Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Environmental Impact on the Behavior of CFRP Sheet Attached to Concrete

Environmental Impact on the Behavior of CFRP Sheet Attached to Concrete Article  Environmental Impact on the Behavior of CFRP Sheet Attached  to Concrete  1 2, 3 4 Ayssar Al‐Khafaji  , Ayman El‐Zohairy  *, Mirnes Mustafic   and Hani Salim      Structural Designer, Infrastructure Consulting & Engineering, Raleigh, NC 27609, USA;  ayssar.alkhafaji@ice‐eng.com    Department of Engineering and Technology, Texas A&M University‐Commerce, Commerce, TX 75429, USA    Lyles School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA;  mmustafi@purdue.edu    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA;  salimh@missouri.edu  *  Correspondence: ayman.elzohairy@tamuc.edu; Tel.: +1‐903‐468‐8683  Abstract:  Carbon  fiber‐reinforced  polymer  (CFRP)  has  many  advantages  as  a  construction/structural‐strengthening  material.  However,  there  are  still  concerns  regarding  the  long‐term  performance  of  these  materials  when  used  with  reinforced  concrete  (RC)  structures.  Environmental conditions have an adverse effect on the behavior of CFRP and the bond between  these sheets and concrete. Therefore, the durability of CFRP used for strengthening RC beams was  evaluated under different environmental scenarios, including subjection to immersion in deicing  agents,  tap  water,  and  saltwater,  freeze‐and‐thaw  cycles,  and  outdoor  environmental  changes.  Laboratory tests were performed to examine the influence of these environmental scenarios on the  bonding behavior between CFRP sheets and concrete in terms of deformations and modes of failure.  Two types of test setups were performed in this study, namely pull‐off shearing and three‐point  bending.  Forty‐two  concrete  prisms  with  CFRP  were  prepared  and  tested  by  using  the  pull‐off  Citation: Al‐Khafaji, A.;   shearing setup. It was observed that as the period of exposure increased, noticeable effects on the  El‐Zohairy, A.; Mustafic, M.;   CFRP sheet as well as the bond stiffness were observed. Exposure to tap water had a greater impact  Salim, H. Environmental Impact on  than  saltwater  on  the  CFRP–concrete  bond  strength  as  well  as  the  CFRP.  In  addition,  eighteen  the Behavior of CFRP Sheet  notched  concrete  beams  strengthened  with  an  external  CFRP  were  tested  under  three‐point  Attached to Concrete. Buildings 2022,  bending. The tap water exposure showed a 3.6% increase in the bond strength compared to the  12, 873. https://doi.org/10.3390/  control specimen. However, the saltwater exposure showed a 10% increase.  buildings12070873  Academic Editor: Pavel Reiterman  Keywords: environmental impacts; concrete; bond strength; CFRP; deflection; debonding  Received: 2 June 2022  Accepted: 20 June 2022  Published: 21 June 2022  1. Introduction  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  Strengthening RC beams or columns by composite material has lots of advantages.  neutral with  regard  to jurisdictional  The low density, high specific strength, corrosion resistance, and ease of installation make  claims  in  published  maps  and  fiber‐reinforced polymers (FRPs) a suitable technology for strengthening or rehabilitating  institutional affiliations.  structures.  Until  now,  their  cost  and  long‐term  behavior  make  their  development  doubtable. Enormous costs associated with synthetic FRPs may limit their use in several  low‐budget  applications  [1,2].  Low‐cost  and  easily  available  fiber  rope‐reinforced  Copyright:  ©  2022  by  the  authors.  polymer composites were used to strengthen concrete columns [1]. Moreover, low‐cost  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  glass fiber sheets were used to upgrade concrete with waste aggregate [2]. Carbon fiber‐ This article  is an open access article  reinforced  polymer  (CFRP)  has  superior  mechanical  properties  and  higher  tensile  distributed  under  the  terms  and  strength, stiffness, and durability compared with other fiber‐based systems. Therefore,  conditions of the Creative Commons  CFRP was the strengthening technique in this study. The bond strength between CFRP  Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  (https://creativecommons.org/license and concrete is the main factor for controlling failures of strengthened structures [3]. The  s/by/4.0/).  rough surface of CFRP showed superior bond strength when compared to the smooth  Buildings 2022, 12, 873. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12070873  www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  2  of  18  surface of CFRP [4]. The geometry, in terms of length and width, of CFRP is a major factor  that  shapes  the  bond  strength  [5].  The  durability  of  CFRP  materials  in  different  environments  is  one  of  the  primary  issues  that  has  limited  the  development  of  these  materials in the application of some infrastructure [6]. The CFRP materials are usually  very sensitive to different environmental conditions, mostly moisture and temperature  [7]. With regard to application, it is crucial for a designer to consider not only the short‐ term characteristics of the materials but also the rates of deterioration of FRP composites  as a function of exposure condition and time [8].  Previous  studies  examined  the  effect  of  exposure  to  different  environmental  conditions on the fabric attached to concrete using an epoxy adhesive or cement‐based  adhesive  [8–12].  The  degradation  of  the  bond  between  the  CFRP  and  concrete  was  attributed  to  the  deterioration  of  the  concrete  surface  [9].  The  effect  of  extreme  temperature (over 200 °C) on concrete prisms with attached CFRP using epoxy adhesive  was  investigated.  The  epoxy  adhesive  bond  strength  decreased  gradually  as  the  temperature increased [10]. The thermal cycles in the air increased the interfacial fracture  energy of the CFRP–concrete whereas the interfacial fracture energy was reduced due to  the thermal cycles in water. Thermal cycles in water caused the failure mode to change  from concrete cohesive failure to primer–concrete interfacial debonding [11]. The bond  behavior of the FRP–concrete interface under a hygrothermal environment was studied  [12].  The  ultimate  bearing  capacity  of  the  interface  was  reduced  by  up  to  27.9%  after  exposure to the hygrothermal environments (high temperature and humidity).  Atadero et al. [13] tested cracked concrete beams that were repaired by using CFRP  after being exposed to environmental conditions such as moisture, chloride deicer, non‐ chloride deicer, and freeze‐and‐thaw cycles. The exposure to moisture showed reductions  in the bond strength of the epoxy adhesive. The effects of acid environments on the bond  strength of FRP sheets bonded on the concrete surface were investigated [14]. The bond  strength of the externally bonded FRP specimens depends on both exposure type and  duration. The bond strength decreased by up to about 19.7% after increasing the exposure  duration to 250 days. Taukta et al. [15] performed tests on concrete beams that had FRP  bound to them by using epoxy adhesive. The beams were tested in different moisture  environments by using an environmental chamber at 23 °C and at 50 °C before testing. It  was found that the bond strength of the FRP and concrete decayed exponentially with  respect to the moisture content of the interface of the epoxy and concrete. The thickness  of the adhesive  layers (i.e.,  0.2  mm and 1 mm) affects the  bonding properties and the  resistance to the water immersion [16]. The thinner the adhesive layer, the higher moisture  content  is  found  at  the  adhesive/concrete  interface.  Water  immersion  altered  the  debonding mode from cohesive concrete fracture to adhesive separation from the concrete  substrate  [16,17].  Exposure  of  RC  elements  in  marine  structures  to  an  aggressive  environment, where the humidity and seawater attack, exhibited noticeable effects on the  cracking and deterioration of structures when compared to other environmental exposure  [18,19].  The  most  damaging  condition  for  CFRP  composites  was  exposure  to  high  quantities of moisture, which caused the fiber–matrix interface to be prone to degradation.  A clearly negative effect of the conditioning factors for the specimens with the CFRP was  obtained as the conditioning time increased because of the plasticization phenomena of  the epoxy adhesive [20]. The effects of freeze–thaw cycling on the bond between FRP and  concrete were examined [21]. The bond between carbon FRP strips and concrete is not  significantly damaged by up to 300 freeze–thaw cycles.  There has been much research to investigate the moisture and temperature effect on  the bond strength of the epoxy adhesive. However, limited research has been conducted  on  the  effects  of  freeze–thaw  cycles  and  deicing  chemicals  on  the  CFRP  and  CFRP– concrete bond. Moreover, the current studies mostly focused on the structural behaviors  and  modes  of  failure  of  concrete  members  strengthened  with  CFRP  and  undergoing  outdoor environmental changes. Therefore, the present study is an attempt to expand the  state  of  knowledge  to  evaluate  the  durability  of  CFRP  materials  that  are  used  for  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  3  of  18  strengthening  concrete  members  under  different  environmental  scenarios,  including  being subjected to immersion in deicing agents, tap water, and saltwater, freeze‐and‐thaw  cycles, and outdoor environmental changes. Laboratory tests were performed to examine  the influence of these environmental scenarios on the bonding behavior between CFRP  and  concrete.  Two  types  of  test  setups  were  performed  in  this  study,  namely  pull‐off  shearing [22] and three‐point bending [23]. Forty‐two concrete prisms with CFRP were  prepared  and  tested  by  using  the  pull‐off  shearing  setup.  In  addition,  eighteen  short  beams strengthened with an external CFRP were tested under three‐point bending.  2. Description of the Experimental Program  The  experimental  program  was  conducted  by  using  pull‐off  shearing  testing  and  three‐point  bending  testing  of short  beams to  evaluate the bond  strength  between the  CFRP  and  concrete.  The  specimens  for  both  testing  setups  were  exposed  to  various  environmental conditions, and the results were compared to control specimens.  2.1. Pull‐off Shearing Tests  Most available models for the prediction of bond characteristics between CFRP and  concrete are based on data from tests on pull‐off shearing specimens [20], according to  ASTM D7522/D7522M‐21 [22].  2.1.1. Details of Specimens  The  experimental  program  was  carried  out  on  a  total  of  42  rectangular  concrete  prisms of 152.4 mm × 152.4 mm × 203.2 mm (6 in. × 6 in. × 8 in.). This block size was chosen  to provide easy handling of the specimens during the test. The composite system was  prepared  in  accordance  with  Sika’s  manufacturer’s  specifications  (Kansas  City,  MO,  USA). The unidirectional fabrics were each cut into strips of three different widths (25  mm, 50 mm, and 75 mm) and bonded to the concrete blocks after being cured, as shown  in Figure 1. These different widths were selected to consider the effect of different contact  areas  between  the  CFRP  and  concrete  under  different  environmental  scenarios  on  the  bond strength between the two elements.      (a)   (b)   Figure 1. Preparation of specimens. (a) Rectangular concrete prisms. (b) The CFRP bonded to the  concrete blocks.  2.1.2. Exposure Conditions  The test exposures were divided into four groups as seen in Table 1. Each group  consisted of six specimens with three different widths of CFRP ranging from 25 mm to 75  mm. The control specimens were cured in the laboratory and were tested at the same time  that  the  exposed  specimens  were  tested.  To  evaluate  the  long‐term  durability  of  the  bonded  CFRP,  the  saltwater,  tap  water,  and  outdoor  changes  in  temperature  and  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  4  of  18  humidity were the exposure conditions adopted in this study. The aggressive chloride  environment, represented by the saltwater exposure, had a salt solution of 35 g/L of NaCl  (corresponding to the salt concentration of seawater) [24]. The tap water environment was  simulated to be somewhat realistic to what would be found in the real world along a  bridge deck or underside. The tap water had a pH value of 8.5 according to the City of  Columbia public water system (Columbia, MO, USA). The full‐immersion procedures for  the concrete specimens and bonding areas were used for the saltwater and tap water, as  shown in Figure 2.     (a)   (b)   (c)   Figure 2. The full immersion procedures for the specimens of the pull‐off shearing tests. (a) The  saltwater exposure. (b) The tap water exposure. (c) The outdoor exposure.  Table 1. Summary of exposure conditions used to weather the specimens.  Exposure Times   CFRP Width   Number of  Exposure Condition  (days)  (mm)  Specimens  Control  60 and 195  25, 50, and 75  6  Saltwater immersion  60 and 195  25, 50, and 75  6  Outdoor environment  60 and 195  25, 50, and 75  6  Immersion in tap  60 and 195  25, 50, and 75  6  water  For the outdoor exposure, the specimens were left in the outdoor environment for  the exposure time to expose them to various weather conditions, as shown in Figure 2c.  Temperature and precipitation data were collected from the online database of Sanborn  Field  (University  of  Missouri  2018)  for  the  time  the  specimens  were  exposed  to  the  outdoor environment (see Figure 3a). The humidity data was also collected for the same  period from the Columbia, MO History online database Weather Underground (2019), as  shown  in  Figure  3b.  The  results  indicate  that  the  samples  were  exposed  to  relative  humidity  ranging  from  approximately  45%  to  85%  in  addition  to  some  precipitation  during the observed period.  (a)  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  5  of  18  (b)   Figure 3. Outdoor environmental changes. (a) Average temperature and precipitation. (b)  Humidity data.  2.1.3. Test Setup  An MTS loading machine was used to conduct the double‐face shear‐type pull‐off  shearing test  [22].  This kind  of  loading  was used  to  eliminate  the  action  of the  load’s  eccentricity on the CFRP–concrete interface [20]. Figure 4 displays the details of the test  setup, which consists of a cylindrical roller with a diameter of 150 mm (6 in.) to match the  width of the concrete prisms to apply a pure shear along with the interface between the  CFRP and concrete. A thick steel plate of 25 mm (1 in.) thickness with four anchor bolts  was used to fix the concrete prisms in their position during the test. The CFRP strip was  wrapped around the cylindrical roller, and the two ends were bonded to the sides of the  concrete prism by using epoxy resin. The steel roller was directly attached to the load cell  by using mechanical fasteners (see Figure 4).    Buildings 2022, 12, 873  6  of  18  Figure 4. The pull‐off shearing test set‐up. (Dimensions are in mm).  2.2. Three‐Point Bending Tests  The three‐point‐bending tests are the most relevant models for the prediction of the  CFRP flexural bond [19].  2.2.1. Details of Specimens  A total of 18 concrete prisms of dimensions 100 mm × 100 mm × 355 mm (4 in. × 4 in.  × 14 in.) were cast and cured for 28 days. These dimensions were selected according to  ASTM C78/C78M‐18 [25]. Additionally, six concrete cylinders 100 mm × 200 mm (4 in. × 8  in.)  were  cast  in  accordance  with  ASTM  C31/C31M‐21a  [26].  After  the  completion  of  curing, a circular saw with a 3 mm (1/8 in.) wide blade was used to make a cut across the  tension side of the beam perpendicular to the edge (short ways) with a depth of 25 mm (1  in.), as shown in Figure 5. The initial cut was meant to simulate an initial crack that can  occur in concrete beams due to various load applications or weather [16]. The fabric sheet  was cut into 25 mm × 250 mm (1 in. × 10 in.) strips and bound to the tension side of the  beam centered in the middle, as shown in Figure 5. The epoxy was cured for seven days  to reach maximum strength. After curing the strengthened specimens, the concrete beams  were ready to be exposed to the respective environments.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  7  of  18       (a)   (b)   (c)   Figure 5. Preparation of the strengthened pre‐notched concrete prisms. (a) Crack initiation. (b)  Application of the CFRP sheets to concrete. (c) Strengthened specimens.  2.2.2. Exposure Conditions  In the current test, three specimens with CFRP strips were used in each exposure.  The environments that were tested were a controlled environment, wet‐and‐dry cycles in  both tap water and saltwater, freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in both a chloride deicer and a non‐ chloride‐based deicer, and freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in tap water. The control environment  was  a  temperature‐controlled  lab  where  the  beams  were  placed  on  their  compression  sides so that the CFRP was not touching any surface. The temperature in the room was  set to room temperature, 21 °C (70 °F). The beams were then left for 90 days before being  tested in flexure. The beams were placed inside of a 16‐gallon tote, which was filled up  with tap water. The beams had a 6.5 mm (¼ in.) submerged depth in the tap water. The  procedure for the saltwater exposure was exactly the same as the tap water. The only  difference was use of a saltwater solution instead of tap water. To prepare the saltwater  solution, two liters of water were measured out, and 70 g of regular table salt were used  (35 g per liter). The salt was thoroughly mixed for approximately one minute with the  water.  Then  the  saltwater  solution  was  poured  into  the  tote  until  the  beams  were  submerged at least 6.5 mm (¼ in.) covering the CFRP–concrete bond. The beams exposed  to the tap water and saltwater were subjected to a kind of fatigue testing. These specimens  were immersed in their respective baths for 24 h, and then they were taken out to dry for  another 24 h at room temperature with a relative humidity of 45%. This fatigue testing is  more realistic than simply submerging the beams in tap and saltwater. The total number  of wet‐and‐dry cycles was 30 for both the tap and saltwater exposures, which means the  total duration of these exposures was 60 days. After each wet cycle, the containers were  rinsed out and a new solution was prepared.  For  the  freeze‐and‐thaw  cycles,  only  30  cycles  of  freezing  and  thawing  were  completed by using a small chest freezer according to ASTM C666 / C666M‐15 [27]. The  temperature inside the chest freezer was set to −29 °C (−20 °F), and the temperature at  which the beams were set to thaw in was approximately 21 °C (70 °F). The exposure to  deicing agents was tested by using a modified version of ASTM C672/C672M‐12 [28]. The  two types of deicers used in this testing were Meltdown Apex (as a magnesium chloride‐ based  deicer)  and  Apogee  (as  a  non‐chloride‐based  deicer),  provided  by  EnviroTech  Services, Inc. (Greeley, CO, USA. The compositions and information on the ingredients of  the two agents are listed in Table 2. The deicers were diluted with water to enable the used  chest freezer to fully freeze them. The deicer‐to‐water ratio (by mass) of 1:3 was chosen  for these tests. After the solution was prepared, the deicer and water solution were poured  into the tote containing the concrete beams for full immersion. Then they were placed  with the lid inside the freezer and taken out after at least 16 h of freezing. The beams were  left to thaw for at least eight hours before being again placed inside the freezer. After every  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  8  of  18  five cycles, an observation of the surface condition was made, the totes were cleaned, the  concrete’s surface was flushed, and the deicing solution was replaced.  Table 2. Composition/information on ingredients (provided by EnviroTech Services, Inc., Greeley,  CO, USA).  MeltDown Apex  Apogee  Component  Amount  Component  Amount  Water  65–75%  Water  Balance  Proprietary Organic Based  Magnesium Chloride  25–35%  75–85%  Components  Proprietary Performance  Corrosion Inhibitor  <1.0%  2–6%  Additive  Performance  <1.0%  Relative Density  1.15–1.27  Additive  Relative Density  1.24–1.34     2.2.3. Test Setup  After the concrete beams had been exposed to their respective environments for the  designated times, they  were  ready  to  be  tested  in three‐point  bending  to  see  how  the  CFRP–concrete  bond  behaved.  The  test  began  with  placing  the  beams  onto  the  MTS  loading machine’s supports and configuring the beam so that the supports were 50 mm  (2 in.) away from the ends of the beam with a clear span of 255 mm (10 in.), as shown in  Figure 6. The loading machine was then activated and proceeded to apply a static load  downward at a rate of 0.5 mm/minute (0.02 in./minute) until the beam failed. The MTS  loading machine’s built‐in LVDT and load cell were used to monitor the displacement as  well as the applied load, respectively, for each specimen.  Figure 6. Three‐point bending test set‐up.  2.3. Material Properties  Ready‐mix concrete was used for the construction of the beams with a maximum size  of aggregate of 9.5 mm (3/8 in.). The average compressive strength of concrete at the age  of 28 days was 38.9 MPa (5648 psi). A unidirectional carbon fiber tape, Sikawrap Hex‐ Buildings 2022, 12, 873  9  of  18  230C, was used in the strengthening process with an effective thickness of 0.38 mm. The  dry fiber properties, according to the manufacturer (Sika, Kansas City, MO, USA), are  listed in Table 3. Two‐component structural epoxy (Sikadur 330, Sika, Kansas City, MO,  USA) was used as the glue material to bond the fabric to the concrete surface. The mixing  ratio of the epoxy was 4 to 1 of resin to hardener by weight. The mechanical properties of  epoxy adhesive are listed in Table 4.  Table 3. Mechanical properties of CFRP strips (provided by the manufacturer).  Fiber orientation  0  Areal weight  450 g/m   Fabric design thickness  0.38 mm (based on the total area of carbon fibers)  Tensile strength of fibers  986 MPa  Tensile E—modulus of fibers  95837 MPa  Elongation at break  2.1%  Table 4. Mechanical properties of epoxy adhesive (provided by the manufacturer).  Appearance  Yellow  Density  1.1 g/cm   Mixing ratio  4:1 by weight (at +25 C)  Open time  30 min  Tensile strength  33.8 MPa  E‐modulus (Flexural)  3488 MPa  Flexural strength  60.7 MPa  2.4. Application of the CFRP Strips  The fabric sheets were adhered to the concrete specimens by using an external bond‐ strengthening  technique.  First,  the  concrete  surface  was  sanded  with  an  abrasive  dry  grinder to remove the mortar to avoid any uneven surface and loading. Then, the fabric  sheet  was  cut  into  the  desired  strip  widths.  The  mixed  adhesive  was  applied  to  the  prepared substrate by using a brush. The fabric was rolled over with a roller‐shaped comb  to be immersed totally in the epoxy. A plastic laminating roller was used to adhere the  fabric infused with resin to the concrete surface and to remove the air bubbles. Finally, all  strengthened beams were cured at room temperature (25 °C) for seven days before being  tested. After the epoxy was cured, the concrete specimens were ready to be tested in their  respective environments.  3. Experimental Results and Discussions  3.1. The Pull‐off Shearing Test Results  The applied load versus deflections for the tested specimens are shown in Figure 7.  The  tested  specimens  experienced  undesired  modes  of  failure.  The  CFRP  strips  failed  instead of the CFRP–concrete bond failure, as shown in Figure 8. After 60 days of exposure  to the saltwater, reductions in the CFRP strength were 20%, 26%, and 18% for the 25 mm,  50 mm, and 75 mm widths, respectively. However, the effect of tap water had a greater  adverse effect on the CFRP strength. Total reductions of 61%, 52%, and 51% of the CFRP  strength were obtained for the 25 mm, 50 mm, and 75 mm widths, respectively, after the  exposure to tap water (see Figure 9). The peak loads from the pull‐off shearing tests after  60 and 195 days of exposure are listed in Table 5. As the period of exposure increased to  195 days, more reductions in the CFRP strength were obtained (55%, 30%, and 21% for the  25 mm, 50 mm, and 75 mm widths, respectively), as shown in Figure 10 and listed in Table  5. The same failure modes were obtained.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  10  of  18     (a)   (b)   (c)   Figure 7. Load versus deflection curves after 60 days of exposure. (a) CFRP strip width of 25 mm  (1.0 in.). (b) CFRP strip width of 50 mm (2.0 in.). (c) CFRP strip width of 75 mm (3.0 in.).      (a)   (b)   (c)   Figure 8. Typical failure mode after 60 days of exposure. (a) 25 mm width. (b) 50 mm width. (c) 75  mm width.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  11  of  18  Figure 9. Effect of 60 days of exposure on the CFRP strength.  Table 5. Peak loads from the pull‐off shearing tests after 60 and 195 days of exposure.  60 Days of Exposure  195 Days of Exposure  Exposure Condition  CFRP Width (mm)  Peak Load  Peak Load  % Change  % Change  (kN)  (kN)  25  8.8 ‐  10.2 ‐  Control  50  20.6 ‐  18.5 ‐  75  28.4 ‐  23.2 ‐  25  7.0  20  10.1  1  Saltwater   50  15.2  26  18.3  2  75  23.3  18  16.8  27  25  3.4  61  4.7  54  Tap water  50  10.0  52  12.6  32  75  13.9  51  19.3  17  25  Lost data * ‐  6.4  38  Outdoor  50  20.0  3  13.4  28  environment  75  27.1  5  21.3  8  * The test data was lost due to an error from the MTS loading machine.  (a)   (b)   Buildings 2022, 12, 873  12  of  18  (c)   Figure 10. Load versus deflection curves after 195 days of exposure. (a) CFRP strip width of 25  mm (1.0 in.). (b) CFRP strip width of 50 mm (2.0 in.). (c) CFRP strip width of 75 mm (3.0 in.).  Comparing the strength and stiffness of the outdoor‐exposed CFRP and their control  partners, the outdoor environment can be considered as having a negligible effect after 60  days of exposure, as listed in Table 5. However, after 195 days, this environment had an  adverse  effect  on  the  CFRP  strength,  as  shown  in  Figure  11.  The  drops  in  the  CFRP  strength were 38%, 28%, and 8%, as listed in Table 5. The combined effect of moisture and  ultraviolet rays caused this reduction effect. This indicated that the effect of the outdoor  environment  can  be  considered  more  damaging  to  the  CFRP‐strengthening  technique  than the saltwater as the time of exposure increases. Figure 12 shows the effect of exposure  time on the strength of the 75 mm CFRP sheets. It can be seen from Figure 12 that as the  time  of  exposure  increased,  there  was  a  degradation  in  the  CFRP  strength,  except  for  samples exposed to the tap water. This could be attributed to the improvement in the  concrete tensile strength experienced by the exposure to tap water, which delayed the  debonding  of  the  CFRP.  The  bond  strength  in  this  experiment  was  greater  than  the  strength of the CFRP. Therefore, the typical failure mode was a rupture in the CFRP strips.  In order to obtain failure in the bond between the CFRP strips and concrete, the bond area  should be reduced.    Buildings 2022, 12, 873  13  of  18  Figure 11. Effect of 195 days of exposure on CFRP strength. Figure 12. Effect of exposure time on the strength of the 75 mm CFRP.  3.2. Three‐Point Bending Test Results  The results from the three‐point bending tests are listed in Table 6 and shown in  Figure 13. For the control specimens, the load increased steadily until hair cracks emerged  at the loading level of 9.3 kN, and then the initial cracks continuously propagated as the  applied load increased.  The average failure load of these specimens was 11.4 kN. The  failure mode was debonding of the CFRP.  (a)   (b)      (c)   (d)   Buildings 2022, 12, 873  14  of  18     (e)   (f)   Figure 13. Load deflection response for the effect of different environmental exposures of the three‐ point bending test results. (a) Control specimens. (b) Wet‐and‐dry cycles in tap water. (c) Wet‐and‐ dry cycles in saltwater. (d) Freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in chloride deicer. (e) Freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in  non‐chloride deicer. (f) Freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in tap water.  Table 6. Peak loads from the three‐point bending tests after 30 cycles of exposure.  Exposure Condition  Peak Load (kN)  % Change  Failure MODE  Control  11.4 ‐  Debonding  Tap water  11.8  +3.5  Debonding  Saltwater  12.6  +10.5  Debonding  Chloride Deicer  11.5  +0.8  Debonding  Non‐Chloride Deicer  9.6 −15.7  Debonding  Freeze and Thaw cycles  9.1 −20.2  Debonding  The flexural behavior of the specimens under the effect of wet‐and‐dry cycles in tap  water is shown in Figure 13b. The load steadily increased with time and the initial crack  formed at the loading level of 8.9 kN. The average failure load was 11.8 kN, which was  3.6%  higher  than  that  of  the  control  specimens.  This  could  be  attributed  to  the  improvement in the concrete tensile strength experienced by the exposure to tap water,  which delayed the debonding of the CFRP. After completion of 30 wet‐and‐dry cycles in  saltwater, there were no major changes in the appearance of these specimens other than  white specks on the CFRP. They were most likely caused by salt that recrystallized in the  drying process. The effect of the wet‐and‐dry cycles in saltwater is illustrated in Figure  13c.  Multiple  hair  cracks  were  initiated  before  the  specimens  reached  their  maximum  loads. The average maximum load was 12.6 kN, which was 10% more than the average  maximum load of the control specimens. The concrete surface was supposed to be affected  by chlorides in a negative way. However, it was the same scenario for the wet‐and‐dry  cycles in tap water. The only difference was that slightly more concrete was attached to  the CFRP after debonding.  The load versus deflection curves for the concrete specimens exposed to freeze‐and‐ thaw cycles in chloride‐based deicer are shown in Figure 13d. The average maximum load  was 11.5 kN, which was 0.42% higher than that one for the control specimens. On the other  hand, the flexure behaviors of the non‐chloride‐based concrete specimens are presented  in Figure 13e. Two specimens experienced premature failure at the maximum loads of 5.6  kN and 4.7 kN. The mode of failure for these two specimens was concrete failure around  the CFRP without debonding. Figure 14a shows the large cracks that were formed in the  first two specimens. By excluding the results of these two specimens, the maximum load  was 9.6 kN, which was 15.7% less than the control specimens. The results confirmed side  effects  on  the  concrete  strength  due  to  the  exposure  to  the  non‐chloride‐based  deicer,  which caused failure in the concrete instead of the CFRP. Although the third specimen  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  15  of  18  experienced debonding of the CFRP (see Figure 14b), there was much concrete, which was  bound to the epoxy. The epoxy was firmly bound to the concrete surface. That was not  the same case as with the tap water and saltwater exposures. The flexure curves for the  concrete specimens undergoing freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in tap water are shown in Figure  13f.  The  average  maximum  load  was  9.1  kN,  which  was  20.2%  less  than  the  control  specimens. Deterioration occurred in the epoxy strength due to the exposure to freeze‐ and‐thaw cycles in tap  water.  Comparisons  of the  three‐point  bending test  results are  presented in Figure 15. Additional comparisons between the average peak loads of each  group with error bars are provided in Figure 16. In this figure, the bar heights represent  the average peak load and the black error bar gives information on how the scatter of the  results between different specimens of a given group. The measurements in the group of  tap  water  are  the  most  precise  and  the  least  precise  results  are  for  the  group  of  non‐ chloride deicer. A previous study confirmed the same increase in the bond strength and  peak loads after exposure to saline environments [29].  (a)   (b)   Figure 14. Non‐chloride‐based deicer concrete deterioration. (a) Failure of concrete around the  CFRP. (b) Mode of failure.    (a)   (b)   Figure 15. Load deflection response comparisons of the three‐point bending test results. (a) Wet‐ and‐dry cycles. (b) Freeze‐and‐thaw cycles.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  16  of  18  Figure 16. Comparisons between the average peak loads of each group with error bars.  4. Conclusions  The durability of CFRP materials used for strengthening RC beams was tested under  various environmental scenarios including subjection to immersion in deicing agents, tap  water,  and  saltwater,  freeze‐and‐thaw  cycles,  and  outdoor  environmental  changes.  Laboratory  tests  were  performed  to  examine  the  influence  of  these  environmental  scenarios on the bond behavior between the CFRP and concrete. Two types of test setups  were performed in this study, namely pull‐off shearing and three‐point bending. Forty‐ two concrete prisms with CFRP were prepared and tested by using the pull‐off shearing  setup. In addition, eighteen short concrete beams strengthened with an external CFRP  were tested under three‐point bending. Based on the experimental results, the following  conclusions could be drawn:  1. It was observed that as the period of exposure increased, a noticeable effect on the  stiffness of the CFRP was observed.  2. Tap water exposure had a greater impact on the CFRP–concrete bond strength and  on the CFRP than the saltwater exposure. The strength was reduced after 60 days of  exposure by an average of 5% and 26% for the saltwater and tap water exposures,  respectively, for the 25 mm CFRP width.  3. It can be seen that after 60 days of outdoor exposure, the strength of the CFRP was  not affected. However, after 195 days, this environment had an adverse effect on the  CFRP strength. Increasing the period of outdoor exposure tends to weaken the CFRP  strength.  4. From the three‐point bending testing, it was observed that tap water showed a 3.6%  increase  in  the  bond  strength  compared  to  the  control  specimens.  However,  the  saltwater showed a 10% increase in the bond strength.  5. Chloride deicer slightly affected strength, whereas non‐chloride deicer reduced the  strength by 42%.  6. In this study, it was observed that freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in tap water reduced the  strength by 20.2% compared to the control specimens.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, A.A.‐K. and H.S.; data curation, A.E.‐Z.; formal analysis,  A.E.‐Z.; investigation, A.E.‐Z., M.M., and A.A.‐K.; methodology, A.E.‐Z. and M.M.; resources, M.M.  and A.A.‐K.; supervision, A.E.‐Z. and H.S.; visualization, H.S.; writing—original draft, M.M. and  A.A.‐K.;  writing—review  &  editing,  A.E.‐Z.  All  authors  have  read  and  agreed  to  the  published  version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research received no external funding.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  17  of  18  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable.  Informed Consent Statement: Not applicable.  Data Availability Statement: Not applicable.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Hussain,  Q.;  Ruangrassamee,  A.;  Tangtermsirikul,  S.;  Joyklad,  P.;  Wijeyewickrema,  A.C.  Low‐Cost  Fiber  Rope  Reinforced  Polymer (FRRP) Confinement of Square Columns with Different Corner Radii. Buildings 2021, 11, 355.  2. Rodsin, K.; Ali, N.; Joyklad, P.; Chaiyasarn, K.; Al Zand, A.W.; Hussain, Q. Improving stress‐strain behavior of waste aggregate  concrete  using  affordable  glass  fiber  reinforced  polymer  (GFRP)  composites.  Sustainability  2022,  14,  6611.  https://doi.org/10.3390/su14116611.  3. Fan, M. Sustainable fiber‐reinforced polymer composites in construction. Manag. Recycl. Reuse Waste Compos. 2010, 520–568.  https://doi.org/10.1533/9781845697662.5.520.  4. Al‐Saadi, N.T.K.; Al‐Mahaidi, R.; Kamiran Abdouka, K. Bond behaviour between NSM CFRP strips and concrete substrate  using  single‐lap  shear  testing  with  cement‐based  adhesives.  Aust.  J.  Struct.  Eng.  2016,  17,  28–38.  https://doi.org/10.1080/13287982.2015.1116180.  5. Haddad,  R.H.  An  Anchorage  System  for  Enhanced  Bond  Behavior  between  Carbon  Fiber  Reinforced  Polymer  Sheets  and  Cracked Concrete. Lat. Am. J. Solids Struct. 2019, 16. https://doi.org/10.1590/1679‐78255708.  6. Zhao,  J.;  Cai,  G.;  Cui,  L.;  Si  Larbi,  A.;  Daniel  Tsavdaridis,  K.  Deterioration  of  Basic  Properties  of  the  Materials  in  FRP‐ Strengthening RC Structures under Ultraviolet Exposure. Polymers 2017, 9, 402. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym9090402.  7. Soutis,  C.;  Turkmen,  D.  Moisture  and  Temperature  Effects  of  the  Compressive  Failure  of  CFRP  Unidirectional  Laminates.  Compos. Mater. 1997, 31, 832–849. https://doi.org/10.1177/002199839703100805.  8. Li, S.; Hu, J.; Ren, H. The Combined Effects of Environmental Conditioning and Sustained Load on Mechanical Properties of  Wet Lay‐Up Fiber Reinforced Polymer. Polymers 2017, 9, 244. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym9070244.  9. Peng, H.; Liu, Y.; Cai, C.; Yu, J.; Zhang, J. Experimental investigation of bond between near‐surface‐mounted CFRP strips and  concrete under freeze‐thawing cycling. J. Aerosp. Eng. 2019, 32. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)AS.1943‐5525.0000937.  10. Jadooe,  A.;  Al‐Mahaidi,  R.;  Abdouka,  K.  Bond  behavior  between  NSM  CFRP  strips  and  concrete  exposed  to  elevated  temperature  using  cement‐based  and  epoxy  adhesives.  J.  Compos.  Constr.  2017,  21.  https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)CC.1943‐ 5614.0000812.  11. Liu, S.; Pan, Y.; Li, H.; Xian, G. Durability of the Bond between CFRP and Concrete Exposed to Thermal Cycles. Materials 2019,  12, 515. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12030515.  12. Zheng,  X.H.;  Huang,  P.Y.;  Guo,  X.Y.;  Huang,  J.L.  Experimental  Study  on  Bond  Behavior  of  FRP‐Concrete  Interface  in  Hygrothermal Environment. Int. J. Polym. Sci. 2016, 2016, 5832130. https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/5832130.  13. Atadero, R.A.; Douglas, G.A.; Oscar, R.M. Long‐Term Monitoring of Mechanical Properties of FRP Repair Materials. Available  online: https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/26179 (accessed on 01 July 2013).  14. Mohammadi, M.; Mostofinejad, D. CFRP‐to‐concrete bond behavior under aggressive exposure of sewer chamber. J. Compos.  Mater. 2021, 55, 3359–3373. https://doi.org/10.1177/00219983211004699.  15. Taukta, C.; Buyukozturk, O. Conceptual model for prediction of FRP‐concrete bond strength under moisture cycles. J. Compos.  Constr. 2011, 15. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)CC.1943‐5614.0000210.  16. Pan, Y.; Xian, G.; Silva, M.A.G. Effects of water immersion on the bond behavior between CFRP plates and concrete substrate.  Constr. Build. Mater. 2015, 101, 326–337, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2015.10.129.  17. Lu, Y.; Zhu, T.; Li, S.; Liu, Z. Bond Behavior of Wet‐Bonded Carbon Fiber‐Reinforced Polymer‐Concrete Interface Subjected to  Moisture. Int. J. Polym. Sci. 2018, 2018, 3120545. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3120545.  18. Medeiros, M.H.F.; Gobbi, A.; Réus, G.C.; Helene, P. Reinforced concrete in marine environment: Effect of wetting and drying  cycles,  height  and  positioning  in  relation  to  the  sea  shore.  Constr.  Build.  Mater.  2013,  44,  452–457,  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2013.02.078.  19. Ragab, A.M.; Elgammal, M.A.; Hodhod, O.A.; Ahmed, T.E. Evaluation of field concrete deterioration under real conditions of  seawater attack. Constr. Build. Mater. 2016, 119, 130–144. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2016.05.014.  20. Ceroni, F.; Bonati, A.; Galimberti, V.; Occhiuzzi, A. Effects of Environmental Conditioning on the Bond Behavior of FRP and  FRCM Systems Applied to Concrete Elements. J. Eng. Mech. 2018, 144. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)EM.1943‐7889.0001375.  21.   Green,  M.F.;  Bisby,  L.A.;  Beaudoin,  Y.;  Labossière,  P.  Effect  of  freeze‐thaw  cycles  on  the  bond  durability  between  fibre  reinforced polymer plate reinforcement and concrete. Canadian J. Civ. Eng. 2000, 27, 949–959. https://doi.org/10.1139/l00‐031.  22. ASTM  D7522/D7522M‐21;  Standard  Test  Method  for  Pull‐Off  Strength  for  FRP  Laminate  Systems  Bonded  to  Concrete  or  Masonry Substrates. ASTM International: West Conshohocken, PA, USA, 2021.  23. Gartner, A.; Douglas, E.P.; Dolan, C.W.; Hamilton, H.R. Small beam bond test method for CFRP composites applied to concrete.  J. Compos. Constr. 2011, 15. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)CC.1943‐5614.0000151.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  18  of  18  24. Yan, L.; Chouw, N. Effect of Water, Seawater and Alkaline Solution Ageing on Mechanical Properties of Flax Fabric/Epoxy  Composites  Used  for  Civil  Engineering  Applications.  Constr.  Build.  Mater.  2015,  99,  118–127.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2015.09.025.  25. ASTM C78/C78M; Standard Test Method for Flexural Strength of Concrete. ASTM International: West Conshohocken, PA, USA,  2018. https://doi.org/10.1520/C0078_C0078M‐18.  26. ASTM C31/C31M‐21a; Standard Practice for Making and Curing Concrete Test Specimens in the Field. ASTM International:  West Conshohocken, PA, USA, 2021. https://doi.org/10.1520/C0031_C0031M‐21A.  27. ASTM C666/C666M‐15; Standard Test Method for Resistance of Concrete to Rapid Freezing and Thawing. ASTM International:  West Conshohocken, PA, USA, 2015.  28. ASTM C672/C672M‐12; Standard Test Method for Scaling Resistance of Concrete Surfaces Exposed to Deicing Chemicals. ASTM  International: West Conshohocken, PA, USA, 2012.  29. Al‐Tamimi, A.K.; Hawileh, R.A.; Abdalla, J.A.; Rasheed, H.A.; Al‐Mahaidi, R. Durability of the bond between CFRP plates and  concrete exposed to harsh environments. J. Mater. Civ. Eng. 2005, 27. https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)mt.1943‐5533.0001226.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buildings Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Environmental Impact on the Behavior of CFRP Sheet Attached to Concrete

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/environmental-impact-on-the-behavior-of-cfrp-sheet-attached-to-mP25hihCH4
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2022 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2075-5309
DOI
10.3390/buildings12070873
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Environmental Impact on the Behavior of CFRP Sheet Attached  to Concrete  1 2, 3 4 Ayssar Al‐Khafaji  , Ayman El‐Zohairy  *, Mirnes Mustafic   and Hani Salim      Structural Designer, Infrastructure Consulting & Engineering, Raleigh, NC 27609, USA;  ayssar.alkhafaji@ice‐eng.com    Department of Engineering and Technology, Texas A&M University‐Commerce, Commerce, TX 75429, USA    Lyles School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA;  mmustafi@purdue.edu    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA;  salimh@missouri.edu  *  Correspondence: ayman.elzohairy@tamuc.edu; Tel.: +1‐903‐468‐8683  Abstract:  Carbon  fiber‐reinforced  polymer  (CFRP)  has  many  advantages  as  a  construction/structural‐strengthening  material.  However,  there  are  still  concerns  regarding  the  long‐term  performance  of  these  materials  when  used  with  reinforced  concrete  (RC)  structures.  Environmental conditions have an adverse effect on the behavior of CFRP and the bond between  these sheets and concrete. Therefore, the durability of CFRP used for strengthening RC beams was  evaluated under different environmental scenarios, including subjection to immersion in deicing  agents,  tap  water,  and  saltwater,  freeze‐and‐thaw  cycles,  and  outdoor  environmental  changes.  Laboratory tests were performed to examine the influence of these environmental scenarios on the  bonding behavior between CFRP sheets and concrete in terms of deformations and modes of failure.  Two types of test setups were performed in this study, namely pull‐off shearing and three‐point  bending.  Forty‐two  concrete  prisms  with  CFRP  were  prepared  and  tested  by  using  the  pull‐off  Citation: Al‐Khafaji, A.;   shearing setup. It was observed that as the period of exposure increased, noticeable effects on the  El‐Zohairy, A.; Mustafic, M.;   CFRP sheet as well as the bond stiffness were observed. Exposure to tap water had a greater impact  Salim, H. Environmental Impact on  than  saltwater  on  the  CFRP–concrete  bond  strength  as  well  as  the  CFRP.  In  addition,  eighteen  the Behavior of CFRP Sheet  notched  concrete  beams  strengthened  with  an  external  CFRP  were  tested  under  three‐point  Attached to Concrete. Buildings 2022,  bending. The tap water exposure showed a 3.6% increase in the bond strength compared to the  12, 873. https://doi.org/10.3390/  control specimen. However, the saltwater exposure showed a 10% increase.  buildings12070873  Academic Editor: Pavel Reiterman  Keywords: environmental impacts; concrete; bond strength; CFRP; deflection; debonding  Received: 2 June 2022  Accepted: 20 June 2022  Published: 21 June 2022  1. Introduction  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  Strengthening RC beams or columns by composite material has lots of advantages.  neutral with  regard  to jurisdictional  The low density, high specific strength, corrosion resistance, and ease of installation make  claims  in  published  maps  and  fiber‐reinforced polymers (FRPs) a suitable technology for strengthening or rehabilitating  institutional affiliations.  structures.  Until  now,  their  cost  and  long‐term  behavior  make  their  development  doubtable. Enormous costs associated with synthetic FRPs may limit their use in several  low‐budget  applications  [1,2].  Low‐cost  and  easily  available  fiber  rope‐reinforced  Copyright:  ©  2022  by  the  authors.  polymer composites were used to strengthen concrete columns [1]. Moreover, low‐cost  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  glass fiber sheets were used to upgrade concrete with waste aggregate [2]. Carbon fiber‐ This article  is an open access article  reinforced  polymer  (CFRP)  has  superior  mechanical  properties  and  higher  tensile  distributed  under  the  terms  and  strength, stiffness, and durability compared with other fiber‐based systems. Therefore,  conditions of the Creative Commons  CFRP was the strengthening technique in this study. The bond strength between CFRP  Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  (https://creativecommons.org/license and concrete is the main factor for controlling failures of strengthened structures [3]. The  s/by/4.0/).  rough surface of CFRP showed superior bond strength when compared to the smooth  Buildings 2022, 12, 873. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12070873  www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  2  of  18  surface of CFRP [4]. The geometry, in terms of length and width, of CFRP is a major factor  that  shapes  the  bond  strength  [5].  The  durability  of  CFRP  materials  in  different  environments  is  one  of  the  primary  issues  that  has  limited  the  development  of  these  materials in the application of some infrastructure [6]. The CFRP materials are usually  very sensitive to different environmental conditions, mostly moisture and temperature  [7]. With regard to application, it is crucial for a designer to consider not only the short‐ term characteristics of the materials but also the rates of deterioration of FRP composites  as a function of exposure condition and time [8].  Previous  studies  examined  the  effect  of  exposure  to  different  environmental  conditions on the fabric attached to concrete using an epoxy adhesive or cement‐based  adhesive  [8–12].  The  degradation  of  the  bond  between  the  CFRP  and  concrete  was  attributed  to  the  deterioration  of  the  concrete  surface  [9].  The  effect  of  extreme  temperature (over 200 °C) on concrete prisms with attached CFRP using epoxy adhesive  was  investigated.  The  epoxy  adhesive  bond  strength  decreased  gradually  as  the  temperature increased [10]. The thermal cycles in the air increased the interfacial fracture  energy of the CFRP–concrete whereas the interfacial fracture energy was reduced due to  the thermal cycles in water. Thermal cycles in water caused the failure mode to change  from concrete cohesive failure to primer–concrete interfacial debonding [11]. The bond  behavior of the FRP–concrete interface under a hygrothermal environment was studied  [12].  The  ultimate  bearing  capacity  of  the  interface  was  reduced  by  up  to  27.9%  after  exposure to the hygrothermal environments (high temperature and humidity).  Atadero et al. [13] tested cracked concrete beams that were repaired by using CFRP  after being exposed to environmental conditions such as moisture, chloride deicer, non‐ chloride deicer, and freeze‐and‐thaw cycles. The exposure to moisture showed reductions  in the bond strength of the epoxy adhesive. The effects of acid environments on the bond  strength of FRP sheets bonded on the concrete surface were investigated [14]. The bond  strength of the externally bonded FRP specimens depends on both exposure type and  duration. The bond strength decreased by up to about 19.7% after increasing the exposure  duration to 250 days. Taukta et al. [15] performed tests on concrete beams that had FRP  bound to them by using epoxy adhesive. The beams were tested in different moisture  environments by using an environmental chamber at 23 °C and at 50 °C before testing. It  was found that the bond strength of the FRP and concrete decayed exponentially with  respect to the moisture content of the interface of the epoxy and concrete. The thickness  of the adhesive  layers (i.e.,  0.2  mm and 1 mm) affects the  bonding properties and the  resistance to the water immersion [16]. The thinner the adhesive layer, the higher moisture  content  is  found  at  the  adhesive/concrete  interface.  Water  immersion  altered  the  debonding mode from cohesive concrete fracture to adhesive separation from the concrete  substrate  [16,17].  Exposure  of  RC  elements  in  marine  structures  to  an  aggressive  environment, where the humidity and seawater attack, exhibited noticeable effects on the  cracking and deterioration of structures when compared to other environmental exposure  [18,19].  The  most  damaging  condition  for  CFRP  composites  was  exposure  to  high  quantities of moisture, which caused the fiber–matrix interface to be prone to degradation.  A clearly negative effect of the conditioning factors for the specimens with the CFRP was  obtained as the conditioning time increased because of the plasticization phenomena of  the epoxy adhesive [20]. The effects of freeze–thaw cycling on the bond between FRP and  concrete were examined [21]. The bond between carbon FRP strips and concrete is not  significantly damaged by up to 300 freeze–thaw cycles.  There has been much research to investigate the moisture and temperature effect on  the bond strength of the epoxy adhesive. However, limited research has been conducted  on  the  effects  of  freeze–thaw  cycles  and  deicing  chemicals  on  the  CFRP  and  CFRP– concrete bond. Moreover, the current studies mostly focused on the structural behaviors  and  modes  of  failure  of  concrete  members  strengthened  with  CFRP  and  undergoing  outdoor environmental changes. Therefore, the present study is an attempt to expand the  state  of  knowledge  to  evaluate  the  durability  of  CFRP  materials  that  are  used  for  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  3  of  18  strengthening  concrete  members  under  different  environmental  scenarios,  including  being subjected to immersion in deicing agents, tap water, and saltwater, freeze‐and‐thaw  cycles, and outdoor environmental changes. Laboratory tests were performed to examine  the influence of these environmental scenarios on the bonding behavior between CFRP  and  concrete.  Two  types  of  test  setups  were  performed  in  this  study,  namely  pull‐off  shearing [22] and three‐point bending [23]. Forty‐two concrete prisms with CFRP were  prepared  and  tested  by  using  the  pull‐off  shearing  setup.  In  addition,  eighteen  short  beams strengthened with an external CFRP were tested under three‐point bending.  2. Description of the Experimental Program  The  experimental  program  was  conducted  by  using  pull‐off  shearing  testing  and  three‐point  bending  testing  of short  beams to  evaluate the bond  strength  between the  CFRP  and  concrete.  The  specimens  for  both  testing  setups  were  exposed  to  various  environmental conditions, and the results were compared to control specimens.  2.1. Pull‐off Shearing Tests  Most available models for the prediction of bond characteristics between CFRP and  concrete are based on data from tests on pull‐off shearing specimens [20], according to  ASTM D7522/D7522M‐21 [22].  2.1.1. Details of Specimens  The  experimental  program  was  carried  out  on  a  total  of  42  rectangular  concrete  prisms of 152.4 mm × 152.4 mm × 203.2 mm (6 in. × 6 in. × 8 in.). This block size was chosen  to provide easy handling of the specimens during the test. The composite system was  prepared  in  accordance  with  Sika’s  manufacturer’s  specifications  (Kansas  City,  MO,  USA). The unidirectional fabrics were each cut into strips of three different widths (25  mm, 50 mm, and 75 mm) and bonded to the concrete blocks after being cured, as shown  in Figure 1. These different widths were selected to consider the effect of different contact  areas  between  the  CFRP  and  concrete  under  different  environmental  scenarios  on  the  bond strength between the two elements.      (a)   (b)   Figure 1. Preparation of specimens. (a) Rectangular concrete prisms. (b) The CFRP bonded to the  concrete blocks.  2.1.2. Exposure Conditions  The test exposures were divided into four groups as seen in Table 1. Each group  consisted of six specimens with three different widths of CFRP ranging from 25 mm to 75  mm. The control specimens were cured in the laboratory and were tested at the same time  that  the  exposed  specimens  were  tested.  To  evaluate  the  long‐term  durability  of  the  bonded  CFRP,  the  saltwater,  tap  water,  and  outdoor  changes  in  temperature  and  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  4  of  18  humidity were the exposure conditions adopted in this study. The aggressive chloride  environment, represented by the saltwater exposure, had a salt solution of 35 g/L of NaCl  (corresponding to the salt concentration of seawater) [24]. The tap water environment was  simulated to be somewhat realistic to what would be found in the real world along a  bridge deck or underside. The tap water had a pH value of 8.5 according to the City of  Columbia public water system (Columbia, MO, USA). The full‐immersion procedures for  the concrete specimens and bonding areas were used for the saltwater and tap water, as  shown in Figure 2.     (a)   (b)   (c)   Figure 2. The full immersion procedures for the specimens of the pull‐off shearing tests. (a) The  saltwater exposure. (b) The tap water exposure. (c) The outdoor exposure.  Table 1. Summary of exposure conditions used to weather the specimens.  Exposure Times   CFRP Width   Number of  Exposure Condition  (days)  (mm)  Specimens  Control  60 and 195  25, 50, and 75  6  Saltwater immersion  60 and 195  25, 50, and 75  6  Outdoor environment  60 and 195  25, 50, and 75  6  Immersion in tap  60 and 195  25, 50, and 75  6  water  For the outdoor exposure, the specimens were left in the outdoor environment for  the exposure time to expose them to various weather conditions, as shown in Figure 2c.  Temperature and precipitation data were collected from the online database of Sanborn  Field  (University  of  Missouri  2018)  for  the  time  the  specimens  were  exposed  to  the  outdoor environment (see Figure 3a). The humidity data was also collected for the same  period from the Columbia, MO History online database Weather Underground (2019), as  shown  in  Figure  3b.  The  results  indicate  that  the  samples  were  exposed  to  relative  humidity  ranging  from  approximately  45%  to  85%  in  addition  to  some  precipitation  during the observed period.  (a)  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  5  of  18  (b)   Figure 3. Outdoor environmental changes. (a) Average temperature and precipitation. (b)  Humidity data.  2.1.3. Test Setup  An MTS loading machine was used to conduct the double‐face shear‐type pull‐off  shearing test  [22].  This kind  of  loading  was used  to  eliminate  the  action  of the  load’s  eccentricity on the CFRP–concrete interface [20]. Figure 4 displays the details of the test  setup, which consists of a cylindrical roller with a diameter of 150 mm (6 in.) to match the  width of the concrete prisms to apply a pure shear along with the interface between the  CFRP and concrete. A thick steel plate of 25 mm (1 in.) thickness with four anchor bolts  was used to fix the concrete prisms in their position during the test. The CFRP strip was  wrapped around the cylindrical roller, and the two ends were bonded to the sides of the  concrete prism by using epoxy resin. The steel roller was directly attached to the load cell  by using mechanical fasteners (see Figure 4).    Buildings 2022, 12, 873  6  of  18  Figure 4. The pull‐off shearing test set‐up. (Dimensions are in mm).  2.2. Three‐Point Bending Tests  The three‐point‐bending tests are the most relevant models for the prediction of the  CFRP flexural bond [19].  2.2.1. Details of Specimens  A total of 18 concrete prisms of dimensions 100 mm × 100 mm × 355 mm (4 in. × 4 in.  × 14 in.) were cast and cured for 28 days. These dimensions were selected according to  ASTM C78/C78M‐18 [25]. Additionally, six concrete cylinders 100 mm × 200 mm (4 in. × 8  in.)  were  cast  in  accordance  with  ASTM  C31/C31M‐21a  [26].  After  the  completion  of  curing, a circular saw with a 3 mm (1/8 in.) wide blade was used to make a cut across the  tension side of the beam perpendicular to the edge (short ways) with a depth of 25 mm (1  in.), as shown in Figure 5. The initial cut was meant to simulate an initial crack that can  occur in concrete beams due to various load applications or weather [16]. The fabric sheet  was cut into 25 mm × 250 mm (1 in. × 10 in.) strips and bound to the tension side of the  beam centered in the middle, as shown in Figure 5. The epoxy was cured for seven days  to reach maximum strength. After curing the strengthened specimens, the concrete beams  were ready to be exposed to the respective environments.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  7  of  18       (a)   (b)   (c)   Figure 5. Preparation of the strengthened pre‐notched concrete prisms. (a) Crack initiation. (b)  Application of the CFRP sheets to concrete. (c) Strengthened specimens.  2.2.2. Exposure Conditions  In the current test, three specimens with CFRP strips were used in each exposure.  The environments that were tested were a controlled environment, wet‐and‐dry cycles in  both tap water and saltwater, freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in both a chloride deicer and a non‐ chloride‐based deicer, and freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in tap water. The control environment  was  a  temperature‐controlled  lab  where  the  beams  were  placed  on  their  compression  sides so that the CFRP was not touching any surface. The temperature in the room was  set to room temperature, 21 °C (70 °F). The beams were then left for 90 days before being  tested in flexure. The beams were placed inside of a 16‐gallon tote, which was filled up  with tap water. The beams had a 6.5 mm (¼ in.) submerged depth in the tap water. The  procedure for the saltwater exposure was exactly the same as the tap water. The only  difference was use of a saltwater solution instead of tap water. To prepare the saltwater  solution, two liters of water were measured out, and 70 g of regular table salt were used  (35 g per liter). The salt was thoroughly mixed for approximately one minute with the  water.  Then  the  saltwater  solution  was  poured  into  the  tote  until  the  beams  were  submerged at least 6.5 mm (¼ in.) covering the CFRP–concrete bond. The beams exposed  to the tap water and saltwater were subjected to a kind of fatigue testing. These specimens  were immersed in their respective baths for 24 h, and then they were taken out to dry for  another 24 h at room temperature with a relative humidity of 45%. This fatigue testing is  more realistic than simply submerging the beams in tap and saltwater. The total number  of wet‐and‐dry cycles was 30 for both the tap and saltwater exposures, which means the  total duration of these exposures was 60 days. After each wet cycle, the containers were  rinsed out and a new solution was prepared.  For  the  freeze‐and‐thaw  cycles,  only  30  cycles  of  freezing  and  thawing  were  completed by using a small chest freezer according to ASTM C666 / C666M‐15 [27]. The  temperature inside the chest freezer was set to −29 °C (−20 °F), and the temperature at  which the beams were set to thaw in was approximately 21 °C (70 °F). The exposure to  deicing agents was tested by using a modified version of ASTM C672/C672M‐12 [28]. The  two types of deicers used in this testing were Meltdown Apex (as a magnesium chloride‐ based  deicer)  and  Apogee  (as  a  non‐chloride‐based  deicer),  provided  by  EnviroTech  Services, Inc. (Greeley, CO, USA. The compositions and information on the ingredients of  the two agents are listed in Table 2. The deicers were diluted with water to enable the used  chest freezer to fully freeze them. The deicer‐to‐water ratio (by mass) of 1:3 was chosen  for these tests. After the solution was prepared, the deicer and water solution were poured  into the tote containing the concrete beams for full immersion. Then they were placed  with the lid inside the freezer and taken out after at least 16 h of freezing. The beams were  left to thaw for at least eight hours before being again placed inside the freezer. After every  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  8  of  18  five cycles, an observation of the surface condition was made, the totes were cleaned, the  concrete’s surface was flushed, and the deicing solution was replaced.  Table 2. Composition/information on ingredients (provided by EnviroTech Services, Inc., Greeley,  CO, USA).  MeltDown Apex  Apogee  Component  Amount  Component  Amount  Water  65–75%  Water  Balance  Proprietary Organic Based  Magnesium Chloride  25–35%  75–85%  Components  Proprietary Performance  Corrosion Inhibitor  <1.0%  2–6%  Additive  Performance  <1.0%  Relative Density  1.15–1.27  Additive  Relative Density  1.24–1.34     2.2.3. Test Setup  After the concrete beams had been exposed to their respective environments for the  designated times, they  were  ready  to  be  tested  in three‐point  bending  to  see  how  the  CFRP–concrete  bond  behaved.  The  test  began  with  placing  the  beams  onto  the  MTS  loading machine’s supports and configuring the beam so that the supports were 50 mm  (2 in.) away from the ends of the beam with a clear span of 255 mm (10 in.), as shown in  Figure 6. The loading machine was then activated and proceeded to apply a static load  downward at a rate of 0.5 mm/minute (0.02 in./minute) until the beam failed. The MTS  loading machine’s built‐in LVDT and load cell were used to monitor the displacement as  well as the applied load, respectively, for each specimen.  Figure 6. Three‐point bending test set‐up.  2.3. Material Properties  Ready‐mix concrete was used for the construction of the beams with a maximum size  of aggregate of 9.5 mm (3/8 in.). The average compressive strength of concrete at the age  of 28 days was 38.9 MPa (5648 psi). A unidirectional carbon fiber tape, Sikawrap Hex‐ Buildings 2022, 12, 873  9  of  18  230C, was used in the strengthening process with an effective thickness of 0.38 mm. The  dry fiber properties, according to the manufacturer (Sika, Kansas City, MO, USA), are  listed in Table 3. Two‐component structural epoxy (Sikadur 330, Sika, Kansas City, MO,  USA) was used as the glue material to bond the fabric to the concrete surface. The mixing  ratio of the epoxy was 4 to 1 of resin to hardener by weight. The mechanical properties of  epoxy adhesive are listed in Table 4.  Table 3. Mechanical properties of CFRP strips (provided by the manufacturer).  Fiber orientation  0  Areal weight  450 g/m   Fabric design thickness  0.38 mm (based on the total area of carbon fibers)  Tensile strength of fibers  986 MPa  Tensile E—modulus of fibers  95837 MPa  Elongation at break  2.1%  Table 4. Mechanical properties of epoxy adhesive (provided by the manufacturer).  Appearance  Yellow  Density  1.1 g/cm   Mixing ratio  4:1 by weight (at +25 C)  Open time  30 min  Tensile strength  33.8 MPa  E‐modulus (Flexural)  3488 MPa  Flexural strength  60.7 MPa  2.4. Application of the CFRP Strips  The fabric sheets were adhered to the concrete specimens by using an external bond‐ strengthening  technique.  First,  the  concrete  surface  was  sanded  with  an  abrasive  dry  grinder to remove the mortar to avoid any uneven surface and loading. Then, the fabric  sheet  was  cut  into  the  desired  strip  widths.  The  mixed  adhesive  was  applied  to  the  prepared substrate by using a brush. The fabric was rolled over with a roller‐shaped comb  to be immersed totally in the epoxy. A plastic laminating roller was used to adhere the  fabric infused with resin to the concrete surface and to remove the air bubbles. Finally, all  strengthened beams were cured at room temperature (25 °C) for seven days before being  tested. After the epoxy was cured, the concrete specimens were ready to be tested in their  respective environments.  3. Experimental Results and Discussions  3.1. The Pull‐off Shearing Test Results  The applied load versus deflections for the tested specimens are shown in Figure 7.  The  tested  specimens  experienced  undesired  modes  of  failure.  The  CFRP  strips  failed  instead of the CFRP–concrete bond failure, as shown in Figure 8. After 60 days of exposure  to the saltwater, reductions in the CFRP strength were 20%, 26%, and 18% for the 25 mm,  50 mm, and 75 mm widths, respectively. However, the effect of tap water had a greater  adverse effect on the CFRP strength. Total reductions of 61%, 52%, and 51% of the CFRP  strength were obtained for the 25 mm, 50 mm, and 75 mm widths, respectively, after the  exposure to tap water (see Figure 9). The peak loads from the pull‐off shearing tests after  60 and 195 days of exposure are listed in Table 5. As the period of exposure increased to  195 days, more reductions in the CFRP strength were obtained (55%, 30%, and 21% for the  25 mm, 50 mm, and 75 mm widths, respectively), as shown in Figure 10 and listed in Table  5. The same failure modes were obtained.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  10  of  18     (a)   (b)   (c)   Figure 7. Load versus deflection curves after 60 days of exposure. (a) CFRP strip width of 25 mm  (1.0 in.). (b) CFRP strip width of 50 mm (2.0 in.). (c) CFRP strip width of 75 mm (3.0 in.).      (a)   (b)   (c)   Figure 8. Typical failure mode after 60 days of exposure. (a) 25 mm width. (b) 50 mm width. (c) 75  mm width.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  11  of  18  Figure 9. Effect of 60 days of exposure on the CFRP strength.  Table 5. Peak loads from the pull‐off shearing tests after 60 and 195 days of exposure.  60 Days of Exposure  195 Days of Exposure  Exposure Condition  CFRP Width (mm)  Peak Load  Peak Load  % Change  % Change  (kN)  (kN)  25  8.8 ‐  10.2 ‐  Control  50  20.6 ‐  18.5 ‐  75  28.4 ‐  23.2 ‐  25  7.0  20  10.1  1  Saltwater   50  15.2  26  18.3  2  75  23.3  18  16.8  27  25  3.4  61  4.7  54  Tap water  50  10.0  52  12.6  32  75  13.9  51  19.3  17  25  Lost data * ‐  6.4  38  Outdoor  50  20.0  3  13.4  28  environment  75  27.1  5  21.3  8  * The test data was lost due to an error from the MTS loading machine.  (a)   (b)   Buildings 2022, 12, 873  12  of  18  (c)   Figure 10. Load versus deflection curves after 195 days of exposure. (a) CFRP strip width of 25  mm (1.0 in.). (b) CFRP strip width of 50 mm (2.0 in.). (c) CFRP strip width of 75 mm (3.0 in.).  Comparing the strength and stiffness of the outdoor‐exposed CFRP and their control  partners, the outdoor environment can be considered as having a negligible effect after 60  days of exposure, as listed in Table 5. However, after 195 days, this environment had an  adverse  effect  on  the  CFRP  strength,  as  shown  in  Figure  11.  The  drops  in  the  CFRP  strength were 38%, 28%, and 8%, as listed in Table 5. The combined effect of moisture and  ultraviolet rays caused this reduction effect. This indicated that the effect of the outdoor  environment  can  be  considered  more  damaging  to  the  CFRP‐strengthening  technique  than the saltwater as the time of exposure increases. Figure 12 shows the effect of exposure  time on the strength of the 75 mm CFRP sheets. It can be seen from Figure 12 that as the  time  of  exposure  increased,  there  was  a  degradation  in  the  CFRP  strength,  except  for  samples exposed to the tap water. This could be attributed to the improvement in the  concrete tensile strength experienced by the exposure to tap water, which delayed the  debonding  of  the  CFRP.  The  bond  strength  in  this  experiment  was  greater  than  the  strength of the CFRP. Therefore, the typical failure mode was a rupture in the CFRP strips.  In order to obtain failure in the bond between the CFRP strips and concrete, the bond area  should be reduced.    Buildings 2022, 12, 873  13  of  18  Figure 11. Effect of 195 days of exposure on CFRP strength. Figure 12. Effect of exposure time on the strength of the 75 mm CFRP.  3.2. Three‐Point Bending Test Results  The results from the three‐point bending tests are listed in Table 6 and shown in  Figure 13. For the control specimens, the load increased steadily until hair cracks emerged  at the loading level of 9.3 kN, and then the initial cracks continuously propagated as the  applied load increased.  The average failure load of these specimens was 11.4 kN. The  failure mode was debonding of the CFRP.  (a)   (b)      (c)   (d)   Buildings 2022, 12, 873  14  of  18     (e)   (f)   Figure 13. Load deflection response for the effect of different environmental exposures of the three‐ point bending test results. (a) Control specimens. (b) Wet‐and‐dry cycles in tap water. (c) Wet‐and‐ dry cycles in saltwater. (d) Freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in chloride deicer. (e) Freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in  non‐chloride deicer. (f) Freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in tap water.  Table 6. Peak loads from the three‐point bending tests after 30 cycles of exposure.  Exposure Condition  Peak Load (kN)  % Change  Failure MODE  Control  11.4 ‐  Debonding  Tap water  11.8  +3.5  Debonding  Saltwater  12.6  +10.5  Debonding  Chloride Deicer  11.5  +0.8  Debonding  Non‐Chloride Deicer  9.6 −15.7  Debonding  Freeze and Thaw cycles  9.1 −20.2  Debonding  The flexural behavior of the specimens under the effect of wet‐and‐dry cycles in tap  water is shown in Figure 13b. The load steadily increased with time and the initial crack  formed at the loading level of 8.9 kN. The average failure load was 11.8 kN, which was  3.6%  higher  than  that  of  the  control  specimens.  This  could  be  attributed  to  the  improvement in the concrete tensile strength experienced by the exposure to tap water,  which delayed the debonding of the CFRP. After completion of 30 wet‐and‐dry cycles in  saltwater, there were no major changes in the appearance of these specimens other than  white specks on the CFRP. They were most likely caused by salt that recrystallized in the  drying process. The effect of the wet‐and‐dry cycles in saltwater is illustrated in Figure  13c.  Multiple  hair  cracks  were  initiated  before  the  specimens  reached  their  maximum  loads. The average maximum load was 12.6 kN, which was 10% more than the average  maximum load of the control specimens. The concrete surface was supposed to be affected  by chlorides in a negative way. However, it was the same scenario for the wet‐and‐dry  cycles in tap water. The only difference was that slightly more concrete was attached to  the CFRP after debonding.  The load versus deflection curves for the concrete specimens exposed to freeze‐and‐ thaw cycles in chloride‐based deicer are shown in Figure 13d. The average maximum load  was 11.5 kN, which was 0.42% higher than that one for the control specimens. On the other  hand, the flexure behaviors of the non‐chloride‐based concrete specimens are presented  in Figure 13e. Two specimens experienced premature failure at the maximum loads of 5.6  kN and 4.7 kN. The mode of failure for these two specimens was concrete failure around  the CFRP without debonding. Figure 14a shows the large cracks that were formed in the  first two specimens. By excluding the results of these two specimens, the maximum load  was 9.6 kN, which was 15.7% less than the control specimens. The results confirmed side  effects  on  the  concrete  strength  due  to  the  exposure  to  the  non‐chloride‐based  deicer,  which caused failure in the concrete instead of the CFRP. Although the third specimen  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  15  of  18  experienced debonding of the CFRP (see Figure 14b), there was much concrete, which was  bound to the epoxy. The epoxy was firmly bound to the concrete surface. That was not  the same case as with the tap water and saltwater exposures. The flexure curves for the  concrete specimens undergoing freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in tap water are shown in Figure  13f.  The  average  maximum  load  was  9.1  kN,  which  was  20.2%  less  than  the  control  specimens. Deterioration occurred in the epoxy strength due to the exposure to freeze‐ and‐thaw cycles in tap  water.  Comparisons  of the  three‐point  bending test  results are  presented in Figure 15. Additional comparisons between the average peak loads of each  group with error bars are provided in Figure 16. In this figure, the bar heights represent  the average peak load and the black error bar gives information on how the scatter of the  results between different specimens of a given group. The measurements in the group of  tap  water  are  the  most  precise  and  the  least  precise  results  are  for  the  group  of  non‐ chloride deicer. A previous study confirmed the same increase in the bond strength and  peak loads after exposure to saline environments [29].  (a)   (b)   Figure 14. Non‐chloride‐based deicer concrete deterioration. (a) Failure of concrete around the  CFRP. (b) Mode of failure.    (a)   (b)   Figure 15. Load deflection response comparisons of the three‐point bending test results. (a) Wet‐ and‐dry cycles. (b) Freeze‐and‐thaw cycles.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  16  of  18  Figure 16. Comparisons between the average peak loads of each group with error bars.  4. Conclusions  The durability of CFRP materials used for strengthening RC beams was tested under  various environmental scenarios including subjection to immersion in deicing agents, tap  water,  and  saltwater,  freeze‐and‐thaw  cycles,  and  outdoor  environmental  changes.  Laboratory  tests  were  performed  to  examine  the  influence  of  these  environmental  scenarios on the bond behavior between the CFRP and concrete. Two types of test setups  were performed in this study, namely pull‐off shearing and three‐point bending. Forty‐ two concrete prisms with CFRP were prepared and tested by using the pull‐off shearing  setup. In addition, eighteen short concrete beams strengthened with an external CFRP  were tested under three‐point bending. Based on the experimental results, the following  conclusions could be drawn:  1. It was observed that as the period of exposure increased, a noticeable effect on the  stiffness of the CFRP was observed.  2. Tap water exposure had a greater impact on the CFRP–concrete bond strength and  on the CFRP than the saltwater exposure. The strength was reduced after 60 days of  exposure by an average of 5% and 26% for the saltwater and tap water exposures,  respectively, for the 25 mm CFRP width.  3. It can be seen that after 60 days of outdoor exposure, the strength of the CFRP was  not affected. However, after 195 days, this environment had an adverse effect on the  CFRP strength. Increasing the period of outdoor exposure tends to weaken the CFRP  strength.  4. From the three‐point bending testing, it was observed that tap water showed a 3.6%  increase  in  the  bond  strength  compared  to  the  control  specimens.  However,  the  saltwater showed a 10% increase in the bond strength.  5. Chloride deicer slightly affected strength, whereas non‐chloride deicer reduced the  strength by 42%.  6. In this study, it was observed that freeze‐and‐thaw cycles in tap water reduced the  strength by 20.2% compared to the control specimens.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, A.A.‐K. and H.S.; data curation, A.E.‐Z.; formal analysis,  A.E.‐Z.; investigation, A.E.‐Z., M.M., and A.A.‐K.; methodology, A.E.‐Z. and M.M.; resources, M.M.  and A.A.‐K.; supervision, A.E.‐Z. and H.S.; visualization, H.S.; writing—original draft, M.M. and  A.A.‐K.;  writing—review  &  editing,  A.E.‐Z.  All  authors  have  read  and  agreed  to  the  published  version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research received no external funding.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  17  of  18  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable.  Informed Consent Statement: Not applicable.  Data Availability Statement: Not applicable.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Hussain,  Q.;  Ruangrassamee,  A.;  Tangtermsirikul,  S.;  Joyklad,  P.;  Wijeyewickrema,  A.C.  Low‐Cost  Fiber  Rope  Reinforced  Polymer (FRRP) Confinement of Square Columns with Different Corner Radii. Buildings 2021, 11, 355.  2. Rodsin, K.; Ali, N.; Joyklad, P.; Chaiyasarn, K.; Al Zand, A.W.; Hussain, Q. Improving stress‐strain behavior of waste aggregate  concrete  using  affordable  glass  fiber  reinforced  polymer  (GFRP)  composites.  Sustainability  2022,  14,  6611.  https://doi.org/10.3390/su14116611.  3. Fan, M. Sustainable fiber‐reinforced polymer composites in construction. Manag. Recycl. Reuse Waste Compos. 2010, 520–568.  https://doi.org/10.1533/9781845697662.5.520.  4. Al‐Saadi, N.T.K.; Al‐Mahaidi, R.; Kamiran Abdouka, K. Bond behaviour between NSM CFRP strips and concrete substrate  using  single‐lap  shear  testing  with  cement‐based  adhesives.  Aust.  J.  Struct.  Eng.  2016,  17,  28–38.  https://doi.org/10.1080/13287982.2015.1116180.  5. Haddad,  R.H.  An  Anchorage  System  for  Enhanced  Bond  Behavior  between  Carbon  Fiber  Reinforced  Polymer  Sheets  and  Cracked Concrete. Lat. Am. J. Solids Struct. 2019, 16. https://doi.org/10.1590/1679‐78255708.  6. Zhao,  J.;  Cai,  G.;  Cui,  L.;  Si  Larbi,  A.;  Daniel  Tsavdaridis,  K.  Deterioration  of  Basic  Properties  of  the  Materials  in  FRP‐ Strengthening RC Structures under Ultraviolet Exposure. Polymers 2017, 9, 402. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym9090402.  7. Soutis,  C.;  Turkmen,  D.  Moisture  and  Temperature  Effects  of  the  Compressive  Failure  of  CFRP  Unidirectional  Laminates.  Compos. Mater. 1997, 31, 832–849. https://doi.org/10.1177/002199839703100805.  8. Li, S.; Hu, J.; Ren, H. The Combined Effects of Environmental Conditioning and Sustained Load on Mechanical Properties of  Wet Lay‐Up Fiber Reinforced Polymer. Polymers 2017, 9, 244. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym9070244.  9. Peng, H.; Liu, Y.; Cai, C.; Yu, J.; Zhang, J. Experimental investigation of bond between near‐surface‐mounted CFRP strips and  concrete under freeze‐thawing cycling. J. Aerosp. Eng. 2019, 32. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)AS.1943‐5525.0000937.  10. Jadooe,  A.;  Al‐Mahaidi,  R.;  Abdouka,  K.  Bond  behavior  between  NSM  CFRP  strips  and  concrete  exposed  to  elevated  temperature  using  cement‐based  and  epoxy  adhesives.  J.  Compos.  Constr.  2017,  21.  https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)CC.1943‐ 5614.0000812.  11. Liu, S.; Pan, Y.; Li, H.; Xian, G. Durability of the Bond between CFRP and Concrete Exposed to Thermal Cycles. Materials 2019,  12, 515. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12030515.  12. Zheng,  X.H.;  Huang,  P.Y.;  Guo,  X.Y.;  Huang,  J.L.  Experimental  Study  on  Bond  Behavior  of  FRP‐Concrete  Interface  in  Hygrothermal Environment. Int. J. Polym. Sci. 2016, 2016, 5832130. https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/5832130.  13. Atadero, R.A.; Douglas, G.A.; Oscar, R.M. Long‐Term Monitoring of Mechanical Properties of FRP Repair Materials. Available  online: https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/26179 (accessed on 01 July 2013).  14. Mohammadi, M.; Mostofinejad, D. CFRP‐to‐concrete bond behavior under aggressive exposure of sewer chamber. J. Compos.  Mater. 2021, 55, 3359–3373. https://doi.org/10.1177/00219983211004699.  15. Taukta, C.; Buyukozturk, O. Conceptual model for prediction of FRP‐concrete bond strength under moisture cycles. J. Compos.  Constr. 2011, 15. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)CC.1943‐5614.0000210.  16. Pan, Y.; Xian, G.; Silva, M.A.G. Effects of water immersion on the bond behavior between CFRP plates and concrete substrate.  Constr. Build. Mater. 2015, 101, 326–337, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2015.10.129.  17. Lu, Y.; Zhu, T.; Li, S.; Liu, Z. Bond Behavior of Wet‐Bonded Carbon Fiber‐Reinforced Polymer‐Concrete Interface Subjected to  Moisture. Int. J. Polym. Sci. 2018, 2018, 3120545. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3120545.  18. Medeiros, M.H.F.; Gobbi, A.; Réus, G.C.; Helene, P. Reinforced concrete in marine environment: Effect of wetting and drying  cycles,  height  and  positioning  in  relation  to  the  sea  shore.  Constr.  Build.  Mater.  2013,  44,  452–457,  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2013.02.078.  19. Ragab, A.M.; Elgammal, M.A.; Hodhod, O.A.; Ahmed, T.E. Evaluation of field concrete deterioration under real conditions of  seawater attack. Constr. Build. Mater. 2016, 119, 130–144. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2016.05.014.  20. Ceroni, F.; Bonati, A.; Galimberti, V.; Occhiuzzi, A. Effects of Environmental Conditioning on the Bond Behavior of FRP and  FRCM Systems Applied to Concrete Elements. J. Eng. Mech. 2018, 144. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)EM.1943‐7889.0001375.  21.   Green,  M.F.;  Bisby,  L.A.;  Beaudoin,  Y.;  Labossière,  P.  Effect  of  freeze‐thaw  cycles  on  the  bond  durability  between  fibre  reinforced polymer plate reinforcement and concrete. Canadian J. Civ. Eng. 2000, 27, 949–959. https://doi.org/10.1139/l00‐031.  22. ASTM  D7522/D7522M‐21;  Standard  Test  Method  for  Pull‐Off  Strength  for  FRP  Laminate  Systems  Bonded  to  Concrete  or  Masonry Substrates. ASTM International: West Conshohocken, PA, USA, 2021.  23. Gartner, A.; Douglas, E.P.; Dolan, C.W.; Hamilton, H.R. Small beam bond test method for CFRP composites applied to concrete.  J. Compos. Constr. 2011, 15. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)CC.1943‐5614.0000151.  Buildings 2022, 12, 873  18  of  18  24. Yan, L.; Chouw, N. Effect of Water, Seawater and Alkaline Solution Ageing on Mechanical Properties of Flax Fabric/Epoxy  Composites  Used  for  Civil  Engineering  Applications.  Constr.  Build.  Mater.  2015,  99,  118–127.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2015.09.025.  25. ASTM C78/C78M; Standard Test Method for Flexural Strength of Concrete. ASTM International: West Conshohocken, PA, USA,  2018. https://doi.org/10.1520/C0078_C0078M‐18.  26. ASTM C31/C31M‐21a; Standard Practice for Making and Curing Concrete Test Specimens in the Field. ASTM International:  West Conshohocken, PA, USA, 2021. https://doi.org/10.1520/C0031_C0031M‐21A.  27. ASTM C666/C666M‐15; Standard Test Method for Resistance of Concrete to Rapid Freezing and Thawing. ASTM International:  West Conshohocken, PA, USA, 2015.  28. ASTM C672/C672M‐12; Standard Test Method for Scaling Resistance of Concrete Surfaces Exposed to Deicing Chemicals. ASTM  International: West Conshohocken, PA, USA, 2012.  29. Al‐Tamimi, A.K.; Hawileh, R.A.; Abdalla, J.A.; Rasheed, H.A.; Al‐Mahaidi, R. Durability of the bond between CFRP plates and  concrete exposed to harsh environments. J. Mater. Civ. Eng. 2005, 27. https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)mt.1943‐5533.0001226. 

Journal

BuildingsMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Jun 21, 2022

Keywords: environmental impacts; concrete; bond strength; CFRP; deflection; debonding

There are no references for this article.