action  of  the  bending  moment  and  water  pressure, the displacement and strain of the waterproof plate increased significantly  with the increase in water pressure.  (2) There was a chemical adhesive force between the PP waterproof plate and concrete,  which could resist the 20 kPa water pressure. Under a certain uniform load, with the  increase  in  water  pressure,  the  waterproof  plate  and  concrete  in  the  specimen  gradually peeled off, and their combined effect was gradually weakened. Regarding  the PP waterproof plate shear failure, the maximum water pressure was 85 kPa.  (3) The  numerical  model  of  the  plastic–concrete  composite  silo  wall  was  established.  The numerical analysis results were in good agreement with the test results, which  shows that  the  numerical  model  is accurate  and  feasible.  Based on  the  numerical  analysis results, the expressions of the relationship between the design parameters  and the water pressure‐bearing capacity were presented.  (4) When the thickness of the waterproof plate is larger than 14 mm or the radius of the  connecting plate is larger than 60 mm, the bolt strength is the main control factor of  specimen failure. When increasing the thickness of the waterproof plate or the ra‐ dius of the connecting plate to improve the water pressure‐bearing capacity of the  specimen, the bolt strength should also be enhanced.  (5) The numerical parameter analysis shows that, compared with the thickness of the  waterproof plate, the connection plate spacing and its radius have a greater influ‐ ence on the water pressure‐bearing capacity of the specimen. The regression coeffi‐ cients of the connection plate spacing, radius, and waterproof plate thickness on the  water pressure‐bearing capacity of the specimen were −0.874, 0.330, and 0.175, re‐ spectively.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, H.Z. and J.Y.; methodology, H.Z.; software, K.H.; vali‐ dation  and  formal  analysis,  J.Y.;  data  curation,  L.C.;  writing—original  draft  preparation,  K.H.;  writing—review and editing, H.Z. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the  manuscript.  Funding: This research was funded by the National Natural Science Foundations of China (Grant  No. 52108134), the Fund Project of scientific and technological breakthrough of Henan province  (Grant No. 202102110122, 212102110200), and the School Research Fund for the Doctoral Program  (Grant No. 31401223).  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  22  of  24  Informed Consent Statement:  Informed consent was obtained from all subjects involved in the  study. Written informed consent has been obtained from the patient.  Data Availability Statement: The data used to support the findings of this study are available from  the corresponding author upon request.  Acknowledgments: This work is supported by National Ministry of Science and Technology 2014  Special  Project  for  Food  Public  Welfare  Industry  “Research  and  Development  of  the  New  Ware‐house Type and Technical Systems for Ecological Grain Storage” (Grant No. 201413007).  Conflicts of Interest: The author declares no potential conflicts of interest regarding the publica‐ tion of this article.  Author Recommendation: In future research, a more comprehensive analysis will be focused on  the  effect  of  different  connection  plate  radii,  spacings,  and  waterproof  plate  thicknesses  on  the  stress of the plastic–concrete silo wall. In addition, water pressure distribution regularity between  the waterproof plate and concrete will be investigated.  References  1. Pan, Y.; Fang, H.; Li, B.; Wang, F. Stability analysis and full‐scale test of a new recyclable supporting structure for  underground ecological granaries. Eng. Struct. 2019, 192, 205–219. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engstruct.2019.04.087.  2. Valls, A.; García, F.; Ramírez, M.; Benlloch, J. Understanding subterranean grain storage heritage in the Mediter‐ ranean  region:  The  Valencian  silos  (Spain).  Tunn.  Undergr.  Space  Technol.  2015,  50,  178–188.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tust.2015.07.003.  3. Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Wang, Z.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y. Research on the temperature field of grain piles in under‐ ground grain silos lined with plastic. J. Food Process Eng. 2022, 45, e13971. https://doi.org/10.1111/jfpe.13971.  4. Sirousazar, M.; Yari, M.; Achachlouei, B.F.; Arsalani, J.; Mansoori, Y. Polypropylene/montmorillonite Nanocom‐ posites for Food Packaging. e‐Polymersb 2016, 7, 305–313. https://doi.org/10.1515/nano.0013.00019.  5. Gong, C.; Ding, W.; Mosalam, K.M. Performance‐based design of joint waterproofing of segmental tunnel linings  using  hybrid  computational/experimental  procedures.  Tunn.  Undergr.  Space  Technol.  2020,  96,  103172.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tust.2019.103172.  6. Gong,  C.;  Ding,  W.;  Soga,  K.;  Mosalam,  K.M.  Failure  mechanism  of  joint  waterproofing  in  precast  segmental  tunnel linings. Tunn. Undergr. Space Technol. 2018, 84, 334–352. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tust.2018.11.003.  7. Xu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Liu, Q.; Wang, L. Seismic analysis on reinforced concrete group silos through shaking table  tests. Struct. Concr. 2020, 22, 1285–1296. https://doi.org/10.1002/suco.202000207.  8. Ho, N.; Doh, J. Prediction of ultimate strength of concrete walls restrained on three sides. Struct. Concr. 2019, 20,  942–954. https://doi.org/10.1002/suco.201800188.  9. Farajzadehha, S.; Mahdikhani, M.; Moayed, R.Z.; Farajzadehha, S. Experimental study of permeability and elastic  modulus  of  plastic  concrete  containing  nano  silica.  Struct.  Concr.  2020,  23,  521–532.  https://doi.org/10.1002/suco.202000551.  10. Khatib,  J.;  Jahami,  A.;  Elkordi,  A.;  Abdelgader,  H.;  Sonebi,  M.  Structural  Assessment  of  Reinforced  Concrete  Beams Incorporating Waste Plastic Straws. Environments 2020, 7, 96. https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7110096.  11. Massone, L.M.; Rojas, F.R.; Ahumada, M.G. Analytical study of the response of reinforced concrete walls with  discontinuities of flag wall type. Struct. Concr. 2017, 18, 962–973. https://doi.org/10.1002/suco.201600107.  12. Babaei, A.; Mortezaei, A.; Salehian, H. Experimental study on seismic performance of steel fiber reinforced con‐ crete wall piers. Struct. Concr. 2020, 22, 1363–1377. https://doi.org/10.1002/suco.202000104.  13. Scamardo, M.; Cattaneo, S.; Biolzi, L.; Vafa, N. Parametric Analyses of the Response of Masonry Walls with Re‐ inforced Plaster. Appl. Sci. 2022, 12, 5090. https://doi.org/10.3390/app12105090.  14. Lee, C.‐B.; Lee, J.‐H. Nonlinear Dynamic Response of a Concrete Rectangular Liquid Storage Tank on Rigid Soil  Subjected to Three‐Directional Ground Motion. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 4688. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11104688.  15. Qingzhang,  Z.;  Zhilong,  H.;  Hao,  Z.;  Zhenqing,  W.;  Da,  X.  Experimental  study  on  resisted  water  pressure  for  connecting  welds  of  polypropylene  plastic  plates  in  underground  silos.  Plast.  Rubber  Compos.  2021,  1,  1–9.  https://doi.org/10.1080/14658011.2021.1989928.  16. Shi, W.; Wang, L.; Lu, Z.; Zhang, Q. Application of an Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm in an Optimum Tuned  Mass Damper Design for a Pedestrian Bridge. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 175. https://doi.org/10.3390/app8020175.  17. Jeon, S.‐H.; Park, J.‐H. Seismic Fragility of Ordinary Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls with Coupling Beams De‐ signed Using a Performance‐Based Procedure. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 4075. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10124075.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  23  of  24  18. Mohamad,  A.‐B.A.E.;  Chen,  Z.  Experimental  Studies  on  the  Behavior  of  a  Newly‐Developed  Type  of  Self‐Insulating  Concrete  Masonry  Shear  Wall  under  in‐Plane  Cyclic  Loading.  Appl.  Sci.  2017,  7,  463.  https://doi.org/10.3390/app7050463.  19. Hao, T.; Cao, W.; Qiao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Zheng, W. Structural Performance of Composite Shear Walls under Compres‐ sion. Appl. Sci. 2017, 7, 162. https://doi.org/10.3390/app7020162.  20. Poonyakan,  A.;  Rachakornkij,  M.;  Wecharatana,  M.;  Smittakorn,  W.  Potential  Use  of  Plastic  Wastes  for  Low  Thermal Conductivity Concrete. Materials 2018, 11, 1938. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11101938.  21. Kromoser,  B.;  Gericke,  O.;  Hammerl,  M.;  Sobek,  W.  Second‐Generation  Implants  for  Load  Introduction  into  Thin‐Walled CFRP‐Reinforced UHPC Beams: Implant Optimisation and Investigations of Production Technolo‐ gies. Materials 2019, 12, 3973. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12233973.  22. Flores‐Johnson,  E.A.;  Company‐Rodríguez,  B.A.;  Koh‐Dzul,  J.F.;  Carrillo,  J.G.  Shaking  Table  Test  of  U‐Shaped  Walls Made of Fiber‐Reinforced Foamed Concrete. Materials 2020, 13, 2534. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13112534.  23. Al‐Fakih, A.; Al‐Osta, M.A. Finite Element Analysis of Rubberized Concrete Interlocking Masonry under Vertical  Loading. Materials 2022, 15, 2858. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15082858.  24. Lee, J.; Kim, S.; Lee, K.; Kang, Y. Theoretical Local Buckling Behavior of Thin‐Walled UHPC Flanges Subjected to  Pure Compressions. Materials 2021, 14, 2130. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14092130.  25. Kozłowski, M.; Galman, I.; Jasiński, R. Finite Element Study on the Shear Capacity of Traditional Joints between  Walls Made of AAC Masonry Units. Materials 2020, 13, 4035. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13184035.  26. Wang, L.; Shi, W.; Zhou, Y. Study on self‐adjustable variable pendulum tuned mass damper. Struct. Des. Tall Spéc.  Build. 2018, 28, e1561. https://doi.org/10.1002/tal.1561.  27. Yang,  J.;  Lu,  Z.;  Li,  P.  Large‐scale  shaking  table  test  on  tall  buildings  with  viscous  dampers  considering  pile‐soil‐structure interaction. Eng. Struct. 2020, 220, 110960. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engstruct.2020.110960.  28. Yang, J.; Jing, H.; Li, P. Shaking table test and simulation of 12‐story buildings with metallic dampers located on  soft soil. J. Build. Eng. 2021, 46, 103585. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jobe.2021.103585.  29. Hernoune, H.; Benabed, B.; Kanellopoulos, A.; Al‐Zuhairi, A.H.; Guettala, A. Experimental and Numerical Study  of Behaviour of Reinforced Masonry Walls with NSM CFRP Strips Subjected to Combined Loads. Buildings 2020,  10, 103. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10060103.  30. Sun, G.; Li, F.; Zhou, Q. Cyclic Responses of Two‐Side‐Connected Precast‐Reinforced Concrete Infill Panels with  Different Slit Types. Buildings 2021, 12, 16. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12010016.  31. Jamšek,  A.;  Dolšek,  M.  The  Reduced‐Degree‐of‐Freedom  Model  for  Seismic  Analysis  of  Predominantly  Plan‐Symmetric  Reinforced  Concrete  Wall–Frame  Building.  Buildings  2021,  11,  372.  https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11080372.  32. Wang, W.; Quan, C.; Su, S.; Li, Y.; Song, H. Evaluation of seismic performance and effective lateral stiffness for  corrugated steel‐plate concrete composite structural walls repaired using bottom corner dampers. Structures 2022,  40, 1–17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.istruc.2022.04.004.  33. Wen, L.; Cao, W.; Li, Y.; Liu, Y.; Zhou, H. Quantitative study on the influence of foundation valley shape on the  behaviour of concrete cut‐off walls. Structures 2022, 38, 861–873. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.istruc.2022.02.041.  34. Naserpour,  A.;  Fathi,  M.  Numerical  study  of  demountable  shear  wall  system  for  multistory  precast  concrete  buildings. Structures 2021, 34, 700–715. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.istruc.2021.08.014.  35. Grzyb, K.; Jasiński, R. Parameter estimation of a homogeneous macromodel of masonry wall made of autoclaved  aerated concrete based on standard tests. Structures 2022, 38, 385–401. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.istruc.2022.02.005.  36. Nguyen‐Van, V.; Nguyen‐Xuan, H.; Panda, B.; Tran, P. 3D concrete printing modelling of thin‐walled structures.  Structures 2022, 39, 496–511. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.istruc.2022.03.049.  37. Wang, L.;  Shi, W.; Zhou, Y. Adaptive‐passive tuned  mass damper for structural aseismic protection including  soil–structure interaction. Soil Dyn. Earthq. Eng. 2022, 158, 107298. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soildyn.2022.107298.  38. Drobiec, Ł.; Jasiński, R.; Mazur, W.; Rybraczyk, T. Numerical Verification of Interaction between Masonry with  Precast Reinforced Lintel Made of AAC and Reinforced Concrete Confining Elements. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 5446.  https://doi.org/10.3390/app10165446.  39. Shi, W.; Wang, L.; Lu, Z.; Gao, H. Study on Adaptive‐Passive and Semi‐Active Eddy Current Tuned Mass Damper  with Variable Damping. Sustainability 2018, 10, 99. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010099.  40. Ye, J.; Jiang, L. Simplified Analytical Model and Shaking Table Test Validation for Seismic Analysis of Mid‐Rise  Cold‐Formed  Steel  Composite  Shear  Wall  Building.  Sustainability  2018,  10,  3188.  https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093188.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  24  of  24  41. Yang,  J.;  Li,  P.;  Yang,  Y.;  Xu,  D.  An  improved  EMD  method  for  modal  identification  and  a  combined  stat‐ ic‐dynamic method for damage detection. J. Sound Vib. 2018, 420, 242–260. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsv.2018.01.036.  42. Yang, J.; Jing, H.; Li, P. Dynamic characteristics and viscous dampers design for pile‐soil‐structure system. Struct.  Des. Tall Spéc. Build. 2020, 29, e1785. https://doi.org/10.1002/tal.1785.  43. Jing, H.; Chen, H.; Yang, J.; Li, P. Seismic analysis of steel silo considering granular material‐structure interaction.  Structures 2022, 37, 698–708.  44. Kumar,  V.S.;  Ganesan,  N.;  Indira,  P.V.;  Murali,  G.;  Vatin,  N.I.  Flexural  Behaviour  of  Hybrid  Fibre‐Reinforced  Ternary Blend Geopolymer Concrete Beams. Sustainability 2022, 14, 5954. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14105954.  45. Prithiviraj, C.; Saravanan, J.; Kumar, D.R.; Murali, G.; Vatin, N.I.; Swaminathan, P. Assessment of Strength and  Durability  Properties  of  Self‐Compacting  Concrete  Comprising  Alccofine.  Sustainability  2022,  14,  5895.  https://doi.org/10.3390/su14105895.  46. Forero, J.A.; Bravo, M.; Pacheco, J.; de Brito, J.; Evangelista, L. Thermal Performance of Concrete with Reactive  Magnesium Oxide as an Alternative Binder. Sustainability 2022, 14, 5885. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14105885.  47. Shah, S.K.H.; Uchimura, T.; Kawamoto, K. Permanent Deformation and Breakage Response of Recycled Concrete  Aggregates  under  Cyclic  Loading  Subject  to  Moisture  Change.  Sustainability  2022,  14,  5427.  https://doi.org/10.3390/su14095427.  48. Wang, L.; Shi, W.; Zhang, Q.; Zhou, Y. Study on adaptive‐passive multiple tuned mass damper with variable mass  for a large‐span floor structure. Eng. Struct. 2019, 209, 110010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engstruct.2019.110010.  49. Wang, L.; Nagarajaiah, S.; Shi, W.; Zhou, Y. Semi‐active control of walking‐induced vibrations in bridges using  adaptive  tuned  mass  damper  considering  human‐structure‐interaction.  Eng.  Struct.  2021,  244,  112743.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engstruct.2021.112743.  50. Shi, W.; Wang, L.; Lu, Z. Study on self‐adjustable tuned mass damper with variable mass. Struct. Control Health  Monit. 2017, 25, e2114. https://doi.org/10.1002/stc.2114.  51. Apay, A.C.; Özgan, E.; Turgay, T.; Akyol, K. Investigation and modelling the effects of water proofing and water  repellent admixtures dosage on the permeability and compressive strengths of concrete. Constr. Build. Mater. 2016,  113, 698–711. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2016.03.110.  52. Su, J.; Bloodworth, A. Simulating composite behaviour in SCL tunnels with sprayed waterproofing membrane  interface: A state‐of‐the‐art review. Eng. Struct. 2019, 191, 698–710. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engstruct.2019.04.067.  53. Chuai, J.; Hou, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, L. Mechanical Properties of the Vertical Joints of Prefabricated Underground  Silo Steel Plate Concrete Wall. Adv. Civ. Eng. 2020, 2020, 6643811. https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/6643811.  54. Pisova, B.; Hilar, M. Spray‐applied waterproofing membranes: Effective solution for safe and durable tunnel lin‐ ings? IOP Conf. Series: Mater. Sci. Eng. 2017, 236, 012087. https://doi.org/10.1088/1757‐899x/236/1/012087.  55. GB/T 193‐2003; Ordinary Thread Diameter and Pitch Series. The General Administration of Quality Supervision,  Inspection and Quarantine of the People’s Republic of China: Beijing, China, 2003.  56. GT/T 196‐2003; Ordinary Thread Basic Dimensions. The General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspec‐ tion and Quarantine of the People’s Republic of China: Beijing, China, 2003.  57. GB/T 1040‐2006; Plastics Determination of Tensile Properties. The General Administration of Quality Supervision,  Inspection and Quarantine of the People’s Republic of China: Beijing, China, 2006.  58. GB 50010‐2010;  Design  Code  for  Concrete  Structures.  The  General  Administration  of  Quality  Supervision,  In‐ spection and Quarantine of the People’s Republic of China: Beijing, China, 2016.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buildings Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Plastic–Concrete Waterproof Walls of an Underground Granary Subject to Combined Bending Moment and Water Pressure

Buildings , Volume 12 (7) – Jun 24, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/experimental-and-numerical-investigation-of-plastic-ndash-concrete-ARBUTS0qQ6
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2022 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2075-5309
DOI
10.3390/buildings12070893
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

·  Article  Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Plastic–Concrete  Waterproof Walls of an Underground Granary Subject to   Combined Bending Moment and Water Pressure  Hao Zhang, Kaiyi Han, Jinping Yang * and Lei Chen  School of Civil Engineering, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450001, China;   zzbright@163.com (H.Z.); 2020920390@stu.haut.edu.cn (K.H.); chenleihe2008@163.com (L.C.)  *  Correspondence: jping_yang@haut.edu.cn; Tel.: +86‐0371‐67758681  Abstract:  To  investigate  the  mechanical  properties  of  plastic–concrete  silo  walls  in  practice,  the  mechanical  properties  and  failure  mechanism  under  the  combined  bending  moment  and  water  pressure  were  analyzed  through  the  uniform  loading  test,  water  pressure  test,  and  numerical  analysis. The influence of the connecting plate spacing, radius, and the waterproof plate thickness  on the water pressure‐bearing capacity were analyzed. The test results show that the chemical ad‐ hesive force exists between the waterproof plate and concrete and can resist 20 kPa. The displace‐ ment and strain of the waterproof plate increases significantly with the increment in water pres‐ sure. When the water pressure reached 85 kPa, the specimen was damaged due to shear failure.  The established numerical model was validated by the test results. The numerical analysis results  show  that  the  specimen  failure  mainly  depends  on  the  bolt  strength  when  the  thickness  of  the  Citation: Zhang, H.; Han, K.;   waterproof plate is greater than 14 mm or the radius of the connecting plate is greater than 60 mm.  Yang, J.; Chen, L. Experimental and  The  relation  between  the  design  parameters  and  the  water  pressure‐bearing  capacity  was  pro‐ Numerical Investigation of Plas‐ tic–Concrete Waterproof Walls of an  posed.  Compared  with  the waterproof  plate  thickness,  the  connecting  plate  spacing and  radius  Underground Granary Subject to  have greater influence on the water pressure‐bearing capacity.  Combined Bending Moment and  Water Pressure. Buildings 2022, 12,  Keywords: underground granary; plastic‐concrete wall; uniform loading test; water pressure test;  893. https://doi.org/10.3390/  numerical analysis  buildings12070893  Academic Editors: Hongyuan Fang,  Baosong Ma, Qunfang Hu, Xin Feng,  Niannian Wang, Cong Zeng and  1. Introduction  Hongfang Lu  Underground granaries have a long application history in China [1]. Because they  are built underground, they have the advantages of airtightness, low temperature, low  Received: 28 May 2022  Accepted: 20 June 2022  storage cost, no requirement for fumigation, avoidance of pollution, etc. [2,3]. Compared  Published: 24 June 2022  with above‐ground granaries, they also have the advantages of requiring less space, be‐ ing concealed, and preventing fires [4,5]. In recent years, many scholars have devoted  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  themselves  to  the  study  of  new  underground  granaries,  among  which  large  diameter  neutral with regard to  jurisdictional  reinforced concrete underground granaries have become representative of modern un‐ claims  in  published  maps  and  derground granaries, and are notable for their achievements [6].  institutional affiliations.  Concrete  structures  are  widely  used  in  engineering,  and  have  the  advantages  of  good modularity, integrity, and durability [7–10]. Similarly, the cast‐in‐place reinforced  concrete underground silo is also an attractive structural form of the underground silo  Copyright:  ©  2022  by  the  authors.  [11]. However, the issue of ensuring these silos are waterproof and moisture‐proof still  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  restricts their extensive application and promotion [12,13]. Polypropylene plastic is wa‐ This article is  an open  access article  terproof, corrosion‐resistant, easy to construct, non‐toxic and harmless [14], and meets  distributed  under  the  terms  and  conditions of the Creative Commons  food storage standards. In [15], the authors presented a plastic–concrete waterproof sys‐ Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  tem with polypropylene plastic (PP) as the lining material. The waterproof system inte‐ (https://creativecommons.org/license grated the construction of the structure and ensured it was waterproof, and solved the  s/by/4.0/).  problems  associated  with  the  difficulty  in  repairing  the  waterproof  roll  material  and  Buildings 2022, 12, 893. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12070893  www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  2  of  24  coating construction in the reinforced concrete structure. However, in order to ensure the  safety of plastic–concrete silos, it is still necessary to carry out a composite stress analysis  of the bending moment and water pressure on the silo wall. This has not been proposed  in previous studies, e.g., ref. [15].  In order to improve the water resistance and durability of cast‐in‐place reinforced  concrete underground silos from the perspective of applied science [16–19], and to im‐ prove  the  quality  of  internal  grain  storage,  improving  silo  performance  from  the  per‐ spective of concrete materials is a popular research topic. Poonyakan et al. [20] improved  low thermal conductivity concrete using plastic wastes. Kromoser et al. [21] proposed a  novel thin‐walled CFRP‐reinforced UHPC beam based on second‐generation implants.  Flores‐Johnson et al. [22] presented fiber‐reinforced foamed concrete with a shaking table  test.  Al‐Fakih  et  al.  [23]  studied  the  rubberized  concrete  through  numerical  analysis;  however, only the vertical loading was considered. Lee et al. [24] theoretically proposed  thin‐walled UHPC flanges. Kozłowski et al. [25] studied the shear behavior of AAC ma‐ sonry unit walls. These studies indicate that, in order to more accurately obtain the ma‐ terial properties of concrete structures, it is necessary to conduct model tests [26–28].  In addition, it is also necessary to fully study the static characteristics of cast‐in‐place  reinforced concrete underground silos prior to their designing [29–31]. Static properties  include  tensile,  compression,  bending,  and  shear  properties  [32–34].  Mastering  these  static characteristics is required to ensure the safety of the designed underground bunker  [35,36]. More complex stress modes, such as simultaneous compression and bending, are  also lacking research. In addition to the above model tests, it is also necessary to under‐ taken relevant numerical simulation and numerical model verification [37,38].  Furthermore, to ensure that cast‐in‐place reinforced concrete underground silos are  more  sustainable  [39–43]—that  is,  have  better  waterproof  and  moisture‐proof  perfor‐ mance  and  provide  better  protection  for  grain  storage,  as  examined  in  this  study  [44–47]—it is necessary to carry out waterproof research on concrete structures [48–50].  Apay et al. [51] investigated the influence of waterproof and water‐repellent admixtures  on the permeability and compressive strength of concrete. Su et al. [52] presented a re‐ view of the composite behavior of the waterproofing membrane interface. Chuai et al.  [53]  proposed  mechanical  properties  of  a  prefabricated  underground  silo  steel  plate  concrete wall. Pisova et al. [54] studied spray‐applied waterproofing membranes. How‐ ever, there is still a lack of research on the composite stress analysis of the bending mo‐ ment and water pressure of the plastic–concrete wall of underground granaries.  To fill the aforementioned gap, in this study, based on previous references, poly‐ propylene plastic–concrete composite silo wall specimens were designed for an under‐ ground  granary  polypropylene  plastic–concrete  waterproof  system.  In  addition,  the  uniformly distributed load test and water pressure load composite test were undertaken  on the silo wall specimens, to simulate their stress state in real applications. The defor‐ mation, strain evolution, failure mode, and failure mechanism of the specimen under the  combined action of the bending moment and water pressure were analyzed. Based on the  experimental results, the numerical model was established and the parameters affecting  the design of the silo wall were analyzed. This can provide an example for the design of  the silo wall of underground granary.  2. Experimental Design  2.1. Test Specimen Design and Manufacture  The test specimen was composed of a polypropylene plastic (PP) waterproof plate, a  PP bolt, a PP connecting plate, and a concrete plate. The PP connecting plate and PP wa‐ terproof plate were connected by a weld, and the PP bolt and PP connecting plate were  connected by the thread and weld. The structure of the test specimen is shown in Figure  1. The dimensions of the square section of PP waterproof plate are 1800 mm × 1800 mm.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  3  of  24  Five rows and five columns of PP connecting plates were arranged inside the specimen,  and the central spacing of the PP connecting plates was 300 mm.  Figure 1. Schematic diagram of test specimen.  In order to take full advantage of the pull‐out force of the bolt, the diameter of the PP  bolt was 30 mm, its length was 100 mm, and the whole length of the surface of the bolt  was covered in turning wire. According to the standard [55,56] of the ordinary thread,  the diameter, and the pitch series, in the experiment, the thread height was 0.3 mm and  the pitch distance was 1.5 mm. The diameter of the PP connecting plate was 100 mm, and  the thickness was 20 mm. In order to enhance the weld strength, the welds of six poly‐ propylene plastic electrodes were utilized to connect the waterproof plate and the con‐ necting plate. The thickness of the waterproof plate, of 10 mm, was selected to be practi‐ cal  and  economical.  Plastic  formwork  was  arranged  around  the  waterproof  plates  as  pouring formwork.  In  addition, a  waterproof  plastic  plate  was  included.  The  plastic  template, water‐ proof plastic plate, and the PP waterproof plate were connected by welding. In order to  allow water to flow into the specimen, the method of embedding reinforcement was used  to reserve a water injection channel in the specimen. After the concrete was set, the em‐ bedded  reinforcement  was  extracted,  and  the  plastic  plate  and  plastic  template  were  blocked by planting reinforcement glue. The internal steel mesh of the specimen was ar‐ ranged using HRB400 double‐layer rebar of  8 mm diameter with 200  mm  space. Four  hooks with a  diameter  of 16  mm were embedded in  the corners of the  specimen. The  thickness of the concrete protective layer was set to 40 mm, and the concrete strength was  C40.  2.2. Test Device  The specimen was placed on a supporting roller having a span of 1500 mm, and the  center line of the roller was 150 mm from the edge of the specimen. A movable hinge  support and fixed hinge support were each fixed on one side. The test loading was di‐ vided  into  two  stages:  uniform  loading  and  water  pressure  loading.  In  the  uniform  loading stage, a cast iron weight was used for graded loading; the pressure was increased  by 3.79 kN/m , which was maintained for 15 min at each stage, and remained unchanged  after sequential loading to 21.21 kN/m . A hydrostatic water pressure press was used for  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  4  of  24  water pressure loading, which was composed of a pressure pump, pressure control host,  and computer control system.  During the water pressure loading, the water pressure was increased by 10 kPa from  an initial value of 10 kPa. The pressure was maintained for 3 min at each stage, and the  displacement and strain were recorded. The schematic diagram of specimen loading is  presented in Figure 2.  Figure 2. Schematic diagram of test loading.  2.3. Test Method  In order to assess the strain distribution of specimens under the combined action of  the bending moment and water pressure, 80 strain measuring points, numbered Y1‐4 to  Y25‐3,  were  arranged  at  the  weld  joints  inside  the  PP  waterproof  plate.  Forty  strain  measuring points were arranged in the middle of the span of the two nodes on the out‐ side of the PP waterproof plate, numbered YL‐1 to YL‐40. Sixteen strain measuring points  were arranged in the middle of the four‐node span, numbered YS‐1 to YS‐16. Ten strain  gauges, numbered YC‐1 to YC‐10, were arranged on the concrete surface, as illustrated in  Figure 3.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  5  of  24  YL-1 YL-2 YL-3 YL-4 Y1-4 Y2-4 Y3-4 Y4-4 Y2-3 Y3-3 Y4-3 Y5-3 YL-5 YL-6 YL-7 YL-8 YL-9 Y1-2 Y2-2 Y3-2 Y4-2 Y5-2 Y6-1 Y7-1 Y8-1 Y9-1 Y10-1 YL-10 YL-11 YL-12 YL-13 Y6-4 Y7-4 Y8-4 Y9-4 Y7-3 Y8-3 Y9-3 Y10-3 YL-14 YL-15 YL-16 YL-17 YL-18 Y6-2 Y7-2 Y8-2 Y9-2 Y10-2 Y11-1 Y12-1 Y13-1 Y14-1 Y15-1 YL-19 YL-20 YL-21 YL-22 Y11-4 Y12-4 Y13-4 Y14-4 Y12-3 Y13-3 Y14-3 Y15-3 YL-23 YL-24 YL-25 YL-26 YL-27 Y11-2 Y12-2 Y13-2 Y14-2 Y15-2 Y16-1 Y17-1 Y18-1 Y19-1 Y20-1 YL-28 YL-29 YL-30 YL-31 Y16-4 Y17-4 Y18-4 Y19-4 Y17-3 Y18-3 Y19-3 Y20-3 YL-32 YL-33 YL-34 YL-35 YL-36 Y16-2 Y17-2 Y18-2 Y19-2 Y20-2 Y21-1 Y22-1 Y23-1 Y24-1 Y25-1 YL-37 YL-38 YL-39 YL-40 Y21-4 Y22-4 Y23-4 Y24-4 Y22-3 Y23-3 Y24-3 Y25-3     (a)  (b)  YS-1 YS-2 YS-3 YS-4 YC-1 YC-2 YS-5 YS-7 YS-8 YS-6 YC-3 YC-4 YC-5 YC-6 YS-11 YS-9 YS-10 YS-12 YC-7 YC-8 YS-13 YS-14 YS-15 YS-16 YC-9 YC-10     (c)  (d)  Figure 3. Layout of strain measuring points: (a) two‐node mid‐span strain measuring point; (b)  strain measuring point at the weld; (c) four‐node mid‐span strain measuring point; (d) concrete  strain measuring point.  Furthermore, to measure the maximum displacement and the displacement at the  joints  of  the  PP  waterproof  plate,  and  to  explore  the  displacement  change  rule  of  the  specimen, 25 displacement measuring points were arranged at the outer joints of the PP  waterproof plate, numbered WJ‐1 to WJ‐25, and 16 displacement measuring points were  arranged at the middle of the four‐node span, numbered WS‐1 to WS‐16, as shown in  Figure 4.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  6  of  24  WJ-1 WJ-2 WJ-3 WJ-4 WJ-5 WS-2 WS-3 WS-4 WS-1 WJ-6 WJ-7 WJ-8 WJ-9 WJ-10 WS-5 WS-6 WS-7 WS-8 WJ-11 WJ-12 WJ-13 WJ-14 WJ-15 WS-12 WS-9 WS-10 WS-11 WJ-16 WJ-17 WJ-18 WJ-19 WJ-20 WS-13 WS-14 WS-15 WS-16 WJ-21 WJ-22 WJ-23 WJ-24 WJ-25 Figure 4. Layout of displacement measuring points.  3. Test Results Analysis  3.1. Failure Mode  The  test  loading  was  divided  into  two  stages:  uniform  load  loading  and  water  pressure loading. In the stage of uniform load loading, the deformation of the specimen  was small, in general. When the target load was 21.21 kN/m , the load pressure was kept  unchanged. Then, when the pressure was increased to 76 kPa, the No. WJ‐20 node was  damaged, and the water pressure in the specimen dropped to 63 kPa at that time. When  the  water  pressure  was  loaded  to  85 kPa,  the PP waterproof  plate  was  damaged.  The  failure  position  of  the  specimen  is  shown  in  Figure  5a.  The  waterproof  plate  at  node  WJ‐19  was  cut,  as  presented in  Figure  5b;  the  weld  between  the  connecting  plate and  waterproof plate at this node was torn, although the bolts and the connecting plate were  well‐connected.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  7  of  24      (a)  (b)  Figure 5. Schematic diagram of specimen damage: (a) destruction of the waterproof plate; (b) node  destruction.  The damage to the PP waterproof plate can be explained as follows. At that moment,  because of the uneven distribution of water pressure, stripping occurred in the plastic  stud slip of the WJ‐13 node. The waterproof plate and concrete were first located near the  water  concentration,  and  the  force  of  the  near  node  increased,  which  led  to  the  weld  tearing failure of the WJ‐19 node. After the destruction of the WJ‐19 node, with the in‐ crease in water pressure, the weld stress of the nearby nodes increased again, leading to  the failure of the WJ‐20 node. After the two nodes were damaged, the span of the wa‐ terproof plate increased, resulting in the increment in its deformation. Finally, the shear  failure of the PP waterproof plate occurred.  According  to  the  test  results,  when  the  PP  waterproof  plate  was  damaged,  the  pressure of the plastic–concrete composite silo wall specimen was 85 kPa. The slip of the  plastic bolt in concrete had a great influence on the internal force of the plastic member.  The joint weld strength determined the bearing capacity of the plastic waterproof plate.  By increasing the joint weld strength, the water pressure‐bearing capacity of the silo wall  specimen could be improved.  3.2. Load–Displacement Relationship  3.2.1. Load–Displacement Curve of the Node  The displacement at each node increased linearly with the increase in uniform dis‐ tributed load. When the load reached the maximum value of 21.21 kN/m , the maximum  displacement of 1.25 mm appeared at No. WJ‐23. The displacement–load curve is shown  in Figure 6a.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  8  of  24  (a)  (b)  Figure 6. Node displacement–load: (a) displacement–uniform load;  (b) displacement–water pres‐ sure.  When the water pressure was less than 20 kPa, the displacement at most nodes did  not change significantly with the increase in the water pressure. When the water pressure  reached 20 kPa, the displacement of the WJ‐13 node increased with the increase in the  water pressure, and they showed a linear relationship. The water–displacement curve is  shown in Figure 6b.  When the water pressure reached 76 kPa, the maximum displacement of the WJ‐13  node was 4.58 mm, and the displacement of WJ‐19 and WJ‐20 nodes was 7.32 and 7.29  mm, respectively. Comprehensive analysis showed that, in the process of water pressure  loading, the plastic stud of the WJ‐13 node slipped in the concrete, the waterproof plate  near the  node  and  concrete  was  peeled  off,  the  water flow  was concentrated,  and the  stress on the nearby node increased, leading to the weld tear and failure of the WJ‐19  node. The results also showed that the distribution of water pressure was not uniform, in  general,  and  the  strength  of  the  joint  weld  had  a  significant  effect  on  the  water  pres‐ sure‐bearing capacity of specimens.  3.2.2. Four‐Node Mid‐Span Load–Displacement Relationship  The displacement of the measuring point of the four‐node span of the specimen in‐ creased with the increase in the uniform distributed load, and showed a linear relation‐ ship.  When  the  maximum  load  reached  21.21  kN/m ,  the  maximum  displacement  ap‐ peared at the measuring point of WS‐13, with a value of 1.59 mm, as shown in Figure 7a.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  9  of  24  (a)  (b)  Figure  7.  Four‐node  mid‐span  displacement–load:  (a)  displacement–uniform  load;  (b)  displace‐ ment–water pressure.  When the water pressure was less than 20 kPa, its displacement did not change sig‐ nificantly; when the water pressure was greater than 20 kPa, its displacement increased  with the  increase  in the water  pressure;  when the  water  pressure  reached  76  kPa, the  maximum  displacement  appeared  at  WS‐16  with  a  maximum  value  of  12.66  mm,  as  presented in Figure 7b.  Therefore,  during  the  water  pressure  loading,  because  of  the  chemical  adhesive  force between the PP waterproof plate and the concrete, when the water pressure was  low, displacement of each measuring point resulted in no obvious change. With the in‐ crease in water pressure, the PP waterproof plate and concrete were stripped, the meas‐ uring  point displacement  began  to  change, the  water  pressure reached  the maximum,  and the weld of the WJ‐19 node was damaged, causing the displacement of the measur‐ ing point WS‐16. The results showed that the chemical adhesive force between the PP  waterproof plate and the concrete could resist part of the water pressure.  3.3. Strain–Load Relationship  3.3.1. Mid‐Span Strain–Load Relationship of Two Nodes  Under the uniform distributed load, the mid‐span strain of the two nodes increased  with the increase in load, and they had a linear relationship. When the load was 21.21  kN/m , the maximum strain was 0.000172, which was located at the measurement point  YL‐21, as shown in Figure 8a. In the process of water pressure loading, when the water  pressure was less than 20 kPa, the strain changed slightly. When the water pressure was  larger than 20 kPa, the strain linearly increased with the increasing water pressure. As the  water pressure reached 76 kPa, the maximum strain of 0.008 occurred at the measure‐ ment point YL‐15, as presented in Figure 8b.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  10  of  24  (a)  (b)  Figure 8. Mid‐span strain–load at two nodes: (a) strain–uniform load; (b) strain–water pressure.  3.3.2. Mid‐Span Strain–Load Relationship of Four Nodes  Under  the  uniform  distributed  load,  the  mid‐span  strain  of  four  nodes  increased  with  the  increase  in  load.  When  the  uniform  distributed  load  was  increased  to  21.21  kN/m , the maximum strain was 0.000146, which was located at the measurement point  YS‐5, as shown in Figure 9a. When the water pressure was less than 20 kPa, the strain  changed little; when the water pressure was larger than 20 kPa, the strain increased with  the  increase  in  the  water  pressure,  indicating  a  linear  relationship.  When  the  water  pressure was loaded to 76 kPa, the maximum strain was 0.0035, which was located at the  measurement point YS‐2, as illustrated in Figure 9b.  (a)  (b)  Figure 9. Four‐node mid‐span strain–load: (a) strain–uniform load; (b) strain–water pressure.  3.3.3. Nodal Strain–Load Relationship  Under the uniform distributed load, the strain of the waterproof plate at the joint  weld increased with the increase in load. When the uniform load was increased to 21.21  kN/m , the maximum strain  appeared  at Y23‐4, with a value  of 0.000152, as shown in  Figure 10a. When the water pressure was larger than 20 kPa, the strain increased with the  increase in the water pressure. When the water pressure reached 76 kPa, the strain at the  measuring point Y19‐3 increased sharply, by 0.002676, as presented in Figure 10b. Com‐ Buildings 2022, 12, 893  11  of  24  prehensive  analysis  shows  that  the  joint  strain  distribution  was  not  uniform  and  the  stress  state  was  complex  when  the  water  pressure  was  loaded.  This  was  because  the  strain measuring point was located near the weld, and the stress concentration generated  at the weld had a great influence on the measuring point.  (a)  (b)  Figure 10. Nodal strain–load relationship: (a) strain–uniform load; (b) strain–water pressure.  3.3.4. Concrete Surface Strain–Load Relationship  Under the uniform distributed load, the surface strain of concrete increased with the  increase  in  load.  When  the  load  was  21.21  kN/m ,  the  strain  at  each  measuring  point  reached the maximum value, which was 0.000124, located at YC‐5, as shown in Figure  11a. During the stage of water pressure loading, the concrete surface was always under  pressure. However, the strain on the concrete surface changed little, and the influence of  water pressure on the concrete was very small and could even be ignored, as indicated in  Figure 11b.  (a)  (b)  Figure 11. Concrete strain–load curve: (a) strain–uniform load; (b) strain–water pressure.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  12  of  24  4. Numerical Modeling  4.1. Constitutive Relation of Materials  In  the  numerical  analysis,  the  material  properties  of  polypropylene  plastics  were  measured according to [57]. The sample is presented in Figure 12, and the stress–strain  curve obtained through the tensile test is shown in Figure 13. The elastic modulus Pois‐ son ratio, tensile yield stress, and tensile yield strain are 1430 MPa, 0.48, 21.5 MPa, and  3.7%, respectively.  Figure 12. Test specimens of PP.  Figure 13. PP stress–strain relationship.  The concrete damaged plastic damage model was implemented in ABAQUS. The  relationship between the uni‐axial compression and uni‐axial tensile stress–strain curve  was selected according to [58]. The main parameters of concrete are shown in Table 1.  The ideal elastic‐plastic model was selected for the steel constitutive model, for which the  elastic modulus is 2.1 × 10  MPa and Poisson’s ratio is 0.3.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  13  of  24  Table 1. Concrete material parameters.  Characteristic  Parameter  Expansion angle α  36.31°  Eccentricity c  0.1  Fb0/fc0  1.16  Shape factor K  0.667  Viscosity parameter μ  0.0005  Poisson’s ratio ϑ  0.2  4.2. Cell Selection and Meshing  In order to ensure the accuracy of the numerical results, an eight‐node linear hexa‐ hedron linear reduction integral element (C3D8R) was used for the PP waterproof plate,  PP connecting plate, PP bolt, plastic formwork, watertight plastic plate, and concrete; and  the truss element (T3D2) was used for the steel mesh. The grid size of the PP waterproof  plate and plastic template was 40 mm, and the grid size of the waterproof plastic plate  was 20 mm, as shown in Figure 14a. The grid size of the PP stud and PP connecting plate  was 14 mm, as presented in Figure 14b. As the stress of concrete and steel mesh was not  the focus of this analysis, the grid sizes of concrete and steel mesh were 60 and 40 mm,  respectively. The concrete mesh division is illustrated in Figure 14c.  (a)  (b)  (c)  Figure 14. Meshing: (a) mesh division of PP waterproof plate; (b) meshing of pegs and connecting  plates; (c) concrete meshing.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  14  of  24  4.3. Load Application and Boundary Conditions  In the numerical model, the loading form of the force was adopted, and the concrete  surface was uniformly loaded and graded to provide the uniform load. Since the water  pressure action cannot be accurately predicted in the test, the inner waterproof plate was  graded by loading with the most unfavorable uniform load to provide water pressure  action. According to the supporting mode of the specimen in the test, X‐ and Z‐ direc‐ tional  displacement  constraints,  rotation  constraints,  and  Y‐directional  displacement  constraints were applied at 150 mm from the bottom of the specimen to the left edge, and  X‐ and Z‐directional rotational constraints and Y‐ and Z‐directional displacement con‐ straints were applied at 150 mm from the bottom of the specimen to the right edge.  4.4. Contact Simulation  In ABAQUS, the contact unit was used to simulate the contact interface between the  concrete and plastic formwork, and the normal direction of the contact surface was the  hard contact. PP pegs and steel mesh were embedded into the concrete through the em‐ bedment,  and  the  PP  connecting  plate  was  connected  to  the  plastic  waterproof  plate  through the tie.  5. Numerical Model Validation  5.1. Comparison of Load–Displacement Curves  In the uniformly distributed loading stage, the mean values of the mid‐span node  displacement test and corresponding simulated values of the specimens increased with  the increase in load. Furthermore, their variation trends were consistent and their relative  differences ranged from −8.71% to 4.78%, indicating that the numerical analysis results  were in good agreement with the test results, as can be seen in Figure 15a.  (a)  (b)  Figure 15. Displacement comparison: (a) comparison of uniform loading stage; (b) comparison of  water pressure loading stages.  In the water pressure loading stage, due to the water pressure distribution in the  test, the displacement of the four nodes was selected for comparison and analysis; these  displacements grew significantly, as shown in Figure 15b.  During the water pressure loading process, the simulation value was greater than  the  value  in  the  experiment.  When  the  water  pressure  was  greater  than  20  kPa,  both  values showed the same trend, having a relative difference between −18% and 145%. The  main reasons for this are as follows: in the numerical analysis, the water pressure was  loaded according to the most unfavorable loading of the water pressure; it was also as‐ sumed that the waterproof plate is under uniform pressure, and size values for loading  were the same as those for the water pressure test. However, in the actual test, the direc‐ tion of flow of the injection between the waterproof plate and the concrete was randomly  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  15  of  24  distributed, and the size of the water area on the waterproof plate also varied randomly  and was unpredictable. Therefore, during the water pressure loading stage, the size and  mode of numerical loading were inconsistent with those of the test loading, leading to a  large relative difference between the numerical simulation value and the test value, alt‐ hough the overall trends were consistent.  5.2. Comparison of Load–Strain Curves  Under the combined action of the bending moment and water pressure, the tensile  stress of the waterproof plate near the weld joint of the specimen was large. The strain of  the measuring point Y9‐1 at the weld joint was selected for comparative analysis.  Under the uniformly distributed load, the test values and the corresponding simu‐ lation  values  increased  with  the  load,  and  both  showed  a linear  growth  trend,  whose  relative difference was between −0.1% and 17%. Generally, they are in good agreement,  as shown in Figure 16a. The relative difference is mainly due to the fact that the test point  was close to the plastic weld seam of the strain, which had a greater influence on the  measuring point of stress concentration.  (a)  (b)  Figure 16. Strain comparison: (a) comparison of uniform loading stage; (b) comparison of water  pressure loading stages.  In the water pressure loading stages, the early stage of the load simulation had a  value  greater  than  the  test  values.  With  the  increase  in  water  pressure,  the  test  value  gradually became greater than the simulation value. The values showed the same varia‐ tion trend, and the relative difference was between −47.7% and 17%, as shown in Figure  16b. This difference was mainly because of the stress concentration caused by the node  welds, and the difference in the water pressure loading method between the numerical  simulation and the experiment.  Through the above comparative analysis, it can be seen that numerical parameters  selected in this paper, such as constitutive relation, contact relation, and boundary con‐ dition, can better simulate the loading process of the specimen of the silo wall. The mod‐ eling method adopted in numerical is effective, and lays a foundation for the parameter  analysis in next section.  6. Design Parameter Analysis  Based on the verified parameters of the numerical model, 14 numerical models were  established  to  analyze  the  design  parameters  of  plastic–concrete  composite  bin  wall  specimens, including the spacing and radius of the connecting plate and the thickness of  the waterproof plate.  in the test, in the following mod‐ As the direction of water flow cannot be predicted  els, the loaded water pressure was applied uniformly under the most unfavorable con‐ dition. The selection of the numerical design parameters and the main results are listed in  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  16  of  24  Table 2. In each model, a parameter was changed according to the basic model, while the  other parameters were left unchanged.  Table 2. Design parameters and main results.  PP Connec‐ PP Water‐ Numerical  PP Connecting  Water Pres‐ Peak Dis‐ tion Plate  proof Plate  Model  Plate Radius  sure‐Bearing  placement  Spacing  Thickness  Number  (mm)  Capacity (kPa)  (mm)  (mm)  (mm)  PCW‐R40  40  230  22.18  PCW‐R50  50  300  22.09  PCW‐R60  300  10  60  380  22.01  PCW‐R70  70  400  20.84  PCW‐R80  80  420  19.12  PCW‐B8  8  240  24.63  PCW‐B10  10  300  24.28  PCW‐B12  12  350  22.28  300  50  PCW‐B14  14  380  21.91  PCW‐B16  16  350  21.71  PCW‐B18  18  360  20.88  PCW‐D200  200  650  13.04  PCW‐D250  250  450  19.18  PCW‐D300  300  10  50  300  22.09  PCW‐D350  350  200  25.94  PCW‐D400  400  150  28.68  Note: PCW is the abbreviation of plastic–concrete wall; R in R40 means connecting plate radius, 40  means radius of 40 mm; B8 means waterproof plate thickness, 8 means thickness of 8 mm; D200  means D means connecting plate spacing, 200 means spacing of 200 mm.  The influence of the connection plate spacing, radius, and waterproof plate thick‐ nesses on the internal force were investigated under the combined bending moment and  water pressure. The four‐node mid‐span displacement at WS‐7 and the Mises stress at  WJ‐13 were selected for comparison.  6.1. Connecting Plate Spacing  Under  the  compound  action  of  the  bending  moment  and  water  pressure,  the  mid‐span displacement of each specimen at the four joints increased with the increase in  the water pressure at different connecting plate spacings. When the stress of the water‐ proof plate at the joints reached the yield stress of 21.5 MPa, for different connecting plate  spacings  of  200,  250,  300,  350,  and  400  mm,  the  maximum  displacements  were  13.04,  19.18, 22.09, 25.94, and 28.68 mm, respectively. The maximum mid‐span displacement of  four  nodes  increased  with  the  increase  in  the  spacing  between  the  connecting  plates.  When  the  spacing  was  increased  from  200  to  400  mm,  the  displacement  increased  by  119.9%, as presented in Figure 17a.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  17  of  24  (a)  (b)  (c)   Figure 17. Different connecting plate spacing: (a) displacement comparison; (b) stress comparison;  (c) d‐P diagram.  The stress of the waterproof plate at the mid‐span joint of each specimen increased  with the increase in the water pressure, and the two others both increased linearly. When  the  stress  value  reached  the  PP  yield  stress  of  21.5  MPa,  the  water  pressure  of  each  specimen reached its bearing capacity, as shown in Figure 17b.  Corresponding to different connecting plate spacings of 200, 250, 300, 350, and 400  mm, the water pressure‐bearing capacity of each specimen was 650, 450, 300, 200, and 150  kPa,  respectively.  When  the  spacing  increased  from  200  to  400  mm,  the  water  pres‐ sure‐bearing capacity decreased by 76.9%. The relationship between the connecting plate  spacing and water pressure‐bearing capacity is shown in Figure 17c.  It can be seen from Figure 17 that the water pressure‐bearing capacity P and con‐ necting plate spacing d have a nonlinear relationship, and their functional relationship  can be obtained by fitting as follows:  −2.011 P = 2.812e7d   (1) where  P is the water pressure‐bearing  capacity, and  d is the spacing  between PP con‐ necting plate.  The results show that when the radius of the connecting plate and the thickness of  the waterproof plate are constant, the distance between the connecting plate has a sig‐ nificant influence on the water pressure‐bearing capacity and the corresponding maxi‐ Buildings 2022, 12, 893  18  of  24  mum  displacement  of  the  specimen.  In  practical  engineering  design,  by  reducing  the  distance between the connecting plates, the water pressure‐bearing capacity and stiffness  of the specimen can be effectively improved.  6.2. Connecting Plate Radius  Under  the  combined  action  of  the  bending  moment  and  water  pressure,  the  mid‐span  displacement  of  four  joints  of  each  specimen  increased  with  the  increase  in  water pressure under different connecting plate radii. For different connecting plate radii  of 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 mm, the maximum displacements were 21.18, 22.09, 22.01, 20.84,  and 19.12 mm, respectively.  When  the  mid‐span  displacement  of  the  four  joints  reached  the  maximum  value,  and the connection radius was less than or equal to 60 mm, the waterproof plate stress at  the mid‐span joints reached the PP yield stress. When the connection radius was greater  than 60 mm, the PP stud yielded before the waterproof plate. The maximum mid‐span  displacement of the four nodes decreased as the radius of the connecting plate increased.  When the radius increased from 40 to 80 mm, the displacement decreased by 9.7%, as il‐ lustrated in Figure 18a.  (a)  (b)  (c)   Figure 18. Different connecting plate radii: (a) displacement comparison; (b) stress comparison; (c)  r‐P diagram.  The stress of the waterproof plate at the mid‐span joint of each specimen increased  linearly with the increase in water pressure. For different connecting plate radii of 40, 50,  60, 70, and 80 mm, the water pressure‐bearing capacity of each specimen was 230, 300,  380, 400, and 420 kPa, respectively. When the radius increased from 40 to 80 mm, the  water pressure‐bearing capacity increased by 65.2%. When the radius of the connecting  plate was less than or equal to 60 mm, and the water pressure of the specimen reached its  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  19  of  24  water pressure‐bearing capacity, the stress at the joints of the waterproof plate reached  the PP yield stress. When the radius of the connecting plate was greater than 60 mm, and  the water pressure of the specimen reached its water pressure‐bearing capacity, the stress  at the joints of the waterproof plate did not reach its yield stress. At this time, the PP bolt  in the specimen reached the yield before the waterproof plate, leading to the failure of the  specimen. The relation between the radius of the connecting plate and the water pres‐ sure‐bearing capacity is shown in Figure 18c.  It can be seen from Figure 18 that the water pressure‐bearing capacity P has a non‐ linear  relationship  with the  radius  of the  connecting  plate  r,  and  the  function  relation  between them can be obtained by fitting as follows:  P = −330.571 + 18.514r − 0.114r   (2) where r is the radius of the PP connecting plate.  The  results  show  that  when  the  connection  plate  spacing  and  waterproof  plate  thickness are constant, the connecting plate radius of specimen has a greater influence on  the hydrostatic‐bearing capacity and the corresponding maximum displacement. When  the connecting plate radius is greater than 60 mm, the stud strength of specimen becomes  the main control factor of damage. When increasing the radius of the connection plate in  the engineering design, to improve the hydrostatic‐bearing capacity of the specimens, it  is necessary to enhance the strength of the stud at the same time.  6.3. Thickness of Waterproof Plate  Under  the  compound  action  of  the  bending  moment  and  water  pressure,  the  mid‐span  displacement  of  four  joints  of  each  specimen  increased  with  the  increase  in  water pressure under different thicknesses of the waterproof plate, i.e., 8, 10, 12, 14, 16,  and 18 mm. The maximum displacements were 24.63, 24.24, 22.28, 21.91, 21.71, and 20.88  mm, respectively. When the mid‐span displacement of the four joints reached the max‐ imum value and the thickness of the waterproof plate was less than or equal to 14 mm,  the  stress  at  the  joints  of  the  waterproof  plate  reached  the  PP  yield  stress.  When  the  thickness of the waterproof plate was greater than 14 mm, the PP bolt yielded before the  waterproof  plate.  The  maximum  mid‐span  displacement  of  the  four  nodes  decreased  with the increase in the plate thickness. When the plate thickness increased from 8 to 18  mm, the displacement decreased by 11%, as shown in Figure 19a.  (a)  (b)  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  20  of  24  (c)   Figure 19. Different thicknesses of waterproof plate: (a) displacement comparison; (b) stress com‐ parison; (c) b‐P diagram.  The stress of the waterproof plate at the mid‐span joint of the specimen increased  with the increase in water pressure, and they both increased linearly. For different plate  thicknesses of 8, 10, 12, and 14 mm, when the stress at the joints of waterproof plates  reached the yield stress, the water pressure‐bearing capacity of specimens reached 240,  300, 350, and 380 kPa, respectively. For different plate thicknesses of 16 and 18 mm, the  stud  reached  the  yield  stress  earlier  than  the  waterproof  plate,  and  the  water  pres‐ sure‐bearing capacity of the specimens was 350 and 360 kPa, respectively. The relation  between the thickness of the waterproof plate and the water pressure‐bearing capacity is  given in Figure 19c.  It can be seen from Figure 19 that the relation between the water pressure‐bearing  capacity P and the thickness of the waterproof plate b is nonlinear, and the function rela‐ tion between them can be obtained by fitting as follows:  P = −215.214 + 77.303b − 2.545b   (3) where b is the thickness of the PP waterproof plate.  The results show that the thickness of the waterproof plate has a great influence on  the  water  pressure‐bearing  capacity  and  the  corresponding  maximum  displacement,  when the radius and spacing of the connecting plate are constant. When the thickness of  waterproof  plate  is  greater  than  14  mm,  the  specimen  failure  depends  on  the  bolt  strength. Therefore, the water pressure‐bearing capacity can be improved by increasing  the bolt strength in practical engineering.  6.4. Parameter Sensitivity Analysis  Taking  the  water  pressure‐bearing  capacity  of  the  plastic–concrete  composite  silo  wall specimens as the dependent variable, multiple linear regression analysis was con‐ ducted with the spacing d of the connecting plates, radius R of the connecting plates, and  thickness B of the waterproof plates as independent variables. The obtained regression  parameters are summarized in Table 3.  Table 3. Regression parameters.  Regression Coef‐ Project  Coefficient  Standard Error  T‐Statistic  Significance  ficients (Beat)  Constant  788.303  120.865 ‐  6.552  0.000  d −2.500  0.279 −0.874 −8.969  0.000 *  r  4.074  1.216  0.330  3.350  0.006 *  b  7.775  4.377  0.175  1.776  0.101 **  Note: At the significance level of 0.05, * means significant, ** means not significant.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  21  of  24  As can be seen from Table 3, the best values of connection plate spacing, connection  plate radius, and waterproof plate thickness were −0.874, 0.330, and 0.175, respectively,  indicating that the connection plate spacing has the greatest (and negative) correlation  with the  water  pressure‐bearing  capacity  of the  specimen,  followed  by  the  connection  plate radius, which has a positive correlation; the waterproof plate thickness has a small  influence on the water pressure‐bearing capacity of the specimen. It can be seen from the  significance that the connecting plate spacing and its radius are significant, whereas the  thickness  of  the  waterproof  plate  is  not.  Based  on  the  load  design  value,  the  distance  between the connecting plates should be reduced, or the radius of the connecting plates  should be increased to improve the water pressure‐bearing capacity of the specimens.  7. Conclusions  In this study, the internal force, deformation, failure mechanism, and water pres‐ sure‐bearing capacity of the plastic–concrete composite silo wall under the combined ac‐ tion of the bending moment and water pressure were examined by means of uniform  loading and water pressure loading tests and numerical analysis. The following conclu‐ sions can be drawn:  (1) During  the  uniform  loading  stage,  the  plastic  plate  and  concrete  in  the  plas‐ tic–concrete composite specimen worked together through the plastic bolt, and the  displacement and strain of the waterproof plate increased linearly with the increase  in  the  load;  however,  their  values  were  changed  little.  During  the  stage  of  water  pressure  loading,  under  the  compound  action  of  the  bending  moment  and  water  pressure, the displacement and strain of the waterproof plate increased significantly  with the increase in water pressure.  (2) There was a chemical adhesive force between the PP waterproof plate and concrete,  which could resist the 20 kPa water pressure. Under a certain uniform load, with the  increase  in  water  pressure,  the  waterproof  plate  and  concrete  in  the  specimen  gradually peeled off, and their combined effect was gradually weakened. Regarding  the PP waterproof plate shear failure, the maximum water pressure was 85 kPa.  (3) The  numerical  model  of  the  plastic–concrete  composite  silo  wall  was  established.  The numerical analysis results were in good agreement with the test results, which  shows that  the  numerical  model  is accurate  and  feasible.  Based on  the  numerical  analysis results, the expressions of the relationship between the design parameters  and the water pressure‐bearing capacity were presented.  (4) When the thickness of the waterproof plate is larger than 14 mm or the radius of the  connecting plate is larger than 60 mm, the bolt strength is the main control factor of  specimen failure. When increasing the thickness of the waterproof plate or the ra‐ dius of the connecting plate to improve the water pressure‐bearing capacity of the  specimen, the bolt strength should also be enhanced.  (5) The numerical parameter analysis shows that, compared with the thickness of the  waterproof plate, the connection plate spacing and its radius have a greater influ‐ ence on the water pressure‐bearing capacity of the specimen. The regression coeffi‐ cients of the connection plate spacing, radius, and waterproof plate thickness on the  water pressure‐bearing capacity of the specimen were −0.874, 0.330, and 0.175, re‐ spectively.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, H.Z. and J.Y.; methodology, H.Z.; software, K.H.; vali‐ dation  and  formal  analysis,  J.Y.;  data  curation,  L.C.;  writing—original  draft  preparation,  K.H.;  writing—review and editing, H.Z. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the  manuscript.  Funding: This research was funded by the National Natural Science Foundations of China (Grant  No. 52108134), the Fund Project of scientific and technological breakthrough of Henan province  (Grant No. 202102110122, 212102110200), and the School Research Fund for the Doctoral Program  (Grant No. 31401223).  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  22  of  24  Informed Consent Statement:  Informed consent was obtained from all subjects involved in the  study. Written informed consent has been obtained from the patient.  Data Availability Statement: The data used to support the findings of this study are available from  the corresponding author upon request.  Acknowledgments: This work is supported by National Ministry of Science and Technology 2014  Special  Project  for  Food  Public  Welfare  Industry  “Research  and  Development  of  the  New  Ware‐house Type and Technical Systems for Ecological Grain Storage” (Grant No. 201413007).  Conflicts of Interest: The author declares no potential conflicts of interest regarding the publica‐ tion of this article.  Author Recommendation: In future research, a more comprehensive analysis will be focused on  the  effect  of  different  connection  plate  radii,  spacings,  and  waterproof  plate  thicknesses  on  the  stress of the plastic–concrete silo wall. In addition, water pressure distribution regularity between  the waterproof plate and concrete will be investigated.  References  1. Pan, Y.; Fang, H.; Li, B.; Wang, F. Stability analysis and full‐scale test of a new recyclable supporting structure for  underground ecological granaries. Eng. Struct. 2019, 192, 205–219. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engstruct.2019.04.087.  2. Valls, A.; García, F.; Ramírez, M.; Benlloch, J. Understanding subterranean grain storage heritage in the Mediter‐ ranean  region:  The  Valencian  silos  (Spain).  Tunn.  Undergr.  Space  Technol.  2015,  50,  178–188.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tust.2015.07.003.  3. Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Wang, Z.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y. Research on the temperature field of grain piles in under‐ ground grain silos lined with plastic. J. Food Process Eng. 2022, 45, e13971. https://doi.org/10.1111/jfpe.13971.  4. Sirousazar, M.; Yari, M.; Achachlouei, B.F.; Arsalani, J.; Mansoori, Y. Polypropylene/montmorillonite Nanocom‐ posites for Food Packaging. e‐Polymersb 2016, 7, 305–313. https://doi.org/10.1515/nano.0013.00019.  5. Gong, C.; Ding, W.; Mosalam, K.M. Performance‐based design of joint waterproofing of segmental tunnel linings  using  hybrid  computational/experimental  procedures.  Tunn.  Undergr.  Space  Technol.  2020,  96,  103172.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tust.2019.103172.  6. Gong,  C.;  Ding,  W.;  Soga,  K.;  Mosalam,  K.M.  Failure  mechanism  of  joint  waterproofing  in  precast  segmental  tunnel linings. Tunn. Undergr. Space Technol. 2018, 84, 334–352. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tust.2018.11.003.  7. Xu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Liu, Q.; Wang, L. Seismic analysis on reinforced concrete group silos through shaking table  tests. Struct. Concr. 2020, 22, 1285–1296. https://doi.org/10.1002/suco.202000207.  8. Ho, N.; Doh, J. Prediction of ultimate strength of concrete walls restrained on three sides. Struct. Concr. 2019, 20,  942–954. https://doi.org/10.1002/suco.201800188.  9. Farajzadehha, S.; Mahdikhani, M.; Moayed, R.Z.; Farajzadehha, S. Experimental study of permeability and elastic  modulus  of  plastic  concrete  containing  nano  silica.  Struct.  Concr.  2020,  23,  521–532.  https://doi.org/10.1002/suco.202000551.  10. Khatib,  J.;  Jahami,  A.;  Elkordi,  A.;  Abdelgader,  H.;  Sonebi,  M.  Structural  Assessment  of  Reinforced  Concrete  Beams Incorporating Waste Plastic Straws. Environments 2020, 7, 96. https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7110096.  11. Massone, L.M.; Rojas, F.R.; Ahumada, M.G. Analytical study of the response of reinforced concrete walls with  discontinuities of flag wall type. Struct. Concr. 2017, 18, 962–973. https://doi.org/10.1002/suco.201600107.  12. Babaei, A.; Mortezaei, A.; Salehian, H. Experimental study on seismic performance of steel fiber reinforced con‐ crete wall piers. Struct. Concr. 2020, 22, 1363–1377. https://doi.org/10.1002/suco.202000104.  13. Scamardo, M.; Cattaneo, S.; Biolzi, L.; Vafa, N. Parametric Analyses of the Response of Masonry Walls with Re‐ inforced Plaster. Appl. Sci. 2022, 12, 5090. https://doi.org/10.3390/app12105090.  14. Lee, C.‐B.; Lee, J.‐H. Nonlinear Dynamic Response of a Concrete Rectangular Liquid Storage Tank on Rigid Soil  Subjected to Three‐Directional Ground Motion. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 4688. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11104688.  15. Qingzhang,  Z.;  Zhilong,  H.;  Hao,  Z.;  Zhenqing,  W.;  Da,  X.  Experimental  study  on  resisted  water  pressure  for  connecting  welds  of  polypropylene  plastic  plates  in  underground  silos.  Plast.  Rubber  Compos.  2021,  1,  1–9.  https://doi.org/10.1080/14658011.2021.1989928.  16. Shi, W.; Wang, L.; Lu, Z.; Zhang, Q. Application of an Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm in an Optimum Tuned  Mass Damper Design for a Pedestrian Bridge. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 175. https://doi.org/10.3390/app8020175.  17. Jeon, S.‐H.; Park, J.‐H. Seismic Fragility of Ordinary Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls with Coupling Beams De‐ signed Using a Performance‐Based Procedure. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 4075. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10124075.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  23  of  24  18. Mohamad,  A.‐B.A.E.;  Chen,  Z.  Experimental  Studies  on  the  Behavior  of  a  Newly‐Developed  Type  of  Self‐Insulating  Concrete  Masonry  Shear  Wall  under  in‐Plane  Cyclic  Loading.  Appl.  Sci.  2017,  7,  463.  https://doi.org/10.3390/app7050463.  19. Hao, T.; Cao, W.; Qiao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Zheng, W. Structural Performance of Composite Shear Walls under Compres‐ sion. Appl. Sci. 2017, 7, 162. https://doi.org/10.3390/app7020162.  20. Poonyakan,  A.;  Rachakornkij,  M.;  Wecharatana,  M.;  Smittakorn,  W.  Potential  Use  of  Plastic  Wastes  for  Low  Thermal Conductivity Concrete. Materials 2018, 11, 1938. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11101938.  21. Kromoser,  B.;  Gericke,  O.;  Hammerl,  M.;  Sobek,  W.  Second‐Generation  Implants  for  Load  Introduction  into  Thin‐Walled CFRP‐Reinforced UHPC Beams: Implant Optimisation and Investigations of Production Technolo‐ gies. Materials 2019, 12, 3973. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12233973.  22. Flores‐Johnson,  E.A.;  Company‐Rodríguez,  B.A.;  Koh‐Dzul,  J.F.;  Carrillo,  J.G.  Shaking  Table  Test  of  U‐Shaped  Walls Made of Fiber‐Reinforced Foamed Concrete. Materials 2020, 13, 2534. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13112534.  23. Al‐Fakih, A.; Al‐Osta, M.A. Finite Element Analysis of Rubberized Concrete Interlocking Masonry under Vertical  Loading. Materials 2022, 15, 2858. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15082858.  24. Lee, J.; Kim, S.; Lee, K.; Kang, Y. Theoretical Local Buckling Behavior of Thin‐Walled UHPC Flanges Subjected to  Pure Compressions. Materials 2021, 14, 2130. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14092130.  25. Kozłowski, M.; Galman, I.; Jasiński, R. Finite Element Study on the Shear Capacity of Traditional Joints between  Walls Made of AAC Masonry Units. Materials 2020, 13, 4035. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13184035.  26. Wang, L.; Shi, W.; Zhou, Y. Study on self‐adjustable variable pendulum tuned mass damper. Struct. Des. Tall Spéc.  Build. 2018, 28, e1561. https://doi.org/10.1002/tal.1561.  27. Yang,  J.;  Lu,  Z.;  Li,  P.  Large‐scale  shaking  table  test  on  tall  buildings  with  viscous  dampers  considering  pile‐soil‐structure interaction. Eng. Struct. 2020, 220, 110960. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engstruct.2020.110960.  28. Yang, J.; Jing, H.; Li, P. Shaking table test and simulation of 12‐story buildings with metallic dampers located on  soft soil. J. Build. Eng. 2021, 46, 103585. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jobe.2021.103585.  29. Hernoune, H.; Benabed, B.; Kanellopoulos, A.; Al‐Zuhairi, A.H.; Guettala, A. Experimental and Numerical Study  of Behaviour of Reinforced Masonry Walls with NSM CFRP Strips Subjected to Combined Loads. Buildings 2020,  10, 103. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10060103.  30. Sun, G.; Li, F.; Zhou, Q. Cyclic Responses of Two‐Side‐Connected Precast‐Reinforced Concrete Infill Panels with  Different Slit Types. Buildings 2021, 12, 16. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12010016.  31. Jamšek,  A.;  Dolšek,  M.  The  Reduced‐Degree‐of‐Freedom  Model  for  Seismic  Analysis  of  Predominantly  Plan‐Symmetric  Reinforced  Concrete  Wall–Frame  Building.  Buildings  2021,  11,  372.  https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11080372.  32. Wang, W.; Quan, C.; Su, S.; Li, Y.; Song, H. Evaluation of seismic performance and effective lateral stiffness for  corrugated steel‐plate concrete composite structural walls repaired using bottom corner dampers. Structures 2022,  40, 1–17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.istruc.2022.04.004.  33. Wen, L.; Cao, W.; Li, Y.; Liu, Y.; Zhou, H. Quantitative study on the influence of foundation valley shape on the  behaviour of concrete cut‐off walls. Structures 2022, 38, 861–873. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.istruc.2022.02.041.  34. Naserpour,  A.;  Fathi,  M.  Numerical  study  of  demountable  shear  wall  system  for  multistory  precast  concrete  buildings. Structures 2021, 34, 700–715. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.istruc.2021.08.014.  35. Grzyb, K.; Jasiński, R. Parameter estimation of a homogeneous macromodel of masonry wall made of autoclaved  aerated concrete based on standard tests. Structures 2022, 38, 385–401. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.istruc.2022.02.005.  36. Nguyen‐Van, V.; Nguyen‐Xuan, H.; Panda, B.; Tran, P. 3D concrete printing modelling of thin‐walled structures.  Structures 2022, 39, 496–511. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.istruc.2022.03.049.  37. Wang, L.;  Shi, W.; Zhou, Y. Adaptive‐passive tuned  mass damper for structural aseismic protection including  soil–structure interaction. Soil Dyn. Earthq. Eng. 2022, 158, 107298. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soildyn.2022.107298.  38. Drobiec, Ł.; Jasiński, R.; Mazur, W.; Rybraczyk, T. Numerical Verification of Interaction between Masonry with  Precast Reinforced Lintel Made of AAC and Reinforced Concrete Confining Elements. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 5446.  https://doi.org/10.3390/app10165446.  39. Shi, W.; Wang, L.; Lu, Z.; Gao, H. Study on Adaptive‐Passive and Semi‐Active Eddy Current Tuned Mass Damper  with Variable Damping. Sustainability 2018, 10, 99. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010099.  40. Ye, J.; Jiang, L. Simplified Analytical Model and Shaking Table Test Validation for Seismic Analysis of Mid‐Rise  Cold‐Formed  Steel  Composite  Shear  Wall  Building.  Sustainability  2018,  10,  3188.  https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093188.  Buildings 2022, 12, 893  24  of  24  41. Yang,  J.;  Li,  P.;  Yang,  Y.;  Xu,  D.  An  improved  EMD  method  for  modal  identification  and  a  combined  stat‐ ic‐dynamic method for damage detection. J. Sound Vib. 2018, 420, 242–260. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsv.2018.01.036.  42. Yang, J.; Jing, H.; Li, P. Dynamic characteristics and viscous dampers design for pile‐soil‐structure system. Struct.  Des. Tall Spéc. Build. 2020, 29, e1785. https://doi.org/10.1002/tal.1785.  43. Jing, H.; Chen, H.; Yang, J.; Li, P. Seismic analysis of steel silo considering granular material‐structure interaction.  Structures 2022, 37, 698–708.  44. Kumar,  V.S.;  Ganesan,  N.;  Indira,  P.V.;  Murali,  G.;  Vatin,  N.I.  Flexural  Behaviour  of  Hybrid  Fibre‐Reinforced  Ternary Blend Geopolymer Concrete Beams. Sustainability 2022, 14, 5954. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14105954.  45. Prithiviraj, C.; Saravanan, J.; Kumar, D.R.; Murali, G.; Vatin, N.I.; Swaminathan, P. Assessment of Strength and  Durability  Properties  of  Self‐Compacting  Concrete  Comprising  Alccofine.  Sustainability  2022,  14,  5895.  https://doi.org/10.3390/su14105895.  46. Forero, J.A.; Bravo, M.; Pacheco, J.; de Brito, J.; Evangelista, L. Thermal Performance of Concrete with Reactive  Magnesium Oxide as an Alternative Binder. Sustainability 2022, 14, 5885. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14105885.  47. Shah, S.K.H.; Uchimura, T.; Kawamoto, K. Permanent Deformation and Breakage Response of Recycled Concrete  Aggregates  under  Cyclic  Loading  Subject  to  Moisture  Change.  Sustainability  2022,  14,  5427.  https://doi.org/10.3390/su14095427.  48. Wang, L.; Shi, W.; Zhang, Q.; Zhou, Y. Study on adaptive‐passive multiple tuned mass damper with variable mass  for a large‐span floor structure. Eng. Struct. 2019, 209, 110010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engstruct.2019.110010.  49. Wang, L.; Nagarajaiah, S.; Shi, W.; Zhou, Y. Semi‐active control of walking‐induced vibrations in bridges using  adaptive  tuned  mass  damper  considering  human‐structure‐interaction.  Eng.  Struct.  2021,  244,  112743.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engstruct.2021.112743.  50. Shi, W.; Wang, L.; Lu, Z. Study on self‐adjustable tuned mass damper with variable mass. Struct. Control Health  Monit. 2017, 25, e2114. https://doi.org/10.1002/stc.2114.  51. Apay, A.C.; Özgan, E.; Turgay, T.; Akyol, K. Investigation and modelling the effects of water proofing and water  repellent admixtures dosage on the permeability and compressive strengths of concrete. Constr. Build. Mater. 2016,  113, 698–711. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2016.03.110.  52. Su, J.; Bloodworth, A. Simulating composite behaviour in SCL tunnels with sprayed waterproofing membrane  interface: A state‐of‐the‐art review. Eng. Struct. 2019, 191, 698–710. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engstruct.2019.04.067.  53. Chuai, J.; Hou, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, L. Mechanical Properties of the Vertical Joints of Prefabricated Underground  Silo Steel Plate Concrete Wall. Adv. Civ. Eng. 2020, 2020, 6643811. https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/6643811.  54. Pisova, B.; Hilar, M. Spray‐applied waterproofing membranes: Effective solution for safe and durable tunnel lin‐ ings? IOP Conf. Series: Mater. Sci. Eng. 2017, 236, 012087. https://doi.org/10.1088/1757‐899x/236/1/012087.  55. GB/T 193‐2003; Ordinary Thread Diameter and Pitch Series. The General Administration of Quality Supervision,  Inspection and Quarantine of the People’s Republic of China: Beijing, China, 2003.  56. GT/T 196‐2003; Ordinary Thread Basic Dimensions. The General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspec‐ tion and Quarantine of the People’s Republic of China: Beijing, China, 2003.  57. GB/T 1040‐2006; Plastics Determination of Tensile Properties. The General Administration of Quality Supervision,  Inspection and Quarantine of the People’s Republic of China: Beijing, China, 2006.  58. GB 50010‐2010;  Design  Code  for  Concrete  Structures.  The  General  Administration  of  Quality  Supervision,  In‐ spection and Quarantine of the People’s Republic of China: Beijing, China, 2016. 

Journal

BuildingsMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Jun 24, 2022

Keywords: underground granary; plastic-concrete wall; uniform loading test; water pressure test; numerical analysis

There are no references for this article.