Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Data-Driven Adaptive Control for Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing with Automatic Controller Tuning

Data-Driven Adaptive Control for Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing with Automatic Controller Tuning Article  Data‐Driven Adaptive Control for Laser‐Based  Additive Manufacturing with Automatic   Controller Tuning  1,2 1, 1 1 2, 1, Lequn Chen  , Xiling Yao  *, Youxiang Chew  , Fei Weng  , Seung Ki Moon  * and Guijun Bi  *    Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research,   73 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637662, Singapore; CHEN1189@e.ntu.edu.sg (L.C.);   chewyx@simtech.a‐star.edu.sg (Y.C.); weng_fei@simtech.a‐star.edu.sg (F.W.)    School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Ave,  Singapore 639798, Singapore  *  Correspondence: yao_xiling@simtech.a‐star.edu.sg (X.Y.); skmoon@ntu.edu.sg (S.K.M.);   gjbi@simtech.a‐star.edu.sg (G.B.)  Received: 22 September 2020; Accepted: 8 November 2020; Published: 10 November 2020  Abstract: Closed‐loop control is desirable in direct energy deposition (DED) to stabilize the process  and improve the fabrication quality. Most existing DED controllers require system identifications  by  experiments  to  obtain  plant  models  or  layer‐dependent  adaptive  control  rules,  and  such  processes are cumbersome and time‐consuming. This paper proposes a novel data‐driven adaptive  control strategy to adjust laser voltage with the melt pool size feedback. A multitasking controller  architecture is developed to incorporate an autotuning unit that optimizes controller parameters  based on the DED process data automatically. Experimental validations show improvements in the  geometric accuracy and melt pool consistency of controlled samples. The main advantage of the  proposed controller is that it can adapt to DED processes with different part shapes, materials, tool  paths, and process parameters without tweaking. System identification is not required even when  process conditions are changed, which reduces the controller implementation time and cost for end‐ users.  Keywords: additive manufacturing; direct energy deposition; closed‐loop control; virtual reference  feedback tuning  1. Introduction  Laser‐based direct energy deposition (DED) is an additive manufacturing (AM) process that is  used  to  fabricate  metallic  components  layer  by  layer  and  uses  a  laser  as  the  heat  source  to  melt  additive materials (in either powder or wire form) as they are deposited onto a substrate [1]. The  laser‐based DED  has  found  broad  applications in the  aerospace  and  marine industries  due  to its  capability of making large‐scale and customized parts in a cost‐effective way. However, the laser‐ based DED process has poorer stability compared to traditional metal forming processes. It is prone  to defects and dimensional inaccuracy due to various factors, including uneven thermal stress, strong  melt  pool  dynamics,  localized  heat  accumulation,  inconsistent  speed,  and  other  unpredictable  disturbances  during  laser  beam  delivery  and  material  feeding  [2].  Therefore,  closed‐loop  control  systems with sensor feedbacks are highly desirable for the laser‐based DED process [3]. However,  the nonlinearity and varying dynamics of the DED makes the search for robust control algorithms a  challenging task. Constant controller parameters may not perform well for all the layers in DED, as  the process conditions (e.g., the solidified layer temperature and the associated nominal melt pool  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967; doi:10.3390/app10227967  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  2  of  19  size) change over time as the part grows [4]. Moreover, a controller designed for a specific material  may not be suitable for another material, since the nominal DED process parameters and material  properties (e.g., thermal conductivity, viscosity, and emissivity) are different. Therefore, this research  aimed  to  develop  a  data‐driven  adaptive  control  method  in  which  the  controller  parameters  are  variables that can be automatically updated during the laser‐based DED process.  Melt pool characteristics have a strong correlation with the process stability and part quality in  DED,  and  hence  they  are  frequently  used  in  closed‐loop  control  systems  [5].  The  effects  of  DED  process parameters on melt pool characteristics have been investigated quantitatively in previous  research. It was found that the melt pool size and temperature are both positively influenced by the  input energy density and hence the laser power [6,7]. The proportional–integral–derivative (PID)  controller has been widely adopted in the development of melt‐pool‐based DED control systems due  to its simplicity and effectiveness. For example, Bi et al. [8,9] used a pyrometer to sense the infrared  (IR) radiation from the melt pool and sent the reading to a PID controller. Based on the error term  calculated as the difference between the real‐time IR signal and its nominal value, the PID controller  could change the laser power in response to the fluctuation in melt pool temperature. Consistent  height  of  the  as‐built  part  was  achieved  by  the  above  approach.  Hofman  et  al.  [10]  utilized  a  complementary  metal‐oxide‐semiconductor  (CMOS)  camera  to  capture  the  melt  pool  image  and  measure the melt pool width. Then, they applied a PID controller to increase and decrease the laser  power to compensate for the rise and fall of the melt pool width, respectively. Similar studies used  PID  controllers  to  adjust  the  laser  power  based  on  the  variation  of  melt  pool  area  [11,12].  Enhancements  have  also  been  made  to  the  conventional  PID  method,  aiming  to  improve  the  controller performance under the varying dynamics of the DED process. For example, Moralejo et al.  [13] added a feedforward path to a PID controller, which could reduce the overshoot and improve  the response speed. The authors also embedded the melt pool size setpoint into the preprogrammed  computer numerical control (CNC) code. The position‐dependent setpoint allowed the building of  changeable  geometries  using  a  single‐track  toolpath.  However,  extensive  experimentation  was  needed  to  obtain  the  correct  controller  parameters.  Akbari  and  Kovacevic  [4]  implemented  an  adaptive control strategy that handled the variation of melt pool response across multiple layers.  System identification was performed for each layer, and the response of melt pool size to the laser  power was represented by a first‐order transfer function that had different coefficients for different  layers.  A  PID  controller  was  used  to  adjust  the  laser  power;  but  instead  of  having  constant  parameters, its PID parameters were tuned for each layer using the corresponding transfer function.  This strategy allowed the controller to be adaptable to changes in the heat conduction mode and  cooling  rate  as  the  part  height  increased.  However,  the  layer‐by‐layer  system  identification  and  controller tuning process was time‐consuming and lacked automation, which made the above control  strategy less user‐friendly for industry applications. Song et al. [14] proposed a two‐input single‐ output  hybrid  controller  that  consisted  of  a  rule‐based  height  controller  and  a  closed‐loop  temperature controller. The laser power was reduced by the height controller until the melt pool  height was below the preset layer thickness threshold. Afterward, the temperature controller took  over and adjusted the laser power based on the pyrometer feedback. Another hybrid control strategy  was proposed for a laser–wire DED system by Gibson et al. [15]. The laser power was controlled by  the melt pool geometry using thermal camera feedback, while the printing speed and wire feeding  rate were controlled by the part height on a per‐layer basis. As the part height increased, both the  printing speed and wire feeding rate increased. Hence, the average laser energy density decreased,  which was allowed due to the heat accumulation in the freshly built layers below the melt pool. This  approach  could  maintain  the  process  stability  and  improve  the  productivity  at  the  same  time.  However, since the heat accumulation effect strongly depended on the material, geometry, area, and  maximum height of the part, the selection of controller parameters for a specific product might not  be suitable for another product.  One of the limitations in the existing control strategies that extensive experimentation is required  to find the optimal controller parameters. The system identification and parameter tuning processes  are  cumbersome  and  time‐consuming.  Besides,  although  some  of  the  aforementioned  controllers  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  3  of  19  considered  interlayer  changes  in  DED  process  conditions,  they  did  not  adapt  to  the  intralayer  variation of melt pool dynamics. Therefore, in this research, we propose a novel data‐driven adaptive  control  strategy  with  automatic  parameter  tuning  instead  of  using  a  prior  plant  model  or  static  controller parameters. During the laser‐based DED process, the sensor‐captured melt pool size and  the laser voltage signal are recorded in each time frame as the system input and output (I/O) data,  respectively. The I/O data collected within a periodic time interval are stored in a buffer before they  are fed into an autotuning unit to compute the optimal PID controller parameters. The PID controller  with the updated parameters is used to adjust the laser power in the next time interval while the new  sets of I/O data are being collected to overwrite the buffer. The controller parameters are reoptimized  once  again  at  the  end  of  the  cycle,  using  the  updated  I/O  data  that  reflect  the  varying  response  dynamics  of  the  melt  pool.  The  virtual  reference  feedback  tuning  (VRFT)  algorithm  [16]  is  implemented  in  the  autotuning  unit  for  PID  parameter  optimization.  The  data‐driven  controller  update is performed periodically throughout the entire DED process regardless of the present time,  layer, material, size, or shape. Prior and interlayer system identification experiments are no longer  needed, thus saving time and cost. Besides, since the proposed adaptive controller is dynamically set  by the time‐dependent process data, it can be applied to parts with any materials, geometries, and  sizes without modification, which makes its adoption convenient for industry end‐users.  This paper is organized as follows: Section 2 introduces the overall setup of the laser‐based DED  system  with  melt  pool  monitoring  and  closed‐loop  control.  Section  3  explains  the  details  of  the  proposed  data‐driven  adaptive  control  strategy.  Section  4  presents  the  experimental  results  that  demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Lastly, Section 5 concludes the paper and  provides direction for future research.  2. System Setup  This research was conducted on an in‐house‐developed laser‐based DED system. Figure 1 shows  a  simplified  illustration  of  the  system  setup,  where  the  transmissions  of  energy  and  signal  are  represented by solid arrows. A six‐axis IRB‐4400 industrial robot (ABB, Zürich, Switzerland) carried  the optical head and a two‐axis IRBP‐A positioner (ABB, Zürich, Switzerland) held the substrate. The  laser  beam  with  1070  nm  wavelength  was  supplied  by  a  YLS‐6000  Ytterbium  laser  source  (IPG  Photonics, Oxford, MA, USA) with the maximum power of 6 kW. A BIMO optical head (HIGHYAG,  Kleinmachnow, Germany) received the laser beam via fiber and focused the beam onto the substrate  as it melted the metal powders. A powder feeder (GTV, Luckenbach, Germany) was used to deliver  the metallic powder to the nozzle installed at the bottom of the optical head. A WAT‐902B charged‐ couple device (CCD) camera (Watec, NY, USA) was mounted on the optical head. Through a series  of reflective optics, the melt pool image could be captured by the CCD camera coaxially. The viewing  direction was perpendicular to the melt pool that was located at the center of the camera view. The  melt pool emits a larger amount of near‐infrared (NIR) radiation than its surroundings due to its  higher temperature. Therefore, a NIR band‐pass filter with a bandwidth of 780–1000 nm was attached  to the CCD camera so that the melt pool could be isolated from the surroundings without sensing the  diffusively reflected 1070 nm laser.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  4  of  19  Figure 1. The setup of the laser‐based direct energy deposition (DED) system with closed‐loop control.  A personal computer (PC) running an Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system was used as the main  controller.  It  was  responsible  for  sensor  data  collection,  image  processing,  and  control  algorithm  execution. The output channel of the CCD camera was connected to the controlling PC that received  the digital image data via a USB 3.0 port. The raw image in grey‐scale pixels was processed by a series  of computer vision algorithms using the OpenCV library [17]. The melt pool area was cropped from  the raw image by a circular mask that has a diameter slightly smaller than that of the nozzle outlet so  that the NIR light reflected by the nozzle’s inner surface could be removed. Then, a filter with a  prescribed threshold was applied to binarize the melt pool image, after which an ellipse was fit into  the binary image, as shown in Figure 1. The melt pool width (MPW) was approximated by the minor  axis  of  the  resulting  ellipse.  The  MPW  is  influenced  by  the  quality  of  interlayer  fusion  and  heat  transfer mode, and it is an indicator of the part integrity and surface roughness of DED‐fabricated  parts [6]. Therefore, the MPW value was sent to the controller as the feedback data. The proposed  data‐driven  adaptive  controller  was  implemented  in  an  in‐house‐developed  software  program  running on the PC. The output of the controller was the analog voltage signal supplied to the laser  source. The laser voltage ranging from 0 to 10 V determined the actual laser power. The digital on/off  signal of the laser emission was sent from the robot’s control box to the laser source via hardwiring,  which did not interfere with the laser voltage sent from the PC. The computation of the output laser  voltage based on the feedback melt pool data using the proposed control strategy is discussed in the  next section.  3. The Data‐Driven Adaptive Control Strategy  3.1. Conventional Proportional–Integral–Derivative (PID) Algorithm  This  section  introduces  the  formulation  of  a  conventional  PID  controller  and  its  parameter  optimization  problem,  which  lays  the  foundation  of  the  proposed  data‐driven  adaptive  control  strategy. In the DED process, the goal of closed‐loop control is to improve the stability of the MPW  by  adjusting  the  laser  voltage  that  determines  the  laser  power.  The  block  diagram  for  the  conventional  closed‐loop  control  system  is  shown  in  Figure  2.  The  PID  control  action  in  the  continuous time‐domain can be expressed as:  𝑢 𝑡 𝐾 𝑒 𝑡 𝐾 𝑒 𝑡 𝑑𝑡𝐾 𝑒𝑡   (1)  𝑑𝑡 where 𝑒𝑡   is the error term that equals to the difference between the reference MPW value (𝑟𝑡 )  and the measured MPW value (𝑦𝑡 ); Kp, Ki, and Kd are the tuneable PID parameters; and 𝑢𝑡   is the  laser voltage signal computed by the PID controller. The laser voltage signal is input into the plant  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  5  of  19  𝐺 𝑠   that  produces  the  MPW  feedback. The  PID  controller  with  a  first‐order  low‐pass  filter  in  derivate term can be represented as the following s‐domain transfer function [18]:  1 𝑠 𝐶 𝑠 𝐾 𝐾 𝐾   (2)  𝑠 1𝜏 𝑠 where 𝜏   is  the  first‐order  derivative  filter  time  and 𝑠   is  the  complex  variable  in  the  frequency  domain.  Figure  2.  Block  diagram  of  the  conventional  closed‐loop  control  system  for  the  direct  energy  deposition (DED) process.  To  obtain  the  optimal  controller  parameters  denoted  as  𝜃𝐾 ,𝐾 ,𝐾 ,  the  following  optimization problem in the model‐reference (MR) framework [19] can be established as follows:  𝜃 arg min𝐽   (3)  𝐺 𝑧 2 𝐽 𝜃 ≜ 𝑇 𝑧 𝐿   (4)  1 𝐺 𝑧 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 2 where the  cost function 𝐽 𝜃   penalizes the  difference  between  the  desired  closed‐loop transfer  function 𝑇 𝑧   and the actual closed‐loop transfer function, 𝐺 𝑧   and 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃   are the discrete  time‐domain counterparts of 𝐺 𝑠   and 𝐶 𝑠 , respectively, and 𝐿 𝑧   is a band‐pass noise filter.  The  optimization  objective  is  to  minimize  the  𝐽 𝜃   criterion.  The  controller  𝐶   with  the  optimal parameters 𝜃   is the final tuning outcome, and the resultant closed‐loop transfer function  should be equal to the desired closed‐loop reference model 𝑇 , i.e.,  𝐺 𝑧 (5)  𝑇   1 𝐺 𝑧 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 Since the plant model 𝐺 𝑧   in the cost function 𝐽 𝜃 is unknown, system identification is  needed  in  the  conventional  tuning  process  to  find  𝐺 𝑧   before  controller  parameters  can  be  optimized; otherwise, trial‐and‐error experiments are conducted to determine the PID gains, which  is  cumbersome  and  time‐consuming.  The  inaccuracy  in  the  system  identification  could  also  jeopardize the controller tuning result. Moreover, for different part geometries and powder materials,  the DED process does not have a single plant model 𝐺 𝑠   that can generalize the melt pool dynamic  response to the laser voltage signal. The melt pool response also varies with time when fabricating  the same part, and hence a single set of optimal controller parameters 𝜃   cannot be obtained for the  entire time domain. Therefore, an adaptive control method is needed to automatically update the  controller parameters without repeated system identification. The proposed data‐driven adaptive  controller is explained in Section 3.2.  3.2. Adaptive Controller Design  The proposed adaptive controller is implemented with a multitasking architecture, as illustrated  in Figure 3. Three main tasks are executed concurrently during the DED process, i.e., the melt pool  monitoring  unit,  the  autotuning  unit,  and  the  digital  PID  unit.  Each  of  them  contains  subtasks  performing  different  functions  automatically  and  continuously.  Data  transmission  within  the  𝜃 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  6  of  19  controller is indicated by the dotted lines in Figure 3, and the controller parameter update routine is  highlighted by the blue line. Details of the above three units are given below.  In the melt pool monitoring unit, the “camera driver” subtask reads the raw melt pool image  captured by the co‐axial CCD camera, and the “image processing” subtask performs the masking,  binarization, and ellipse fitting procedures as described in Section 2. The minor axis length of the  fitted ellipse, measured in the number of pixels, is published as the MPW data. The MPW data are  received by both the digital PID unit and the autotuning unit.  The digital PID unit calculates the output laser voltage based on the MPW feedback using the  standard formulations in Equations (1) and (2). However, instead of using predetermined and user‐ specified constant controller parameters, this PID unit accepts the adaptive parameters  𝐾 ,𝐾 ,𝐾   calculated in situ by the autotuning unit. System identification by experimental trials‐and‐errors is  removed from the controller design procedure, and the prior knowledge of a plant model is no longer  required. The output laser voltage is sent to the laser source as an analog signal, and at the same time  it is subscribed by the autotuning unit as an input to update the Kp, Ki, and Kd parameters.  The autotuning unit has two responsibilities, i.e., (1) collecting the process data generated by the  other two units and (2) using the process data to update the controller parameters repeatedly and  automatically,  thus  achieving  the  data‐driven  adaptive  control  capability.  The  autotuning  unit  consists  of  a  temporary  data  buffer,  a  timer  function,  and  a  VRFT  function.  The  MPW  and  laser  voltage are recorded in each time frame as the system input and output (I/O) data, respectively. The  I/O data collected within a periodic time interval are stored in the temporary buffer before they are  extracted by the VRFT function. The timer function launches the VRFT function when the timeout  signal is issued. The VRFT function computes the optimal controller parameters using the I/O data  in the buffer and sends the updated Kp, Ki, and Kd values back to the digital PID unit. The timer is  reset upon completion of the VRFT routine, and the temporary buffer is flushed. The PID unit with  the updated parameters adjusts the laser voltage in the next time interval while the new sets of I/O  data are being collected by the buffer. Periodically, the controller parameters are reoptimized at the  end of each timer cycle using the updated I/O data until the end of the DED process.  Figure 3. The multitasking architecture of the proposed data‐driven adaptive controller.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  7  of  19  Figure 4 shows the block diagram of the proposed adaptive controller. In addition to the error  feedback in the conventional PID controller (Figure 2), the autotuning unit forms the second feedback  loop that updates the Kp, Ki, and Kd parameters automatically. The reference model, denoted by 𝑇 ,  is an s‐domain transfer function representing the desired closed‐loop system behavior (e.g., desired  settling time and desired response speed) [20], and it can be written as follows:  𝑇   (6)  1 0.2𝑡 𝑠 where the settling time 𝑡 0.01 s, the response delay time 𝜏 0, and 𝑛 1  are specified for the  stable steady‐state tracking purpose [20]. The reference model 𝑇   in Figure 4 is the z‐domain  transfer function that is computed by transforming 𝑇   into the discrete‐time domain using the  bilinear method [21].  Figure 4. Block diagram of the adaptive controller with an autotuning unit.  The objective of the VRFT function in the autotuning unit is to optimize the controller so that the  resulting closed‐loop transfer function is identical to the reference model 𝑇 . Only the I/O data  collected during the experiment are used directly in the VRFT function. The plant model 𝐺𝑧   can  remain unknown since it is not required in the VRFT function, and hence the system identification  can be eliminated from the controller tuning process. More details of the fundamental VRFT theories  can be found in [16,22]. The reference model 𝑇   generates the desired system output 𝑦 ,  which is expressed as  𝑦 𝑧 𝑇 𝑧 (7)  where 𝑟 𝑧   is the reference signal (i.e., the setpoint). During the laser‐based DED process, the laser  voltage signal and MPW data collected during the time interval ∆𝑡   are denoted by  𝐷 𝑢 ,𝑦 ,𝑘 1,2 …𝑁   (8)  where 𝑢   and 𝑦   are the kth instance of the laser voltage and MPW data, respectively. Given the  reference model 𝑇   and system output 𝑦𝑧 , the virtual reference signal can be computed as  𝑟 ̃ 𝑇   (9)  where 𝑦𝑧   is  the  discrete‐time  transform  of  the  measured  MPW  dataset 𝑦 ,𝑦 ,𝑦 ,…𝑦 .  The  virtual reference signal 𝑟 ̃   is not the actual input signal used to generate the resulting MPW  𝑦𝑧 . Instead, it is the desired reference signal fed into the reference model 𝑇   if we consider  the measured output 𝑦𝑧   as the desired system output 𝑦 𝑧 .  𝑧𝑦 𝑧 𝑧 𝑟 𝑧 𝑧 𝑧 𝑠 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  8  of  19  Based on the computed virtual reference signal 𝑟 ̃ , the virtual error signal 𝑒 ̃ 𝑧   is defined  as the difference between the virtual reference signal and the measured system output, i.e.,  𝑒 ̃ 𝑧 𝑟 ̃ 𝑧 𝑦 𝑧 𝑇 𝑧 1 𝑦 𝑧   (10)  The  unknown  plant  model  𝐺 𝑧   can  produce  the  MPW  𝑦 𝑧   when  it  is  fed  with  the  . Therefore, we can define an “ideal controller” 𝐶 𝑧 ,𝜃   that should  measured laser voltage 𝑢 𝑧 generate the measured laser voltage 𝑢 𝑧   when it is fed with the virtual error signal 𝑒 ̃ 𝑧 . The  above control action can be written as  𝑢 𝑧 𝐶𝑧 ,𝜃𝑒 ̃ 𝑧   (11)  The controller 𝐶𝑧 ,𝜃   can be represented in the general format of:  𝐶 𝑧 ,𝜃 𝜌   (12)  where 𝜃   is the  variable  controller  parameter and 𝜌   is  a  vector  of transfer  functions. For a  discrete PID controller 𝐶 𝑧 ,𝜃 , the following expression can be obtained by applying the bilinear  𝐾 𝐾 𝐾 transform to Equation (2), and the 𝜃   and 𝜌𝑧   terms in Equation (12) are now    and  1 , respectively.  ⎡ ⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ 𝑇 1 𝑧 ⎢ ⎥ 𝐾 𝐾 𝐾 𝐶 𝑧 ,𝜃   (13)  2 1𝑧 ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ 2 1 𝑧 ⎢ ⎥ ⎣𝑇 3𝑧 ⎦ In order to find the “ideal controller” that generates the laser voltage signal 𝑢𝑧   with the  feedback error 𝑒 ̃ , the following optimization problem is solved in the VRFT function:  𝜃 arg min𝐽   (14)  𝐽 𝜃 ≜ ‖𝑢 𝑧 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 𝑒 ̃ 𝑧 ‖   (15)  𝑢 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 𝑇 𝑧 1 𝑦   The above optimization problem can be solved by the quadratic programming (QP) method that  searches for the best controller parameter 𝜃   to minimize the 𝐽 𝜃   criterion. In this research,  the solving algorithm was implemented in Python, adopted from the Pyvrft library [23]. The VRFT  optimization  problem  is  a  mathematical  equivalence  to  the  conventional  model‐reference  optimization problem described by Equations (3) and (4), as proven in [22]. A fixed plant model  𝐺 𝑧   required in Equations (3) and (4) is no longer included in Equations (14) and (15), which  contributes to the adaptability of the proposed data‐driven controller. The filtered error signal 𝑒 ̃   and laser voltage signal 𝑢   can be expressed as follows:  𝑒 ̃ 𝐿𝑧 ̃ , 𝑢 𝐿𝑧 𝑘   (16)  The above‐filtered signals are then used in the formulation of a modified cost function 𝐽 𝜃   as follows:  𝑢 𝑘 𝑘 𝑒 𝑘 𝜃 𝑧 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  9  of  19  𝐽 𝜃 𝑢 𝑘 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 𝑒 ̃ 𝑘   𝐿𝑧 𝑢 𝑘 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 𝑒 ̃ 𝑘   (17)  𝐿𝑧 𝑢 𝑘 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 𝑇 𝑧 1 𝑦 𝑘   The  filter 𝐿𝑧   is  formulated  as  follows,  which  makes  the  resultant  PID  controller  a  good  approximation of the “ideal controller” [16]:  1𝑇 (18)  𝐿𝑧   The Φ   term in Equation (18) is the spectral density of the laser voltage signal, which can  be calculated based on the I/O dataset  𝑢𝑘   by periodogram and ARMA modeling methods  , … [24,25].  The  execution  of  the  VRFT‐based  autotuning  unit  in  the  laser‐based  DED  process  can  be  summarized in the following steps:  Step 0 VRFT  presetting:  Before  the  control  process  starts,  the  reference  model  𝑇 ,  representing the desired system performance, is specified by Equation (6).  Step 1 Data collection and preprocessing: During the Mth adaptive control cycle, the laser voltage  and MPW data 𝐷 𝑢 ,𝑦   are recorded and stored into the temporary buffer within  the interval ∆𝑡 𝑡 ~𝑡 . The virtual reference signal 𝑟 ̃   and the virtual error signal  𝑒 ̃   for  this cycle are  then calculated using Equations (9) and  (10). The filter 𝐿𝑧   determined by Equation (18) is applied to filter the I/O data and virtual signals.  Step 2 VRFT controller tuning: When the Mth control cycle has completed, and the timeout signal  is  issued  in  the  autotuning  unit,  the  VRFT  function  updates  the  optimal  controller  parameters 𝜃   by minimizing the modified cost function 𝐽 𝜃   in Equation (17), using  the data 𝐷 𝑢 ,𝑦   in the buffer.  Step 3 PID parameter updating: The autotuning unit sends the updated controller parameters 𝜃   to the digital PID controller unit, resets the timer, flushes the buffer, and then returns to Step  1 to start the (M+1)th control cycle.  The main contribution of the proposed DED control strategy is that the autotuning method has  eliminated the necessity of prior system identification and its associated cost and manual labor. The  same  controller  can  be  applied  in  the  DED  fabrication  with  any  shape,  size,  or  material  without  modification. Previous rule‐based adaptive DED control methods updated the controller parameters  based on the layer number or the part height, while the rules were derived from experiments for a  specific combination of material and process parameters [4,14,15]. In comparison, the proposed data‐ driven adaptive controller can update the parameters automatically regardless of the layer number  or part height, and no prior experiments are needed to generate the control rules, thus saving time  and cost for end‐users.  4. Experimental Validation  The proposed data‐driven adaptive controller was implemented in the laser‐based DED system  and validated experimentally. As listed in Table 1, different materials, geometries, and deposition  tool  paths  were  tested  to  validate  that  the  proposed  controller  could  automatically  adjust  its  parameters and was adaptable to different deposition situations without the necessity to conduct  system identification. Specifically, three experiments were conducted: (1) solid  semicylinder with  profile tool paths in 316 L stainless steel, (2) solid semicylinder without profile tool paths in 316 L  stainless steel, and (3) thin‐wall pipe with a continuous spiral tool path in LPW‐35N nickel alloy (a  𝑧 𝑇 𝑧 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  10  of  19  customized material designed by the authors’ organization). Experiments 1 and 2 each comprised  three samples. The first sample was fabricated using the constant nominal process parameters listed  without  the  employed  control  system  in  Table  2.  The  second  sample  was  fabricated  using  a  conventional PID controller, where constant PID gains were used. The PID gains were determined  by experiment‐based system identification and trial‐and‐error. The third sample was fabricated using  the proposed adaptive control method, where PID gains were automatically optimized and updated  during  the  process.  These  three  samples  were  compared  with  each  other,  and  the  effect  of  the  adaptive  controller  was  analyzed.  Experiment  3  was  conducted  to  validate  that  the  proposed  adaptive control method was still effective even when the powder material and part geometry were  changed  (compared  to  Experiments  1  and  2),  while  no  additional  experiment  was  needed  to  recalibrate the controller. The MPW data and the corresponding laser voltage output in these three  experiments were recorded, and the results are discussed below.  Table 1. Materials, geometries, and deposition tool paths in different experiments.  Experiment Number  Powder Material  Geometry  Deposition Tool Path  Zigzag infill with the  1  316 L stainless steel  Solid semicylinder  profile tool path  Zigzag infill without the  2  316 L stainless steel  Solid semicylinder  profile tool path  LPW‐35N nickel  Thin‐walled  Continuous spiral single‐ 3  alloy  hollow pipe  bead tool path  Table 2. Constant nominal process parameters used for direct energy deposition (DED) processes  without control.  Powder Material  Process Parameters  316 L Stainless  LPW‐35N Nickel  Unit  Steel  Alloy  Laser voltage  6.2  6.2  V  Printing speed  20.0  20.0  mm/s  Powder feeding rate  6.09  7.73  g/min  Layer thickness  0.2  0.3  mm  Infill hatch distance (for solid parts only)  2.0  2.0  mm  Figure 5 shows the results of Experiment 1, comparing the samples of depositing the 30 mm  diameter semicylinder structure using 316 L stainless steel. The part’s nominal height (HN) was 9 mm,  and the nominal semicylinder diameter (DN) was 30 mm, as indicated in Figure 5. In Figure 5a, the  semicylinder structure was fabricated using the constant laser voltage signal (6.2 V) without control.  A laser profiler was used to scan the surface of the part and produce its 3D point cloud using the  method introduced in [26,27]. The scanned surface reconstructed from the point cloud is shown in  Figure 5b, where the color bar indicates the distance in the z‐direction from the points to the reference  plane [26]. The larger distance shown in the graph means the lower dimensional accuracy of the DED‐ fabricated part. A bulging area at the center of the surface that is significantly higher than the edges  can be seen in Figure 5b, which was caused by the unstable laser energy density and hence the uneven  heat  accumulation  in  the  part.  Figure  5c  shows  the  sample  deposited  using  a  conventional  PID  controller with constant PID gains ((KP, KI, KD) = (0.04, 0.02, 0.00)). The PID gains were tuned based  on  Ziegler‐Nichols  criteria  [28]  via  trial‐and‐error  experiments,  which  was  considerably  time‐ consuming and ineffective in terms of manpower and cost. The top surface of the conventional PID  controlled sample is shown in Figure 5d. It can be seen that its surface was flatter and the central  bulge height was smaller than that in the uncontrolled sample. This is due to the effect of the closed‐ loop control on stabilizing the heat input and reducing the localized heat accumulation. Figure 5e  shows the sample deposited with the proposed adaptive controller, and its surface was also scanned  and reconstructed, as shown in Figure 5f. It can be observed that the central bulge area was further  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  11  of  19  flattened compared with the conventional PID controlled sample. Figure 6a–c shows the time plots  of the MPW data and laser voltage signals for the uncontrolled sample, conventional PID controlled  sample, and adaptively controlled sample, respectively. In Figure 6a, a progressive increase in the  MPW  is  observed  due  to  the  accumulated  heat  built  up  in  the  part  when  using  a  constant  laser  voltage. The MPW exceeded 140 pixels at the end of the fabrication process with the trend of growing  even larger. In Figure 6b, the conventional PID controller was used, and the growth of MPW was  reduced compared to the uncontrolled sample. However, there was still an increasing trend in MPW.  About half of the MPW data were in the range of 120–130 pixels after 250 s, suggesting an unstable  heat input across the surface and the possibility of more severe geometry inaccuracy if the deposition  continues. In Figure 6c, the adaptive controller showed a more significant effect on stabilizing the  melt pool than the conventional PID controller. The laser voltage signal was reduced gradually to  decrease the average energy density as the process continued. The MPW data were maintained at a  narrower  range  of  115–120  pixels  throughout  the  entire  deposition  process.  Therefore,  uneven  localized heat accumulation was minimized, and  the possibility of surface defect occurrence was  reduced.  During the closed‐loop control, the laser voltage output was constrained by a maximum value  of 6.2 V. This value was the limit of the DED process window determined in previous experiments,  in order to prevent material failure. In fact, as shown in Figure 6b,c, the laser voltage was below 6.0  V for most of the time and seldomly hit the 6.2 V limit.  Figure 5. Samples of Experiment 1 (solid semicylinder with the profile tool path, 316 L stainless steel).  (a) The sample fabricated without control; (b) The reconstructed surface of the uncontrolled sample;  (c) The sample fabricated with a conventional proportional–integral–derivative (PID) controller; (d)  The reconstructed surface of the conventional PID controlled sample; (e) The sample fabricated with  the proposed adaptive controller; (f) The reconstructed surface of the adaptively controlled sample.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  12  of  19  Figure 6. Time plots of the melt pool width (MPW) and laser voltage signals for Experiment 1 (solid  semicylinder with the profile tool path, 316 L stainless steel). (a) The data without control; (b) The  data with conventional PID control; (c) The data with adaptive control.  Figure 7 shows the PID gain variations for the entire time‐plots extracted from Figure 6c, where  the controller parameters (KP, KI, KD) were updated in each adaptive control interval (10 s in this  study). The collected I/O dataset in each interval was used to optimize the controller parameters  automatically without manual tuning. The resultant controller parameters were truncated at three  decimals, as shown in the plot. The resultant PID controller had zero derivative gains (K  = 0), which  was acceptable in this case since the negligible derivative action could reduce the systemʹs sensitivity  to noises. When the first layer was deposited, a significant portion of the input heat was conducted  to the substrate, and hence the melt pool was in a transient state. Since neither surface defect nor  geometric nonconformance was observed in the first layer, a constant laser voltage was applied. As  the deposition process continued, the heat transfer rate between part and substrate reached a steady  state,  and  the  local  fluctuation  of  the  MPW  would  potentially  lead  to  geometric  inaccuracies.  Therefore, the control action was started in the second layer at the time around 30 s. After the second  layer, the MPW was stabilized and maintained within 115–120 pixels.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  13  of  19  Figure 7. The MPW data for the entire time‐domain extracted from Figure 6c, showing the automatic  update of the controller parameters (KP, KI, KD).  Figure  8  illustrates  the  results  of  Experiment  2.  The  samples  in  Experiment  2  had  the  same  nominal dimensions as those in Experiment 1 but with different tool path settings. In particular, the  samples printed in Experiment 2 did not include the profile tool path. Only the infill was built, while  the outer contour of each layer was not deposited. Figure 8a,b shows the sample fabricated with the  constant laser  voltage  (6.2  V)  without  control.  With  a  higher  central  bulge  and  lower  edges,  this  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  14  of  19  sample had a more significant distortion than that seen in Figure 5 in Experiment 1, which was the  result of less material added to the edges to compensate for the distortion when the profile tool path  was absent. The conventional PID control method was used for the sample in Figure 8c,d. Both the  height and area of the surface bulge area were reduced compared to those in the uncontrolled sample.  However,  before  the  PID  controller  was  deployed,  system  identifications  and  trial‐and‐error  experiments were conducted to determine the PID gains, thus introducing extra time and material  wastage. With the proposed adaptive controller employed, as shown in Figure 8e,f, the sample had  a  flatter surface,  sharper  edges,  and  hence  a  better  geometric accuracy than  its uncontrolled  and  conventional  PID  controlled  counterparts.  Figure  9  shows  the  time  plots  of  the  MPW  and  laser  voltage in Experiment 2. The MPW value of the uncontrolled sample increased continuously until it  exceeded 150 pixels at the end of the fabrication. The MPW value of the conventional PID controlled  sample shows a slower growth compared to the uncontrolled sample. Compared to the conventional  PID controller, the proposed adaptive control method was able to further stabilize the MPW while  keeping it within the range of 115–130 pixels. The proposed adaptive control method was proven  effective regardless of the tool path setting.  Figure 8. Samples of Experiment 2 (solid semicylinder without the profile tool path, 316 L stainless  steel). (a) The sample fabricated without control; (b) The reconstructed surface of the uncontrolled  sample; (c) The sample fabricated with conventional PID controller; (d) The reconstructed surface of  the conventional PID controlled sample; (e) The sample fabricated with proposed adaptive control  method; (f) The reconstructed surface of the adaptively controlled sample.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  15  of  19  Figure  9.  Time  plots  of  the  MPW  and  laser  voltage  signals  for  Experiment  2  (solid  semicylinder  without the profile tool path, 316 L stainless steel). (a) The data without control; (b) The data with  conventional PID control; (c) The data with the proposed adaptive control.  Experiment 3 was conducted to validate the capability of the proposed adaptive controller in  improving the geometric accuracy for any random part, without extra controller tuning or system  identification. Compared to the previous two experiments, Experiment 3 involved different material  (LPW‐35N nickel alloy instead of 316 L stainless steel), geometry (a thin‐walled hollow part instead  of  a  solid  part),  tool  path  (continuous  spiral  path  instead  of  zigzag  straight  path  segments),  and  process parameters (different powder feeding rates and layer thicknesses). The fabrication result of  Experiment 3 is shown in Figure 10. Figure 10a shows the uncontrolled sample deposited with the  constant laser voltage (6.2 V), which shows a wavy top surface with obvious bulge and dent regions.  The highest point and lowest point were measured at 24.25 mm and 21.33 mm, respectively, making  a height difference of 2.92 mm. The significant unevenness of the top surface was mainly due to the  inconsistent printing velocity along the spiral tool path when the robot carrying the optical head kept  accelerating  or  decelerating  in  both  X  and  Y  directions.  The  inconsistent  velocity  resulted  in  inconsistent laser energy density input to the melt pool. Figure 10b shows the sample fabricated with  the proposed adaptive controller enabled. The adaptively controlled sample had a more even surface  than the uncontrolled counterparts. The lowest and highest points were 22.90 mm and 24.15 mm,  respectively, and the 1.25 mm height difference was less than half that of the uncontrolled sample.  As a result of the adaptive closed‐loop control, the geometric accuracy of the thin‐walled part could  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  16  of  19  be improved. The inconsistent energy density due to velocity inconsistency was compensated for by  the controlled laser voltage. Figure 10c,d shows the time plots of the MPW data and laser voltage  signal  in  Experiment  3.  When  the  MPW  rose  due  to  higher  energy  density  (and  slower  absolute  speed), the laser signal was reduced, attempting to lower the MPW, and vice versa. The stabilizing  effect  of  the  proposed  controller  can  be  observed  from  the  MPW  plot  in  Figure  10d,  which  has  considerably smaller fluctuation than that in Figure 10c. Similar to Experiments 1 and 2, Experiment  3 also demonstrated the capability of the proposed controller in reducing heat accumulation. This  capability was more important for thin‐walled hollow parts than solid parts since thin‐walled parts  had smaller cross‐sections and hence poorer heat conduction rate. The  MPW of the uncontrolled  sample grew to nearly 140 pixels in Figure 10c, whereas the MPW of the adaptively controlled sample  remained in the narrow range of 95–105 pixels in Figure 10d throughout the process. The reduced  heat accumulation due to the relative consistency of the MPW also contributed to the better accuracy  of the controlled sample.  Figure 10. Results of Experiment 3 (thin‐walled hollow pipes with a spiral tool path, LPW‐35N nickel  alloy). (a) The sample fabricated without control; (b) The sample fabricated with adaptive control; (c)  The MPW and laser voltage plots for the uncontrolled sample; (d) The MPW and laser voltage plots  for the adaptively controlled sample.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  17  of  19  The above experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed data‐driven adaptive  control strategy in enhancing the laser‐based DED system’s performance. In general, the proposed  adaptive control method could produce a better result than the uncontrolled and conventional PID  controlled  processes  in  terms  of  MPW  stabilization  and  geometric  accuracy  improvement.  More  importantly,  the  proposed  adaptive  control  method  could  eliminate  the  costly  and  inefficient  controller  tuning  procedures  used  in  the  conventional  PID  method.  A  different  set  of  controller  parameters  needed  to  be  obtained  by  system  identification  and  trial‐and‐error  experiments  in  conventional PID whenever the process conditions were changed. In comparison, the proposed data‐ driven adaptive controller could be used to fabricate parts with any shapes, materials, tool paths, or  process parameters. Experiment‐based system identification and manual tweaking of the controller  was  not  required  even  when  the  DED  process  conditions  were  changed  for  different  parts.  The  controller  parameters  could  be  optimized  and  updated  automatically  on‐the‐fly  during  the  DED  process without human intervention, and the reduced complexity in controller implementation could  pave the way to broader adoption of closed‐loop DED systems by industry end‐users.  5. Conclusions  In this research, a data‐driven adaptive control strategy with the automatic parameter tuning  capability was proposed for the laser‐based DED process. A multitasking controller architecture was  developed with the melt pool monitoring unit, autotuning unit, and digital PID unit being executed  concurrently. In the autotuning unit, the MPW and laser voltage data were recorded in a temporary  buffer periodically before they were used to optimize the controller parameters by the VRFT function.  The optimized controller parameters were used to update the digital PID unit automatically. It was  demonstrated by experiments that the proposed controller could adapt to different shapes, powder  materials,  tool  paths,  and  process  conditions  in  DED.  Experiments  showed  improvements  in  geometric  accuracies  of  DED‐fabricated  parts  as  the  result  of  applying  the  proposed  adaptive  controller. The improvements were achieved by the melt‐pool‐stabilizing effect of the controller. The  MPW  data  of  controlled  samples  had  less  fluctuation  and  better  consistency  than  those  of  uncontrolled  and  conventional  PID  controlled  samples.  Another  advantage  of  the  proposed  controller is that it does not require prior system identification even when the DED process conditions  are changed. Controller parameters are updated automatically by the DED process data, and hence  experiment‐based, layer‐dependent, and process‐specific control rules are not required. Therefore,  the complexity and manpower cost of implementing a closed‐loop DED system can be reduced by  the proposed method, making it easy for end‐users to adopt the controller. The main limitation of  this research is that the laser voltage is the only controlled variable in the DED process, while other  parameters (e.g., the printing speed and powder feeding rate) are not controlled. In future research,  the proposed data‐driven adaptive controller can be further developed to take more DED process  variables into consideration.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, X.Y. and G.B.; methodology, L.C. and X.Y.; software, L.C. and X.Y.;  validation, L.C., X.Y., Y.C. and F.W.; formal analysis, L.C., X.Y., Y.C. and F.W.; writing—L.C., X.Y., S.K.M. and  G.B.;  writing—review  and  editing,  L.C.,  X.Y.,  S.K.M.  and  G.B.;  supervision,  S.K.M.  and  G.B.;  project  administration,  X.Y.;  funding  acquisition,  C.Y.  and  G.B.  All  authors  have  read  and  agreed  to  the  published  version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research was funded by A*ccelerate, grant number ACCL/19‐GAP077‐R20A.  Acknowledgments:  We  acknowledge  the  support  from  Nanyang  Technological  University  under  the  Undergraduate Research Experience on campus (URECA) program.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.    Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  18  of  19  References  1. Dass,  A.;  Moridi,  A.  State  of  the  Art  in  Directed  Energy  Deposition:  From  Additive  Manufacturing  to  Materials Design. Coatings 2019, 9, 418, doi:10.3390/coatings9070418.  2. Collins, P.C.; Brice, D.A.; Samimi, P.; Ghamarian, I.; Fraser, H.L. Microstructural Control of Additively  Manufactured  Metallic  Materials.  Annu.  Rev.  Mater.  Res.  2016,  46,  63–91,  doi:10.1146/annurev‐matsci‐ 070115‐031816.  3. Tapia,  G.;  Elwany,  A.  A  Review  on  Process  Monitoring  and  Control  in  Metal‐Based  Additive  Manufacturing. J. Manuf. Sci. Eng. 2014, 136, 060801, doi:10.1115/1.4028540.  4. Akbari,  M.;  Kovacevic,  R.  Closed  loop  control  of  melt  pool  width  in  robotized  laser  powder–directed  energy deposition process. Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol. 2019, 104, 2887–2898, doi:10.1007/s00170‐019‐04195‐ y.  5. Bi, G.; Sun, C.N.; Gasser, A. Study on influential factors for process monitoring and control in laser aided  additive manufacturing. J. Mater. Process. Technol. 2013, 213, 463–468, doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2012.10.006.  6. Vasinonta,  A.;  Beuth,  J.L.;  Griffith,  M.L.  A  Process  Map  for  Consistent  Build  Conditions  in  the  Solid  Freeform  Fabrication  of  Thin‐Walled  Structures.  J.  Manuf.  Sci.  Eng.  2001,  123,  615–622,  doi:10.1115/1.1370497.  7. Vasinonta, A.; Beuth, J.L.; Griffith, M. Process Maps for Predicting Residual Stress and Melt Pool Size in  the  Laser‐Based  Fabrication  of  Thin‐Walled  Structures.  J.  Manuf.  Sci.  Eng.  2007,  129,  101–109,  doi:10.1115/1.2335852.  8. Bi, G.; Gasser, A.; Wissenbach, K.; Drenker, A.; Poprawe, R. Identification and qualification of temperature  signal  for  monitoring  and  control  in  laser  cladding.  Opt.  Lasers  Eng.  2006,  44,  1348–1359,  doi:10.1016/j.optlaseng.2006.01.009.  9. Bi, G.; Gasser, A.; Wissenbach, K.; Drenker, A.; Poprawe, R. Characterization of the process control for the  direct  laser  metallic  powder  deposition.  Surf.  Coat.  Technol.  2006,  201,  2676–2683,  doi:10.1016/j.surfcoat.2006.05.006.  10. Hofman, J.T.; Pathiraj, B.; van Dijk, J.; de Lange, D.F.; Meijer, J. A camera based feedback control strategy  for  the  laser  cladding  process.  J.  Mater.  Process.  Technol.  2012,  212,  2455–2462,  doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2012.06.027.  11. Hu, D.; Kovacevic, R. Sensing, modeling and control for laser‐based additive manufacturing. Int. J. Mach.  Tools Manuf. 2003, 43, 51–60, doi:10.1016/S0890‐6955(02)00163‐3.  12. García‐Díaz, A.; Panadeiro, V.; Lodeiro, B.; Rodríguez‐Araújo, J.; Stavridis, J.; Papacharalampopoulos, A.;  Stavropoulos,  P.  OpenLMD,  an  open  source  middleware  and  toolkit  for  laser‐based  additive  manufacturing  of  large  metal  parts.  Robot.  Comput.  Integr.  Manuf.  2018,  53,  153–161,  doi:10.1016/j.rcim.2018.04.006.  13. Moralejo, S.; Penaranda, X.; Nieto, S.; Barrios, A.; Arrizubieta, I.; Tabernero, I.; Figueras, J. A feedforward  controller for tuning laser cladding melt pool geometry in real time. Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol. 2017, 89,  821–831, doi:10.1007/s00170‐016‐9138‐7.  14. Song, L.; Bagavath‐Singh, V.; Dutta, B.; Mazumder, J. Control of melt pool temperature and deposition  height  during  direct  metal  deposition  process.  Int.  J.  Adv.  Manuf.  Technol.  2012,  58,  247–256,  doi:10.1007/s00170‐011‐3395‐2.  15. Gibson, B.T.; Bandari, Y.K.; Richardson, B.S.; Henry, W.C.; Vetland, E.J.; Sundermann, T.W.; Love, L.J. Melt  pool size control through multiple closed‐loop modalities in laser‐wire directed energy deposition of Ti‐ 6Al‐4V. Addit. Manuf. 2020, 32, 100993, doi:10.1016/j.addma.2019.100993.  16. Campi, M.C.; Lecchini, A.; Savaresi, S.M. Virtual reference feedback tuning: A direct method for the design  of feedback controllers. Automatica 2002, 38, 1337–1346, doi:10.1016/S0005‐1098(02)00032‐8.  17. OpenCV. Available online: https://opencv.org/ (accessed on 25 July 2020).  18. Visioli, A. Practical PID Control; Springer: London, UK, 2006.  19. Bazanella,  A.S.;  Campestrini,  L.;  Eckhard,  D.  Data‐Driven  Controller  Design:  The  H2  Approach;  Springer  Science & Business Media: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2011.  20. Formentin,  S.;  Campi,  M.C.;  Carè,  A.;  Savaresi,  S.M.  Deterministic  continuous‐time  Virtual  Reference  Feedback  Tuning  (VRFT)  with  application  to  PID  design.  Syst.  Control  Lett.  2019,  127,  25–34,  doi:10.1016/j.sysconle.2019.03.007.  21. Ogata, K. Discrete‐Time Control Systems, 2nd ed.; Prentice‐Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA, 1998.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  19  of  19  22. Campi, M.C.; Lecchini, A.; Savaresi, S.M. Virtual reference feedback tuning (VRFT): A new direct approach  to the design of feedback controllers. In Proceedings of the 39th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control  (Cat.  No.00CH37187),  Sydney,  Australia,  12–15  December  2000;  Volume  1,  pp.  623–629,  doi:10.1109/CDC.2000.912835.  23. Boeira, E.; Eckhard, D. pyvrft: A Python package for the Virtual Reference Feedback Tuning, a direct data‐ driven control method. SoftwareX 2020, 11, 100383, doi:10.1016/j.softx.2019.100383.  24. Stoica, P.; Moses, R.L. Spectral Analysis of Signals; Pearson, Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA,  2005.  Boston, MA, USA, 2001.  25. Gröchenig, K. Foundations of Time‐Frequency Analysis; Birkhäuser Boston:  26. Chen, L.; Yao, X.; Xu, P.; Moon, S.K.; Bi, G. Surface Monitoring for Additive Manufacturing with in‐situ  Point Cloud Processing. In Proceedings of the 2020 6th International Conference on Control, Automation  and Robotics (ICCAR), Singapore, 20–23 April 2020; pp. 196–201, doi:10.1109/ICCAR49639.2020.9108092.  27. Chen, L.; Yao, X.; Xu, P.; Moon, S.K.; Bi, G. Rapid surface defect identification for additive manufacturing  with  in‐situ  point  cloud  processing  and  machine  learning.  Virtual  Phys.  Prototyp.  2020,  1–18,  doi:10.1080/17452759.2020.1832695.  28. Ziegler, J.G.; Nichols, N.B. Optimum Settings for Automatic Controllers. J. Dyn. Syst. Meas. Control. 1993,  115, 220–222, doi:10.1115/1.2899060.  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional  affiliations.  © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access  article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution  (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Sciences Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Data-Driven Adaptive Control for Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing with Automatic Controller Tuning

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/data-driven-adaptive-control-for-laser-based-additive-manufacturing-RxoHmmwuyY
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2020 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2076-3417
DOI
10.3390/app10227967
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Data‐Driven Adaptive Control for Laser‐Based  Additive Manufacturing with Automatic   Controller Tuning  1,2 1, 1 1 2, 1, Lequn Chen  , Xiling Yao  *, Youxiang Chew  , Fei Weng  , Seung Ki Moon  * and Guijun Bi  *    Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research,   73 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637662, Singapore; CHEN1189@e.ntu.edu.sg (L.C.);   chewyx@simtech.a‐star.edu.sg (Y.C.); weng_fei@simtech.a‐star.edu.sg (F.W.)    School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Ave,  Singapore 639798, Singapore  *  Correspondence: yao_xiling@simtech.a‐star.edu.sg (X.Y.); skmoon@ntu.edu.sg (S.K.M.);   gjbi@simtech.a‐star.edu.sg (G.B.)  Received: 22 September 2020; Accepted: 8 November 2020; Published: 10 November 2020  Abstract: Closed‐loop control is desirable in direct energy deposition (DED) to stabilize the process  and improve the fabrication quality. Most existing DED controllers require system identifications  by  experiments  to  obtain  plant  models  or  layer‐dependent  adaptive  control  rules,  and  such  processes are cumbersome and time‐consuming. This paper proposes a novel data‐driven adaptive  control strategy to adjust laser voltage with the melt pool size feedback. A multitasking controller  architecture is developed to incorporate an autotuning unit that optimizes controller parameters  based on the DED process data automatically. Experimental validations show improvements in the  geometric accuracy and melt pool consistency of controlled samples. The main advantage of the  proposed controller is that it can adapt to DED processes with different part shapes, materials, tool  paths, and process parameters without tweaking. System identification is not required even when  process conditions are changed, which reduces the controller implementation time and cost for end‐ users.  Keywords: additive manufacturing; direct energy deposition; closed‐loop control; virtual reference  feedback tuning  1. Introduction  Laser‐based direct energy deposition (DED) is an additive manufacturing (AM) process that is  used  to  fabricate  metallic  components  layer  by  layer  and  uses  a  laser  as  the  heat  source  to  melt  additive materials (in either powder or wire form) as they are deposited onto a substrate [1]. The  laser‐based DED  has  found  broad  applications in the  aerospace  and  marine industries  due  to its  capability of making large‐scale and customized parts in a cost‐effective way. However, the laser‐ based DED process has poorer stability compared to traditional metal forming processes. It is prone  to defects and dimensional inaccuracy due to various factors, including uneven thermal stress, strong  melt  pool  dynamics,  localized  heat  accumulation,  inconsistent  speed,  and  other  unpredictable  disturbances  during  laser  beam  delivery  and  material  feeding  [2].  Therefore,  closed‐loop  control  systems with sensor feedbacks are highly desirable for the laser‐based DED process [3]. However,  the nonlinearity and varying dynamics of the DED makes the search for robust control algorithms a  challenging task. Constant controller parameters may not perform well for all the layers in DED, as  the process conditions (e.g., the solidified layer temperature and the associated nominal melt pool  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967; doi:10.3390/app10227967  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  2  of  19  size) change over time as the part grows [4]. Moreover, a controller designed for a specific material  may not be suitable for another material, since the nominal DED process parameters and material  properties (e.g., thermal conductivity, viscosity, and emissivity) are different. Therefore, this research  aimed  to  develop  a  data‐driven  adaptive  control  method  in  which  the  controller  parameters  are  variables that can be automatically updated during the laser‐based DED process.  Melt pool characteristics have a strong correlation with the process stability and part quality in  DED,  and  hence  they  are  frequently  used  in  closed‐loop  control  systems  [5].  The  effects  of  DED  process parameters on melt pool characteristics have been investigated quantitatively in previous  research. It was found that the melt pool size and temperature are both positively influenced by the  input energy density and hence the laser power [6,7]. The proportional–integral–derivative (PID)  controller has been widely adopted in the development of melt‐pool‐based DED control systems due  to its simplicity and effectiveness. For example, Bi et al. [8,9] used a pyrometer to sense the infrared  (IR) radiation from the melt pool and sent the reading to a PID controller. Based on the error term  calculated as the difference between the real‐time IR signal and its nominal value, the PID controller  could change the laser power in response to the fluctuation in melt pool temperature. Consistent  height  of  the  as‐built  part  was  achieved  by  the  above  approach.  Hofman  et  al.  [10]  utilized  a  complementary  metal‐oxide‐semiconductor  (CMOS)  camera  to  capture  the  melt  pool  image  and  measure the melt pool width. Then, they applied a PID controller to increase and decrease the laser  power to compensate for the rise and fall of the melt pool width, respectively. Similar studies used  PID  controllers  to  adjust  the  laser  power  based  on  the  variation  of  melt  pool  area  [11,12].  Enhancements  have  also  been  made  to  the  conventional  PID  method,  aiming  to  improve  the  controller performance under the varying dynamics of the DED process. For example, Moralejo et al.  [13] added a feedforward path to a PID controller, which could reduce the overshoot and improve  the response speed. The authors also embedded the melt pool size setpoint into the preprogrammed  computer numerical control (CNC) code. The position‐dependent setpoint allowed the building of  changeable  geometries  using  a  single‐track  toolpath.  However,  extensive  experimentation  was  needed  to  obtain  the  correct  controller  parameters.  Akbari  and  Kovacevic  [4]  implemented  an  adaptive control strategy that handled the variation of melt pool response across multiple layers.  System identification was performed for each layer, and the response of melt pool size to the laser  power was represented by a first‐order transfer function that had different coefficients for different  layers.  A  PID  controller  was  used  to  adjust  the  laser  power;  but  instead  of  having  constant  parameters, its PID parameters were tuned for each layer using the corresponding transfer function.  This strategy allowed the controller to be adaptable to changes in the heat conduction mode and  cooling  rate  as  the  part  height  increased.  However,  the  layer‐by‐layer  system  identification  and  controller tuning process was time‐consuming and lacked automation, which made the above control  strategy less user‐friendly for industry applications. Song et al. [14] proposed a two‐input single‐ output  hybrid  controller  that  consisted  of  a  rule‐based  height  controller  and  a  closed‐loop  temperature controller. The laser power was reduced by the height controller until the melt pool  height was below the preset layer thickness threshold. Afterward, the temperature controller took  over and adjusted the laser power based on the pyrometer feedback. Another hybrid control strategy  was proposed for a laser–wire DED system by Gibson et al. [15]. The laser power was controlled by  the melt pool geometry using thermal camera feedback, while the printing speed and wire feeding  rate were controlled by the part height on a per‐layer basis. As the part height increased, both the  printing speed and wire feeding rate increased. Hence, the average laser energy density decreased,  which was allowed due to the heat accumulation in the freshly built layers below the melt pool. This  approach  could  maintain  the  process  stability  and  improve  the  productivity  at  the  same  time.  However, since the heat accumulation effect strongly depended on the material, geometry, area, and  maximum height of the part, the selection of controller parameters for a specific product might not  be suitable for another product.  One of the limitations in the existing control strategies that extensive experimentation is required  to find the optimal controller parameters. The system identification and parameter tuning processes  are  cumbersome  and  time‐consuming.  Besides,  although  some  of  the  aforementioned  controllers  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  3  of  19  considered  interlayer  changes  in  DED  process  conditions,  they  did  not  adapt  to  the  intralayer  variation of melt pool dynamics. Therefore, in this research, we propose a novel data‐driven adaptive  control  strategy  with  automatic  parameter  tuning  instead  of  using  a  prior  plant  model  or  static  controller parameters. During the laser‐based DED process, the sensor‐captured melt pool size and  the laser voltage signal are recorded in each time frame as the system input and output (I/O) data,  respectively. The I/O data collected within a periodic time interval are stored in a buffer before they  are fed into an autotuning unit to compute the optimal PID controller parameters. The PID controller  with the updated parameters is used to adjust the laser power in the next time interval while the new  sets of I/O data are being collected to overwrite the buffer. The controller parameters are reoptimized  once  again  at  the  end  of  the  cycle,  using  the  updated  I/O  data  that  reflect  the  varying  response  dynamics  of  the  melt  pool.  The  virtual  reference  feedback  tuning  (VRFT)  algorithm  [16]  is  implemented  in  the  autotuning  unit  for  PID  parameter  optimization.  The  data‐driven  controller  update is performed periodically throughout the entire DED process regardless of the present time,  layer, material, size, or shape. Prior and interlayer system identification experiments are no longer  needed, thus saving time and cost. Besides, since the proposed adaptive controller is dynamically set  by the time‐dependent process data, it can be applied to parts with any materials, geometries, and  sizes without modification, which makes its adoption convenient for industry end‐users.  This paper is organized as follows: Section 2 introduces the overall setup of the laser‐based DED  system  with  melt  pool  monitoring  and  closed‐loop  control.  Section  3  explains  the  details  of  the  proposed  data‐driven  adaptive  control  strategy.  Section  4  presents  the  experimental  results  that  demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Lastly, Section 5 concludes the paper and  provides direction for future research.  2. System Setup  This research was conducted on an in‐house‐developed laser‐based DED system. Figure 1 shows  a  simplified  illustration  of  the  system  setup,  where  the  transmissions  of  energy  and  signal  are  represented by solid arrows. A six‐axis IRB‐4400 industrial robot (ABB, Zürich, Switzerland) carried  the optical head and a two‐axis IRBP‐A positioner (ABB, Zürich, Switzerland) held the substrate. The  laser  beam  with  1070  nm  wavelength  was  supplied  by  a  YLS‐6000  Ytterbium  laser  source  (IPG  Photonics, Oxford, MA, USA) with the maximum power of 6 kW. A BIMO optical head (HIGHYAG,  Kleinmachnow, Germany) received the laser beam via fiber and focused the beam onto the substrate  as it melted the metal powders. A powder feeder (GTV, Luckenbach, Germany) was used to deliver  the metallic powder to the nozzle installed at the bottom of the optical head. A WAT‐902B charged‐ couple device (CCD) camera (Watec, NY, USA) was mounted on the optical head. Through a series  of reflective optics, the melt pool image could be captured by the CCD camera coaxially. The viewing  direction was perpendicular to the melt pool that was located at the center of the camera view. The  melt pool emits a larger amount of near‐infrared (NIR) radiation than its surroundings due to its  higher temperature. Therefore, a NIR band‐pass filter with a bandwidth of 780–1000 nm was attached  to the CCD camera so that the melt pool could be isolated from the surroundings without sensing the  diffusively reflected 1070 nm laser.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  4  of  19  Figure 1. The setup of the laser‐based direct energy deposition (DED) system with closed‐loop control.  A personal computer (PC) running an Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system was used as the main  controller.  It  was  responsible  for  sensor  data  collection,  image  processing,  and  control  algorithm  execution. The output channel of the CCD camera was connected to the controlling PC that received  the digital image data via a USB 3.0 port. The raw image in grey‐scale pixels was processed by a series  of computer vision algorithms using the OpenCV library [17]. The melt pool area was cropped from  the raw image by a circular mask that has a diameter slightly smaller than that of the nozzle outlet so  that the NIR light reflected by the nozzle’s inner surface could be removed. Then, a filter with a  prescribed threshold was applied to binarize the melt pool image, after which an ellipse was fit into  the binary image, as shown in Figure 1. The melt pool width (MPW) was approximated by the minor  axis  of  the  resulting  ellipse.  The  MPW  is  influenced  by  the  quality  of  interlayer  fusion  and  heat  transfer mode, and it is an indicator of the part integrity and surface roughness of DED‐fabricated  parts [6]. Therefore, the MPW value was sent to the controller as the feedback data. The proposed  data‐driven  adaptive  controller  was  implemented  in  an  in‐house‐developed  software  program  running on the PC. The output of the controller was the analog voltage signal supplied to the laser  source. The laser voltage ranging from 0 to 10 V determined the actual laser power. The digital on/off  signal of the laser emission was sent from the robot’s control box to the laser source via hardwiring,  which did not interfere with the laser voltage sent from the PC. The computation of the output laser  voltage based on the feedback melt pool data using the proposed control strategy is discussed in the  next section.  3. The Data‐Driven Adaptive Control Strategy  3.1. Conventional Proportional–Integral–Derivative (PID) Algorithm  This  section  introduces  the  formulation  of  a  conventional  PID  controller  and  its  parameter  optimization  problem,  which  lays  the  foundation  of  the  proposed  data‐driven  adaptive  control  strategy. In the DED process, the goal of closed‐loop control is to improve the stability of the MPW  by  adjusting  the  laser  voltage  that  determines  the  laser  power.  The  block  diagram  for  the  conventional  closed‐loop  control  system  is  shown  in  Figure  2.  The  PID  control  action  in  the  continuous time‐domain can be expressed as:  𝑢 𝑡 𝐾 𝑒 𝑡 𝐾 𝑒 𝑡 𝑑𝑡𝐾 𝑒𝑡   (1)  𝑑𝑡 where 𝑒𝑡   is the error term that equals to the difference between the reference MPW value (𝑟𝑡 )  and the measured MPW value (𝑦𝑡 ); Kp, Ki, and Kd are the tuneable PID parameters; and 𝑢𝑡   is the  laser voltage signal computed by the PID controller. The laser voltage signal is input into the plant  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  5  of  19  𝐺 𝑠   that  produces  the  MPW  feedback. The  PID  controller  with  a  first‐order  low‐pass  filter  in  derivate term can be represented as the following s‐domain transfer function [18]:  1 𝑠 𝐶 𝑠 𝐾 𝐾 𝐾   (2)  𝑠 1𝜏 𝑠 where 𝜏   is  the  first‐order  derivative  filter  time  and 𝑠   is  the  complex  variable  in  the  frequency  domain.  Figure  2.  Block  diagram  of  the  conventional  closed‐loop  control  system  for  the  direct  energy  deposition (DED) process.  To  obtain  the  optimal  controller  parameters  denoted  as  𝜃𝐾 ,𝐾 ,𝐾 ,  the  following  optimization problem in the model‐reference (MR) framework [19] can be established as follows:  𝜃 arg min𝐽   (3)  𝐺 𝑧 2 𝐽 𝜃 ≜ 𝑇 𝑧 𝐿   (4)  1 𝐺 𝑧 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 2 where the  cost function 𝐽 𝜃   penalizes the  difference  between  the  desired  closed‐loop transfer  function 𝑇 𝑧   and the actual closed‐loop transfer function, 𝐺 𝑧   and 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃   are the discrete  time‐domain counterparts of 𝐺 𝑠   and 𝐶 𝑠 , respectively, and 𝐿 𝑧   is a band‐pass noise filter.  The  optimization  objective  is  to  minimize  the  𝐽 𝜃   criterion.  The  controller  𝐶   with  the  optimal parameters 𝜃   is the final tuning outcome, and the resultant closed‐loop transfer function  should be equal to the desired closed‐loop reference model 𝑇 , i.e.,  𝐺 𝑧 (5)  𝑇   1 𝐺 𝑧 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 Since the plant model 𝐺 𝑧   in the cost function 𝐽 𝜃 is unknown, system identification is  needed  in  the  conventional  tuning  process  to  find  𝐺 𝑧   before  controller  parameters  can  be  optimized; otherwise, trial‐and‐error experiments are conducted to determine the PID gains, which  is  cumbersome  and  time‐consuming.  The  inaccuracy  in  the  system  identification  could  also  jeopardize the controller tuning result. Moreover, for different part geometries and powder materials,  the DED process does not have a single plant model 𝐺 𝑠   that can generalize the melt pool dynamic  response to the laser voltage signal. The melt pool response also varies with time when fabricating  the same part, and hence a single set of optimal controller parameters 𝜃   cannot be obtained for the  entire time domain. Therefore, an adaptive control method is needed to automatically update the  controller parameters without repeated system identification. The proposed data‐driven adaptive  controller is explained in Section 3.2.  3.2. Adaptive Controller Design  The proposed adaptive controller is implemented with a multitasking architecture, as illustrated  in Figure 3. Three main tasks are executed concurrently during the DED process, i.e., the melt pool  monitoring  unit,  the  autotuning  unit,  and  the  digital  PID  unit.  Each  of  them  contains  subtasks  performing  different  functions  automatically  and  continuously.  Data  transmission  within  the  𝜃 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  6  of  19  controller is indicated by the dotted lines in Figure 3, and the controller parameter update routine is  highlighted by the blue line. Details of the above three units are given below.  In the melt pool monitoring unit, the “camera driver” subtask reads the raw melt pool image  captured by the co‐axial CCD camera, and the “image processing” subtask performs the masking,  binarization, and ellipse fitting procedures as described in Section 2. The minor axis length of the  fitted ellipse, measured in the number of pixels, is published as the MPW data. The MPW data are  received by both the digital PID unit and the autotuning unit.  The digital PID unit calculates the output laser voltage based on the MPW feedback using the  standard formulations in Equations (1) and (2). However, instead of using predetermined and user‐ specified constant controller parameters, this PID unit accepts the adaptive parameters  𝐾 ,𝐾 ,𝐾   calculated in situ by the autotuning unit. System identification by experimental trials‐and‐errors is  removed from the controller design procedure, and the prior knowledge of a plant model is no longer  required. The output laser voltage is sent to the laser source as an analog signal, and at the same time  it is subscribed by the autotuning unit as an input to update the Kp, Ki, and Kd parameters.  The autotuning unit has two responsibilities, i.e., (1) collecting the process data generated by the  other two units and (2) using the process data to update the controller parameters repeatedly and  automatically,  thus  achieving  the  data‐driven  adaptive  control  capability.  The  autotuning  unit  consists  of  a  temporary  data  buffer,  a  timer  function,  and  a  VRFT  function.  The  MPW  and  laser  voltage are recorded in each time frame as the system input and output (I/O) data, respectively. The  I/O data collected within a periodic time interval are stored in the temporary buffer before they are  extracted by the VRFT function. The timer function launches the VRFT function when the timeout  signal is issued. The VRFT function computes the optimal controller parameters using the I/O data  in the buffer and sends the updated Kp, Ki, and Kd values back to the digital PID unit. The timer is  reset upon completion of the VRFT routine, and the temporary buffer is flushed. The PID unit with  the updated parameters adjusts the laser voltage in the next time interval while the new sets of I/O  data are being collected by the buffer. Periodically, the controller parameters are reoptimized at the  end of each timer cycle using the updated I/O data until the end of the DED process.  Figure 3. The multitasking architecture of the proposed data‐driven adaptive controller.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  7  of  19  Figure 4 shows the block diagram of the proposed adaptive controller. In addition to the error  feedback in the conventional PID controller (Figure 2), the autotuning unit forms the second feedback  loop that updates the Kp, Ki, and Kd parameters automatically. The reference model, denoted by 𝑇 ,  is an s‐domain transfer function representing the desired closed‐loop system behavior (e.g., desired  settling time and desired response speed) [20], and it can be written as follows:  𝑇   (6)  1 0.2𝑡 𝑠 where the settling time 𝑡 0.01 s, the response delay time 𝜏 0, and 𝑛 1  are specified for the  stable steady‐state tracking purpose [20]. The reference model 𝑇   in Figure 4 is the z‐domain  transfer function that is computed by transforming 𝑇   into the discrete‐time domain using the  bilinear method [21].  Figure 4. Block diagram of the adaptive controller with an autotuning unit.  The objective of the VRFT function in the autotuning unit is to optimize the controller so that the  resulting closed‐loop transfer function is identical to the reference model 𝑇 . Only the I/O data  collected during the experiment are used directly in the VRFT function. The plant model 𝐺𝑧   can  remain unknown since it is not required in the VRFT function, and hence the system identification  can be eliminated from the controller tuning process. More details of the fundamental VRFT theories  can be found in [16,22]. The reference model 𝑇   generates the desired system output 𝑦 ,  which is expressed as  𝑦 𝑧 𝑇 𝑧 (7)  where 𝑟 𝑧   is the reference signal (i.e., the setpoint). During the laser‐based DED process, the laser  voltage signal and MPW data collected during the time interval ∆𝑡   are denoted by  𝐷 𝑢 ,𝑦 ,𝑘 1,2 …𝑁   (8)  where 𝑢   and 𝑦   are the kth instance of the laser voltage and MPW data, respectively. Given the  reference model 𝑇   and system output 𝑦𝑧 , the virtual reference signal can be computed as  𝑟 ̃ 𝑇   (9)  where 𝑦𝑧   is  the  discrete‐time  transform  of  the  measured  MPW  dataset 𝑦 ,𝑦 ,𝑦 ,…𝑦 .  The  virtual reference signal 𝑟 ̃   is not the actual input signal used to generate the resulting MPW  𝑦𝑧 . Instead, it is the desired reference signal fed into the reference model 𝑇   if we consider  the measured output 𝑦𝑧   as the desired system output 𝑦 𝑧 .  𝑧𝑦 𝑧 𝑧 𝑟 𝑧 𝑧 𝑧 𝑠 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  8  of  19  Based on the computed virtual reference signal 𝑟 ̃ , the virtual error signal 𝑒 ̃ 𝑧   is defined  as the difference between the virtual reference signal and the measured system output, i.e.,  𝑒 ̃ 𝑧 𝑟 ̃ 𝑧 𝑦 𝑧 𝑇 𝑧 1 𝑦 𝑧   (10)  The  unknown  plant  model  𝐺 𝑧   can  produce  the  MPW  𝑦 𝑧   when  it  is  fed  with  the  . Therefore, we can define an “ideal controller” 𝐶 𝑧 ,𝜃   that should  measured laser voltage 𝑢 𝑧 generate the measured laser voltage 𝑢 𝑧   when it is fed with the virtual error signal 𝑒 ̃ 𝑧 . The  above control action can be written as  𝑢 𝑧 𝐶𝑧 ,𝜃𝑒 ̃ 𝑧   (11)  The controller 𝐶𝑧 ,𝜃   can be represented in the general format of:  𝐶 𝑧 ,𝜃 𝜌   (12)  where 𝜃   is the  variable  controller  parameter and 𝜌   is  a  vector  of transfer  functions. For a  discrete PID controller 𝐶 𝑧 ,𝜃 , the following expression can be obtained by applying the bilinear  𝐾 𝐾 𝐾 transform to Equation (2), and the 𝜃   and 𝜌𝑧   terms in Equation (12) are now    and  1 , respectively.  ⎡ ⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ 𝑇 1 𝑧 ⎢ ⎥ 𝐾 𝐾 𝐾 𝐶 𝑧 ,𝜃   (13)  2 1𝑧 ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ 2 1 𝑧 ⎢ ⎥ ⎣𝑇 3𝑧 ⎦ In order to find the “ideal controller” that generates the laser voltage signal 𝑢𝑧   with the  feedback error 𝑒 ̃ , the following optimization problem is solved in the VRFT function:  𝜃 arg min𝐽   (14)  𝐽 𝜃 ≜ ‖𝑢 𝑧 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 𝑒 ̃ 𝑧 ‖   (15)  𝑢 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 𝑇 𝑧 1 𝑦   The above optimization problem can be solved by the quadratic programming (QP) method that  searches for the best controller parameter 𝜃   to minimize the 𝐽 𝜃   criterion. In this research,  the solving algorithm was implemented in Python, adopted from the Pyvrft library [23]. The VRFT  optimization  problem  is  a  mathematical  equivalence  to  the  conventional  model‐reference  optimization problem described by Equations (3) and (4), as proven in [22]. A fixed plant model  𝐺 𝑧   required in Equations (3) and (4) is no longer included in Equations (14) and (15), which  contributes to the adaptability of the proposed data‐driven controller. The filtered error signal 𝑒 ̃   and laser voltage signal 𝑢   can be expressed as follows:  𝑒 ̃ 𝐿𝑧 ̃ , 𝑢 𝐿𝑧 𝑘   (16)  The above‐filtered signals are then used in the formulation of a modified cost function 𝐽 𝜃   as follows:  𝑢 𝑘 𝑘 𝑒 𝑘 𝜃 𝑧 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  9  of  19  𝐽 𝜃 𝑢 𝑘 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 𝑒 ̃ 𝑘   𝐿𝑧 𝑢 𝑘 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 𝑒 ̃ 𝑘   (17)  𝐿𝑧 𝑢 𝑘 𝐶 𝑧 ;𝜃 𝑇 𝑧 1 𝑦 𝑘   The  filter 𝐿𝑧   is  formulated  as  follows,  which  makes  the  resultant  PID  controller  a  good  approximation of the “ideal controller” [16]:  1𝑇 (18)  𝐿𝑧   The Φ   term in Equation (18) is the spectral density of the laser voltage signal, which can  be calculated based on the I/O dataset  𝑢𝑘   by periodogram and ARMA modeling methods  , … [24,25].  The  execution  of  the  VRFT‐based  autotuning  unit  in  the  laser‐based  DED  process  can  be  summarized in the following steps:  Step 0 VRFT  presetting:  Before  the  control  process  starts,  the  reference  model  𝑇 ,  representing the desired system performance, is specified by Equation (6).  Step 1 Data collection and preprocessing: During the Mth adaptive control cycle, the laser voltage  and MPW data 𝐷 𝑢 ,𝑦   are recorded and stored into the temporary buffer within  the interval ∆𝑡 𝑡 ~𝑡 . The virtual reference signal 𝑟 ̃   and the virtual error signal  𝑒 ̃   for  this cycle are  then calculated using Equations (9) and  (10). The filter 𝐿𝑧   determined by Equation (18) is applied to filter the I/O data and virtual signals.  Step 2 VRFT controller tuning: When the Mth control cycle has completed, and the timeout signal  is  issued  in  the  autotuning  unit,  the  VRFT  function  updates  the  optimal  controller  parameters 𝜃   by minimizing the modified cost function 𝐽 𝜃   in Equation (17), using  the data 𝐷 𝑢 ,𝑦   in the buffer.  Step 3 PID parameter updating: The autotuning unit sends the updated controller parameters 𝜃   to the digital PID controller unit, resets the timer, flushes the buffer, and then returns to Step  1 to start the (M+1)th control cycle.  The main contribution of the proposed DED control strategy is that the autotuning method has  eliminated the necessity of prior system identification and its associated cost and manual labor. The  same  controller  can  be  applied  in  the  DED  fabrication  with  any  shape,  size,  or  material  without  modification. Previous rule‐based adaptive DED control methods updated the controller parameters  based on the layer number or the part height, while the rules were derived from experiments for a  specific combination of material and process parameters [4,14,15]. In comparison, the proposed data‐ driven adaptive controller can update the parameters automatically regardless of the layer number  or part height, and no prior experiments are needed to generate the control rules, thus saving time  and cost for end‐users.  4. Experimental Validation  The proposed data‐driven adaptive controller was implemented in the laser‐based DED system  and validated experimentally. As listed in Table 1, different materials, geometries, and deposition  tool  paths  were  tested  to  validate  that  the  proposed  controller  could  automatically  adjust  its  parameters and was adaptable to different deposition situations without the necessity to conduct  system identification. Specifically, three experiments were conducted: (1) solid  semicylinder with  profile tool paths in 316 L stainless steel, (2) solid semicylinder without profile tool paths in 316 L  stainless steel, and (3) thin‐wall pipe with a continuous spiral tool path in LPW‐35N nickel alloy (a  𝑧 𝑇 𝑧 Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  10  of  19  customized material designed by the authors’ organization). Experiments 1 and 2 each comprised  three samples. The first sample was fabricated using the constant nominal process parameters listed  without  the  employed  control  system  in  Table  2.  The  second  sample  was  fabricated  using  a  conventional PID controller, where constant PID gains were used. The PID gains were determined  by experiment‐based system identification and trial‐and‐error. The third sample was fabricated using  the proposed adaptive control method, where PID gains were automatically optimized and updated  during  the  process.  These  three  samples  were  compared  with  each  other,  and  the  effect  of  the  adaptive  controller  was  analyzed.  Experiment  3  was  conducted  to  validate  that  the  proposed  adaptive control method was still effective even when the powder material and part geometry were  changed  (compared  to  Experiments  1  and  2),  while  no  additional  experiment  was  needed  to  recalibrate the controller. The MPW data and the corresponding laser voltage output in these three  experiments were recorded, and the results are discussed below.  Table 1. Materials, geometries, and deposition tool paths in different experiments.  Experiment Number  Powder Material  Geometry  Deposition Tool Path  Zigzag infill with the  1  316 L stainless steel  Solid semicylinder  profile tool path  Zigzag infill without the  2  316 L stainless steel  Solid semicylinder  profile tool path  LPW‐35N nickel  Thin‐walled  Continuous spiral single‐ 3  alloy  hollow pipe  bead tool path  Table 2. Constant nominal process parameters used for direct energy deposition (DED) processes  without control.  Powder Material  Process Parameters  316 L Stainless  LPW‐35N Nickel  Unit  Steel  Alloy  Laser voltage  6.2  6.2  V  Printing speed  20.0  20.0  mm/s  Powder feeding rate  6.09  7.73  g/min  Layer thickness  0.2  0.3  mm  Infill hatch distance (for solid parts only)  2.0  2.0  mm  Figure 5 shows the results of Experiment 1, comparing the samples of depositing the 30 mm  diameter semicylinder structure using 316 L stainless steel. The part’s nominal height (HN) was 9 mm,  and the nominal semicylinder diameter (DN) was 30 mm, as indicated in Figure 5. In Figure 5a, the  semicylinder structure was fabricated using the constant laser voltage signal (6.2 V) without control.  A laser profiler was used to scan the surface of the part and produce its 3D point cloud using the  method introduced in [26,27]. The scanned surface reconstructed from the point cloud is shown in  Figure 5b, where the color bar indicates the distance in the z‐direction from the points to the reference  plane [26]. The larger distance shown in the graph means the lower dimensional accuracy of the DED‐ fabricated part. A bulging area at the center of the surface that is significantly higher than the edges  can be seen in Figure 5b, which was caused by the unstable laser energy density and hence the uneven  heat  accumulation  in  the  part.  Figure  5c  shows  the  sample  deposited  using  a  conventional  PID  controller with constant PID gains ((KP, KI, KD) = (0.04, 0.02, 0.00)). The PID gains were tuned based  on  Ziegler‐Nichols  criteria  [28]  via  trial‐and‐error  experiments,  which  was  considerably  time‐ consuming and ineffective in terms of manpower and cost. The top surface of the conventional PID  controlled sample is shown in Figure 5d. It can be seen that its surface was flatter and the central  bulge height was smaller than that in the uncontrolled sample. This is due to the effect of the closed‐ loop control on stabilizing the heat input and reducing the localized heat accumulation. Figure 5e  shows the sample deposited with the proposed adaptive controller, and its surface was also scanned  and reconstructed, as shown in Figure 5f. It can be observed that the central bulge area was further  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  11  of  19  flattened compared with the conventional PID controlled sample. Figure 6a–c shows the time plots  of the MPW data and laser voltage signals for the uncontrolled sample, conventional PID controlled  sample, and adaptively controlled sample, respectively. In Figure 6a, a progressive increase in the  MPW  is  observed  due  to  the  accumulated  heat  built  up  in  the  part  when  using  a  constant  laser  voltage. The MPW exceeded 140 pixels at the end of the fabrication process with the trend of growing  even larger. In Figure 6b, the conventional PID controller was used, and the growth of MPW was  reduced compared to the uncontrolled sample. However, there was still an increasing trend in MPW.  About half of the MPW data were in the range of 120–130 pixels after 250 s, suggesting an unstable  heat input across the surface and the possibility of more severe geometry inaccuracy if the deposition  continues. In Figure 6c, the adaptive controller showed a more significant effect on stabilizing the  melt pool than the conventional PID controller. The laser voltage signal was reduced gradually to  decrease the average energy density as the process continued. The MPW data were maintained at a  narrower  range  of  115–120  pixels  throughout  the  entire  deposition  process.  Therefore,  uneven  localized heat accumulation was minimized, and  the possibility of surface defect occurrence was  reduced.  During the closed‐loop control, the laser voltage output was constrained by a maximum value  of 6.2 V. This value was the limit of the DED process window determined in previous experiments,  in order to prevent material failure. In fact, as shown in Figure 6b,c, the laser voltage was below 6.0  V for most of the time and seldomly hit the 6.2 V limit.  Figure 5. Samples of Experiment 1 (solid semicylinder with the profile tool path, 316 L stainless steel).  (a) The sample fabricated without control; (b) The reconstructed surface of the uncontrolled sample;  (c) The sample fabricated with a conventional proportional–integral–derivative (PID) controller; (d)  The reconstructed surface of the conventional PID controlled sample; (e) The sample fabricated with  the proposed adaptive controller; (f) The reconstructed surface of the adaptively controlled sample.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  12  of  19  Figure 6. Time plots of the melt pool width (MPW) and laser voltage signals for Experiment 1 (solid  semicylinder with the profile tool path, 316 L stainless steel). (a) The data without control; (b) The  data with conventional PID control; (c) The data with adaptive control.  Figure 7 shows the PID gain variations for the entire time‐plots extracted from Figure 6c, where  the controller parameters (KP, KI, KD) were updated in each adaptive control interval (10 s in this  study). The collected I/O dataset in each interval was used to optimize the controller parameters  automatically without manual tuning. The resultant controller parameters were truncated at three  decimals, as shown in the plot. The resultant PID controller had zero derivative gains (K  = 0), which  was acceptable in this case since the negligible derivative action could reduce the systemʹs sensitivity  to noises. When the first layer was deposited, a significant portion of the input heat was conducted  to the substrate, and hence the melt pool was in a transient state. Since neither surface defect nor  geometric nonconformance was observed in the first layer, a constant laser voltage was applied. As  the deposition process continued, the heat transfer rate between part and substrate reached a steady  state,  and  the  local  fluctuation  of  the  MPW  would  potentially  lead  to  geometric  inaccuracies.  Therefore, the control action was started in the second layer at the time around 30 s. After the second  layer, the MPW was stabilized and maintained within 115–120 pixels.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  13  of  19  Figure 7. The MPW data for the entire time‐domain extracted from Figure 6c, showing the automatic  update of the controller parameters (KP, KI, KD).  Figure  8  illustrates  the  results  of  Experiment  2.  The  samples  in  Experiment  2  had  the  same  nominal dimensions as those in Experiment 1 but with different tool path settings. In particular, the  samples printed in Experiment 2 did not include the profile tool path. Only the infill was built, while  the outer contour of each layer was not deposited. Figure 8a,b shows the sample fabricated with the  constant laser  voltage  (6.2  V)  without  control.  With  a  higher  central  bulge  and  lower  edges,  this  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  14  of  19  sample had a more significant distortion than that seen in Figure 5 in Experiment 1, which was the  result of less material added to the edges to compensate for the distortion when the profile tool path  was absent. The conventional PID control method was used for the sample in Figure 8c,d. Both the  height and area of the surface bulge area were reduced compared to those in the uncontrolled sample.  However,  before  the  PID  controller  was  deployed,  system  identifications  and  trial‐and‐error  experiments were conducted to determine the PID gains, thus introducing extra time and material  wastage. With the proposed adaptive controller employed, as shown in Figure 8e,f, the sample had  a  flatter surface,  sharper  edges,  and  hence  a  better  geometric accuracy than  its uncontrolled  and  conventional  PID  controlled  counterparts.  Figure  9  shows  the  time  plots  of  the  MPW  and  laser  voltage in Experiment 2. The MPW value of the uncontrolled sample increased continuously until it  exceeded 150 pixels at the end of the fabrication. The MPW value of the conventional PID controlled  sample shows a slower growth compared to the uncontrolled sample. Compared to the conventional  PID controller, the proposed adaptive control method was able to further stabilize the MPW while  keeping it within the range of 115–130 pixels. The proposed adaptive control method was proven  effective regardless of the tool path setting.  Figure 8. Samples of Experiment 2 (solid semicylinder without the profile tool path, 316 L stainless  steel). (a) The sample fabricated without control; (b) The reconstructed surface of the uncontrolled  sample; (c) The sample fabricated with conventional PID controller; (d) The reconstructed surface of  the conventional PID controlled sample; (e) The sample fabricated with proposed adaptive control  method; (f) The reconstructed surface of the adaptively controlled sample.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  15  of  19  Figure  9.  Time  plots  of  the  MPW  and  laser  voltage  signals  for  Experiment  2  (solid  semicylinder  without the profile tool path, 316 L stainless steel). (a) The data without control; (b) The data with  conventional PID control; (c) The data with the proposed adaptive control.  Experiment 3 was conducted to validate the capability of the proposed adaptive controller in  improving the geometric accuracy for any random part, without extra controller tuning or system  identification. Compared to the previous two experiments, Experiment 3 involved different material  (LPW‐35N nickel alloy instead of 316 L stainless steel), geometry (a thin‐walled hollow part instead  of  a  solid  part),  tool  path  (continuous  spiral  path  instead  of  zigzag  straight  path  segments),  and  process parameters (different powder feeding rates and layer thicknesses). The fabrication result of  Experiment 3 is shown in Figure 10. Figure 10a shows the uncontrolled sample deposited with the  constant laser voltage (6.2 V), which shows a wavy top surface with obvious bulge and dent regions.  The highest point and lowest point were measured at 24.25 mm and 21.33 mm, respectively, making  a height difference of 2.92 mm. The significant unevenness of the top surface was mainly due to the  inconsistent printing velocity along the spiral tool path when the robot carrying the optical head kept  accelerating  or  decelerating  in  both  X  and  Y  directions.  The  inconsistent  velocity  resulted  in  inconsistent laser energy density input to the melt pool. Figure 10b shows the sample fabricated with  the proposed adaptive controller enabled. The adaptively controlled sample had a more even surface  than the uncontrolled counterparts. The lowest and highest points were 22.90 mm and 24.15 mm,  respectively, and the 1.25 mm height difference was less than half that of the uncontrolled sample.  As a result of the adaptive closed‐loop control, the geometric accuracy of the thin‐walled part could  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  16  of  19  be improved. The inconsistent energy density due to velocity inconsistency was compensated for by  the controlled laser voltage. Figure 10c,d shows the time plots of the MPW data and laser voltage  signal  in  Experiment  3.  When  the  MPW  rose  due  to  higher  energy  density  (and  slower  absolute  speed), the laser signal was reduced, attempting to lower the MPW, and vice versa. The stabilizing  effect  of  the  proposed  controller  can  be  observed  from  the  MPW  plot  in  Figure  10d,  which  has  considerably smaller fluctuation than that in Figure 10c. Similar to Experiments 1 and 2, Experiment  3 also demonstrated the capability of the proposed controller in reducing heat accumulation. This  capability was more important for thin‐walled hollow parts than solid parts since thin‐walled parts  had smaller cross‐sections and hence poorer heat conduction rate. The  MPW of the uncontrolled  sample grew to nearly 140 pixels in Figure 10c, whereas the MPW of the adaptively controlled sample  remained in the narrow range of 95–105 pixels in Figure 10d throughout the process. The reduced  heat accumulation due to the relative consistency of the MPW also contributed to the better accuracy  of the controlled sample.  Figure 10. Results of Experiment 3 (thin‐walled hollow pipes with a spiral tool path, LPW‐35N nickel  alloy). (a) The sample fabricated without control; (b) The sample fabricated with adaptive control; (c)  The MPW and laser voltage plots for the uncontrolled sample; (d) The MPW and laser voltage plots  for the adaptively controlled sample.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  17  of  19  The above experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed data‐driven adaptive  control strategy in enhancing the laser‐based DED system’s performance. In general, the proposed  adaptive control method could produce a better result than the uncontrolled and conventional PID  controlled  processes  in  terms  of  MPW  stabilization  and  geometric  accuracy  improvement.  More  importantly,  the  proposed  adaptive  control  method  could  eliminate  the  costly  and  inefficient  controller  tuning  procedures  used  in  the  conventional  PID  method.  A  different  set  of  controller  parameters  needed  to  be  obtained  by  system  identification  and  trial‐and‐error  experiments  in  conventional PID whenever the process conditions were changed. In comparison, the proposed data‐ driven adaptive controller could be used to fabricate parts with any shapes, materials, tool paths, or  process parameters. Experiment‐based system identification and manual tweaking of the controller  was  not  required  even  when  the  DED  process  conditions  were  changed  for  different  parts.  The  controller  parameters  could  be  optimized  and  updated  automatically  on‐the‐fly  during  the  DED  process without human intervention, and the reduced complexity in controller implementation could  pave the way to broader adoption of closed‐loop DED systems by industry end‐users.  5. Conclusions  In this research, a data‐driven adaptive control strategy with the automatic parameter tuning  capability was proposed for the laser‐based DED process. A multitasking controller architecture was  developed with the melt pool monitoring unit, autotuning unit, and digital PID unit being executed  concurrently. In the autotuning unit, the MPW and laser voltage data were recorded in a temporary  buffer periodically before they were used to optimize the controller parameters by the VRFT function.  The optimized controller parameters were used to update the digital PID unit automatically. It was  demonstrated by experiments that the proposed controller could adapt to different shapes, powder  materials,  tool  paths,  and  process  conditions  in  DED.  Experiments  showed  improvements  in  geometric  accuracies  of  DED‐fabricated  parts  as  the  result  of  applying  the  proposed  adaptive  controller. The improvements were achieved by the melt‐pool‐stabilizing effect of the controller. The  MPW  data  of  controlled  samples  had  less  fluctuation  and  better  consistency  than  those  of  uncontrolled  and  conventional  PID  controlled  samples.  Another  advantage  of  the  proposed  controller is that it does not require prior system identification even when the DED process conditions  are changed. Controller parameters are updated automatically by the DED process data, and hence  experiment‐based, layer‐dependent, and process‐specific control rules are not required. Therefore,  the complexity and manpower cost of implementing a closed‐loop DED system can be reduced by  the proposed method, making it easy for end‐users to adopt the controller. The main limitation of  this research is that the laser voltage is the only controlled variable in the DED process, while other  parameters (e.g., the printing speed and powder feeding rate) are not controlled. In future research,  the proposed data‐driven adaptive controller can be further developed to take more DED process  variables into consideration.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, X.Y. and G.B.; methodology, L.C. and X.Y.; software, L.C. and X.Y.;  validation, L.C., X.Y., Y.C. and F.W.; formal analysis, L.C., X.Y., Y.C. and F.W.; writing—L.C., X.Y., S.K.M. and  G.B.;  writing—review  and  editing,  L.C.,  X.Y.,  S.K.M.  and  G.B.;  supervision,  S.K.M.  and  G.B.;  project  administration,  X.Y.;  funding  acquisition,  C.Y.  and  G.B.  All  authors  have  read  and  agreed  to  the  published  version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research was funded by A*ccelerate, grant number ACCL/19‐GAP077‐R20A.  Acknowledgments:  We  acknowledge  the  support  from  Nanyang  Technological  University  under  the  Undergraduate Research Experience on campus (URECA) program.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.    Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  18  of  19  References  1. Dass,  A.;  Moridi,  A.  State  of  the  Art  in  Directed  Energy  Deposition:  From  Additive  Manufacturing  to  Materials Design. Coatings 2019, 9, 418, doi:10.3390/coatings9070418.  2. Collins, P.C.; Brice, D.A.; Samimi, P.; Ghamarian, I.; Fraser, H.L. Microstructural Control of Additively  Manufactured  Metallic  Materials.  Annu.  Rev.  Mater.  Res.  2016,  46,  63–91,  doi:10.1146/annurev‐matsci‐ 070115‐031816.  3. Tapia,  G.;  Elwany,  A.  A  Review  on  Process  Monitoring  and  Control  in  Metal‐Based  Additive  Manufacturing. J. Manuf. Sci. Eng. 2014, 136, 060801, doi:10.1115/1.4028540.  4. Akbari,  M.;  Kovacevic,  R.  Closed  loop  control  of  melt  pool  width  in  robotized  laser  powder–directed  energy deposition process. Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol. 2019, 104, 2887–2898, doi:10.1007/s00170‐019‐04195‐ y.  5. Bi, G.; Sun, C.N.; Gasser, A. Study on influential factors for process monitoring and control in laser aided  additive manufacturing. J. Mater. Process. Technol. 2013, 213, 463–468, doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2012.10.006.  6. Vasinonta,  A.;  Beuth,  J.L.;  Griffith,  M.L.  A  Process  Map  for  Consistent  Build  Conditions  in  the  Solid  Freeform  Fabrication  of  Thin‐Walled  Structures.  J.  Manuf.  Sci.  Eng.  2001,  123,  615–622,  doi:10.1115/1.1370497.  7. Vasinonta, A.; Beuth, J.L.; Griffith, M. Process Maps for Predicting Residual Stress and Melt Pool Size in  the  Laser‐Based  Fabrication  of  Thin‐Walled  Structures.  J.  Manuf.  Sci.  Eng.  2007,  129,  101–109,  doi:10.1115/1.2335852.  8. Bi, G.; Gasser, A.; Wissenbach, K.; Drenker, A.; Poprawe, R. Identification and qualification of temperature  signal  for  monitoring  and  control  in  laser  cladding.  Opt.  Lasers  Eng.  2006,  44,  1348–1359,  doi:10.1016/j.optlaseng.2006.01.009.  9. Bi, G.; Gasser, A.; Wissenbach, K.; Drenker, A.; Poprawe, R. Characterization of the process control for the  direct  laser  metallic  powder  deposition.  Surf.  Coat.  Technol.  2006,  201,  2676–2683,  doi:10.1016/j.surfcoat.2006.05.006.  10. Hofman, J.T.; Pathiraj, B.; van Dijk, J.; de Lange, D.F.; Meijer, J. A camera based feedback control strategy  for  the  laser  cladding  process.  J.  Mater.  Process.  Technol.  2012,  212,  2455–2462,  doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2012.06.027.  11. Hu, D.; Kovacevic, R. Sensing, modeling and control for laser‐based additive manufacturing. Int. J. Mach.  Tools Manuf. 2003, 43, 51–60, doi:10.1016/S0890‐6955(02)00163‐3.  12. García‐Díaz, A.; Panadeiro, V.; Lodeiro, B.; Rodríguez‐Araújo, J.; Stavridis, J.; Papacharalampopoulos, A.;  Stavropoulos,  P.  OpenLMD,  an  open  source  middleware  and  toolkit  for  laser‐based  additive  manufacturing  of  large  metal  parts.  Robot.  Comput.  Integr.  Manuf.  2018,  53,  153–161,  doi:10.1016/j.rcim.2018.04.006.  13. Moralejo, S.; Penaranda, X.; Nieto, S.; Barrios, A.; Arrizubieta, I.; Tabernero, I.; Figueras, J. A feedforward  controller for tuning laser cladding melt pool geometry in real time. Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol. 2017, 89,  821–831, doi:10.1007/s00170‐016‐9138‐7.  14. Song, L.; Bagavath‐Singh, V.; Dutta, B.; Mazumder, J. Control of melt pool temperature and deposition  height  during  direct  metal  deposition  process.  Int.  J.  Adv.  Manuf.  Technol.  2012,  58,  247–256,  doi:10.1007/s00170‐011‐3395‐2.  15. Gibson, B.T.; Bandari, Y.K.; Richardson, B.S.; Henry, W.C.; Vetland, E.J.; Sundermann, T.W.; Love, L.J. Melt  pool size control through multiple closed‐loop modalities in laser‐wire directed energy deposition of Ti‐ 6Al‐4V. Addit. Manuf. 2020, 32, 100993, doi:10.1016/j.addma.2019.100993.  16. Campi, M.C.; Lecchini, A.; Savaresi, S.M. Virtual reference feedback tuning: A direct method for the design  of feedback controllers. Automatica 2002, 38, 1337–1346, doi:10.1016/S0005‐1098(02)00032‐8.  17. OpenCV. Available online: https://opencv.org/ (accessed on 25 July 2020).  18. Visioli, A. Practical PID Control; Springer: London, UK, 2006.  19. Bazanella,  A.S.;  Campestrini,  L.;  Eckhard,  D.  Data‐Driven  Controller  Design:  The  H2  Approach;  Springer  Science & Business Media: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2011.  20. Formentin,  S.;  Campi,  M.C.;  Carè,  A.;  Savaresi,  S.M.  Deterministic  continuous‐time  Virtual  Reference  Feedback  Tuning  (VRFT)  with  application  to  PID  design.  Syst.  Control  Lett.  2019,  127,  25–34,  doi:10.1016/j.sysconle.2019.03.007.  21. Ogata, K. Discrete‐Time Control Systems, 2nd ed.; Prentice‐Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA, 1998.  Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7967  19  of  19  22. Campi, M.C.; Lecchini, A.; Savaresi, S.M. Virtual reference feedback tuning (VRFT): A new direct approach  to the design of feedback controllers. In Proceedings of the 39th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control  (Cat.  No.00CH37187),  Sydney,  Australia,  12–15  December  2000;  Volume  1,  pp.  623–629,  doi:10.1109/CDC.2000.912835.  23. Boeira, E.; Eckhard, D. pyvrft: A Python package for the Virtual Reference Feedback Tuning, a direct data‐ driven control method. SoftwareX 2020, 11, 100383, doi:10.1016/j.softx.2019.100383.  24. Stoica, P.; Moses, R.L. Spectral Analysis of Signals; Pearson, Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA,  2005.  Boston, MA, USA, 2001.  25. Gröchenig, K. Foundations of Time‐Frequency Analysis; Birkhäuser Boston:  26. Chen, L.; Yao, X.; Xu, P.; Moon, S.K.; Bi, G. Surface Monitoring for Additive Manufacturing with in‐situ  Point Cloud Processing. In Proceedings of the 2020 6th International Conference on Control, Automation  and Robotics (ICCAR), Singapore, 20–23 April 2020; pp. 196–201, doi:10.1109/ICCAR49639.2020.9108092.  27. Chen, L.; Yao, X.; Xu, P.; Moon, S.K.; Bi, G. Rapid surface defect identification for additive manufacturing  with  in‐situ  point  cloud  processing  and  machine  learning.  Virtual  Phys.  Prototyp.  2020,  1–18,  doi:10.1080/17452759.2020.1832695.  28. Ziegler, J.G.; Nichols, N.B. Optimum Settings for Automatic Controllers. J. Dyn. Syst. Meas. Control. 1993,  115, 220–222, doi:10.1115/1.2899060.  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional  affiliations.  © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access  article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution  (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). 

Journal

Applied SciencesMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Nov 10, 2020

There are no references for this article.