Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Demographic Groups’ Differences in Restorative Perception of Urban Public Spaces in COVID-19

Demographic Groups’ Differences in Restorative Perception of Urban Public Spaces in COVID-19 Article  Demographic Groups’ Differences in Restorative Perception of  Urban Public Spaces in COVID‐19  Shiqi Wang and Ang Li *  School of Architecture and Design, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, China;  wangshiqi@cumt.edu.cn  *  Correspondence: li_ang@cumt.edu.cn; Tel.: +86‐136‐2461‐4957  Abstract: The health‐promoting functions of one’s spatial environment have been widely recog‐ nized. Facing the huge loss of mental resources caused by the COVID‐19 pandemic, visiting and  perception of urban public spaces with restorative potential should be encouraged. However per‐ ceived,  restorativeness  differs  from  individual  features. Moreover,  the COVID‐19  pandemic  has  considerable effects on residents’ leisure travel and psychological states. Therefore, the aim of our  research is to identify the demographic variables influencing restorative perception of typical urban  public spaces under the social background of the COVID‐19 pandemic. The research consists of 841  residents’ restorative evaluation of four kinds of urban public spaces according to the Chinese ver‐ sion of the Perceived Restorativeness Scale, including urban green spaces, exhibition spaces, com‐ mercial spaces and sports spaces. Then, 10 individual factors were recorded which represented their  demographic features and the influence of COVID‐19. Then, the relationship between individual  features and perceived restoration of different urban public spaces was analyzed, respectively, by  using One‐way ANOVA and regression analysis. The results show that the urban green spaces were  ranked as the most restorative, followed by commercial spaces, sports spaces and exhibition spaces.  Further, the findings indicate that significant factors affect the restoration of four typical urban pub‐ Citation: Wang, S.; Li, A.   lic spaces.  Demographic Groups’ Differences in  Restorative Perception of Urban  Keywords: urban public space; health‐promoting environments; psychological restoration; demo‐ Public Spaces in COVID‐19.   graphic variable; COVID‐19 pandemic  Buildings 2022, 12, 869.  https://doi.org/10.3390/  buildings12070869  Academic Editor: Dirk H.R.   1. Introduction  Spennemann  The COVID‐19  outbreak at the beginning of 2020  has made dramatical effects  on  public health both in mind and body all over the world. In China, the social policies and  Received: 18 May 2022  regulations for dealing with the outbreak limited people’s abilities to partake in typical,  Accepted: 19 June 2022  Published: 21 June 2022  out‐of‐home social activities, which caused a sharp decline in entertainment activities, so‐ cial contact and physical activities. Therefore, emotional problems are common among  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  neu‐ urban residents in China after suffering from the COVID‐19 pandemic, such as indolence,  tral  with  regard  to  jurisdictional  anxiety,  depression  and  self‐reported  stresses  [1].  The  restorative  environment  is  re‐ claims in published maps and institu‐ garded as having potential and power to renew physical, psychological and social capa‐ tional affiliations.  bilities consumed in the process of adaptation [2]. Regarding the huge need of restoration  for residents, visiting a restorative environment to regain mental capacities and energy is  of great importance, especially during this special time.  Copyright: © 2022 by the authors. Li‐ There has been extensive published research demonstrating the restorative attributes  censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  of some kinds of urban public spaces (UPSs), including urban green spaces, exhibition  This article  is an open access article  spaces, commercial spaces and sports spaces. First of all, the UPSs are identified as a typ‐ distributed under the terms and con‐ ical restorative environment by creating natural experiences [3]. Residents who have close  ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ tribution (CC BY) license (https://cre‐ and frequent contacts with parks, gardens or other sources of natural environment report  ativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  less  stress  and  negative  attitudes  [4].  Although  natural  environments  are  the  typical  Buildings 2022, 12, 869. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12070869  www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  2  of  13  settings for possessing restorative potential, well‐designed constructions are also capable  of attracting involuntary attention and thus promoting restoration from directed attention  fatigue.  Museums  contribute  to  restorative  experiences  for  some  people.  The  earliest  study about this was conducted by Kaplan et al. [5], which declared the restorative expe‐ rience offered by art museums, especially for frequent visitors. Similar conclusions were  also drawn in other museum environment, such as zoos, history museums or galleries [6– 8]. Moreover, Rosenbaum et al. [9] illustrated that shopping centers could provide cus‐ tomers with restorative servicescapes by  decorating them with green facilities. On the  other hand, markets or other similar commercial spaces were proved to contain restora‐ tive potential by enhancing social supportive resources and encourage communication  and gathering [10,11]. As we all know, physical activities bring significant emotional ben‐ efits by improved self‐esteem, enhanced emotional regulation, adaptation to stress and  better sleep quality [12], which is beneficial to physical and mental restoration. The lack  of physical activity is a leading risk factor for depression during the pandemic [13]. There‐ fore, the sports spaces were concluded as restorative in our studies.   It has been suggested that restorative benefits caused by the environment differ be‐ cause of the diversities of demographic characteristics (DCs) [14]. Hartig et al. [15] consid‐ ered gender as a determinant of restorative outcomes by investigating the differences on  the perceived restoration of 26 couples. Regan and Horn [16] explored the association be‐ tween ages and environmental preference by taking people aged from 6 to 76 years‐old as  a sample. Additionally, the person–environment fit theory points that people tend to pre‐ fer an environment which is correlated with their needs or capacities [17], which empha‐ sizes the compatibility between individual attributes and the environment. For example,  monasteries are thought of as a restorative environment only for pilgrims who could un‐ derstand its cultural connotations [18]. Then, Korpela et al. [19] regarded natural hobbies  and natural experience, health self‐assessment, life satisfaction and social support as de‐ mographic  factors  because  of  their  influence  on  visiting  desire  and  restorative  need.  Therefore, the chosen determinants related to personal features are mainly guided by re‐ search about the personality traits referred to above when taking into the distinct restora‐ tive perception of spaces, including gender, age, education, natural hobbies and natural  experiences, health self‐assessment, life satisfaction and social support.   The analysis of the research literature above shows the great potential of UPSs and  residents’ strong needs to renew their mental resources. However, the pandemic in China  has been basically brought under control and most of UPSs can be visited normally at  present. Risks of infection still exist and affect people’s behavior and psychology, espe‐ cially the frequency and willingness to visit public spaces. Some studies related to the  influencing factors of leisure travel give the present research inspirations. Perceived risk  was defined as the unpredictable consequences of one’ actions [20]. In the process of vis‐ iting the destinations, it has a huge influence on people’s decisions and satisfaction [21],  which,  according  to  our  studies,  mainly  results  from  the  possibility  of  inflection  of  COVID‐19. Therefore, we selected three items that represented the perceived risk caused  by the COVID‐19 pandemic as additional demographic variables, including the perceived  severity of COVID‐19, perceived risk of visiting and infection history of COVID‐19.   To sum up, the present study was inspired by the changes of residents visiting and  perceiving urban public spaces under the influence of the COVID‐19 pandemic. In con‐ sideration of their health and attitude problems caused by social isolation and disease  stress, it is important to find out the restorative outcomes of UPSs during special times  such as these more deeply. Though some published studies have documented the rela‐ tionship between restorative perception and demographic characteristics well [22], there  is little discussion about the impact of the pandemic, which has significant impacts on  behavior patterns and personal factors.   Although the differences in perceptions of restorative environments among groups  have been widely discussed, the effects of the pandemics have not been explored. Moreo‐ ver, published studies mainly focused on urban green spaces and paid less attention to  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  3  of  13  other kinds of urban public spaces, especially indoor spaces. Considering the proven ef‐ fects of DCs on perceived restoration (PR), we hypothesized that people with different  DCs  will  make  different  restorative  evaluations  of  UPSs,  and  some  DCs  will  consider  some types of UPSs to have more important effects on PR. In order to verify the hypothe‐ ses, the aim of the study is to (1) identify the key DCs influencing restorative perception  of typical UPSs under the social background of the COVID‐19 pandemic and (2) evaluate  the impact degree of DCs on restorative perception in four typical UPSs.  2. Methods  2.1. Study Area  Our study area was Xuzhou City (34° N and 117° E), belonging to Jiangsu Province  in consideration of its representativeness of most cities in China. Then 4 kinds of city pub‐ lic spaces which had been evaluated as restorative in published studies were recognized  as research objects, including (1) city green spaces, (2) exhibition spaces, (3) sports spaces  and (4) commercial spaces. After that, 3 specific buildings or outdoor spaces with different  sizes or appearances in each type were picked in order to show its characteristics more  comprehensively. Additionally, all selected places have good operations and free visita‐ tions during the survey period. Located in main urban areas, there are no obvious eco‐ nomic or demographic differences among regions. To reduce the interference of social– cultural factors, we exclude those with special events such as festival celebrations, sales  promotions and sports games. At last, 12 locations have been selected as final survey sub‐ jects. Their information is shown below in Table 1.  Table 1. Information of study areas.  Types of  Place 1  Place 2  Place 3  Spaces  A1: Yunlong Park, 30.67 ha, in‐ A2: Quanshan Park, 113.33 ha, in‐ A3: Huaihai Park, 39.85 ha, in‐ City green  cluding 8 ha of water surface,  cluding 0.21 ha of water surface,  cluding 0.43 ha of water sur‐ spaces  city center  south of city  face, east of city  B3: Xuzhou City Wall Mu‐ Exhibition  B1: Xuzhou museum, building  B2: Xuzhou Zoo, floor area 73,333  seum, building area 950 m ,  2 2 spaces  area 12,000 m , west of city  m , city center  city center  C1: Xuzhou city stadium,  Sports  C2: Han gymnasium, building  C3: Lide fitness center, build‐ building area 66,700 m , for  2 2 spaces  area 500 m , south of city  ing area 2000 m , south of city  6000 people, west of city  D1: Hubu mountain pedestrian  D3: Kuangxi small market,  Commer‐ D2: Wanda shopping mall, build‐ street, length 1200 m, center of  building area 700 m , west of  cial spaces  ing area 53,000 m , south of city  city  city  2.2. Perceived Restorativeness Assessment   The  questionnaire  consisted  of  three  parts.  The  first  part  aimed  to  obtain  demo‐ graphic information including (1) gender, (2) age, (3) education level, (4) natural hobbies  and natural experiences, (5) health self‐assessment, (6) life satisfaction and (7) social sup‐ port, which were inspired by published research. The second part was to investigate the  effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on residents’ perception and attitudes, consisting of (8)  perceived severity of COVID‐19, (9) perceived risk of visiting the space, and (10) own or  familiar people’ infection of COVID‐19. The third part was the Chinese version of Per‐ ceived Restorativeness Scale (PRS) containing 22 items, established by Ye et al. [23], which  had high reliability and validity (a = 0.936/ S‐B = 0.903), to measure citizens’ obtained per‐ ceived restorativeness after visiting the spaces. The pretest was conducted by 20 people  without professional knowledge from different ages and educational groups, to ensure  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  4  of  13  the clearness of all questions and acceptable reliability and validity. According to that, a  few alterations were made.   The field survey was conducted during June of 2021, when the spread of COVID‐19  had been largely brought under control and residents could visit urban public places more  freely than during the outbreak period. In total, 80 questionnaires were distributed in 12  places, respectively, with the uniform distribution of genders and ages. People with pro‐ fessional knowledge, alcohol or drug addiction, mental or physical illnesses, emotional  frustration, and life challenges were excluded. In order to avoid cognitive bias caused by  unfamiliarity  with the places, we chose frequent visitors. We notified each participant  about the content and purpose of our experiment and obtained their permission before  proceeding.  The  survey  of  each  place  happened  between  9  am  and  11  am  in  sunny  weather. In the end, the 960 questionnaires were taken back. The missing or casual ques‐ tions were excluded, and 841 valid ones were obtained.  2.3. Data Analysis  For data analysis, we used SPSS 22.0 software. Firstly, the data was processed by the  method of One‐way ANOVA to test if there is a significant difference in restorative eval‐ uation of UPSs among different demographic groups. The demographic characteristics  which have significant effects on restorative perception of 4 typical urban public spaces  were identified, respectively. Then, to measure the degree of influence degree of demo‐ graphic characteristics on perceptive restoration of urban public spaces, the stepwise mul‐ tiple linear regression analysis was carried out. Before starting the regression analysis, a  correlation analysis was performed to avoid problems with multicollinearity. These meth‐ ods have been widely and frequently used in similar research to analyze the perceptive  difference of people with different demographic characteristics [24]. For example, Wang  and Zhao (2017) used these methods to check and assess demographic variables’ effect on  landscape preference [25]; Rogge et al. (2007) utilized them to analyze differences in per‐ ception of rural landscapes among different groups [26].  3. Results  3.1. Description of Samples  Firstly, the interclass reliability of demographic information and four parts of the re‐ storativeness assessment were calculated, respectively. Cronbach’s α of demographic in‐ formation was 0.908, which showed that the survey data is considered to have internal  consistency. Then, Table 2 shows the description of participants’ demographic character‐ istics, which was similar to population features of Xuzhou in 2010. Additionally, a higher  proportion  of  respondents  are aged  between  25 and  30,  probably  due to  a  higher  fre‐ quency of outdoor excursions in younger people. In addition, by calculating the mean  restorative scores of each type of urban public space, we ranked the urban green spaces  (mean = 46.67) in the order of the most restorative, followed by commercial spaces (mean  = 43.44) and sports spaces (mean = 39.90). Additionally, the exhibition spaces (mean =  39.17) supplied the least PR values in our results.      Buildings 2022, 12, 869  5  of  13  Table 2. Description of characteristics of participants (n = 841).  Demographic  N  %  Demographic  N  %  Gender     Life satisfaction     Male  417  49.6  Dis‐satisfied   297  35.3  Female  424  50.4  So‐so   247  29.4  Age       Satisfied  297  35.3  18–30  64  7.6  Social support     31–40  370  44.0  Not much  111  13.2  41–50  92  10.9  Moderate  334  39.7  51–60  136  16.2  Much   396  47.1  Over 61  179  21.3  Perceived severity of COVID‐19  Education       Not serious  247  29.4  Higher education  284  33.8  A little serious  309  36.8  Without higher education  557  66.2  Very serious  285  33.8  Natural hobbies and Natural experiences  Perceived risk of visiting       Few  395  47.0  Not risky  240  28.5  Moderate  358  42.6  A little risky  223  26.5  Many   88  10.4  Very risky  378  45.0  Health self‐assessment     Infection of COVID‐19     Sick   198  23.5  None   756  89.9  Subhealthy  291  34.6  Familiar person’s infection  64  7.6  Healthy  352  41.9  Own infection  21  2.5  3.2. Rating Restorative Experiences of Eight Rooms  The intraclass correlations coefficient was calculated to test the interclass reliability.  The results were Cronbach’s α = 0.901, p < 0.001, which showed a high consistency. Then,  the mean scores of each place were calculated to rank their restorative potential (Table 3).  Huaihai Park (A3) had the highest scores followed by Xuzhou Zoo (B2) and Yunlong Park  (A1), while the Xuzhou city (C1) stadium has the lowest scores. The city green spaces have  the  highest  restoration,  followed  by  commercial  spaces,  sports  spaces  and  exhibition  spaces.  Table 3. The restorative ranking of 12 study places.  City Green Spaces  Exhibition Spaces  Sports Spaces  Commercial Spaces  Places  A1  A2  A3  B1  B2  B3  C1  C2  C3  D1  D2  D3  Mean  4.83  4.52  4.98  3.21  4.85  3.36  3.67  4.55  4.32  4.45  4.63  4.51  Grand average  4.78  3.81  4.18  4.53  Ranking  1  4  3  2  3.3. Significant Factors of Perceived Restoration  Using One‐way ANOVA, the influential factors were identified (Table 4). There were  significant differences in the restorative perception of urban green spaces among people  with different natural hobbies and natural experiences (F = 4.325, p = 0.039) and life satis‐ faction (F = 5.293, p = 0.022). Education (F = 9.248, p = 0.008), social support (F = 3.848, p =  0.005) and perceived risk of visiting (F = 3.988, p = 0.041) were considerable factors when  regarding people’s perception of exhibition spaces. People with different social support  and perceived risk of visiting show markedly different evaluations of sports spaces. In  commercial spaces, age, gender, perceived risk of visiting and infection of COVID‐19 are  important demographic factors. Then, the correlation analysis among identified factors  showed that perceived risk of visiting was related to infection of COVID‐19, educational  level was related to life satisfaction and social support, and perceived severity of COVID‐ 19 was related to perceived risk of visiting (Table 5). Apart from that, no statistically sig‐ nificant correlations existed among demographic factors.      Buildings 2022, 12, 869  6  of  13  Table 4. One‐way ANOVA among different groups’ assessment of urban public spaces.  Space   Demographic Variable  Sum of Squares  DF  Meansquare  F  P  Urban green space  Natural hobbies and Natural experiences  697.583  2  348.792  4.325  .039  (n = 213)  Life satisfaction  780.500  2  390.250  5.293  .022  Education   2088.008  1  2088.008  9.248  .008  Exhibition space  Social support   1933.000  2  966.500  3.848  .045  (n = 207)  Perceived risk of visiting  1978.755  2  989.377  3.988  .041  Sports space  Social support  507.951  2  354.413  3.215  0.31  (n = 226)  Perceived severity of COVID‐19  549.668  2  274.834  4.844  .022  Age   3168.143  4  792.036  4.066  .024  Commercial space  Gender   835.204  1  835.204  5.162  .034  (n = 195)  Perceived risk of visiting  506.417  2  253.208  4.345  .048  Infection of COVID‐19  587.503  1  587.503  4.526  .049  Table 5. Correlations among significant demographic factors.  Life  Social  Perceived  Perceived  Gen‐ Educa‐ Natural  Infection of     Age  Satis‐ Sup‐ Severity of  Risk of  der  tion  Hobby  COVID‐19  faction  port  COVID‐19  Visiting  Gender   0.051  0.758  0.264  0.337  0.215  0.328  0.595  0.175  Age       0.325  0.221  0.157  0.127  0.204  0.215  0.307  Education       0.187  0.289 *  0.324 *  0.126  0.489  0.279  Natural hobby         0.056  0.081  0.192  0.135  0.176  Life satisfaction           0.215  0.384  0.429  0.495  Social support             0.517  0.269  0.124  Perceived  severity               0.159 *  0.178  of COVID‐19  Perceived  risk  of                 0.141 **  visiting   * Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level. ** Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level.  At last, the detailed perceived differences were explored by calculating the mean and  standard deviation of restorative ratings from different groups. Generally speaking, par‐ ticipants with higher levels of education, natural hobbies and natural experiences, life sat‐ isfaction and social support showed more restorative assessment. However, the perceived  risk of visiting and perceived severity of COVID‐19 had negative effects on restorative  perception. Moreover, participants aged 18 to 30 showed the highest rating for commer‐ cial spaces, followed by 41–50 years old, 51–60 years old and >60 years old. The respond‐ ents at the age of 31–41 ranked lowest (Figure 1).  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  7  of  13  Figure 1. The description of overall PR of UPSs from different groups.  3.4. Degree of Effect of Demographic Variables  The significant correlations were further described by using the stepwise multiple  linear regression analysis using the demographic factors as independents and the restor‐ ative scores of each participant as dependents. The results showed the degree of influence  of the above key demographic factors on the restorative perception of four kinds of UPSs.  There was no multicollinearity (VIF < 5) or correlation (D‐W = 1.7~2.3) problems among  2    independents. Moreover, all models can fit and describe the data well (Adjusted R > 0.5).  For urban green spaces, about 75% of restorative scores could be explained by two  2    predictors including life satisfaction and natural hobbies (R =0.751). They all had positive  effects on restorative experience. Additionally, natural hobbies and natural experiences  were more significant than life satisfaction (Table 6).  Table 6. The effect of demographic characteristics on restoration of urban green spaces.  Collinearity Statistics  Variables  Unstandardized Beta  Standardized Beta  t  Sig.  Tolerance  VIF  (Constant) −57.026 ‐  −0.977  0.000 ‐  ‐  Life satisfaction  7.798  0.694  2.340  0.049  0.359  2.789  Natural hobbies and   9.963  0.907  2.683  0.036  0.274  3.650  Natural experiences  2    Note: Adjusted R = 0.751, D‐W = 1.904, n = 213.  In exhibition spaces, three factors, including education level, social support and per‐ ceived severity of COVID‐19, could clarify about 70% of the total variance in the restora‐ 2    tive scores (R = 0.699). Higher education levels and more social support will promote re‐ storative  experiences  obtained  by  visiting  exhibition  spaces.  Additionally,  educational  level had a stronger influence than social support, while the perceived severity of COVID‐ 19 was considered to be a negative factor for mental restoration (Table 7).  Table 7. The effect of demographic characteristics on restoration of exhibition spaces.  Collinearity Statistics  Variables  Unstandardized Beta  Standardized Beta  t  Sig.  Tolerance  VIF  (Constant)  30.962 ‐  1.566  0.000 ‐  ‐  Education level  24.046  0.605  3.041  0.008  0.986  1.077  Social support  13.900  0.582  2.864  0.011  0.925  1.012  Perceived severity of COVID‐19 −15.235 −0.588 −2.910  0.010  0.991  1.052  2    Note: Adjusted R = 0.699, D‐W = 1.840, n = 207.  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  8  of  13  In sports spaces, about 70% of the total variance in the restorative scores could be  2    illustrated by the factors of social support and perceived severity of COVID‐19 (R =0.727).  They had a similar degree of influence. There was a positive correlation between social  support and perceived restoration, while it was more difficult to perceive restoration in  sports spaces for people who perceived a greater degree of severity in COVID‐19 (Table  8).  Table 8. The effect of demographic characteristics on restoration of urban sports spaces.  Collinearity Statis‐ Unstandardized  Standardized  Variables  t  Sig.  tics  Beta  Beta  Tolerance  VIF  (Constant)   ‐  18.230  0.007 ‐  ‐  Social support  4.435  0.585  2.598  0.022  0.856  2.526  Perceived severity of COVID‐ −5.254 −0.577 −2.426  0.023  0.815  1.947  19  2    Note: Adjusted R = 0.727, D‐W = 1.882, n = 226.  In commercial spaces, four factors would explain 73% of the variance in the overall  2    score for restorative assessment (R = 0.731), including age, gender, perceived risk of visit‐ ing and infection of COVID‐19. The factor of gender had the largest positive effects on  restoration of commercial spaces, followed by age. Additionally, perceived risk of visiting  and infection of COVID‐19 had negative effects (Table 9).  Table 9. The effect of demographic characteristics on restoration of urban commercial spaces.  Collinearity Statistics  Variables  Unstandardized Beta  Standardized Beta  t  Sig.  Tolerance  VIF  (Constant)   ‐  3.219  0.013 ‐  ‐  Age   10.127  0.529  0.957  0.015  0.728  1.064  Gender   8.173  0.646  3.050  0.009  0.891  1.236  Perceived risk of visiting −13.245 −0.156 −2.683  0.036  0.882  1.588  Infection of COVID‐19 −24.941 −0.107 −2.127  0.049  0.890  1.397  2    Note: Adjusted R = 0.731, D‐W = 1.936, n = 195.  From the above results, we can see that different groups indeed show various evalu‐ ations of the same spaces, and each type of space had its unique key factors, which was  consistent with results of the ANOVA. Additionally, perceived severity of COVID‐19 and  social support were regarded as playing important roles in both exhibition spaces and  sports spaces.  4. Discussion  4.1. Verifying the Rankings of Four Typical UPSs  Our results showed that urban green spaces contained the most restorative potential,  followed by commercial spaces, sports spaces and exhibition spaces, which could be sup‐ ported by existing studies. As referred to in much precious research, the green experience  is regarded as a kind of direct and effective resource arousing mental restoration [3,27,28].  Moreover, its outdoor environment supplies good ventilation and spacious places, which  is beneficial to preventing the spread of the virus and avoiding close contact under the  request of antipandemic  precautions. Commercial spaces, such as  shopping malls and  business streets, are considered to be mechanisms supplying restorative services for cus‐ tomers  [9].  Some  special  settings,  such  as  comfortable  benches,  beautiful  tables,  green  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  9  of  13  landscape or fountains in commercial spaces, would support customers’ restoration by  promoting social interaction and relaxation [29]. Sports could concentrate one’s physical  and mental resources quickly on the current activity, which may clear away random and  disturbing  thoughts  and  renew  the  directed  attention  energy.  Plenty  of  studies  have  proven the healthy benefits of physical activities [30,31], such as positive mood and ener‐ getic state, which makes for self‐regulation and recovery. However, as a type of drastic  and intense stimulus, it is difficult to arouse the contemplative and peaceful state of mind  which is a symbol of long‐lasting restorative results [32]. Exhibition spaces supplied the  least  perceived  restorativeness  in  our  results.  According  to  Packer  and  Bond  [33]  and  Ouellette and Kaplan [18], museums on the theme of arts, history, zoos or monasteries  were regarded as restorative environments for some people who could understand the  artificial or historical connotation of exhibits or have related beliefs.  4.2. Identifying Differences in DCs’ Contributions to PR for Different UPSs  The present results showed that there were considerable differences in significant  demographic variables for four typical UPSs. Identifying the key demographic variables  for each kind of UPS would be beneficial for choosing the most effective restorative envi‐ ronment for various groups and for making better considerations about individualized  design.  Korpela et al. [19] have emphasized the associations between natural hobbies or nat‐ ural experiences and mentioning green nature. People with rich natural experiences or an  innate preference for nature have more desire to be around a green environment, and  obtain more pleasure when there. It is in line with our results that natural hobbies and  natural experiences are the most significant factors for urban green spaces. Then, the life  satisfaction reflects the positive or negative trend they interpret regarding environmental  elements [34]. Under normal conditions, the optimistic assessment of one’ own life will  result in high restorative perception, which is in line with our results, while the negative  correlations between the two items have also been proven because of the greater need for  restoration for people with more life stress or terrible mood [35].  The existing emotional bond between commodities or shopping actions and custom‐ ers enhance the restorative effect. Additionally, considering the Chinese social phenome‐ non  of  revenge  spending  during  the  postpandemic  era,  commercial  spaces  may  bring  much pleasure and entertainment, especially for females. Therefore, the female customers  obtain more restorative outcomes than males from visiting shopping spaces in our results,  which is consistent with the opinions of Korpela and Hartig [36] that restorative psycho‐ logical processes proceed more in people’s favorite places than in usual places. This view  is also documented by Caspi et al. [17], who state that the environment correlated with  individual’s needs or abilities fits users better. Additionally, the commercial spaces pro‐ cess more restorative outcomes to participants at the age of 18 to 30, which may be due to  their high frequency of their visits. In addition, most commercial spaces carry a high risk  of spreading the virus because of their poor ventilation and dense flow. Therefore, the  degree of individuals’ perceived risk depends on their access frequency.  Social  support  has  been  regarded  as  an  important  factor  in  our  results  for  sports  spaces, which could be inferred from existing conclusions. For example, Staats and Hartig  [37] suggested that companies would enhance restoration by offering a sense of safety and  more pleasure, especially in urban environments. Sullivan et al. [38] proved the relation‐ ship  between  restoration  and  sense  of  community  for  individuals  living  in  apartment  buildings.  Furthermore,  most  sporting  events  build  on  company  or  social  connections  [39]. Therefore, it could be argued that social support, including company, good interper‐ sonal relationships and sense of community, would result in an increase in restorative  perception. Additionally, perceived severity of COVID‐19 was also a reliable predictor of  one’s restoration when visiting the sports spaces. During the outbreak period of the pan‐ demic, the physical activities dramatically decreased, partly because of the shutdown of  gyms  and  fitness  centers,  which  caused  an  increasing  need  of  physical  exercise  and  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  10  of  13  worries about the inflection risk of visiting sports spaces at the same time [40]. Conse‐ quently, it is likely that the desire to visit sports spaces depends on individuals’ perceived  risk of COVID‐19 during the postpandemic era of China.  The comprehensive and correct interpretation of the surrounding environment or  emotional connections to the environment are the premise of compatibility and interac‐ tion, which is a requirement for the restorative process [41]. Additionally, frequent or re‐ peat visitors are more likely to gain restoration than first‐time visitors [5]. Therefore, par‐ ticipants with high educational levels more easily reported good evaluations of exhibition  spaces regarding their restorative qualities because of their strong ability to understand  and their investigation while visiting. As discussed above, the social support and low per‐ ceived severity of COVID‐19 contribute to satisfying experiences and a sense of safety,  which improve the frequency of exhibition spaces’ visiting.  4.3. Detecting the Influence of Interaction among DCs on PR  Some demographic variables were related in our results, which was consistent with  previous works [42]. This explains the reasons of conflicting study results on the degree  of influence of DCs on perception and preference. The interactions among DCs largely  depend on local socioeconomic conditions. For example, the education level would be  more likely to be related to age and income in developing countries than developed coun‐ tries  because  the  elderly  have  less  access  to  high‐quality  education  due  to  limited  re‐ sources.  Thus,  the  studies  conducted  in  different  regions  or  with  diverse  participants  would obtain divergent results. In our results, people who or whose families or friends  have been infected with COVID‐19 perceived a greater risk of visiting UPSs. It is not just  because infected history or related experiences increase the fear and anxiety of the pan‐ demic, but because this group will usually be identified as high‐risk and thus be con‐ strained from visiting UPSs to avoid the potential possibility of viral transmission. Addi‐ tionally, educational level was related to life satisfaction and social support, which was  also in line with current national conditions. Higher educational levels contribute to larger  income and more social respect, which could enhance life satisfaction and social support.  Detecting the interaction among DCs helps with understanding the differences in RP  of different groups. In the present study, people aged 18 to 30 obtained the strongest re‐ storative experiences from visiting UPSs. The reasons may link to the interaction between  perceived risk of visiting and infection of COVID‐19. This age group has better physical  and mental conditions and are more adventurous, which cause lower rates of disease and  perceived risk. Thus, these two DCs together played an role in the process of perceiving  spatial environment, which should be further explored.  5. Conclusions  Our research finds that DCs have effects on perceived restoration of UPSs, which  differ depending on the type of space. Meanwhile, the factors which could embody the  effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on people’s bodies, minds and behaviors are consid‐ ered. Overall, the urban green space is ranked the highest in terms of restorative potential,  followed by commercial spaces, sports spaces and exhibition spaces, and the pandemic  has negative effects on obtaining a restorative experience by adding visiting risk. On this  basis, the significant factors in four typical UPSs were identified and their degrees of in‐ fluence  were  evaluated,  which  further  emphasizes  the  importance  and  novelty  of  this  study. For example, the natural hobbies and life satisfaction are reliable predictors for ur‐ ban green space.  Based on related studies on the restorative environment, there is no doubt that some  UPSs have positive functions on relieving pressure, arousing mental restoration and pro‐ moting health, which city planners, landscape architects and even decision makers should  make  full  use  of,  especially  regarding  the  consumption  of  body  and  mind  caused  by  COVID‐19. Studies have already been conducted on the effects of DCs on restorative per‐ ception  of  urban  green spaces.  Our  results  are  relatively in  line  with  them,  even  after  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  11  of  13  focusing on other kinds of UPSs and Chinese samples, which strengthens the foundation  for wider application. Moreover, we also assess the impacts of the COVID‐19 pandemic,  which promotes the application of the restorative design into dealing with physical and  mental consumption caused by social isolation and pandemic disease aggression. Given  the groups’ differences in preference for choosing restorative places, personalized design  should be carried out to meet the needs of different groups in the processes of building  design and planning layout of UPSs. The results presented here offer more evidence for  understanding the relationship between DCs and perceived restoration, and more guid‐ ance for constructing restorative UPSs efficiently. Meanwhile, it provides directions for  city managers to plan and for urban residents to decide how to visit restorative urban  public spaces nearby.  In consideration of diversity, 12 places respective of four kinds of UPSs were selected  as research locations. However, disadvantages still exist when referring to generalization,  because it is hard to contain all features of the UPSs with limited study areas. Although  we selected participants randomly, some socioeconomic factors are still ignored. For in‐ stance, people with less leisure time, physical disabilities or low accessibility to UPSs have  fewer opportunities to visit UPSs and are excluded in our study. The nonconsideration of  the environmental features of UPSs also represents a possible bias. In addition, using the  Chinese version of Perceived Restorativeness Scale as a measurement tool may lead to  semantic guidance, which can cause a biased restorative assessment.  Thus, to obtain more accuracy and better applicable conclusions, studies with larger  samples and more comprehensive measurements should be conducted. In addition, we  should further analyze the impacts of the pandemic on individual travel behavior and  identify more related demographic factors to carry out a more comprehensive study of  the restorative environment in response to the pandemic. Additionally, differences in re‐ storative needs of different groups before and after the pandemic should be explored to  carry out more targeted space design.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, methodology, S.W. and A.L.; software, validation, for‐ mal analysis, writing—original draft preparation, S.W.; investigation, resources and data curation,  writing—review  and  editing,  project  administration,  S.W.;  funding  acquisition, A.L.  All  authors  have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research was funded by Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities,  China, grant number 2021QN1039, and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities,  China, grant number 2021QN1040.  Informed Consent Statement: Informed consent  was  obtained  from all subjects involved  in the  study.  Data Availability Statement: Not applicable.  Acknowledgments: The authors would like to thank all of the respondents for spending time to  participate in experiments and answer the questionnaires.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Ren, X.; Huang, W.; Pan, H.; Huang, T.; Wang, X.; Ma, Y. Mental Health during the COVID‐19 Outbreak in China: A Meta‐ Analysis. Psychiatr. Q. 2020, 91, 10227.  2. Hartig, T. Toward Understanding the Restorative Environment as a Health Resource. Open Space—People Space: An Interna‐ tional Conference on Inclusive Environments. 2004. Available online: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/241378226_To‐ ward_Understanding_the_Restorative_Environment_as_a_Health_Resource (accessed on 2 April 2009).  3. Kaplan, R.; Kaplan, S. The Experience of Nature: A Psychological Perspective; Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK, 1989.  4. Maas, J.; Verheij, R.A.; Groenewegen, P.P.; deVries, S.; Spreeuwenberg, P. Green space, urbanity, and health: How strong is the  relation? J. Epidemiol. Community Health 2006, 60, 587–592.  5. Kaplan, S.; Bardwell, L.V.; Slakter, D.B. The museum as a restorative environment. Environ. Behav. 1993, 25, 725–742.  6. Packer, J.; Ballantyne, R. Motivational factors and the visitor experience: A comparison of three sites. Curator Mus. J. 2002, 45,  183–198.  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  12  of  13  7. Scopelliti, M.; Giuliani, M.V. Choosing restorative environments across the lifespan: A matter of place experience. J. Environ.  Psychol. 2004, 24, 423–437.  8. Pals, R.; Steg, L.F.W.; Siero, K.I.; Zee, V.D. Development of the PRCQ: A measure of perceived restorative characteristics of zoo  attractions. J. Environ. Psychol. 2009, 29, 441–449.  9. Rosenbaum, M.S.; Otalora, M.L.; Ramirez, G.C. The restorative potential of shopping malls. J. Retail. Consum. Serv. 2016, 31, 157– 165.  10. Kang, N.; Ridgway, N.M. The importance of consumer market interactions as a form of social support for elderly consumers. J.  Public Policy Mark. 1996, 15, 108–117.  11. Rosenbaum, M.S. Return on community for consumers and service establishments. J. Serv. Res. 2008, 11, 179–196.  12. Pretty, J.; Peacock, J.; Sellens, M.; Griffin, M. The mental and physical health outcomes of green exercise. Int. J. Environ. Health  Res. 2005, 15, 319–337.  13. Giuntella, O.; Hyde, K.; Saccardo, S.; Sadoff, S. Lifestyle and Mental Health Disruptions during COVID‐19. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.  USA 2021, 118, e2016632118.  14. Staats, H.; Jahncke, H.; Herzog, T.; Hartig, T. Urban options for psychoogcal restoration: Common strategies in everyday situa‐ tions. PLoS ONE 2016, 11, e0146213.  15. Hartig, T.; Lindblom, K.; Ovefelt, K. The home and near home area offer restoration opportunities differentiated by gender.  Scand. Hous. Plan. Res. 1998, 15, 283–296.  16. Regan, C.L.; Horn, S.A. To nature or not to nature: Associations between environmental preferences, mood states and demo‐ graphic factors. J. Environ. Psychol. 2005, 25, 57–66.  17. Caspi, A.; Roberts, B.W.; Shiner, R.L. Personality development: Stability and change. Annu. Rev. Psychol. 2005, 56, 453–484.  18. Ouellette, P.; Kaplan, S. The monastery as a restorative environment. J. Environ. Psychol. 2005, 25, 175–188.  19. Korpela, K.M.; Ylén, M.; Tyrväinen, L.; Silvennoinen, H. Determinants of restorative experiences in everyday favorite places.  Health Place 2008, 14, 636–652.  20. Bauer, R.A. Consumer Behavior as Risk Taking. In Proceedings of the 43rd National Conference of the American Marketing  Assocation, Chicago, IL, USA, 15–17 June 1960; American Marketing Association: Chicago, IL, USA, 1960.  21. Jonas, A.; Mansfeld, Y.; Paz, S.; Potasman, I. Determinants of Health Risk Perception among Low‐risk‐taking Tourists Traveling  to Developing Countries. J. Travel Res. 2011, 49, 87–99.  22. Vries, D.S.; Verheij, R.A.; Groenewegen, P.P. Natural environments—healthy environments? An exploratory analysis of the  relationship between greenspace and health. Environ. Plan. A 2003, 35, 1717–1731.  23. Ye, L.H.; Zhang, F.; Wu, J.P. Developing the restoration environment scale. China J. Health Psychol. 2010, 18, 1515–1518.  24. Yao, Y.; Zhu, X.; Xu, Y.; Yang, H.; Wu, X.; Li, Y.; Zhang, Y. Assessing the visual quality of green landscaping in rural residential  areas: The case of Changzhou, China. Environ. Monit. Assess. 2012, 184, 951–967.  25. Wang, R.; Zhao, J.Demographic groups’ differences in visual preference for vegetated landscapes in urban green space. Sustain.  Cities Soc. 2017, 28, 350–357.  26. Rogge, E.; Nevens, F.; Gulinck, H. Perception of rural landscapes in Flanders: Looking beyond aesthetics. Landsc. Urban Plan.  2007, 82, 159–174.  27. Bratman, G.N.; Daily, G.C.; Levy, B.J.; Gross, J.J. The Benefits of Nature Experience: Improved Affect and Cognition. Landsc.  Urban Plan. 2015, 138, 41–50.  28. Ulrich, R. Natural versus Urban Scenes Some Psychophysiological Effects. Environ. Behav. 1981, 13, 523–556.  29. Korpela, K.M.; Hartig, T.; Kaiser, F.G.; Fuhrer, U. Restorative experience and self‐regulation in favorite places. Environ. Behav.  2001, 33, 572–589.  30. Timmons, B.W.; Leblanc, A.G.; Carson, V.; Gorber, S.C.; Dillman, C.; Janssen, I. Systematic review of physical activity and health  in the early years (aged 0–4 years). BMC Public Health 2012, 17, 773–792.  31. Manley, A.F. Physical activity and health: A report of the Surgeon General.   Atlanta, Georgia. US Department of Health and  Human Services, Public Health Service, CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 1997.  Available online: www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/sgr/pdf/execsumm.pdf (accessed on 15 September 1997).  32. Herzog, T.R.; Black, A.M.; Fountaine, K.A.; Knotts, D.J. Reflection and attentional recovery as distinctive benefits of restorative  environments. J. Environ. Psychol. 1997, 17, 165–170.  33. Packer, J.; Bond, N. Museums as Restorative Environments. Curator Mus. J. 2010, 53, 421–436.  34. Feist, G.J.; Bodner, T.E.; Jacobs, J.F.; Miles, M.; Tan, V. Integrating top‐down and bottom‐up structural models of subjective well‐ being: A longitudinal investigation. J. Personal. Soc. Psychol. 1995, 68, 138–150.  35. Bodin, M.; Hartig, T. Does the outdoor environment matter for psychological restoration gained through running? Psychol. Sport  Exerc. 2003, 4, 141–153.  36. Korpela, K.M.; Hartig, T. Restorative qualities of favourite places. J. Environ. Psychol. 1996, 16, 221–233.  37. Staats, H.; Kieviet, A.; Hartig, T. Where to recover from attentional fatigue: An expectancy‐value analysis of environmental  preference. J. Environ. Psychol. 2003, 23, 147–157.   spaces. Environ. Behav. 2004, 36, 678–700.  38. Sullivan, W.C.; Kuo, F.E.; Depooter, S.F. The fruit of urban nature: Vital neighborhood 39. Shakib, S.; Veliz, P. Race, sport and social support: A comparison between African American and White youths’ perceptions of  social support for sport participation. Int. Rev. Sociol. Sport 2013, 48, 295–317.  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  13  of  13  40. Yang, Y.; Joerg, K. Determinants of physical activity maintenance during the COVID‐19 pandemic: A focus on fitness apps.  Transl. Behav. Med. 2020, 10, 835–842.  41. Kaplan, S. The restorative benefits of nature: Toward an integrative framework. J. Environ. Psychol. 1995, 15, 169–182.  42. Kaltenborn, B.P.; Bjerke, T. Associations between environmental value orientations and landscape preferences. Landsc. Urban  Plan. 2002, 59, 1–11.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buildings Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Demographic Groups&rsquo; Differences in Restorative Perception of Urban Public Spaces in COVID-19

Buildings , Volume 12 (7) – Jun 21, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/demographic-groups-rsquo-differences-in-restorative-perception-of-QHcFg1k2RV
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2022 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2075-5309
DOI
10.3390/buildings12070869
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Demographic Groups’ Differences in Restorative Perception of  Urban Public Spaces in COVID‐19  Shiqi Wang and Ang Li *  School of Architecture and Design, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, China;  wangshiqi@cumt.edu.cn  *  Correspondence: li_ang@cumt.edu.cn; Tel.: +86‐136‐2461‐4957  Abstract: The health‐promoting functions of one’s spatial environment have been widely recog‐ nized. Facing the huge loss of mental resources caused by the COVID‐19 pandemic, visiting and  perception of urban public spaces with restorative potential should be encouraged. However per‐ ceived,  restorativeness  differs  from  individual  features. Moreover,  the COVID‐19  pandemic  has  considerable effects on residents’ leisure travel and psychological states. Therefore, the aim of our  research is to identify the demographic variables influencing restorative perception of typical urban  public spaces under the social background of the COVID‐19 pandemic. The research consists of 841  residents’ restorative evaluation of four kinds of urban public spaces according to the Chinese ver‐ sion of the Perceived Restorativeness Scale, including urban green spaces, exhibition spaces, com‐ mercial spaces and sports spaces. Then, 10 individual factors were recorded which represented their  demographic features and the influence of COVID‐19. Then, the relationship between individual  features and perceived restoration of different urban public spaces was analyzed, respectively, by  using One‐way ANOVA and regression analysis. The results show that the urban green spaces were  ranked as the most restorative, followed by commercial spaces, sports spaces and exhibition spaces.  Further, the findings indicate that significant factors affect the restoration of four typical urban pub‐ Citation: Wang, S.; Li, A.   lic spaces.  Demographic Groups’ Differences in  Restorative Perception of Urban  Keywords: urban public space; health‐promoting environments; psychological restoration; demo‐ Public Spaces in COVID‐19.   graphic variable; COVID‐19 pandemic  Buildings 2022, 12, 869.  https://doi.org/10.3390/  buildings12070869  Academic Editor: Dirk H.R.   1. Introduction  Spennemann  The COVID‐19  outbreak at the beginning of 2020  has made dramatical effects  on  public health both in mind and body all over the world. In China, the social policies and  Received: 18 May 2022  regulations for dealing with the outbreak limited people’s abilities to partake in typical,  Accepted: 19 June 2022  Published: 21 June 2022  out‐of‐home social activities, which caused a sharp decline in entertainment activities, so‐ cial contact and physical activities. Therefore, emotional problems are common among  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  neu‐ urban residents in China after suffering from the COVID‐19 pandemic, such as indolence,  tral  with  regard  to  jurisdictional  anxiety,  depression  and  self‐reported  stresses  [1].  The  restorative  environment  is  re‐ claims in published maps and institu‐ garded as having potential and power to renew physical, psychological and social capa‐ tional affiliations.  bilities consumed in the process of adaptation [2]. Regarding the huge need of restoration  for residents, visiting a restorative environment to regain mental capacities and energy is  of great importance, especially during this special time.  Copyright: © 2022 by the authors. Li‐ There has been extensive published research demonstrating the restorative attributes  censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  of some kinds of urban public spaces (UPSs), including urban green spaces, exhibition  This article  is an open access article  spaces, commercial spaces and sports spaces. First of all, the UPSs are identified as a typ‐ distributed under the terms and con‐ ical restorative environment by creating natural experiences [3]. Residents who have close  ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ tribution (CC BY) license (https://cre‐ and frequent contacts with parks, gardens or other sources of natural environment report  ativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  less  stress  and  negative  attitudes  [4].  Although  natural  environments  are  the  typical  Buildings 2022, 12, 869. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12070869  www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  2  of  13  settings for possessing restorative potential, well‐designed constructions are also capable  of attracting involuntary attention and thus promoting restoration from directed attention  fatigue.  Museums  contribute  to  restorative  experiences  for  some  people.  The  earliest  study about this was conducted by Kaplan et al. [5], which declared the restorative expe‐ rience offered by art museums, especially for frequent visitors. Similar conclusions were  also drawn in other museum environment, such as zoos, history museums or galleries [6– 8]. Moreover, Rosenbaum et al. [9] illustrated that shopping centers could provide cus‐ tomers with restorative servicescapes by  decorating them with green facilities. On the  other hand, markets or other similar commercial spaces were proved to contain restora‐ tive potential by enhancing social supportive resources and encourage communication  and gathering [10,11]. As we all know, physical activities bring significant emotional ben‐ efits by improved self‐esteem, enhanced emotional regulation, adaptation to stress and  better sleep quality [12], which is beneficial to physical and mental restoration. The lack  of physical activity is a leading risk factor for depression during the pandemic [13]. There‐ fore, the sports spaces were concluded as restorative in our studies.   It has been suggested that restorative benefits caused by the environment differ be‐ cause of the diversities of demographic characteristics (DCs) [14]. Hartig et al. [15] consid‐ ered gender as a determinant of restorative outcomes by investigating the differences on  the perceived restoration of 26 couples. Regan and Horn [16] explored the association be‐ tween ages and environmental preference by taking people aged from 6 to 76 years‐old as  a sample. Additionally, the person–environment fit theory points that people tend to pre‐ fer an environment which is correlated with their needs or capacities [17], which empha‐ sizes the compatibility between individual attributes and the environment. For example,  monasteries are thought of as a restorative environment only for pilgrims who could un‐ derstand its cultural connotations [18]. Then, Korpela et al. [19] regarded natural hobbies  and natural experience, health self‐assessment, life satisfaction and social support as de‐ mographic  factors  because  of  their  influence  on  visiting  desire  and  restorative  need.  Therefore, the chosen determinants related to personal features are mainly guided by re‐ search about the personality traits referred to above when taking into the distinct restora‐ tive perception of spaces, including gender, age, education, natural hobbies and natural  experiences, health self‐assessment, life satisfaction and social support.   The analysis of the research literature above shows the great potential of UPSs and  residents’ strong needs to renew their mental resources. However, the pandemic in China  has been basically brought under control and most of UPSs can be visited normally at  present. Risks of infection still exist and affect people’s behavior and psychology, espe‐ cially the frequency and willingness to visit public spaces. Some studies related to the  influencing factors of leisure travel give the present research inspirations. Perceived risk  was defined as the unpredictable consequences of one’ actions [20]. In the process of vis‐ iting the destinations, it has a huge influence on people’s decisions and satisfaction [21],  which,  according  to  our  studies,  mainly  results  from  the  possibility  of  inflection  of  COVID‐19. Therefore, we selected three items that represented the perceived risk caused  by the COVID‐19 pandemic as additional demographic variables, including the perceived  severity of COVID‐19, perceived risk of visiting and infection history of COVID‐19.   To sum up, the present study was inspired by the changes of residents visiting and  perceiving urban public spaces under the influence of the COVID‐19 pandemic. In con‐ sideration of their health and attitude problems caused by social isolation and disease  stress, it is important to find out the restorative outcomes of UPSs during special times  such as these more deeply. Though some published studies have documented the rela‐ tionship between restorative perception and demographic characteristics well [22], there  is little discussion about the impact of the pandemic, which has significant impacts on  behavior patterns and personal factors.   Although the differences in perceptions of restorative environments among groups  have been widely discussed, the effects of the pandemics have not been explored. Moreo‐ ver, published studies mainly focused on urban green spaces and paid less attention to  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  3  of  13  other kinds of urban public spaces, especially indoor spaces. Considering the proven ef‐ fects of DCs on perceived restoration (PR), we hypothesized that people with different  DCs  will  make  different  restorative  evaluations  of  UPSs,  and  some  DCs  will  consider  some types of UPSs to have more important effects on PR. In order to verify the hypothe‐ ses, the aim of the study is to (1) identify the key DCs influencing restorative perception  of typical UPSs under the social background of the COVID‐19 pandemic and (2) evaluate  the impact degree of DCs on restorative perception in four typical UPSs.  2. Methods  2.1. Study Area  Our study area was Xuzhou City (34° N and 117° E), belonging to Jiangsu Province  in consideration of its representativeness of most cities in China. Then 4 kinds of city pub‐ lic spaces which had been evaluated as restorative in published studies were recognized  as research objects, including (1) city green spaces, (2) exhibition spaces, (3) sports spaces  and (4) commercial spaces. After that, 3 specific buildings or outdoor spaces with different  sizes or appearances in each type were picked in order to show its characteristics more  comprehensively. Additionally, all selected places have good operations and free visita‐ tions during the survey period. Located in main urban areas, there are no obvious eco‐ nomic or demographic differences among regions. To reduce the interference of social– cultural factors, we exclude those with special events such as festival celebrations, sales  promotions and sports games. At last, 12 locations have been selected as final survey sub‐ jects. Their information is shown below in Table 1.  Table 1. Information of study areas.  Types of  Place 1  Place 2  Place 3  Spaces  A1: Yunlong Park, 30.67 ha, in‐ A2: Quanshan Park, 113.33 ha, in‐ A3: Huaihai Park, 39.85 ha, in‐ City green  cluding 8 ha of water surface,  cluding 0.21 ha of water surface,  cluding 0.43 ha of water sur‐ spaces  city center  south of city  face, east of city  B3: Xuzhou City Wall Mu‐ Exhibition  B1: Xuzhou museum, building  B2: Xuzhou Zoo, floor area 73,333  seum, building area 950 m ,  2 2 spaces  area 12,000 m , west of city  m , city center  city center  C1: Xuzhou city stadium,  Sports  C2: Han gymnasium, building  C3: Lide fitness center, build‐ building area 66,700 m , for  2 2 spaces  area 500 m , south of city  ing area 2000 m , south of city  6000 people, west of city  D1: Hubu mountain pedestrian  D3: Kuangxi small market,  Commer‐ D2: Wanda shopping mall, build‐ street, length 1200 m, center of  building area 700 m , west of  cial spaces  ing area 53,000 m , south of city  city  city  2.2. Perceived Restorativeness Assessment   The  questionnaire  consisted  of  three  parts.  The  first  part  aimed  to  obtain  demo‐ graphic information including (1) gender, (2) age, (3) education level, (4) natural hobbies  and natural experiences, (5) health self‐assessment, (6) life satisfaction and (7) social sup‐ port, which were inspired by published research. The second part was to investigate the  effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on residents’ perception and attitudes, consisting of (8)  perceived severity of COVID‐19, (9) perceived risk of visiting the space, and (10) own or  familiar people’ infection of COVID‐19. The third part was the Chinese version of Per‐ ceived Restorativeness Scale (PRS) containing 22 items, established by Ye et al. [23], which  had high reliability and validity (a = 0.936/ S‐B = 0.903), to measure citizens’ obtained per‐ ceived restorativeness after visiting the spaces. The pretest was conducted by 20 people  without professional knowledge from different ages and educational groups, to ensure  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  4  of  13  the clearness of all questions and acceptable reliability and validity. According to that, a  few alterations were made.   The field survey was conducted during June of 2021, when the spread of COVID‐19  had been largely brought under control and residents could visit urban public places more  freely than during the outbreak period. In total, 80 questionnaires were distributed in 12  places, respectively, with the uniform distribution of genders and ages. People with pro‐ fessional knowledge, alcohol or drug addiction, mental or physical illnesses, emotional  frustration, and life challenges were excluded. In order to avoid cognitive bias caused by  unfamiliarity  with the places, we chose frequent visitors. We notified each participant  about the content and purpose of our experiment and obtained their permission before  proceeding.  The  survey  of  each  place  happened  between  9  am  and  11  am  in  sunny  weather. In the end, the 960 questionnaires were taken back. The missing or casual ques‐ tions were excluded, and 841 valid ones were obtained.  2.3. Data Analysis  For data analysis, we used SPSS 22.0 software. Firstly, the data was processed by the  method of One‐way ANOVA to test if there is a significant difference in restorative eval‐ uation of UPSs among different demographic groups. The demographic characteristics  which have significant effects on restorative perception of 4 typical urban public spaces  were identified, respectively. Then, to measure the degree of influence degree of demo‐ graphic characteristics on perceptive restoration of urban public spaces, the stepwise mul‐ tiple linear regression analysis was carried out. Before starting the regression analysis, a  correlation analysis was performed to avoid problems with multicollinearity. These meth‐ ods have been widely and frequently used in similar research to analyze the perceptive  difference of people with different demographic characteristics [24]. For example, Wang  and Zhao (2017) used these methods to check and assess demographic variables’ effect on  landscape preference [25]; Rogge et al. (2007) utilized them to analyze differences in per‐ ception of rural landscapes among different groups [26].  3. Results  3.1. Description of Samples  Firstly, the interclass reliability of demographic information and four parts of the re‐ storativeness assessment were calculated, respectively. Cronbach’s α of demographic in‐ formation was 0.908, which showed that the survey data is considered to have internal  consistency. Then, Table 2 shows the description of participants’ demographic character‐ istics, which was similar to population features of Xuzhou in 2010. Additionally, a higher  proportion  of  respondents  are aged  between  25 and  30,  probably  due to  a  higher  fre‐ quency of outdoor excursions in younger people. In addition, by calculating the mean  restorative scores of each type of urban public space, we ranked the urban green spaces  (mean = 46.67) in the order of the most restorative, followed by commercial spaces (mean  = 43.44) and sports spaces (mean = 39.90). Additionally, the exhibition spaces (mean =  39.17) supplied the least PR values in our results.      Buildings 2022, 12, 869  5  of  13  Table 2. Description of characteristics of participants (n = 841).  Demographic  N  %  Demographic  N  %  Gender     Life satisfaction     Male  417  49.6  Dis‐satisfied   297  35.3  Female  424  50.4  So‐so   247  29.4  Age       Satisfied  297  35.3  18–30  64  7.6  Social support     31–40  370  44.0  Not much  111  13.2  41–50  92  10.9  Moderate  334  39.7  51–60  136  16.2  Much   396  47.1  Over 61  179  21.3  Perceived severity of COVID‐19  Education       Not serious  247  29.4  Higher education  284  33.8  A little serious  309  36.8  Without higher education  557  66.2  Very serious  285  33.8  Natural hobbies and Natural experiences  Perceived risk of visiting       Few  395  47.0  Not risky  240  28.5  Moderate  358  42.6  A little risky  223  26.5  Many   88  10.4  Very risky  378  45.0  Health self‐assessment     Infection of COVID‐19     Sick   198  23.5  None   756  89.9  Subhealthy  291  34.6  Familiar person’s infection  64  7.6  Healthy  352  41.9  Own infection  21  2.5  3.2. Rating Restorative Experiences of Eight Rooms  The intraclass correlations coefficient was calculated to test the interclass reliability.  The results were Cronbach’s α = 0.901, p < 0.001, which showed a high consistency. Then,  the mean scores of each place were calculated to rank their restorative potential (Table 3).  Huaihai Park (A3) had the highest scores followed by Xuzhou Zoo (B2) and Yunlong Park  (A1), while the Xuzhou city (C1) stadium has the lowest scores. The city green spaces have  the  highest  restoration,  followed  by  commercial  spaces,  sports  spaces  and  exhibition  spaces.  Table 3. The restorative ranking of 12 study places.  City Green Spaces  Exhibition Spaces  Sports Spaces  Commercial Spaces  Places  A1  A2  A3  B1  B2  B3  C1  C2  C3  D1  D2  D3  Mean  4.83  4.52  4.98  3.21  4.85  3.36  3.67  4.55  4.32  4.45  4.63  4.51  Grand average  4.78  3.81  4.18  4.53  Ranking  1  4  3  2  3.3. Significant Factors of Perceived Restoration  Using One‐way ANOVA, the influential factors were identified (Table 4). There were  significant differences in the restorative perception of urban green spaces among people  with different natural hobbies and natural experiences (F = 4.325, p = 0.039) and life satis‐ faction (F = 5.293, p = 0.022). Education (F = 9.248, p = 0.008), social support (F = 3.848, p =  0.005) and perceived risk of visiting (F = 3.988, p = 0.041) were considerable factors when  regarding people’s perception of exhibition spaces. People with different social support  and perceived risk of visiting show markedly different evaluations of sports spaces. In  commercial spaces, age, gender, perceived risk of visiting and infection of COVID‐19 are  important demographic factors. Then, the correlation analysis among identified factors  showed that perceived risk of visiting was related to infection of COVID‐19, educational  level was related to life satisfaction and social support, and perceived severity of COVID‐ 19 was related to perceived risk of visiting (Table 5). Apart from that, no statistically sig‐ nificant correlations existed among demographic factors.      Buildings 2022, 12, 869  6  of  13  Table 4. One‐way ANOVA among different groups’ assessment of urban public spaces.  Space   Demographic Variable  Sum of Squares  DF  Meansquare  F  P  Urban green space  Natural hobbies and Natural experiences  697.583  2  348.792  4.325  .039  (n = 213)  Life satisfaction  780.500  2  390.250  5.293  .022  Education   2088.008  1  2088.008  9.248  .008  Exhibition space  Social support   1933.000  2  966.500  3.848  .045  (n = 207)  Perceived risk of visiting  1978.755  2  989.377  3.988  .041  Sports space  Social support  507.951  2  354.413  3.215  0.31  (n = 226)  Perceived severity of COVID‐19  549.668  2  274.834  4.844  .022  Age   3168.143  4  792.036  4.066  .024  Commercial space  Gender   835.204  1  835.204  5.162  .034  (n = 195)  Perceived risk of visiting  506.417  2  253.208  4.345  .048  Infection of COVID‐19  587.503  1  587.503  4.526  .049  Table 5. Correlations among significant demographic factors.  Life  Social  Perceived  Perceived  Gen‐ Educa‐ Natural  Infection of     Age  Satis‐ Sup‐ Severity of  Risk of  der  tion  Hobby  COVID‐19  faction  port  COVID‐19  Visiting  Gender   0.051  0.758  0.264  0.337  0.215  0.328  0.595  0.175  Age       0.325  0.221  0.157  0.127  0.204  0.215  0.307  Education       0.187  0.289 *  0.324 *  0.126  0.489  0.279  Natural hobby         0.056  0.081  0.192  0.135  0.176  Life satisfaction           0.215  0.384  0.429  0.495  Social support             0.517  0.269  0.124  Perceived  severity               0.159 *  0.178  of COVID‐19  Perceived  risk  of                 0.141 **  visiting   * Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level. ** Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level.  At last, the detailed perceived differences were explored by calculating the mean and  standard deviation of restorative ratings from different groups. Generally speaking, par‐ ticipants with higher levels of education, natural hobbies and natural experiences, life sat‐ isfaction and social support showed more restorative assessment. However, the perceived  risk of visiting and perceived severity of COVID‐19 had negative effects on restorative  perception. Moreover, participants aged 18 to 30 showed the highest rating for commer‐ cial spaces, followed by 41–50 years old, 51–60 years old and >60 years old. The respond‐ ents at the age of 31–41 ranked lowest (Figure 1).  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  7  of  13  Figure 1. The description of overall PR of UPSs from different groups.  3.4. Degree of Effect of Demographic Variables  The significant correlations were further described by using the stepwise multiple  linear regression analysis using the demographic factors as independents and the restor‐ ative scores of each participant as dependents. The results showed the degree of influence  of the above key demographic factors on the restorative perception of four kinds of UPSs.  There was no multicollinearity (VIF < 5) or correlation (D‐W = 1.7~2.3) problems among  2    independents. Moreover, all models can fit and describe the data well (Adjusted R > 0.5).  For urban green spaces, about 75% of restorative scores could be explained by two  2    predictors including life satisfaction and natural hobbies (R =0.751). They all had positive  effects on restorative experience. Additionally, natural hobbies and natural experiences  were more significant than life satisfaction (Table 6).  Table 6. The effect of demographic characteristics on restoration of urban green spaces.  Collinearity Statistics  Variables  Unstandardized Beta  Standardized Beta  t  Sig.  Tolerance  VIF  (Constant) −57.026 ‐  −0.977  0.000 ‐  ‐  Life satisfaction  7.798  0.694  2.340  0.049  0.359  2.789  Natural hobbies and   9.963  0.907  2.683  0.036  0.274  3.650  Natural experiences  2    Note: Adjusted R = 0.751, D‐W = 1.904, n = 213.  In exhibition spaces, three factors, including education level, social support and per‐ ceived severity of COVID‐19, could clarify about 70% of the total variance in the restora‐ 2    tive scores (R = 0.699). Higher education levels and more social support will promote re‐ storative  experiences  obtained  by  visiting  exhibition  spaces.  Additionally,  educational  level had a stronger influence than social support, while the perceived severity of COVID‐ 19 was considered to be a negative factor for mental restoration (Table 7).  Table 7. The effect of demographic characteristics on restoration of exhibition spaces.  Collinearity Statistics  Variables  Unstandardized Beta  Standardized Beta  t  Sig.  Tolerance  VIF  (Constant)  30.962 ‐  1.566  0.000 ‐  ‐  Education level  24.046  0.605  3.041  0.008  0.986  1.077  Social support  13.900  0.582  2.864  0.011  0.925  1.012  Perceived severity of COVID‐19 −15.235 −0.588 −2.910  0.010  0.991  1.052  2    Note: Adjusted R = 0.699, D‐W = 1.840, n = 207.  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  8  of  13  In sports spaces, about 70% of the total variance in the restorative scores could be  2    illustrated by the factors of social support and perceived severity of COVID‐19 (R =0.727).  They had a similar degree of influence. There was a positive correlation between social  support and perceived restoration, while it was more difficult to perceive restoration in  sports spaces for people who perceived a greater degree of severity in COVID‐19 (Table  8).  Table 8. The effect of demographic characteristics on restoration of urban sports spaces.  Collinearity Statis‐ Unstandardized  Standardized  Variables  t  Sig.  tics  Beta  Beta  Tolerance  VIF  (Constant)   ‐  18.230  0.007 ‐  ‐  Social support  4.435  0.585  2.598  0.022  0.856  2.526  Perceived severity of COVID‐ −5.254 −0.577 −2.426  0.023  0.815  1.947  19  2    Note: Adjusted R = 0.727, D‐W = 1.882, n = 226.  In commercial spaces, four factors would explain 73% of the variance in the overall  2    score for restorative assessment (R = 0.731), including age, gender, perceived risk of visit‐ ing and infection of COVID‐19. The factor of gender had the largest positive effects on  restoration of commercial spaces, followed by age. Additionally, perceived risk of visiting  and infection of COVID‐19 had negative effects (Table 9).  Table 9. The effect of demographic characteristics on restoration of urban commercial spaces.  Collinearity Statistics  Variables  Unstandardized Beta  Standardized Beta  t  Sig.  Tolerance  VIF  (Constant)   ‐  3.219  0.013 ‐  ‐  Age   10.127  0.529  0.957  0.015  0.728  1.064  Gender   8.173  0.646  3.050  0.009  0.891  1.236  Perceived risk of visiting −13.245 −0.156 −2.683  0.036  0.882  1.588  Infection of COVID‐19 −24.941 −0.107 −2.127  0.049  0.890  1.397  2    Note: Adjusted R = 0.731, D‐W = 1.936, n = 195.  From the above results, we can see that different groups indeed show various evalu‐ ations of the same spaces, and each type of space had its unique key factors, which was  consistent with results of the ANOVA. Additionally, perceived severity of COVID‐19 and  social support were regarded as playing important roles in both exhibition spaces and  sports spaces.  4. Discussion  4.1. Verifying the Rankings of Four Typical UPSs  Our results showed that urban green spaces contained the most restorative potential,  followed by commercial spaces, sports spaces and exhibition spaces, which could be sup‐ ported by existing studies. As referred to in much precious research, the green experience  is regarded as a kind of direct and effective resource arousing mental restoration [3,27,28].  Moreover, its outdoor environment supplies good ventilation and spacious places, which  is beneficial to preventing the spread of the virus and avoiding close contact under the  request of antipandemic  precautions. Commercial spaces, such as  shopping malls and  business streets, are considered to be mechanisms supplying restorative services for cus‐ tomers  [9].  Some  special  settings,  such  as  comfortable  benches,  beautiful  tables,  green  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  9  of  13  landscape or fountains in commercial spaces, would support customers’ restoration by  promoting social interaction and relaxation [29]. Sports could concentrate one’s physical  and mental resources quickly on the current activity, which may clear away random and  disturbing  thoughts  and  renew  the  directed  attention  energy.  Plenty  of  studies  have  proven the healthy benefits of physical activities [30,31], such as positive mood and ener‐ getic state, which makes for self‐regulation and recovery. However, as a type of drastic  and intense stimulus, it is difficult to arouse the contemplative and peaceful state of mind  which is a symbol of long‐lasting restorative results [32]. Exhibition spaces supplied the  least  perceived  restorativeness  in  our  results.  According  to  Packer  and  Bond  [33]  and  Ouellette and Kaplan [18], museums on the theme of arts, history, zoos or monasteries  were regarded as restorative environments for some people who could understand the  artificial or historical connotation of exhibits or have related beliefs.  4.2. Identifying Differences in DCs’ Contributions to PR for Different UPSs  The present results showed that there were considerable differences in significant  demographic variables for four typical UPSs. Identifying the key demographic variables  for each kind of UPS would be beneficial for choosing the most effective restorative envi‐ ronment for various groups and for making better considerations about individualized  design.  Korpela et al. [19] have emphasized the associations between natural hobbies or nat‐ ural experiences and mentioning green nature. People with rich natural experiences or an  innate preference for nature have more desire to be around a green environment, and  obtain more pleasure when there. It is in line with our results that natural hobbies and  natural experiences are the most significant factors for urban green spaces. Then, the life  satisfaction reflects the positive or negative trend they interpret regarding environmental  elements [34]. Under normal conditions, the optimistic assessment of one’ own life will  result in high restorative perception, which is in line with our results, while the negative  correlations between the two items have also been proven because of the greater need for  restoration for people with more life stress or terrible mood [35].  The existing emotional bond between commodities or shopping actions and custom‐ ers enhance the restorative effect. Additionally, considering the Chinese social phenome‐ non  of  revenge  spending  during  the  postpandemic  era,  commercial  spaces  may  bring  much pleasure and entertainment, especially for females. Therefore, the female customers  obtain more restorative outcomes than males from visiting shopping spaces in our results,  which is consistent with the opinions of Korpela and Hartig [36] that restorative psycho‐ logical processes proceed more in people’s favorite places than in usual places. This view  is also documented by Caspi et al. [17], who state that the environment correlated with  individual’s needs or abilities fits users better. Additionally, the commercial spaces pro‐ cess more restorative outcomes to participants at the age of 18 to 30, which may be due to  their high frequency of their visits. In addition, most commercial spaces carry a high risk  of spreading the virus because of their poor ventilation and dense flow. Therefore, the  degree of individuals’ perceived risk depends on their access frequency.  Social  support  has  been  regarded  as  an  important  factor  in  our  results  for  sports  spaces, which could be inferred from existing conclusions. For example, Staats and Hartig  [37] suggested that companies would enhance restoration by offering a sense of safety and  more pleasure, especially in urban environments. Sullivan et al. [38] proved the relation‐ ship  between  restoration  and  sense  of  community  for  individuals  living  in  apartment  buildings.  Furthermore,  most  sporting  events  build  on  company  or  social  connections  [39]. Therefore, it could be argued that social support, including company, good interper‐ sonal relationships and sense of community, would result in an increase in restorative  perception. Additionally, perceived severity of COVID‐19 was also a reliable predictor of  one’s restoration when visiting the sports spaces. During the outbreak period of the pan‐ demic, the physical activities dramatically decreased, partly because of the shutdown of  gyms  and  fitness  centers,  which  caused  an  increasing  need  of  physical  exercise  and  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  10  of  13  worries about the inflection risk of visiting sports spaces at the same time [40]. Conse‐ quently, it is likely that the desire to visit sports spaces depends on individuals’ perceived  risk of COVID‐19 during the postpandemic era of China.  The comprehensive and correct interpretation of the surrounding environment or  emotional connections to the environment are the premise of compatibility and interac‐ tion, which is a requirement for the restorative process [41]. Additionally, frequent or re‐ peat visitors are more likely to gain restoration than first‐time visitors [5]. Therefore, par‐ ticipants with high educational levels more easily reported good evaluations of exhibition  spaces regarding their restorative qualities because of their strong ability to understand  and their investigation while visiting. As discussed above, the social support and low per‐ ceived severity of COVID‐19 contribute to satisfying experiences and a sense of safety,  which improve the frequency of exhibition spaces’ visiting.  4.3. Detecting the Influence of Interaction among DCs on PR  Some demographic variables were related in our results, which was consistent with  previous works [42]. This explains the reasons of conflicting study results on the degree  of influence of DCs on perception and preference. The interactions among DCs largely  depend on local socioeconomic conditions. For example, the education level would be  more likely to be related to age and income in developing countries than developed coun‐ tries  because  the  elderly  have  less  access  to  high‐quality  education  due  to  limited  re‐ sources.  Thus,  the  studies  conducted  in  different  regions  or  with  diverse  participants  would obtain divergent results. In our results, people who or whose families or friends  have been infected with COVID‐19 perceived a greater risk of visiting UPSs. It is not just  because infected history or related experiences increase the fear and anxiety of the pan‐ demic, but because this group will usually be identified as high‐risk and thus be con‐ strained from visiting UPSs to avoid the potential possibility of viral transmission. Addi‐ tionally, educational level was related to life satisfaction and social support, which was  also in line with current national conditions. Higher educational levels contribute to larger  income and more social respect, which could enhance life satisfaction and social support.  Detecting the interaction among DCs helps with understanding the differences in RP  of different groups. In the present study, people aged 18 to 30 obtained the strongest re‐ storative experiences from visiting UPSs. The reasons may link to the interaction between  perceived risk of visiting and infection of COVID‐19. This age group has better physical  and mental conditions and are more adventurous, which cause lower rates of disease and  perceived risk. Thus, these two DCs together played an role in the process of perceiving  spatial environment, which should be further explored.  5. Conclusions  Our research finds that DCs have effects on perceived restoration of UPSs, which  differ depending on the type of space. Meanwhile, the factors which could embody the  effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on people’s bodies, minds and behaviors are consid‐ ered. Overall, the urban green space is ranked the highest in terms of restorative potential,  followed by commercial spaces, sports spaces and exhibition spaces, and the pandemic  has negative effects on obtaining a restorative experience by adding visiting risk. On this  basis, the significant factors in four typical UPSs were identified and their degrees of in‐ fluence  were  evaluated,  which  further  emphasizes  the  importance  and  novelty  of  this  study. For example, the natural hobbies and life satisfaction are reliable predictors for ur‐ ban green space.  Based on related studies on the restorative environment, there is no doubt that some  UPSs have positive functions on relieving pressure, arousing mental restoration and pro‐ moting health, which city planners, landscape architects and even decision makers should  make  full  use  of,  especially  regarding  the  consumption  of  body  and  mind  caused  by  COVID‐19. Studies have already been conducted on the effects of DCs on restorative per‐ ception  of  urban  green spaces.  Our  results  are  relatively in  line  with  them,  even  after  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  11  of  13  focusing on other kinds of UPSs and Chinese samples, which strengthens the foundation  for wider application. Moreover, we also assess the impacts of the COVID‐19 pandemic,  which promotes the application of the restorative design into dealing with physical and  mental consumption caused by social isolation and pandemic disease aggression. Given  the groups’ differences in preference for choosing restorative places, personalized design  should be carried out to meet the needs of different groups in the processes of building  design and planning layout of UPSs. The results presented here offer more evidence for  understanding the relationship between DCs and perceived restoration, and more guid‐ ance for constructing restorative UPSs efficiently. Meanwhile, it provides directions for  city managers to plan and for urban residents to decide how to visit restorative urban  public spaces nearby.  In consideration of diversity, 12 places respective of four kinds of UPSs were selected  as research locations. However, disadvantages still exist when referring to generalization,  because it is hard to contain all features of the UPSs with limited study areas. Although  we selected participants randomly, some socioeconomic factors are still ignored. For in‐ stance, people with less leisure time, physical disabilities or low accessibility to UPSs have  fewer opportunities to visit UPSs and are excluded in our study. The nonconsideration of  the environmental features of UPSs also represents a possible bias. In addition, using the  Chinese version of Perceived Restorativeness Scale as a measurement tool may lead to  semantic guidance, which can cause a biased restorative assessment.  Thus, to obtain more accuracy and better applicable conclusions, studies with larger  samples and more comprehensive measurements should be conducted. In addition, we  should further analyze the impacts of the pandemic on individual travel behavior and  identify more related demographic factors to carry out a more comprehensive study of  the restorative environment in response to the pandemic. Additionally, differences in re‐ storative needs of different groups before and after the pandemic should be explored to  carry out more targeted space design.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, methodology, S.W. and A.L.; software, validation, for‐ mal analysis, writing—original draft preparation, S.W.; investigation, resources and data curation,  writing—review  and  editing,  project  administration,  S.W.;  funding  acquisition, A.L.  All  authors  have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research was funded by Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities,  China, grant number 2021QN1039, and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities,  China, grant number 2021QN1040.  Informed Consent Statement: Informed consent  was  obtained  from all subjects involved  in the  study.  Data Availability Statement: Not applicable.  Acknowledgments: The authors would like to thank all of the respondents for spending time to  participate in experiments and answer the questionnaires.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  References  1. Ren, X.; Huang, W.; Pan, H.; Huang, T.; Wang, X.; Ma, Y. Mental Health during the COVID‐19 Outbreak in China: A Meta‐ Analysis. Psychiatr. Q. 2020, 91, 10227.  2. Hartig, T. Toward Understanding the Restorative Environment as a Health Resource. Open Space—People Space: An Interna‐ tional Conference on Inclusive Environments. 2004. Available online: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/241378226_To‐ ward_Understanding_the_Restorative_Environment_as_a_Health_Resource (accessed on 2 April 2009).  3. Kaplan, R.; Kaplan, S. The Experience of Nature: A Psychological Perspective; Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK, 1989.  4. Maas, J.; Verheij, R.A.; Groenewegen, P.P.; deVries, S.; Spreeuwenberg, P. Green space, urbanity, and health: How strong is the  relation? J. Epidemiol. Community Health 2006, 60, 587–592.  5. Kaplan, S.; Bardwell, L.V.; Slakter, D.B. The museum as a restorative environment. Environ. Behav. 1993, 25, 725–742.  6. Packer, J.; Ballantyne, R. Motivational factors and the visitor experience: A comparison of three sites. Curator Mus. J. 2002, 45,  183–198.  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  12  of  13  7. Scopelliti, M.; Giuliani, M.V. Choosing restorative environments across the lifespan: A matter of place experience. J. Environ.  Psychol. 2004, 24, 423–437.  8. Pals, R.; Steg, L.F.W.; Siero, K.I.; Zee, V.D. Development of the PRCQ: A measure of perceived restorative characteristics of zoo  attractions. J. Environ. Psychol. 2009, 29, 441–449.  9. Rosenbaum, M.S.; Otalora, M.L.; Ramirez, G.C. The restorative potential of shopping malls. J. Retail. Consum. Serv. 2016, 31, 157– 165.  10. Kang, N.; Ridgway, N.M. The importance of consumer market interactions as a form of social support for elderly consumers. J.  Public Policy Mark. 1996, 15, 108–117.  11. Rosenbaum, M.S. Return on community for consumers and service establishments. J. Serv. Res. 2008, 11, 179–196.  12. Pretty, J.; Peacock, J.; Sellens, M.; Griffin, M. The mental and physical health outcomes of green exercise. Int. J. Environ. Health  Res. 2005, 15, 319–337.  13. Giuntella, O.; Hyde, K.; Saccardo, S.; Sadoff, S. Lifestyle and Mental Health Disruptions during COVID‐19. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.  USA 2021, 118, e2016632118.  14. Staats, H.; Jahncke, H.; Herzog, T.; Hartig, T. Urban options for psychoogcal restoration: Common strategies in everyday situa‐ tions. PLoS ONE 2016, 11, e0146213.  15. Hartig, T.; Lindblom, K.; Ovefelt, K. The home and near home area offer restoration opportunities differentiated by gender.  Scand. Hous. Plan. Res. 1998, 15, 283–296.  16. Regan, C.L.; Horn, S.A. To nature or not to nature: Associations between environmental preferences, mood states and demo‐ graphic factors. J. Environ. Psychol. 2005, 25, 57–66.  17. Caspi, A.; Roberts, B.W.; Shiner, R.L. Personality development: Stability and change. Annu. Rev. Psychol. 2005, 56, 453–484.  18. Ouellette, P.; Kaplan, S. The monastery as a restorative environment. J. Environ. Psychol. 2005, 25, 175–188.  19. Korpela, K.M.; Ylén, M.; Tyrväinen, L.; Silvennoinen, H. Determinants of restorative experiences in everyday favorite places.  Health Place 2008, 14, 636–652.  20. Bauer, R.A. Consumer Behavior as Risk Taking. In Proceedings of the 43rd National Conference of the American Marketing  Assocation, Chicago, IL, USA, 15–17 June 1960; American Marketing Association: Chicago, IL, USA, 1960.  21. Jonas, A.; Mansfeld, Y.; Paz, S.; Potasman, I. Determinants of Health Risk Perception among Low‐risk‐taking Tourists Traveling  to Developing Countries. J. Travel Res. 2011, 49, 87–99.  22. Vries, D.S.; Verheij, R.A.; Groenewegen, P.P. Natural environments—healthy environments? An exploratory analysis of the  relationship between greenspace and health. Environ. Plan. A 2003, 35, 1717–1731.  23. Ye, L.H.; Zhang, F.; Wu, J.P. Developing the restoration environment scale. China J. Health Psychol. 2010, 18, 1515–1518.  24. Yao, Y.; Zhu, X.; Xu, Y.; Yang, H.; Wu, X.; Li, Y.; Zhang, Y. Assessing the visual quality of green landscaping in rural residential  areas: The case of Changzhou, China. Environ. Monit. Assess. 2012, 184, 951–967.  25. Wang, R.; Zhao, J.Demographic groups’ differences in visual preference for vegetated landscapes in urban green space. Sustain.  Cities Soc. 2017, 28, 350–357.  26. Rogge, E.; Nevens, F.; Gulinck, H. Perception of rural landscapes in Flanders: Looking beyond aesthetics. Landsc. Urban Plan.  2007, 82, 159–174.  27. Bratman, G.N.; Daily, G.C.; Levy, B.J.; Gross, J.J. The Benefits of Nature Experience: Improved Affect and Cognition. Landsc.  Urban Plan. 2015, 138, 41–50.  28. Ulrich, R. Natural versus Urban Scenes Some Psychophysiological Effects. Environ. Behav. 1981, 13, 523–556.  29. Korpela, K.M.; Hartig, T.; Kaiser, F.G.; Fuhrer, U. Restorative experience and self‐regulation in favorite places. Environ. Behav.  2001, 33, 572–589.  30. Timmons, B.W.; Leblanc, A.G.; Carson, V.; Gorber, S.C.; Dillman, C.; Janssen, I. Systematic review of physical activity and health  in the early years (aged 0–4 years). BMC Public Health 2012, 17, 773–792.  31. Manley, A.F. Physical activity and health: A report of the Surgeon General.   Atlanta, Georgia. US Department of Health and  Human Services, Public Health Service, CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 1997.  Available online: www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/sgr/pdf/execsumm.pdf (accessed on 15 September 1997).  32. Herzog, T.R.; Black, A.M.; Fountaine, K.A.; Knotts, D.J. Reflection and attentional recovery as distinctive benefits of restorative  environments. J. Environ. Psychol. 1997, 17, 165–170.  33. Packer, J.; Bond, N. Museums as Restorative Environments. Curator Mus. J. 2010, 53, 421–436.  34. Feist, G.J.; Bodner, T.E.; Jacobs, J.F.; Miles, M.; Tan, V. Integrating top‐down and bottom‐up structural models of subjective well‐ being: A longitudinal investigation. J. Personal. Soc. Psychol. 1995, 68, 138–150.  35. Bodin, M.; Hartig, T. Does the outdoor environment matter for psychological restoration gained through running? Psychol. Sport  Exerc. 2003, 4, 141–153.  36. Korpela, K.M.; Hartig, T. Restorative qualities of favourite places. J. Environ. Psychol. 1996, 16, 221–233.  37. Staats, H.; Kieviet, A.; Hartig, T. Where to recover from attentional fatigue: An expectancy‐value analysis of environmental  preference. J. Environ. Psychol. 2003, 23, 147–157.   spaces. Environ. Behav. 2004, 36, 678–700.  38. Sullivan, W.C.; Kuo, F.E.; Depooter, S.F. The fruit of urban nature: Vital neighborhood 39. Shakib, S.; Veliz, P. Race, sport and social support: A comparison between African American and White youths’ perceptions of  social support for sport participation. Int. Rev. Sociol. Sport 2013, 48, 295–317.  Buildings 2022, 12, 869  13  of  13  40. Yang, Y.; Joerg, K. Determinants of physical activity maintenance during the COVID‐19 pandemic: A focus on fitness apps.  Transl. Behav. Med. 2020, 10, 835–842.  41. Kaplan, S. The restorative benefits of nature: Toward an integrative framework. J. Environ. Psychol. 1995, 15, 169–182.  42. Kaltenborn, B.P.; Bjerke, T. Associations between environmental value orientations and landscape preferences. Landsc. Urban  Plan. 2002, 59, 1–11. 

Journal

BuildingsMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Jun 21, 2022

Keywords: urban public space; health-promoting environments; psychological restoration; demographic variable; COVID-19 pandemic

There are no references for this article.