Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Development of Simulation Based p-Multipliers for Laterally Loaded Pile Groups in Granular Soil Using 3D Nonlinear Finite Element Model

Development of Simulation Based p-Multipliers for Laterally Loaded Pile Groups in Granular Soil... Article  Development of Simulation Based p‐Multipliers for Laterally  Loaded Pile Groups in Granular Soil Using 3D Nonlinear  Finite Element Model  Muhammad Bilal Adeel, Muhammad Asad Jan, Muhammad Aaqib and Duhee Park *  Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Korea;  bilaladeel2@hanyang.ac.kr (M.B.A.); asadjan@hanyang.ac.kr (M.A.J.); aqi443@hanyang.ac.kr (M.A.)  *  Correspondence: dpark@hanyang.ac.kr; Tel.: +82‐2220‐0322  Abstract: The behavior of laterally loaded pile groups is usually accessed by beam‐on‐nonlinear‐ Winkler‐foundation (BNWF) approach employing various forms of empirically derived p‐y curves  and p‐multipliers. Averaged p‐multiplier for a particular pile group is termed as the group effect  parameter. In practice, the p‐y curve presented by the American Petroleum Institute (API) is most  often utilized for piles in granular soils, although its shortcomings are recognized. In this study, we  performed 3D finite element analysis to develop p‐multipliers and group effect parameters for 3 × 3  to 5 × 5 vertically squared pile groups. The effect of the ratio of spacing to pile diameter (S/D),  number of group piles, varying friction angle (φ), and pile fixity conditions on p‐multipliers and  group effect parameters are evaluated and quantified. Based on the simulation outcomes, a new  functional form to calculate p‐multipliers is proposed for pile groups. Extensive comparisons with  the experimental measurements reveal that the calculated p‐multipliers and group effect parameters  are within the recorded range. Comparisons with two design guidelines which do not account for  Citation: Muhammad, B.A.;  the  pile  fixity  condition  demonstrate  that  they  overestimate  the  p‐multipliers  for  fixed‐head  Muhammad, A.J.; Muhammad A.;  condition.  Duhee, P. Development of  Simulation Based p‐Multipliers for  Keywords: pile groups; finite element; BNWF; p‐multipliers; group effect parameter  Laterally Loaded Pile Groups in  Granular Soil Using 3D Nonlinear  Finite Element Model. Appl. Sci.  2021, 11, 26.  1. Introduction  https://doi.org/10.3390/app11010026  Pile foundations are commonly used to withstand both vertical and lateral loads. The   lateral response of a pile–soil system is an important design consideration for pile  Received: 23 November 2020  Accepted: 18 December 2020  foundations.  Well‐known  methods  for  prediction  of  lateral  response  of  a  single  pile  Published: 22 December 2020  includes  the  elastic  solution  proposed  by  Poulos  and  Davis  [1],  strain  wedge  method  proposed  by  Ashour  et  al.  [2],  beam‐on‐nonlinear‐Winkler‐foundation  (BNWF)  model  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays  framework, and continuum analysis [3–8].  neutral with regard to  The  most  common  method  to  analyze  the  lateral  response  of  piles  is  the  BNWF  jurisdictional claims in published  approach. In this approach, the interaction of the pile–soil system is represented by the p‐ maps and institutional affiliations.  y  curve,  where  p  is  the  soil  resistance  and  y  and  is  the  lateral  displacement.  Various  functional forms of p‐y curves are used for the piles embedded in sands such as Reese et  al.  [9]  and  API  [10].  American  Petroleum  Institute  API  [10]  provides  some  simple  guidelines to develop nonlinear p‐y curves that are most often used in practice. However,  Copyright: © 2020 by the authors. a number of researchers [11–15] reported that the use of these generic curves may produce  Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. a high level of error in the prediction of lateral response of pile foundations. Despite their  This article is an open access article documented shortcomings, practitioners most often use the API curves owing to their ease  distributed under the terms and of use.  conditions of the Creative Commons The BNWF model is also widely used to analyze the pile group response subjected  Attribution (CC BY) license to  lateral  loading.  When  piles  act  in  a  group,  the  soil  resistance  decreases  due  to  (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ ”shadowing  effect”  and  ”edge  effect”,  as  reported  by  Larkela  [16].  This  reduction  in  by/4.0/). Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11010026  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  2  of  20  resistance is accounted in the BNWF model by introducing a reduction factor, termed the  p‐multiplier, first proposed by Brown et al. [17]. To account for the shadowing effect, a  higher value of p‐multiplier is typically applied to the leading row relative to the trailing  rows. Various studies recommended that p‐multipliers for squared vertical groups are a  function of center‐to‐center spacing and soil type [17–22]. Extensive studies have been  performed to derive the p‐multipliers from field and model tests [17,19,20,22–27]. Brown  et al. [28] also reported that it is quite acceptable to use an average p‐multiplier for all the  piles  in  the  group,  rather  than  applying  p‐multipliers  for  each  row.  This  averaged  p‐ multiplier  is  referred  to  as  the  group  effect  parameter.  The  group  effect  parameter  is  widely used in a dynamic analysis, where the direction of the loading changes, converting  “leading“ rows of pile immediately into ”trailing rows” [28].  The  p‐multiplier  is  most  often  determined  from  an  iterative  process  involving  comparisons  of  the  BNWF  model  result  with  a  reference  field  load  test  output.  After  selection of the p‐y curves, BNWF analyses are performed with a range of p‐multipliers.  The  p‐multiplier  that  produces  the  most  favorable  fit  with  the  reference  set  of  data  is  selected. Because experimental data are required, there is a limitation on the cases that can  be considered. Full‐scale tests have been mostly performed using 3 × 3 free‐head group  pile with spacing to diameter ratio (S/D) of 3. The effect of number of piles, S/D, and soil  shear strength cannot be evaluated. Additionally, it was reported that the p‐multiplier is  sensitive to the p‐y curves [28]. Considering that the design p‐y curves do not provide  realistic  representation  of  the  pile–soil  interaction,  the  p‐multiplier  derived  from  this  procedure may not be reliable. Additionally, because only the load–displacement outputs  are  compared,  the  BNWF  model  may  not  provide  an  agreeable  fit  with  the  bending  moment profile.   The  p‐multiplier  can  also  be  directly  calculated  from  the  ratio  of  p  calculated  for  group  and  single  piles  [17,22,29,30].  For  this  direct  extraction,  full  3D  numerical  simulations need to be performed. Because the ratio changes with the depth, an averaged  value calculated up to the depth of influence should be extracted. Numerous studies have  been  performed to investigate the response of group  piles subjected to lateral loading  based on 3D numerical analyses. Brown and Shie [3] performed numerical simulation of  one row of piles subjected to lateral loading. It was observed that group effects are most  significantly influenced by the row position and center‐to‐center pile spacing. Yang and  Jeremić [31] performed numerical simulations of 3 × 3 to 4 × 3 pile groups. However, the  influence of S/D on p‐multiplier was not reported. Abu‐Farsakh et al. [30] proposed site  specific p‐multipliers for vertical and battered 3 × 4 pile groups with S/D = 4.3 and 2.5  using the commercial finite element analysis code ABAQUS. The site consisted mainly of  a clay deposit. The influence of number of piles, S/D, and soil type on p‐multipliers was  not accounted. Albusoda et al. [32] performed experimental and numerical modeling of  laterally  loaded  regular  and  finned  pile  foundation  in  sand.  Site  specific  p‐multipliers  were calculated for the pile groups that consist of a maximum of five piles. To model the  sand behavior, the Mohr–Coulomb model was used. The effect of number of piles and soil  condition on p‐multipliers was not evaluated. Fayyazi [14] used the procedure of Rollins  et al. [25] to extract the p‐multipliers and develop group factors for piles in sand profiles  by performing a comprehensive parametric study. However, instead of using the group  pile load test measurements, 3D finite difference analyses were performed. Because the  3D model and BNWF model outputs showed poor fits, p‐multipliers could not be directly  derived. Therefore, the shear modulus of the soil layers for the 3D model was manually  adjusted. Additionally, use of the API curves, which have been reported to provide an  unrealistic  estimate  of  the  soil  resistance,  is  likely  to  have  influenced  the  derived  p‐ multipliers. These adjustments are not needed if the p‐multipliers are directly extracted  from a 3D continuum analysis, or more realistic p‐y curves should be used in the BNWF  model. Literature review reveals that uncertainties remain in estimation of p‐multipliers  for pile foundations in granular soils.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  3  of  20  In this study, p‐multipliers and group effect parameters for piles in granular soils are  developed from a parametric study utilizing 3D nonlinear finite element (FE) analyses.  The p‐multipliers are calculated directly from the numerical analyses. The effect of S/D,  number  of  group  piles,  friction  angle φ,  and  pile  fixity  conditions  are  evaluated  and  quantified. Based on the simulation outcomes, a new functional form for p‐multipliers of  pile groups is proposed. The proposed equation is compared with available measured  values.  Comparisons  are  also  made  with  multipliers  presented  in  AASHTO  [33]  and  FEMA [34] design codes.  2. Summary of p‐Multipliers and Group Effect Parameters   In this section, a comprehensive summary of the experiment and simulation‐based  p‐multipliers and group factors of group piles in sands are presented. The experiment‐ based results are a combination of both field and centrifuge model tests. Table 1 shows  the calculated p‐multipliers from experimental tests for free‐head pile groups. The tests  were conducted on steel pipe piles except for the tests of Ruesta and Townsend [22], where  concrete piles were used. In all of these tests, the range of S/D was from 3 to 5.65, whereas  φ varied from 32° to 40°. The tests were performed using 3 × 3 piles groups, whereas the  tests of Ruesta and Townsend [22],Walsh [27], and McVay et al. [24] were performed on 4  × 4, 3 × 5, and 3 × 7 pile groups, respectively. The proposed p‐multipliers range from 0.65  to  1.0 for  the leading  row,  whereas the  multipliers range from  0.4  to 0.85  for  the  first  trailing row. Table 2 summarizes the p‐multipliers for the fixed‐head pile groups. The p‐ multipliers measured for the leading and first trailing rows were 0.8 and 0.4, respectively.  It is demonstrated that the multipliers are smaller for the fixed‐head piles. Table 3 lists the  p‐multipliers calculated from numerical analyses. Whereas S/D was mostly fixed to 3 in  experimental  tests,  they  were  varied  from  3  to  6  in  the  numerical  simulations.  The  dependences on S/D and pile fixity condition can be observed, which were not evaluated  in the field and centrifuge tests.  Table 1. Previous experimental studies conducted on free‐head pile groups (modified after Fayyazi [14]).  Proposed p‐Multipliers for Rows  Group  Soil  Test  Pile  D  Effect  Reference  φ (°)  Pile Type  S/D  Type  Type  Layout  (cm)  1st   2nd  3rd   4th  5th   6th  7th Paramete r  Brown et  Full‐ Steel  Sand  38.5  3 × 3  27.3  3  0.8  0.4  0.3 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.5  al. [17]  Scale  Pipe  Morrison  and Reese  Sand  38.5  Full‐Scale  3 × 3  Steel Pipe  27.3  3  0.8  0.4  0.3 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.5  [35]  Centrifug Sand  30  3 × 3  Steel Pipe  43  5  1  0.85  0.7 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.85  e  Centrifug Sand  33  3 × 3  Steel Pipe  43  5  1  0.85  0.7 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.85  McVay et  e  al. [19]  Centrifug Sand  30  3 × 3  Steel Pipe  43  3  0.65  0.45  0.35 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.48  e  Centrifug Sand  33  3 × 3  Steel Pipe  43  3  0.8  0.4  0.3 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.5  e  Ruesta and  Square  Townsend  Sand  32  Full‐Scale  4 × 4  76  3  0.8  0.7  0.3  0.3 ‐  ‐  ‐  0.52  Concrete  [22]  Walsh [27]  Sand  40  Full‐Scale  3 × 5  Steel pipe  32.4  3.92  1  0.5  0.35  0.3  0.4 ‐  ‐  0.51  Rollins et  Sand  38  Full‐Scale  3 × 3  Steel pipe  32.4  3.3  0.8  0.4  0.4 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.53  al. [25]  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  4  of  20  Christensen  Sand  38  Full‐Scale  3 × 3  Steel pipe  32.4  5.65  1  0.7  0.65 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.78  [36]  Table 2. Previous experimental studies conducted on fixed‐head pile groups (modified after Fayyazi [14]).  Proposed p‐Multipliers for Rows  Soil  φ  Test  Pile  Group Effect  Reference  Pile Type  D(cm)  S/D  1st  2nd  3rd  4th  5th  6th  7th  Type  (°)  Type  Layout  Parameter  Leading  Trailing  Trailing  Trailing  Trailing  Trailing  Trailing  Centrif Square  Sand  33  3 × 3  42.9  3  0.8  0.4  0.3  ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐  0.5  uge  Steel  Centrifu Square  Sand  33  3 × 4  42.9  3  0.8  0.4  0.3  0.3       0.45  ge  Steel  McVay et  Centrifu Square  Sand  33  3 × 5  42.9  3  0.8  0.4  0.3  0.2  0.3 ‐    0.4  al. [24]  ge  Steel  Centrifu Square  Sand  33  3 × 6  42.9  3  0.8  0.4  0.3  0.2  0.2  0.3   0.37  ge  Steel  Centrifu Square  Sand  33  3 × 7  42.9  3  0.8  0.4  0.3  0.2  0.2  0.2  0.3  0.34  ge  Steel  Table 3. Numerically derived p‐multipliers in previous studies.  p‐Multipliers for Rows  Reference  Soil Type Pile Head Condition S/D Pile Configuration  Group Effect Parameter  1st  2nd  3rd  4th  5th 6th 7th  3  2 × 2  0.81  0.5   ‐   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  0.655  6  2 × 2  0.83  0.69   ‐  ‐    ‐  ‐    ‐  0.76  Albusoda et al. [32]  Sand  Fixed  3  5 piles  0.71  0.6  0.51   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  0.655  6  5 piles  0.9  0.73  0.75   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  0.815  Abu‐Farsakh et al. [30]  Clay  Fixed  4.4  3 × 4  0.56  0.39  0.41  0.53  ‐ ‐ ‐  0.47  3  2 × 2  0.89  0.6   ‐   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  0.745  Stiff Clay  Fixed  7  2 × 2  1  1   ‐   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  1  Taghavi and Muraleetharan [37]  3  2 × 2  0.84  0.43   ‐   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  0.635  Soft clay  Fixed  7  2 × 2  1  1   ‐   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  1  3 × 3  ‐  0.54  4 × 4  ‐  0.43  3  5 × 5  ‐  0.39  6 × 6  ‐  0.35  3 × 3  ‐  0.66  4 × 4  ‐  0.56  4  5 × 5  ‐  0.53  6 × 6  ‐  0.49  Free  3 × 3  ‐  0.8  4 × 4  ‐  0.7  5  5 × 5  ‐  0.67  6 × 6  ‐  0.62  3 × 3  ‐  0.89  4 × 4  ‐  0.83  6  5 × 5  ‐  0.79  Sand  6 × 6  ‐  0.77  Fayyazi [14]  φ = 30°  3 × 3  ‐  0.47  4 × 4  ‐  0.39  3  5 × 5  ‐  0.31  6 × 6  ‐  0.29  3 × 3  ‐  0.52  4 × 4  ‐  0.44  4  5 × 5  ‐  0.41  Fixed  6 × 6  ‐  0.36  3 × 3  ‐  0.59  4 × 4  ‐  0.53  5  5 × 5  ‐  0.49  6 × 6  ‐  0.46  3 × 3  ‐  0.67  6  4 × 4  ‐  0.63  5 × 5  ‐  0.58  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  5  of  20  6 × 6 ‐  0.57    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  6  of  20  3. Finite Element (FE) Model  The 3D nonlinear FE model of the pile group is shown in Figure 1. The size of the  computational domain was determined after a sensitivity analysis such that the calculated  responses were not affected by the boundaries. The length and width of the numerical  model were set to 50D and 33D from the center of the foundation, where D is the pile  diameter. The pile configurations considered in this study are 3 × 3, 4 × 4, and 5 × 5 pile  groups. The size of the computational domain is 30, 20, and 15 m in length, width, and  height,  respectively.  The  convergence  analysis  for  the  finite  element  mesh  was  also  performed to determine optimum element sizes to obtain accurate results. The mesh was  generated in such a way that it was finer near the piles and coarser towards the boundaries  of the computational domain. The width of the smallest element was 0.15D. Eight‐node  brick elements (C3D8) were used to model both the piles and soil. The interface between  the piles and soil was modeled using a surface‐to‐surface contact model that allows for  both slipping and normal separation (gapping). The Coulomb model was used to simulate  the tangential slip, where the friction coefficient was set to tan(2/3𝜑 , as used in the study  of Park et al. [38].  Figure 1. Finite element (FE) model for the 5 × 5 pile group: (a) free‐head and (b) fixed‐head  condition.  The pile group was placed at the center of the computational domain. The length of  the piles was fixed to 12 m. Pile bottoms were tied to the soil elements. The bottom of the  computational model was fixed in the horizontal and vertical directions. The horizontal  displacement  constraints  were  applied  at  the  lateral  boundaries.  No  constraint  was  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  7  of  20  applied at the surface of the soil domain. To simulate the fixed pile head condition, pile  heads were tied with a pile cap. The pile cap was fixed in the vertical direction, whereas  lateral movement was allowed. The piles were modeled using the linear elastic model.  The properties of the hollow steel pipe pile are listed in Table 4. The piles were modeled  as solid rods with an outer diameter of 0.3 m. To achieve identical flexural rigidity as the  reference steel pipe pile, the modulus of elasticity of the solid piles was adjusted such that  it was equivalent to that of the steel pipe pile, as summarized in Table 4.  Table 4. Properties of steel pile.  Parameters  Value  Outer diameter (m)  0.3  Thickness (m)  0.0095  Moment of inertia (m )  0.000398  Modulus of elasticity of reference steel pipe pile, E (GPa)  200  Adjusted modulus of elasticity, E (GPa)  46  The nonlinear soil stress–strain behavior  is simulated  using the bounding surface  plasticity model  of Borja and Amies [39]. The model was selected  because it  has been  widely used in the simulation of the seismic response of soils. It is reported to have no  purely  elastic  region,  and  therefore  effective  in  modeling  even  the  small‐strain  nonlinearity of soil. The shear modulus reduction curve derived from the plasticity model  is as follows:  2τ -1 G 3 R √2+τ ‐τ (1) = 1‐ h +H   G 2γ τ max where    is the secant shear modulus normalized to maximum shear modulus; 𝛾   is  max the shear strain; 𝜏   is the shear stress; R is radius of the bounding surface; h and m, which  are the coefficient and exponent of the exponential hardening function, respectively; and  Ho  is  the  kinematic  hardening  parameter.  This  plasticity  model  was  implemented  in  ABAQUS using the UMAT subroutine code developed by Zhang et al. [40]. The numerical  models of single and 3 × 3 group piles were validated against the field test measurements  of Rollins et al. [25]. The details of the numerical model and validation results are reported  in Adeel et al. [41].   3.1. Procedure for Extraction of p‐Multipliers  The  p‐multipliers  were  calculated directly from  the 3D FE  model  by  dividing the  computed average soil resistance of a row within a pile group configuration and within a  prescribed depth by that of the single pile model at a selected displacement. The double  derivation of the bending moment with respect to depth was used  to calculate p. The  bending moment profile was first fitted with a seventh order polynomial function before  derivation. Figure 2 shows the averaged soil resistance with respect to depth for the single  pile and leading row of the 3 × 3 free‐head group pile. It was observed that the maximum  soil  resistance  occurs  within  a  normalized  depth  of  15  z/D.  Similar  observations  were  reported in Souri et al. [29]. Therefore, p within a depth of 15 z/D was averaged to calculate  the  p‐multiplier.  Static  loading  was  applied  at  the  pile  top  in  the  lateral  direction.  A  displacement controlled approach was used in the numerical simulation. It was reported  in Fayyazi [14] that the upper range of pile head displacement in the experimental tests  listed in Table 1 and Table 2 is 50 mm. Hence, to be consistent with the experimental  studies, the p‐multipliers and group effect parameters were extracted at a displacement of  50 mm.  𝑑𝜏 Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  8  of  20  Averaged soil resistance (kN/m) -20 0 20 40 60 Single Pile Leading row ( pile group) Figure 2. Average soil resistance for a single pile and leading row in a 3 × 3 free‐head pile group at  y = 50 mm.  3.2. Parametric Study  This section describes the parametric studies performed to derive the p‐multipliers  and group effect parameters of group piles in sand. A suite of nonlinear 3D analyses was  performed to investigate the effect of different pile configurations (3 × 3, 4 × 4, and 5 × 5),  pile head fixity (free and fixed), S/D (3, 4, 5, and 6), and friction angle (φ) of sand (30°, 35°,  and 40°). The depth of the soil profile was set to 15 m. The soil profile was assumed to be  composed of uniform soil with a constant φ, but the shear wave velocity (V   was varied  with depth to account for its dependence on confining pressure. It is first calculated by  determining  the  overburden  and  energy  corrected  SPT  blow  count  ( 𝑁 )  and  then  converting to  V . Values of  𝑁   were back‐calculated from φ using the correlation of  Hatanaka and Uchida [42] presented in Equation Error! Reference source not found.:  (2) 𝜙 20 𝑁 20  N1(60) blow count was converted to N60 using the equation of Liao and Whitman [43].  Finally, the  V profile was calculated using the empirical equation of Kwak et al. [44] for  sand. The calculated shear wave velocity used in the simulations is shown in Figure 3.  V   is shown to increase with depth. The unit weight of the soil was set to 18 kN/m . The water  table reduces the effective stress of soil and also the stiffness of the p‐y curve. However,  because the water table is most often below the 10D critical depth of influence, it was  assumed that the soil is dry.  Depth (z/D) Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  9  of  20  V (m/s) 50 100 150 200 250 300  = 30  = 35  = 40 Figure 3. Vs vs depth profiles used in the FE model.  4. Results and Discussions  4.1. Effect of φ, S/D, Pile Head Fixity and Number of Piles on p‐Multipliers  Friction angle φ is observed to have a primary influence on p‐multipliers. Figure 4  plots the variation of p‐multipliers for 5 × 5 free‐ and fixed‐head pile groups with φ and  S/D. The p‐multiplier is shown to decrease with an increase in φ. It was reported in Ashour  et al. [2] that increasing φ causes a wedge‐shaped influence zone in front of each pile to  increase,  which  in  turn  produces  larger  a  shear  zone  and  ultimately  higher  level  of  interaction between piles. Calculated p‐multipliers for free‐head pile groups range from a  minimum value of 0.36 for φ = 40° and S/D = 3 to a maximum value of 1.0 for φ = 30° and  S/D = 6. The p‐multipliers are positively correlated to S/D because the shadowing and edge  effects reduce with an increase in S/D.   Depth (m) Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  10  of  20  1.2 Leading row (a) 1st Trailing row 2nd Trailing row 1.0 3rd Trailing row  = 30 4th Trailing row  = 35 0.8  = 40 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 34 56 S/D 1.2 (b) 1.0 0.8  = 30  = 35  = 40 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 34 56 S/D Figure 4. Numerically calculated p‐multipliers for 5 × 5 (a) free‐head and (b) fixed‐head pile  groups.  The p‐multipliers are highly dependent on the pile head condition. The fixed‐head  pile groups yield lower p‐multipliers compared with those for the free‐head pile groups,  because a higher level of group interaction is produced. For φ = 30°, the p‐multipliers for  3 × 3 fixed‐head pile groups are 0.75, 0.42, and 0.3 for the leading, first, and second trailing  rows, respectively. On the contrary, for the free‐head pile group, the p‐multipliers increase  to  0.81,  0.55,  and  0.51  for  leading,  first,  and  second  trailing  rows,  respectively.  A  pronounced difference is found in the p‐multipliers of the leading and first trailing rows  for the fixed‐head condition, especially at S/D = 5 and 6, as compared with the free‐head  condition. For the widely used spacings of S/D = 3 and 4, the p‐multipliers converge at the  third row. For larger spacings, the p‐multipliers are shown to continuously decrease for  third and fourth trailing rows. However, for conservative design, it can be assumed to  converge after the second trailing row. The number of piles is shown to have negligible  influence on the calculated p‐multipliers. Therefore, the p‐multipliers for 3 × 3 can also be  applied to 4 × 4 and 5 × 5 pile groups.  p - multipliers p - multiplier Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  11  of  20  It is demonstrated in detail that the p‐multipliers are sensitive on φ, pile head fixity,  and S/D. In order to capture the effects of these parameters, the following functional form  is proposed to calculate p‐multipliers:  (3) 𝑝 multiplier 𝑎   where a and b are curve fitting coefficients, summarized in Table 5. These coefficients are  dependent on the fixity condition and φ. It should also be noted that only p‐multipliers  up to second trailing rows are presented because of marginal variation in the calculated  values for the following rows. Figure 5 and Figure 6 show the calculated p‐multipliers  plotted against S/D, along with the proposed functional form. The p‐multipliers obtained  using the equation developed matches well with the calculated results. Therefore, this  equation can be used to predict the p‐multipliers for both free‐ and fixed‐head pile groups  subjected to lateral load.  Proposed curve Simulated Leading row Leading row 1st Trailing row 1st Trailing row 2nd Trailing row 2nd Trailing row 1.2 1.2 (a) (b) 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.0 0.0 23 45 67 23 45 67 S/D S/D 1.2 (c) 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 23 45 67 S/D p-multiplier p-multiplier p-multiplier Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  12  of  20  Figure 5. Regression between calculated p‐multipliers vs. S/D for various rows for free‐head  condition: (a) φ = 30°, (b) φ = 35°, and (c) φ = 40°. Proposed curve Simulated Leading row Leading row 1st Trailing row 1st Trailing row 2nd Trailing row 2nd Trailing row 1.2 1.2 (b) (a) 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.0 0.0 23 45 67 2 3 45 67 S/D S/D 1.2 (c) 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 2 3 45 67 S/D Figure 6. Regression between calculated p‐multipliers vs. S/D for various rows for fixed‐head  condition: (a) φ = 30°, (b) φ = 35°, and (c) φ = 40°. Table 5. Regression coefficients for free‐ and fixed‐head pile group.    Free‐Head Condition  Rows   φ = 30°  φ = 35°  φ = 40°    a  b  a  b  a  b  Leading row   0.55  0.34  0.57  0.27  0.58  0.23  1st Trailing row   0.22  0.80  0.17  0.89  0.14  0.99  2nd Trailing row   0.25  0.62  0.19  0.77  0.16  0.80    Fixed‐Head Condition  Rows   φ = 30°  φ = 35°  φ = 40°    a  b  a  b  a  b  Leading row   0.54  0.31  0.47  0.36  0.43  0.34  1st Trailing row   0.23  0.54  0.18  0.62  0.16  0.60  p- multiplier p- multiplier p- multiplier Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  13  of  20  2nd Trailing row   0.20  0.44  0.16  0.51  0.16  0.43    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  14  of  20  4.2. Comparsion of p‐Multipliers and Group Effect Parameters with Experimental Studies  In  this  section,  the  calculated  p‐multipliers  and  group  effect  parameters  from  the  numerical  simulations  are  compared  with  those  derived  from  previous  experimental  studies. Figure 7 compares the results of the p‐multipliers calculated for 3 × 3 free‐head  pile groups with experimentally extracted values [17,19,25,36,37]. Brown et al. [17] and  Morrison and Reese [35] used a S/D ratio of 3, whereas McVay et al. [19] performed tests  on  piles  with  S/D  ratios  =  3  and  5.  Rollins  et  al.  [25]  and  Christensen  [36]  performed  experimental tests on piles with S/D ratios = 3.3 and 5.65. Full‐scale lateral load tests were  conducted by [17,25,36,37] in granular soil with φ = 38°. The friction angle φ of soil were  reported as 30° and 33° for the tests performed by McVay et al. [19]. The experimentally  derived and numerically calculated p‐multipliers are shown to be comparable. Figure 8  shows the p‐multipliers calculated for 4 × 4 free‐head pile group performed by Ruesta and  Townsend [22] along with those derived from the numerical simulations. φ = 32° and S/D  = 3 were adopted in their study. The p‐multipliers for the leading row calculated in this  study are in line with that measured from field tests. The calculated multiplier is slightly  lower for the first trailing row, and higher for second and third trailing rows. Overall, the  calculated and recorded values are again comparable.  1. 1.4 4 Brown et al.[17] This Study S/D = 3 McVay et al. [19] 1. 1.2 2 This Study S/D = 4 Rollins et al. [25] 1. 1.0 0 Morrison and Reese[35] S/D = 3 0. 0.8 8  = 38.5 S/D = 3.3  = 38 0. 0.6 6 S/D = 3 0. 0.4 4  = 33 0. 0.2 2 (a (a) ) 0. 0.0 0 Leading 1st 2nd row trailing trailing row row 1.4 1.4 This study S/D = 5 McVay et al. [19] This study S/D = 6 Christensen [36] 1.2 1.2 1.0 1.0 S/D = 5 0.8 0.8  = 30 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 S/D = 5.65 0.2 0.2  = 38 (b) 0.0 0.0 Leading 1st 2nd row trailing trailing row row    Figure 7. Comparison between calculated p‐multipliers and previous experimental work for free‐ head pile groups in sand with 3 × 3 pile configuration: (a) S/D = 3, 3.3 and (b) S/D = 5, 5.65.  p-multipliers p-multipliers Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  15  of  20  1.4 Ruesta and Townsend [22] 1.2 This Study S/D = 3  = 30 This Study S/D = 3  = 35 1.0 This Study S/D = 3  = 40 0.8 S/D = 3 0.6  = 32 0.4 0.2 0.0 Leading 1st 2nd 3rd row Trailing Trailing Trailing row row row Figure 8. Comparison of p‐multipliers for the free‐head pile groups in sands calculated in this study with those measured  from field tests with 4 × 4 pile configuration performed by Ruesta and Townsend [22].  Figure  9  compares  the  calculated  and  measured  p‐multipliers  for  fixed‐head  pile  groups. McVay et al. [24] conducted tests on fixed‐head pile groups, which were 3 × 3, 3 ×  4, and 3 × 5. S/D was fixed to 3 and φ = 33° was used. For comparison, the results for 3 ×  3, 4 × 4, and 5 × 5 pile groups are displayed for S/D = 3 and φ = 35°. The calculated and  measured p‐multipliers are shown to match favorably. The extensive comparisons reveal  that the simulated p‐multipliers are in line with those measured, further ensuring that the  numerically derived values are reliable.   p-multipliers Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  16  of  20  1.2 1.2 McVay et al.[24] 1.0 1.0 S/D = 3 This Study S/D = 3  = 33  0.8 0.8 S/D = 3  = 33 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 (b) (a) 0.0 0.0 1st 2nd Leading Leading 1st 2nd 3rd trailing trailing row row trailing trailing trailing row row row row row 1.2 S/D = 3 1.0  = 33 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 (c) 0.0 1st 2nd Leading 3rd 4th trailing row trailing trailing trailing row row row row    Figure 9. Comparison of fixed‐head pile groups in sands calculated in this study and measured from centrifuge tests with  (a) 3 × 3, (b) 3 × 4, and (c) 3 × 5 pile configurations performed by McVay et al. [24].  4.3. Comparsion of Group Effect Parameter with Design Codes  In this section, the groups effect parameters averaged from numerically generated p‐ multipliers are compared and quantified with those provided in the design codes, which  are American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials AASHTO [33]  and Federal Emergency Management Agency FEMA [34].  Table 6 lists the recommended p‐multipliers provided in AASHTO [33]. This design  report presents p‐multipliers obtained from free‐head pile group tests. It should be noted  that the effects of soil shear strength and pile head condition are not accounted for in the  AASHTO recommendations [34]. The p‐multipliers are provided for S/D = 3 and 5. No  recommendation is provided for S/D greater than 5. The effect parameter for AASHTO  [33] is calculated by averaging the p‐multipliers for all rows of pile group and for S/D = 4;  the  group  effect  parameters  are  interpolated  between  S/D  =  3  and  5.  The  equations  suggested by Rollins et al. [45] for estimation of the p‐multipliers were recommended in  FEMA [34]. These equations were proposed on the basis of three full‐scale tests, where 3  × 3, 3 × 4, and 3 × 5 pile groups with S/D = 5.65, 4.4, and 3.3 were used. Soil type was stiff  clay and free‐head condition of pile groups were considered in all of the tests performed.  The effect of soil type was not accounted for in FEMA [34].   p-multipliers p-multipliers Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  17  of  20  Table 6. The p‐multipliers suggested in AASHTO [33].  p‐Multiplier    Pile Spacing  2nd Trailing Row  Group Effect  Leading Row  1st Trailing Row  and Higher  Parameter  3D  0.8  0.4  0.3  0.5  5D  1  0.85  0.7  0.85  Figure  10  compares  group  effect  parameters  calculated  numerically  with  those  recommended in AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34] for both free‐ and fixed‐head conditions.  For S/D = 3 and 4, the group effect parameters of AASHTO [33] are lower than those of  FEMA [34], whereas for S/D = 5 the trend is reversed. The calculated parameters for the  free‐head pile groups match well with those presented in AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34].  The results for φ = 30° produce the upper limit of the parameters for all S/D compared  with those presented in AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34]. For S/D = 3, AASHTO [33] and  FEMA  [34]  parameters  are  similar  to  the  calculated  values  for φ  =  40°  and φ  =  35°,  respectively.  At  higher  S/Ds,  φ  =  35°  results  are  similar  to  the  mean  values  of  the  parameters presented in AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34]. Both AASHTO [33] and FEMA  [34] highly overestimate the parameters for fixed‐head condition, and therefore should be  used with caution.   Free-head Fixed-head This study  This study  This study  This study  This study  This study  1.2 AASHTO (2012) 1.0 FEMA P-1051 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 23 45 67 S/D Group effect parameter Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  18  of  20  Figure 10. Comparison among calculated group effect parameters for 3 × 3 free‐head and fixed‐head pile groups in this  study, AASHTO [33], and FEMA [34].  5. Conclusions  This study focuses on developing the p‐multipliers and group effect parameters for  squared  vertical  pile  groups  in  granular  soil  using  a  3D  nonlinear  FE  model.  The  p‐ multipliers  are  derived  directly  from  numerical  simulation  by  calculating  the  ratio  of  averaged soil resistances within a prescribed depth of group and single piles. The effect  of S/D, number of group piles, φ, and pile fixity conditions are examined and quantified.  Based  on  the  simulation  results,  an  empirical  functional  form  for  the  p‐multipliers  is  proposed for pile groups.  The  proposed  p‐multipliers  generated  from  the  numerical  simulations  exhibit  the  following trends. The p‐multipliers decrease with an increase in φ and decrease in S/D.  The  number  of  piles  is  shown  to  have  marginal  influence  on  the  values  of  the  p‐ multipliers.  The  p‐multipliers  are  shown  to  be  highly  influenced  by  the  pile  fixity  conditions. The results demonstrate that the p‐multipliers are lower for fixed‐head pile  groups because of higher group interactions compared with the free‐head pile groups.  Based on the numerical outputs, an empirical functional form conditioned on S/D, φ, and  fixity condition is proposed to estimate the p‐multipliers.  The numerically calculated p‐multipliers and group effect parameters are compared  with the previous experimental studies. The p‐multipliers calculated in this study are in  line with that measured from field tests. Further comparison of group effect parameters  with the group effect parameters presented in AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34] depicts that  the calculated values for φ = 30° yield the upper limit values for free‐head condition. The  parameters of AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34] do not account for the fixity condition, and  therefore produce significantly higher parameters for fixed‐head condition.   Author Contributions: Conceptualization and methodology, D.P.; formal analysis, resources, and  writing—original draft preparation, M.B.A.; numerical simulations, M.B.A., M.A.J., and M.A.;  review and editing, D.P. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the  manuscript.  Funding: This research was supported by a grant (20SCIP‐B146946‐03) from Smart Civil  Infrastructure Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of  Korean government, Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP), and  the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE) of the Republic of Korea  (No.20183010025580).  Acknowledgments: The authors would like to thank Wenyang Zhang and Ertugrul Taciroglu for  providing the user material subroutine (UMAT) of the nonlinear soil model used in the analyses,  along with a MATLAB code to calibrate its input parameters.   Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Poulos, H.G.; Davis, E.H. Pile Foundation Analysis and Design; John Wiley and Sons: New York, NY, USA, 1980.  2. Ashour, M.; Norris, G.; Pilling, P. Lateral loading of a pile in layered soil using the strain wedge model. J. Geotech. Geoenviron.  1998, 124, 303–315.  3. Brown, D.A.; Shie, C.‐F. Three dimensional finite element model of laterally loaded piles. Comput. Geotech. 1990, 10, 59–79.  4. Muqtadir, A.; Desai, C.S. Three‐dimensional analysis of a pile‐group foundation. IJNAMG 1986, 10, 41–58.  5. Trochanis, A.M.; Bielak, J.; Christiano, P. Three‐dimensional nonlinear study of piles. Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1991, 117, 429– 447.  6. Yang, Z.; Jeremić, B. Numerical analysis of pile behaviour under lateral loads in layered elastic‐plastic soils. IJNAMG 2002, 26,  1385–1406.  7. Kwon,  S.Y.;  Yoo,  M.  Study  on  the  dynamic  soil‐pile‐structure  interactive  behavior  in  liquefiable  sand  by  3D  numerical  simulation. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 2723.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  19  of  20  8. Kwon, S.Y.; Yoo, M. Evaluation of dynamic soil‐pile‐structure interactive behavior in dry sand by 3D numerical simulation.  Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 2612.  9. Reese, L.C.; Cox, W.R.; Koop, F.D. Analysis of laterally loaded piles in sand. In Offshore Technology in Civil Engineering: Hall of  Fame Papers from the Early Years; ASCE Publications: Reston, VA, USA, 1974; pp. 95–105.  10. American Petroleum Institute (API). Recommended Practice for Planning, Designing, and Constructing Fixed Offshore Platforms. API  Recommended Practice 2A‐WSD, 21st ed.; American Petroleum Institute: Washington, DC, USA, 2007; Volume 2.  11. Murchison, J.M.; O’Neill, M.W. Evaluation of py relationships in cohesionless soils. In Analysis and Design of Pile Foundations;  American Society of Civil Engineers: New York, NY, USA, 1984; pp. 174–191.  12. Zhang, L.; Silva, F.; Grismala, R. Ultimate lateral resistance to piles in cohesionless soils. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 2005, 131, 78–83.  13. McGann,  C.R.;  Arduino,  P.;  Mackenzie‐Helnwein,  P.  Applicability  of  conventional  py  relations  to  the  analysis  of  piles  in  laterally spreading soil. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 2010, 137, 557–567.  14. Fayyazi, M.S. Numerical Study on the Response of Pile Groups Under Lateral Loading. Ph.D. Thesis, University of British  Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, August, 2015.  15. Rahmani, A.; Taiebat, M.; Finn, W.L.; Ventura, C.E. Evaluation of py springs for nonlinear static and seismic soil‐pile interaction  analysis under lateral loading. Soil Dyn. Earthq. Eng. 2018, 115, 438–447.  16. Larkela, A. Modeling of a Pile Group Under Static Lateral Loading. Master’s Thesis, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo,  Finland, 2008.  17. Brown, D.A.; Morrison, C.; Reese, L.C. Lateral load behavior of pile group in sand. Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1988, 114, 1261–1276.  18. Chandrasekaran, S.; Boominathan, A.; Dodagoudar, G. Group interaction effects on laterally loaded piles in clay. J. Geotech.  Geoenviron. 2009, 136, 573–582.  19. McVay, M.; Casper, R.; Shang, T.‐I. Lateral response of three‐row groups in loose to dense sands at 3D and 5D pile spacing.  Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1995, 121, 436–441.  20. Rollins, K.M.; Peterson, K.T.; Weaver, T.J. Lateral load behavior of full‐scale pile group in clay. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 1998, 124,  468–478.  21. Rollins, K.; Olsen, R.; Egbert, J.; Olsen, K.; Jensen, D.; Garrett, B. Response, Analysis, and Design of Pile Groups Subjected to Static &  Dynamic Lateral Loads; Utah. Dept. of Transportation. Research Division: Salt Lake City, UT, USA, 2003.  22. Ruesta, P.F.; Townsend, F.C. Evaluation of laterally loaded pile group at Roosevelt Bridge. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 1997, 123,  1153–1161.  23. Brown, D.A.; Reese, L.C.; O’Neill, M.W. Cyclic lateral loading of a large‐scale pile group. Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1987, 113,  1326–1343.  24. McVay, M.; Zhang, L.; Molnit, T.; Lai, P. Centrifuge testing of large laterally loaded pile groups in sands. J. Geotech. Geoenviron.  1998, 124, 1016–1026.  25. Rollins, K.M.; Lane, J.D.; Gerber, T.M. Measured and computed lateral response of a pile group in sand. J. Geotech. Geoenviron.  2005, 131, 103–114.  26. Rollins, K.M.; Olsen, R.J.; Egbert, J.J.; Jensen, D.H.; Olsen, K.G.; Garrett, B.H. Pile spacing effects on lateral pile group behavior:  Load tests. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 2006, 132, 1262–1271.  27. Walsh, J.M. Full‐scale lateral load test of a 3x5 pile group in sand. Master’s Thesis, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA,  2005.  28. Brown, D.A.; O’Neill, M.; Hoit, M.; McVay, M.; el Naggar, M.; Chakraborty, S. Static and Dynamic Lateral Loading of Pile Groups;  TRB: Washington, DC, USA, 2001.  29. Souri, A.; Abu‐Farsakh, M.Y.; Voyiadjis, G.Z. Evaluating the effect of pile spacing and configuration on the lateral resistance of  pile groups. Mar. Georesouces Geotechnol. 2020, 1–13, doi:10.1080/1064119X.2019.1680780.  30. Abu‐Farsakh, M.; Souri, A.; Voyiadjis, G.; Rosti, F. Comparison of static lateral behavior of three pile group configurations using  three‐dimensional finite element modeling. Can. Geotech. J. 2018, 55, 107–118.  31. Yang, Z.; Jeremić, B. Numerical study of group effects for pile groups in sands. IJNAMG 2003, 27, 1255–1276.  32. Albusoda, B.S.; Al‐Saadi, A.F.; Jasim, A.F. An experimental study and numerical modeling of laterally loaded regular and finned  pile foundations in sandy soils. Comput. Geotech. 2018, 102, 102–110.  33. AASHTO.  AASHTO  LRFD  Bridge  Design  Specifications;  American  Association  of  State  Highway  and  Transportation  Officials(AASHTO): Washington, DC, USA, 2012.  34. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Foundation and liquefaction design, FEMA P‐1051. In NEHRP Recommended  Seismic Provisions: Design Examples. Federal Emergency Management Agency; National Institute of Building Sciences: Washington,  DC, USA; Building Seismic Safety Council: Washington, DC, USA, 2015.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  20  of  20  35. Morrison, C.S.; Reese, L.C. A Lateral‐Load Test of a Full‐Scale Pile Group in Sand; The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX,  USA, 1988.  36. Christensen, D.S. Full Scale Static Lateral Load Test of a 9 Pile Group in Sand. Master’s Thesis, Brigham Young University,  Provo, UT, USA, 2006.  37. Taghavi,  A.;  Muraleetharan,  K.K.  Analysis  of  laterally  loaded  pile  groups  in  improved  soft  clay.  Int.  J.  Geomech  2016,  17,  04016098.  38. Park, J.‐S.; Park, D.; Yoo, J.‐K. Vertical bearing capacity of bucket foundations in sand. Ocean Eng. 2016, 121, 453–461.  39. Borja, R.I.; Amies, A.P. Multiaxial cyclic plasticity model for clays. Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1994, 120, 1051–1070.  40. Zhang,  W.;  Esmaeilzadeh  Seylabi,  E.;  Taciroglu,  E.  Validation  of  a  three‐dimensional  constitutive  model  for  nonlinear  site  response and soil‐structure interaction analyses using centrifuge test data. IJNAMG 2017, 41, 1828–1847.  41. Adeel, M.B.; Aaqib, M.; Park, D. Simulation of pile foundations in granular soil subjected to lateral loading using beam‐on‐ nonlinear‐winkler‐foundation and nonlinear finite element models. Ocean Eng. (in press)  42. Hatanaka, M.; Uchida, A. Empirical correlation between penetration resistance and internal friction angle of sandy soils. Soils  Found. 1996, 36, 1–9.  43. Liao, S.S.; Whitman, R.V. Overburden correction factors for SPT in sand. Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1986, 112, 373–377.  44. Kwak, D.Y.; Brandenberg, S.J.; Mikami, A.; Stewart, J.P. Prediction equations for estimating shear‐wave velocity from combined  geotechnical and geomorphic indexes based on Japanese data set. Seismol. Soc. 2015, 105, 1919–1930.  45. Rollins, K.M.; Olsen, K.G.; Jensen, D.H.; Garrett, B.H.; Olsen, R.J.; Egbert, J.J. Pile spacing effects on lateral pile group behavior:  Analysis. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 2006, 132, 1272–1283.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Sciences Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Development of Simulation Based p-Multipliers for Laterally Loaded Pile Groups in Granular Soil Using 3D Nonlinear Finite Element Model

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/development-of-simulation-based-p-multipliers-for-laterally-loaded-89pIMI8Z89
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2020 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2076-3417
DOI
10.3390/app11010026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Development of Simulation Based p‐Multipliers for Laterally  Loaded Pile Groups in Granular Soil Using 3D Nonlinear  Finite Element Model  Muhammad Bilal Adeel, Muhammad Asad Jan, Muhammad Aaqib and Duhee Park *  Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Korea;  bilaladeel2@hanyang.ac.kr (M.B.A.); asadjan@hanyang.ac.kr (M.A.J.); aqi443@hanyang.ac.kr (M.A.)  *  Correspondence: dpark@hanyang.ac.kr; Tel.: +82‐2220‐0322  Abstract: The behavior of laterally loaded pile groups is usually accessed by beam‐on‐nonlinear‐ Winkler‐foundation (BNWF) approach employing various forms of empirically derived p‐y curves  and p‐multipliers. Averaged p‐multiplier for a particular pile group is termed as the group effect  parameter. In practice, the p‐y curve presented by the American Petroleum Institute (API) is most  often utilized for piles in granular soils, although its shortcomings are recognized. In this study, we  performed 3D finite element analysis to develop p‐multipliers and group effect parameters for 3 × 3  to 5 × 5 vertically squared pile groups. The effect of the ratio of spacing to pile diameter (S/D),  number of group piles, varying friction angle (φ), and pile fixity conditions on p‐multipliers and  group effect parameters are evaluated and quantified. Based on the simulation outcomes, a new  functional form to calculate p‐multipliers is proposed for pile groups. Extensive comparisons with  the experimental measurements reveal that the calculated p‐multipliers and group effect parameters  are within the recorded range. Comparisons with two design guidelines which do not account for  Citation: Muhammad, B.A.;  the  pile  fixity  condition  demonstrate  that  they  overestimate  the  p‐multipliers  for  fixed‐head  Muhammad, A.J.; Muhammad A.;  condition.  Duhee, P. Development of  Simulation Based p‐Multipliers for  Keywords: pile groups; finite element; BNWF; p‐multipliers; group effect parameter  Laterally Loaded Pile Groups in  Granular Soil Using 3D Nonlinear  Finite Element Model. Appl. Sci.  2021, 11, 26.  1. Introduction  https://doi.org/10.3390/app11010026  Pile foundations are commonly used to withstand both vertical and lateral loads. The   lateral response of a pile–soil system is an important design consideration for pile  Received: 23 November 2020  Accepted: 18 December 2020  foundations.  Well‐known  methods  for  prediction  of  lateral  response  of  a  single  pile  Published: 22 December 2020  includes  the  elastic  solution  proposed  by  Poulos  and  Davis  [1],  strain  wedge  method  proposed  by  Ashour  et  al.  [2],  beam‐on‐nonlinear‐Winkler‐foundation  (BNWF)  model  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays  framework, and continuum analysis [3–8].  neutral with regard to  The  most  common  method  to  analyze  the  lateral  response  of  piles  is  the  BNWF  jurisdictional claims in published  approach. In this approach, the interaction of the pile–soil system is represented by the p‐ maps and institutional affiliations.  y  curve,  where  p  is  the  soil  resistance  and  y  and  is  the  lateral  displacement.  Various  functional forms of p‐y curves are used for the piles embedded in sands such as Reese et  al.  [9]  and  API  [10].  American  Petroleum  Institute  API  [10]  provides  some  simple  guidelines to develop nonlinear p‐y curves that are most often used in practice. However,  Copyright: © 2020 by the authors. a number of researchers [11–15] reported that the use of these generic curves may produce  Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. a high level of error in the prediction of lateral response of pile foundations. Despite their  This article is an open access article documented shortcomings, practitioners most often use the API curves owing to their ease  distributed under the terms and of use.  conditions of the Creative Commons The BNWF model is also widely used to analyze the pile group response subjected  Attribution (CC BY) license to  lateral  loading.  When  piles  act  in  a  group,  the  soil  resistance  decreases  due  to  (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ ”shadowing  effect”  and  ”edge  effect”,  as  reported  by  Larkela  [16].  This  reduction  in  by/4.0/). Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11010026  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  2  of  20  resistance is accounted in the BNWF model by introducing a reduction factor, termed the  p‐multiplier, first proposed by Brown et al. [17]. To account for the shadowing effect, a  higher value of p‐multiplier is typically applied to the leading row relative to the trailing  rows. Various studies recommended that p‐multipliers for squared vertical groups are a  function of center‐to‐center spacing and soil type [17–22]. Extensive studies have been  performed to derive the p‐multipliers from field and model tests [17,19,20,22–27]. Brown  et al. [28] also reported that it is quite acceptable to use an average p‐multiplier for all the  piles  in  the  group,  rather  than  applying  p‐multipliers  for  each  row.  This  averaged  p‐ multiplier  is  referred  to  as  the  group  effect  parameter.  The  group  effect  parameter  is  widely used in a dynamic analysis, where the direction of the loading changes, converting  “leading“ rows of pile immediately into ”trailing rows” [28].  The  p‐multiplier  is  most  often  determined  from  an  iterative  process  involving  comparisons  of  the  BNWF  model  result  with  a  reference  field  load  test  output.  After  selection of the p‐y curves, BNWF analyses are performed with a range of p‐multipliers.  The  p‐multiplier  that  produces  the  most  favorable  fit  with  the  reference  set  of  data  is  selected. Because experimental data are required, there is a limitation on the cases that can  be considered. Full‐scale tests have been mostly performed using 3 × 3 free‐head group  pile with spacing to diameter ratio (S/D) of 3. The effect of number of piles, S/D, and soil  shear strength cannot be evaluated. Additionally, it was reported that the p‐multiplier is  sensitive to the p‐y curves [28]. Considering that the design p‐y curves do not provide  realistic  representation  of  the  pile–soil  interaction,  the  p‐multiplier  derived  from  this  procedure may not be reliable. Additionally, because only the load–displacement outputs  are  compared,  the  BNWF  model  may  not  provide  an  agreeable  fit  with  the  bending  moment profile.   The  p‐multiplier  can  also  be  directly  calculated  from  the  ratio  of  p  calculated  for  group  and  single  piles  [17,22,29,30].  For  this  direct  extraction,  full  3D  numerical  simulations need to be performed. Because the ratio changes with the depth, an averaged  value calculated up to the depth of influence should be extracted. Numerous studies have  been  performed to investigate the response of group  piles subjected to lateral loading  based on 3D numerical analyses. Brown and Shie [3] performed numerical simulation of  one row of piles subjected to lateral loading. It was observed that group effects are most  significantly influenced by the row position and center‐to‐center pile spacing. Yang and  Jeremić [31] performed numerical simulations of 3 × 3 to 4 × 3 pile groups. However, the  influence of S/D on p‐multiplier was not reported. Abu‐Farsakh et al. [30] proposed site  specific p‐multipliers for vertical and battered 3 × 4 pile groups with S/D = 4.3 and 2.5  using the commercial finite element analysis code ABAQUS. The site consisted mainly of  a clay deposit. The influence of number of piles, S/D, and soil type on p‐multipliers was  not accounted. Albusoda et al. [32] performed experimental and numerical modeling of  laterally  loaded  regular  and  finned  pile  foundation  in  sand.  Site  specific  p‐multipliers  were calculated for the pile groups that consist of a maximum of five piles. To model the  sand behavior, the Mohr–Coulomb model was used. The effect of number of piles and soil  condition on p‐multipliers was not evaluated. Fayyazi [14] used the procedure of Rollins  et al. [25] to extract the p‐multipliers and develop group factors for piles in sand profiles  by performing a comprehensive parametric study. However, instead of using the group  pile load test measurements, 3D finite difference analyses were performed. Because the  3D model and BNWF model outputs showed poor fits, p‐multipliers could not be directly  derived. Therefore, the shear modulus of the soil layers for the 3D model was manually  adjusted. Additionally, use of the API curves, which have been reported to provide an  unrealistic  estimate  of  the  soil  resistance,  is  likely  to  have  influenced  the  derived  p‐ multipliers. These adjustments are not needed if the p‐multipliers are directly extracted  from a 3D continuum analysis, or more realistic p‐y curves should be used in the BNWF  model. Literature review reveals that uncertainties remain in estimation of p‐multipliers  for pile foundations in granular soils.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  3  of  20  In this study, p‐multipliers and group effect parameters for piles in granular soils are  developed from a parametric study utilizing 3D nonlinear finite element (FE) analyses.  The p‐multipliers are calculated directly from the numerical analyses. The effect of S/D,  number  of  group  piles,  friction  angle φ,  and  pile  fixity  conditions  are  evaluated  and  quantified. Based on the simulation outcomes, a new functional form for p‐multipliers of  pile groups is proposed. The proposed equation is compared with available measured  values.  Comparisons  are  also  made  with  multipliers  presented  in  AASHTO  [33]  and  FEMA [34] design codes.  2. Summary of p‐Multipliers and Group Effect Parameters   In this section, a comprehensive summary of the experiment and simulation‐based  p‐multipliers and group factors of group piles in sands are presented. The experiment‐ based results are a combination of both field and centrifuge model tests. Table 1 shows  the calculated p‐multipliers from experimental tests for free‐head pile groups. The tests  were conducted on steel pipe piles except for the tests of Ruesta and Townsend [22], where  concrete piles were used. In all of these tests, the range of S/D was from 3 to 5.65, whereas  φ varied from 32° to 40°. The tests were performed using 3 × 3 piles groups, whereas the  tests of Ruesta and Townsend [22],Walsh [27], and McVay et al. [24] were performed on 4  × 4, 3 × 5, and 3 × 7 pile groups, respectively. The proposed p‐multipliers range from 0.65  to  1.0 for  the leading  row,  whereas the  multipliers range from  0.4  to 0.85  for  the  first  trailing row. Table 2 summarizes the p‐multipliers for the fixed‐head pile groups. The p‐ multipliers measured for the leading and first trailing rows were 0.8 and 0.4, respectively.  It is demonstrated that the multipliers are smaller for the fixed‐head piles. Table 3 lists the  p‐multipliers calculated from numerical analyses. Whereas S/D was mostly fixed to 3 in  experimental  tests,  they  were  varied  from  3  to  6  in  the  numerical  simulations.  The  dependences on S/D and pile fixity condition can be observed, which were not evaluated  in the field and centrifuge tests.  Table 1. Previous experimental studies conducted on free‐head pile groups (modified after Fayyazi [14]).  Proposed p‐Multipliers for Rows  Group  Soil  Test  Pile  D  Effect  Reference  φ (°)  Pile Type  S/D  Type  Type  Layout  (cm)  1st   2nd  3rd   4th  5th   6th  7th Paramete r  Brown et  Full‐ Steel  Sand  38.5  3 × 3  27.3  3  0.8  0.4  0.3 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.5  al. [17]  Scale  Pipe  Morrison  and Reese  Sand  38.5  Full‐Scale  3 × 3  Steel Pipe  27.3  3  0.8  0.4  0.3 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.5  [35]  Centrifug Sand  30  3 × 3  Steel Pipe  43  5  1  0.85  0.7 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.85  e  Centrifug Sand  33  3 × 3  Steel Pipe  43  5  1  0.85  0.7 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.85  McVay et  e  al. [19]  Centrifug Sand  30  3 × 3  Steel Pipe  43  3  0.65  0.45  0.35 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.48  e  Centrifug Sand  33  3 × 3  Steel Pipe  43  3  0.8  0.4  0.3 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.5  e  Ruesta and  Square  Townsend  Sand  32  Full‐Scale  4 × 4  76  3  0.8  0.7  0.3  0.3 ‐  ‐  ‐  0.52  Concrete  [22]  Walsh [27]  Sand  40  Full‐Scale  3 × 5  Steel pipe  32.4  3.92  1  0.5  0.35  0.3  0.4 ‐  ‐  0.51  Rollins et  Sand  38  Full‐Scale  3 × 3  Steel pipe  32.4  3.3  0.8  0.4  0.4 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.53  al. [25]  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  4  of  20  Christensen  Sand  38  Full‐Scale  3 × 3  Steel pipe  32.4  5.65  1  0.7  0.65 ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  0.78  [36]  Table 2. Previous experimental studies conducted on fixed‐head pile groups (modified after Fayyazi [14]).  Proposed p‐Multipliers for Rows  Soil  φ  Test  Pile  Group Effect  Reference  Pile Type  D(cm)  S/D  1st  2nd  3rd  4th  5th  6th  7th  Type  (°)  Type  Layout  Parameter  Leading  Trailing  Trailing  Trailing  Trailing  Trailing  Trailing  Centrif Square  Sand  33  3 × 3  42.9  3  0.8  0.4  0.3  ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐  0.5  uge  Steel  Centrifu Square  Sand  33  3 × 4  42.9  3  0.8  0.4  0.3  0.3       0.45  ge  Steel  McVay et  Centrifu Square  Sand  33  3 × 5  42.9  3  0.8  0.4  0.3  0.2  0.3 ‐    0.4  al. [24]  ge  Steel  Centrifu Square  Sand  33  3 × 6  42.9  3  0.8  0.4  0.3  0.2  0.2  0.3   0.37  ge  Steel  Centrifu Square  Sand  33  3 × 7  42.9  3  0.8  0.4  0.3  0.2  0.2  0.2  0.3  0.34  ge  Steel  Table 3. Numerically derived p‐multipliers in previous studies.  p‐Multipliers for Rows  Reference  Soil Type Pile Head Condition S/D Pile Configuration  Group Effect Parameter  1st  2nd  3rd  4th  5th 6th 7th  3  2 × 2  0.81  0.5   ‐   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  0.655  6  2 × 2  0.83  0.69   ‐  ‐    ‐  ‐    ‐  0.76  Albusoda et al. [32]  Sand  Fixed  3  5 piles  0.71  0.6  0.51   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  0.655  6  5 piles  0.9  0.73  0.75   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  0.815  Abu‐Farsakh et al. [30]  Clay  Fixed  4.4  3 × 4  0.56  0.39  0.41  0.53  ‐ ‐ ‐  0.47  3  2 × 2  0.89  0.6   ‐   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  0.745  Stiff Clay  Fixed  7  2 × 2  1  1   ‐   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  1  Taghavi and Muraleetharan [37]  3  2 × 2  0.84  0.43   ‐   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  0.635  Soft clay  Fixed  7  2 × 2  1  1   ‐   ‐   ‐  ‐    ‐  1  3 × 3  ‐  0.54  4 × 4  ‐  0.43  3  5 × 5  ‐  0.39  6 × 6  ‐  0.35  3 × 3  ‐  0.66  4 × 4  ‐  0.56  4  5 × 5  ‐  0.53  6 × 6  ‐  0.49  Free  3 × 3  ‐  0.8  4 × 4  ‐  0.7  5  5 × 5  ‐  0.67  6 × 6  ‐  0.62  3 × 3  ‐  0.89  4 × 4  ‐  0.83  6  5 × 5  ‐  0.79  Sand  6 × 6  ‐  0.77  Fayyazi [14]  φ = 30°  3 × 3  ‐  0.47  4 × 4  ‐  0.39  3  5 × 5  ‐  0.31  6 × 6  ‐  0.29  3 × 3  ‐  0.52  4 × 4  ‐  0.44  4  5 × 5  ‐  0.41  Fixed  6 × 6  ‐  0.36  3 × 3  ‐  0.59  4 × 4  ‐  0.53  5  5 × 5  ‐  0.49  6 × 6  ‐  0.46  3 × 3  ‐  0.67  6  4 × 4  ‐  0.63  5 × 5  ‐  0.58  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  5  of  20  6 × 6 ‐  0.57    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  6  of  20  3. Finite Element (FE) Model  The 3D nonlinear FE model of the pile group is shown in Figure 1. The size of the  computational domain was determined after a sensitivity analysis such that the calculated  responses were not affected by the boundaries. The length and width of the numerical  model were set to 50D and 33D from the center of the foundation, where D is the pile  diameter. The pile configurations considered in this study are 3 × 3, 4 × 4, and 5 × 5 pile  groups. The size of the computational domain is 30, 20, and 15 m in length, width, and  height,  respectively.  The  convergence  analysis  for  the  finite  element  mesh  was  also  performed to determine optimum element sizes to obtain accurate results. The mesh was  generated in such a way that it was finer near the piles and coarser towards the boundaries  of the computational domain. The width of the smallest element was 0.15D. Eight‐node  brick elements (C3D8) were used to model both the piles and soil. The interface between  the piles and soil was modeled using a surface‐to‐surface contact model that allows for  both slipping and normal separation (gapping). The Coulomb model was used to simulate  the tangential slip, where the friction coefficient was set to tan(2/3𝜑 , as used in the study  of Park et al. [38].  Figure 1. Finite element (FE) model for the 5 × 5 pile group: (a) free‐head and (b) fixed‐head  condition.  The pile group was placed at the center of the computational domain. The length of  the piles was fixed to 12 m. Pile bottoms were tied to the soil elements. The bottom of the  computational model was fixed in the horizontal and vertical directions. The horizontal  displacement  constraints  were  applied  at  the  lateral  boundaries.  No  constraint  was  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  7  of  20  applied at the surface of the soil domain. To simulate the fixed pile head condition, pile  heads were tied with a pile cap. The pile cap was fixed in the vertical direction, whereas  lateral movement was allowed. The piles were modeled using the linear elastic model.  The properties of the hollow steel pipe pile are listed in Table 4. The piles were modeled  as solid rods with an outer diameter of 0.3 m. To achieve identical flexural rigidity as the  reference steel pipe pile, the modulus of elasticity of the solid piles was adjusted such that  it was equivalent to that of the steel pipe pile, as summarized in Table 4.  Table 4. Properties of steel pile.  Parameters  Value  Outer diameter (m)  0.3  Thickness (m)  0.0095  Moment of inertia (m )  0.000398  Modulus of elasticity of reference steel pipe pile, E (GPa)  200  Adjusted modulus of elasticity, E (GPa)  46  The nonlinear soil stress–strain behavior  is simulated  using the bounding surface  plasticity model  of Borja and Amies [39]. The model was selected  because it  has been  widely used in the simulation of the seismic response of soils. It is reported to have no  purely  elastic  region,  and  therefore  effective  in  modeling  even  the  small‐strain  nonlinearity of soil. The shear modulus reduction curve derived from the plasticity model  is as follows:  2τ -1 G 3 R √2+τ ‐τ (1) = 1‐ h +H   G 2γ τ max where    is the secant shear modulus normalized to maximum shear modulus; 𝛾   is  max the shear strain; 𝜏   is the shear stress; R is radius of the bounding surface; h and m, which  are the coefficient and exponent of the exponential hardening function, respectively; and  Ho  is  the  kinematic  hardening  parameter.  This  plasticity  model  was  implemented  in  ABAQUS using the UMAT subroutine code developed by Zhang et al. [40]. The numerical  models of single and 3 × 3 group piles were validated against the field test measurements  of Rollins et al. [25]. The details of the numerical model and validation results are reported  in Adeel et al. [41].   3.1. Procedure for Extraction of p‐Multipliers  The  p‐multipliers  were  calculated directly from  the 3D FE  model  by  dividing the  computed average soil resistance of a row within a pile group configuration and within a  prescribed depth by that of the single pile model at a selected displacement. The double  derivation of the bending moment with respect to depth was used  to calculate p. The  bending moment profile was first fitted with a seventh order polynomial function before  derivation. Figure 2 shows the averaged soil resistance with respect to depth for the single  pile and leading row of the 3 × 3 free‐head group pile. It was observed that the maximum  soil  resistance  occurs  within  a  normalized  depth  of  15  z/D.  Similar  observations  were  reported in Souri et al. [29]. Therefore, p within a depth of 15 z/D was averaged to calculate  the  p‐multiplier.  Static  loading  was  applied  at  the  pile  top  in  the  lateral  direction.  A  displacement controlled approach was used in the numerical simulation. It was reported  in Fayyazi [14] that the upper range of pile head displacement in the experimental tests  listed in Table 1 and Table 2 is 50 mm. Hence, to be consistent with the experimental  studies, the p‐multipliers and group effect parameters were extracted at a displacement of  50 mm.  𝑑𝜏 Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  8  of  20  Averaged soil resistance (kN/m) -20 0 20 40 60 Single Pile Leading row ( pile group) Figure 2. Average soil resistance for a single pile and leading row in a 3 × 3 free‐head pile group at  y = 50 mm.  3.2. Parametric Study  This section describes the parametric studies performed to derive the p‐multipliers  and group effect parameters of group piles in sand. A suite of nonlinear 3D analyses was  performed to investigate the effect of different pile configurations (3 × 3, 4 × 4, and 5 × 5),  pile head fixity (free and fixed), S/D (3, 4, 5, and 6), and friction angle (φ) of sand (30°, 35°,  and 40°). The depth of the soil profile was set to 15 m. The soil profile was assumed to be  composed of uniform soil with a constant φ, but the shear wave velocity (V   was varied  with depth to account for its dependence on confining pressure. It is first calculated by  determining  the  overburden  and  energy  corrected  SPT  blow  count  ( 𝑁 )  and  then  converting to  V . Values of  𝑁   were back‐calculated from φ using the correlation of  Hatanaka and Uchida [42] presented in Equation Error! Reference source not found.:  (2) 𝜙 20 𝑁 20  N1(60) blow count was converted to N60 using the equation of Liao and Whitman [43].  Finally, the  V profile was calculated using the empirical equation of Kwak et al. [44] for  sand. The calculated shear wave velocity used in the simulations is shown in Figure 3.  V   is shown to increase with depth. The unit weight of the soil was set to 18 kN/m . The water  table reduces the effective stress of soil and also the stiffness of the p‐y curve. However,  because the water table is most often below the 10D critical depth of influence, it was  assumed that the soil is dry.  Depth (z/D) Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  9  of  20  V (m/s) 50 100 150 200 250 300  = 30  = 35  = 40 Figure 3. Vs vs depth profiles used in the FE model.  4. Results and Discussions  4.1. Effect of φ, S/D, Pile Head Fixity and Number of Piles on p‐Multipliers  Friction angle φ is observed to have a primary influence on p‐multipliers. Figure 4  plots the variation of p‐multipliers for 5 × 5 free‐ and fixed‐head pile groups with φ and  S/D. The p‐multiplier is shown to decrease with an increase in φ. It was reported in Ashour  et al. [2] that increasing φ causes a wedge‐shaped influence zone in front of each pile to  increase,  which  in  turn  produces  larger  a  shear  zone  and  ultimately  higher  level  of  interaction between piles. Calculated p‐multipliers for free‐head pile groups range from a  minimum value of 0.36 for φ = 40° and S/D = 3 to a maximum value of 1.0 for φ = 30° and  S/D = 6. The p‐multipliers are positively correlated to S/D because the shadowing and edge  effects reduce with an increase in S/D.   Depth (m) Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  10  of  20  1.2 Leading row (a) 1st Trailing row 2nd Trailing row 1.0 3rd Trailing row  = 30 4th Trailing row  = 35 0.8  = 40 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 34 56 S/D 1.2 (b) 1.0 0.8  = 30  = 35  = 40 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 34 56 S/D Figure 4. Numerically calculated p‐multipliers for 5 × 5 (a) free‐head and (b) fixed‐head pile  groups.  The p‐multipliers are highly dependent on the pile head condition. The fixed‐head  pile groups yield lower p‐multipliers compared with those for the free‐head pile groups,  because a higher level of group interaction is produced. For φ = 30°, the p‐multipliers for  3 × 3 fixed‐head pile groups are 0.75, 0.42, and 0.3 for the leading, first, and second trailing  rows, respectively. On the contrary, for the free‐head pile group, the p‐multipliers increase  to  0.81,  0.55,  and  0.51  for  leading,  first,  and  second  trailing  rows,  respectively.  A  pronounced difference is found in the p‐multipliers of the leading and first trailing rows  for the fixed‐head condition, especially at S/D = 5 and 6, as compared with the free‐head  condition. For the widely used spacings of S/D = 3 and 4, the p‐multipliers converge at the  third row. For larger spacings, the p‐multipliers are shown to continuously decrease for  third and fourth trailing rows. However, for conservative design, it can be assumed to  converge after the second trailing row. The number of piles is shown to have negligible  influence on the calculated p‐multipliers. Therefore, the p‐multipliers for 3 × 3 can also be  applied to 4 × 4 and 5 × 5 pile groups.  p - multipliers p - multiplier Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  11  of  20  It is demonstrated in detail that the p‐multipliers are sensitive on φ, pile head fixity,  and S/D. In order to capture the effects of these parameters, the following functional form  is proposed to calculate p‐multipliers:  (3) 𝑝 multiplier 𝑎   where a and b are curve fitting coefficients, summarized in Table 5. These coefficients are  dependent on the fixity condition and φ. It should also be noted that only p‐multipliers  up to second trailing rows are presented because of marginal variation in the calculated  values for the following rows. Figure 5 and Figure 6 show the calculated p‐multipliers  plotted against S/D, along with the proposed functional form. The p‐multipliers obtained  using the equation developed matches well with the calculated results. Therefore, this  equation can be used to predict the p‐multipliers for both free‐ and fixed‐head pile groups  subjected to lateral load.  Proposed curve Simulated Leading row Leading row 1st Trailing row 1st Trailing row 2nd Trailing row 2nd Trailing row 1.2 1.2 (a) (b) 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.0 0.0 23 45 67 23 45 67 S/D S/D 1.2 (c) 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 23 45 67 S/D p-multiplier p-multiplier p-multiplier Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  12  of  20  Figure 5. Regression between calculated p‐multipliers vs. S/D for various rows for free‐head  condition: (a) φ = 30°, (b) φ = 35°, and (c) φ = 40°. Proposed curve Simulated Leading row Leading row 1st Trailing row 1st Trailing row 2nd Trailing row 2nd Trailing row 1.2 1.2 (b) (a) 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.0 0.0 23 45 67 2 3 45 67 S/D S/D 1.2 (c) 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 2 3 45 67 S/D Figure 6. Regression between calculated p‐multipliers vs. S/D for various rows for fixed‐head  condition: (a) φ = 30°, (b) φ = 35°, and (c) φ = 40°. Table 5. Regression coefficients for free‐ and fixed‐head pile group.    Free‐Head Condition  Rows   φ = 30°  φ = 35°  φ = 40°    a  b  a  b  a  b  Leading row   0.55  0.34  0.57  0.27  0.58  0.23  1st Trailing row   0.22  0.80  0.17  0.89  0.14  0.99  2nd Trailing row   0.25  0.62  0.19  0.77  0.16  0.80    Fixed‐Head Condition  Rows   φ = 30°  φ = 35°  φ = 40°    a  b  a  b  a  b  Leading row   0.54  0.31  0.47  0.36  0.43  0.34  1st Trailing row   0.23  0.54  0.18  0.62  0.16  0.60  p- multiplier p- multiplier p- multiplier Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  13  of  20  2nd Trailing row   0.20  0.44  0.16  0.51  0.16  0.43    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  14  of  20  4.2. Comparsion of p‐Multipliers and Group Effect Parameters with Experimental Studies  In  this  section,  the  calculated  p‐multipliers  and  group  effect  parameters  from  the  numerical  simulations  are  compared  with  those  derived  from  previous  experimental  studies. Figure 7 compares the results of the p‐multipliers calculated for 3 × 3 free‐head  pile groups with experimentally extracted values [17,19,25,36,37]. Brown et al. [17] and  Morrison and Reese [35] used a S/D ratio of 3, whereas McVay et al. [19] performed tests  on  piles  with  S/D  ratios  =  3  and  5.  Rollins  et  al.  [25]  and  Christensen  [36]  performed  experimental tests on piles with S/D ratios = 3.3 and 5.65. Full‐scale lateral load tests were  conducted by [17,25,36,37] in granular soil with φ = 38°. The friction angle φ of soil were  reported as 30° and 33° for the tests performed by McVay et al. [19]. The experimentally  derived and numerically calculated p‐multipliers are shown to be comparable. Figure 8  shows the p‐multipliers calculated for 4 × 4 free‐head pile group performed by Ruesta and  Townsend [22] along with those derived from the numerical simulations. φ = 32° and S/D  = 3 were adopted in their study. The p‐multipliers for the leading row calculated in this  study are in line with that measured from field tests. The calculated multiplier is slightly  lower for the first trailing row, and higher for second and third trailing rows. Overall, the  calculated and recorded values are again comparable.  1. 1.4 4 Brown et al.[17] This Study S/D = 3 McVay et al. [19] 1. 1.2 2 This Study S/D = 4 Rollins et al. [25] 1. 1.0 0 Morrison and Reese[35] S/D = 3 0. 0.8 8  = 38.5 S/D = 3.3  = 38 0. 0.6 6 S/D = 3 0. 0.4 4  = 33 0. 0.2 2 (a (a) ) 0. 0.0 0 Leading 1st 2nd row trailing trailing row row 1.4 1.4 This study S/D = 5 McVay et al. [19] This study S/D = 6 Christensen [36] 1.2 1.2 1.0 1.0 S/D = 5 0.8 0.8  = 30 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 S/D = 5.65 0.2 0.2  = 38 (b) 0.0 0.0 Leading 1st 2nd row trailing trailing row row    Figure 7. Comparison between calculated p‐multipliers and previous experimental work for free‐ head pile groups in sand with 3 × 3 pile configuration: (a) S/D = 3, 3.3 and (b) S/D = 5, 5.65.  p-multipliers p-multipliers Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  15  of  20  1.4 Ruesta and Townsend [22] 1.2 This Study S/D = 3  = 30 This Study S/D = 3  = 35 1.0 This Study S/D = 3  = 40 0.8 S/D = 3 0.6  = 32 0.4 0.2 0.0 Leading 1st 2nd 3rd row Trailing Trailing Trailing row row row Figure 8. Comparison of p‐multipliers for the free‐head pile groups in sands calculated in this study with those measured  from field tests with 4 × 4 pile configuration performed by Ruesta and Townsend [22].  Figure  9  compares  the  calculated  and  measured  p‐multipliers  for  fixed‐head  pile  groups. McVay et al. [24] conducted tests on fixed‐head pile groups, which were 3 × 3, 3 ×  4, and 3 × 5. S/D was fixed to 3 and φ = 33° was used. For comparison, the results for 3 ×  3, 4 × 4, and 5 × 5 pile groups are displayed for S/D = 3 and φ = 35°. The calculated and  measured p‐multipliers are shown to match favorably. The extensive comparisons reveal  that the simulated p‐multipliers are in line with those measured, further ensuring that the  numerically derived values are reliable.   p-multipliers Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  16  of  20  1.2 1.2 McVay et al.[24] 1.0 1.0 S/D = 3 This Study S/D = 3  = 33  0.8 0.8 S/D = 3  = 33 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 (b) (a) 0.0 0.0 1st 2nd Leading Leading 1st 2nd 3rd trailing trailing row row trailing trailing trailing row row row row row 1.2 S/D = 3 1.0  = 33 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 (c) 0.0 1st 2nd Leading 3rd 4th trailing row trailing trailing trailing row row row row    Figure 9. Comparison of fixed‐head pile groups in sands calculated in this study and measured from centrifuge tests with  (a) 3 × 3, (b) 3 × 4, and (c) 3 × 5 pile configurations performed by McVay et al. [24].  4.3. Comparsion of Group Effect Parameter with Design Codes  In this section, the groups effect parameters averaged from numerically generated p‐ multipliers are compared and quantified with those provided in the design codes, which  are American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials AASHTO [33]  and Federal Emergency Management Agency FEMA [34].  Table 6 lists the recommended p‐multipliers provided in AASHTO [33]. This design  report presents p‐multipliers obtained from free‐head pile group tests. It should be noted  that the effects of soil shear strength and pile head condition are not accounted for in the  AASHTO recommendations [34]. The p‐multipliers are provided for S/D = 3 and 5. No  recommendation is provided for S/D greater than 5. The effect parameter for AASHTO  [33] is calculated by averaging the p‐multipliers for all rows of pile group and for S/D = 4;  the  group  effect  parameters  are  interpolated  between  S/D  =  3  and  5.  The  equations  suggested by Rollins et al. [45] for estimation of the p‐multipliers were recommended in  FEMA [34]. These equations were proposed on the basis of three full‐scale tests, where 3  × 3, 3 × 4, and 3 × 5 pile groups with S/D = 5.65, 4.4, and 3.3 were used. Soil type was stiff  clay and free‐head condition of pile groups were considered in all of the tests performed.  The effect of soil type was not accounted for in FEMA [34].   p-multipliers p-multipliers Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  17  of  20  Table 6. The p‐multipliers suggested in AASHTO [33].  p‐Multiplier    Pile Spacing  2nd Trailing Row  Group Effect  Leading Row  1st Trailing Row  and Higher  Parameter  3D  0.8  0.4  0.3  0.5  5D  1  0.85  0.7  0.85  Figure  10  compares  group  effect  parameters  calculated  numerically  with  those  recommended in AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34] for both free‐ and fixed‐head conditions.  For S/D = 3 and 4, the group effect parameters of AASHTO [33] are lower than those of  FEMA [34], whereas for S/D = 5 the trend is reversed. The calculated parameters for the  free‐head pile groups match well with those presented in AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34].  The results for φ = 30° produce the upper limit of the parameters for all S/D compared  with those presented in AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34]. For S/D = 3, AASHTO [33] and  FEMA  [34]  parameters  are  similar  to  the  calculated  values  for φ  =  40°  and φ  =  35°,  respectively.  At  higher  S/Ds,  φ  =  35°  results  are  similar  to  the  mean  values  of  the  parameters presented in AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34]. Both AASHTO [33] and FEMA  [34] highly overestimate the parameters for fixed‐head condition, and therefore should be  used with caution.   Free-head Fixed-head This study  This study  This study  This study  This study  This study  1.2 AASHTO (2012) 1.0 FEMA P-1051 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 23 45 67 S/D Group effect parameter Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  18  of  20  Figure 10. Comparison among calculated group effect parameters for 3 × 3 free‐head and fixed‐head pile groups in this  study, AASHTO [33], and FEMA [34].  5. Conclusions  This study focuses on developing the p‐multipliers and group effect parameters for  squared  vertical  pile  groups  in  granular  soil  using  a  3D  nonlinear  FE  model.  The  p‐ multipliers  are  derived  directly  from  numerical  simulation  by  calculating  the  ratio  of  averaged soil resistances within a prescribed depth of group and single piles. The effect  of S/D, number of group piles, φ, and pile fixity conditions are examined and quantified.  Based  on  the  simulation  results,  an  empirical  functional  form  for  the  p‐multipliers  is  proposed for pile groups.  The  proposed  p‐multipliers  generated  from  the  numerical  simulations  exhibit  the  following trends. The p‐multipliers decrease with an increase in φ and decrease in S/D.  The  number  of  piles  is  shown  to  have  marginal  influence  on  the  values  of  the  p‐ multipliers.  The  p‐multipliers  are  shown  to  be  highly  influenced  by  the  pile  fixity  conditions. The results demonstrate that the p‐multipliers are lower for fixed‐head pile  groups because of higher group interactions compared with the free‐head pile groups.  Based on the numerical outputs, an empirical functional form conditioned on S/D, φ, and  fixity condition is proposed to estimate the p‐multipliers.  The numerically calculated p‐multipliers and group effect parameters are compared  with the previous experimental studies. The p‐multipliers calculated in this study are in  line with that measured from field tests. Further comparison of group effect parameters  with the group effect parameters presented in AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34] depicts that  the calculated values for φ = 30° yield the upper limit values for free‐head condition. The  parameters of AASHTO [33] and FEMA [34] do not account for the fixity condition, and  therefore produce significantly higher parameters for fixed‐head condition.   Author Contributions: Conceptualization and methodology, D.P.; formal analysis, resources, and  writing—original draft preparation, M.B.A.; numerical simulations, M.B.A., M.A.J., and M.A.;  review and editing, D.P. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the  manuscript.  Funding: This research was supported by a grant (20SCIP‐B146946‐03) from Smart Civil  Infrastructure Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of  Korean government, Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP), and  the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE) of the Republic of Korea  (No.20183010025580).  Acknowledgments: The authors would like to thank Wenyang Zhang and Ertugrul Taciroglu for  providing the user material subroutine (UMAT) of the nonlinear soil model used in the analyses,  along with a MATLAB code to calibrate its input parameters.   Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Poulos, H.G.; Davis, E.H. Pile Foundation Analysis and Design; John Wiley and Sons: New York, NY, USA, 1980.  2. Ashour, M.; Norris, G.; Pilling, P. Lateral loading of a pile in layered soil using the strain wedge model. J. Geotech. Geoenviron.  1998, 124, 303–315.  3. Brown, D.A.; Shie, C.‐F. Three dimensional finite element model of laterally loaded piles. Comput. Geotech. 1990, 10, 59–79.  4. Muqtadir, A.; Desai, C.S. Three‐dimensional analysis of a pile‐group foundation. IJNAMG 1986, 10, 41–58.  5. Trochanis, A.M.; Bielak, J.; Christiano, P. Three‐dimensional nonlinear study of piles. Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1991, 117, 429– 447.  6. Yang, Z.; Jeremić, B. Numerical analysis of pile behaviour under lateral loads in layered elastic‐plastic soils. IJNAMG 2002, 26,  1385–1406.  7. Kwon,  S.Y.;  Yoo,  M.  Study  on  the  dynamic  soil‐pile‐structure  interactive  behavior  in  liquefiable  sand  by  3D  numerical  simulation. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 2723.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  19  of  20  8. Kwon, S.Y.; Yoo, M. Evaluation of dynamic soil‐pile‐structure interactive behavior in dry sand by 3D numerical simulation.  Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 2612.  9. Reese, L.C.; Cox, W.R.; Koop, F.D. Analysis of laterally loaded piles in sand. In Offshore Technology in Civil Engineering: Hall of  Fame Papers from the Early Years; ASCE Publications: Reston, VA, USA, 1974; pp. 95–105.  10. American Petroleum Institute (API). Recommended Practice for Planning, Designing, and Constructing Fixed Offshore Platforms. API  Recommended Practice 2A‐WSD, 21st ed.; American Petroleum Institute: Washington, DC, USA, 2007; Volume 2.  11. Murchison, J.M.; O’Neill, M.W. Evaluation of py relationships in cohesionless soils. In Analysis and Design of Pile Foundations;  American Society of Civil Engineers: New York, NY, USA, 1984; pp. 174–191.  12. Zhang, L.; Silva, F.; Grismala, R. Ultimate lateral resistance to piles in cohesionless soils. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 2005, 131, 78–83.  13. McGann,  C.R.;  Arduino,  P.;  Mackenzie‐Helnwein,  P.  Applicability  of  conventional  py  relations  to  the  analysis  of  piles  in  laterally spreading soil. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 2010, 137, 557–567.  14. Fayyazi, M.S. Numerical Study on the Response of Pile Groups Under Lateral Loading. Ph.D. Thesis, University of British  Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, August, 2015.  15. Rahmani, A.; Taiebat, M.; Finn, W.L.; Ventura, C.E. Evaluation of py springs for nonlinear static and seismic soil‐pile interaction  analysis under lateral loading. Soil Dyn. Earthq. Eng. 2018, 115, 438–447.  16. Larkela, A. Modeling of a Pile Group Under Static Lateral Loading. Master’s Thesis, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo,  Finland, 2008.  17. Brown, D.A.; Morrison, C.; Reese, L.C. Lateral load behavior of pile group in sand. Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1988, 114, 1261–1276.  18. Chandrasekaran, S.; Boominathan, A.; Dodagoudar, G. Group interaction effects on laterally loaded piles in clay. J. Geotech.  Geoenviron. 2009, 136, 573–582.  19. McVay, M.; Casper, R.; Shang, T.‐I. Lateral response of three‐row groups in loose to dense sands at 3D and 5D pile spacing.  Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1995, 121, 436–441.  20. Rollins, K.M.; Peterson, K.T.; Weaver, T.J. Lateral load behavior of full‐scale pile group in clay. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 1998, 124,  468–478.  21. Rollins, K.; Olsen, R.; Egbert, J.; Olsen, K.; Jensen, D.; Garrett, B. Response, Analysis, and Design of Pile Groups Subjected to Static &  Dynamic Lateral Loads; Utah. Dept. of Transportation. Research Division: Salt Lake City, UT, USA, 2003.  22. Ruesta, P.F.; Townsend, F.C. Evaluation of laterally loaded pile group at Roosevelt Bridge. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 1997, 123,  1153–1161.  23. Brown, D.A.; Reese, L.C.; O’Neill, M.W. Cyclic lateral loading of a large‐scale pile group. Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1987, 113,  1326–1343.  24. McVay, M.; Zhang, L.; Molnit, T.; Lai, P. Centrifuge testing of large laterally loaded pile groups in sands. J. Geotech. Geoenviron.  1998, 124, 1016–1026.  25. Rollins, K.M.; Lane, J.D.; Gerber, T.M. Measured and computed lateral response of a pile group in sand. J. Geotech. Geoenviron.  2005, 131, 103–114.  26. Rollins, K.M.; Olsen, R.J.; Egbert, J.J.; Jensen, D.H.; Olsen, K.G.; Garrett, B.H. Pile spacing effects on lateral pile group behavior:  Load tests. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 2006, 132, 1262–1271.  27. Walsh, J.M. Full‐scale lateral load test of a 3x5 pile group in sand. Master’s Thesis, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA,  2005.  28. Brown, D.A.; O’Neill, M.; Hoit, M.; McVay, M.; el Naggar, M.; Chakraborty, S. Static and Dynamic Lateral Loading of Pile Groups;  TRB: Washington, DC, USA, 2001.  29. Souri, A.; Abu‐Farsakh, M.Y.; Voyiadjis, G.Z. Evaluating the effect of pile spacing and configuration on the lateral resistance of  pile groups. Mar. Georesouces Geotechnol. 2020, 1–13, doi:10.1080/1064119X.2019.1680780.  30. Abu‐Farsakh, M.; Souri, A.; Voyiadjis, G.; Rosti, F. Comparison of static lateral behavior of three pile group configurations using  three‐dimensional finite element modeling. Can. Geotech. J. 2018, 55, 107–118.  31. Yang, Z.; Jeremić, B. Numerical study of group effects for pile groups in sands. IJNAMG 2003, 27, 1255–1276.  32. Albusoda, B.S.; Al‐Saadi, A.F.; Jasim, A.F. An experimental study and numerical modeling of laterally loaded regular and finned  pile foundations in sandy soils. Comput. Geotech. 2018, 102, 102–110.  33. AASHTO.  AASHTO  LRFD  Bridge  Design  Specifications;  American  Association  of  State  Highway  and  Transportation  Officials(AASHTO): Washington, DC, USA, 2012.  34. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Foundation and liquefaction design, FEMA P‐1051. In NEHRP Recommended  Seismic Provisions: Design Examples. Federal Emergency Management Agency; National Institute of Building Sciences: Washington,  DC, USA; Building Seismic Safety Council: Washington, DC, USA, 2015.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 26  20  of  20  35. Morrison, C.S.; Reese, L.C. A Lateral‐Load Test of a Full‐Scale Pile Group in Sand; The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX,  USA, 1988.  36. Christensen, D.S. Full Scale Static Lateral Load Test of a 9 Pile Group in Sand. Master’s Thesis, Brigham Young University,  Provo, UT, USA, 2006.  37. Taghavi,  A.;  Muraleetharan,  K.K.  Analysis  of  laterally  loaded  pile  groups  in  improved  soft  clay.  Int.  J.  Geomech  2016,  17,  04016098.  38. Park, J.‐S.; Park, D.; Yoo, J.‐K. Vertical bearing capacity of bucket foundations in sand. Ocean Eng. 2016, 121, 453–461.  39. Borja, R.I.; Amies, A.P. Multiaxial cyclic plasticity model for clays. Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1994, 120, 1051–1070.  40. Zhang,  W.;  Esmaeilzadeh  Seylabi,  E.;  Taciroglu,  E.  Validation  of  a  three‐dimensional  constitutive  model  for  nonlinear  site  response and soil‐structure interaction analyses using centrifuge test data. IJNAMG 2017, 41, 1828–1847.  41. Adeel, M.B.; Aaqib, M.; Park, D. Simulation of pile foundations in granular soil subjected to lateral loading using beam‐on‐ nonlinear‐winkler‐foundation and nonlinear finite element models. Ocean Eng. (in press)  42. Hatanaka, M.; Uchida, A. Empirical correlation between penetration resistance and internal friction angle of sandy soils. Soils  Found. 1996, 36, 1–9.  43. Liao, S.S.; Whitman, R.V. Overburden correction factors for SPT in sand. Electron. J. Geotech. Eng. 1986, 112, 373–377.  44. Kwak, D.Y.; Brandenberg, S.J.; Mikami, A.; Stewart, J.P. Prediction equations for estimating shear‐wave velocity from combined  geotechnical and geomorphic indexes based on Japanese data set. Seismol. Soc. 2015, 105, 1919–1930.  45. Rollins, K.M.; Olsen, K.G.; Jensen, D.H.; Garrett, B.H.; Olsen, R.J.; Egbert, J.J. Pile spacing effects on lateral pile group behavior:  Analysis. J. Geotech. Geoenviron. 2006, 132, 1272–1283. 

Journal

Applied SciencesMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Dec 22, 2020

There are no references for this article.