Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Controllable Fano-like Resonance in Terahertz Planar Meta-Rotamers

Controllable Fano-like Resonance in Terahertz Planar Meta-Rotamers Article  Controllable Fano‐Like Resonance in Terahertz   Planar Meta‐Rotamers  Subin Jo, Min Gyu Bae and Joong Wook Lee *  Department of Physics and Optoelectronics Convergence Research Center, Chonnam National University,  Gwangju 61186, Korea; whtnqls1995@gmail.com (S.J.); baemingyu357@gmail.com (M.G.B.)  *  Correspondence: leejujc@chonnam.ac.kr  Abstract:  Meta‐molecules  composed  of  meta‐atoms  exhibit  various  electromagnetic  phenomena  owing to the interaction among the resonance modes of the meta‐atoms. In this study, we numeri‐ cally  investigated  Fano‐like‐resonant  planar  metamaterials  composed  of  meta‐molecules  at  te‐ rahertz (THz) frequencies. We present meta‐rotamers based only on the difference in the spatial  position of their component meta‐atoms (C‐ and Y‐shapes) that can be interconverted by rotations  and have tunable Fano‐like resonance. This is because of the cooperative effects determined by the  spatial coupling conditions of the nodes and antinodes of electric‐dipole and inductive–capacitive  (LC) resonances of the meta‐atoms. The findings of this study provide potential options for explor‐ ing novel THz devices and for engineering high‐level functionalities in metamaterial‐based devices.  Keywords: terahertz spectroscopy; metamaterials; modulators; active optics  1. Introduction  The creation of metamaterials, which are artificially constructed composite materials  Citation: Jo, S.; Bae, M.G.; Lee, J.W.  with exceptional properties, has become an extremely interesting area of research in var‐ Controllable Fano‐Like Resonance in  ious fields, such as optics, optoelectronics, electromagnetic field, acoustics, and thermol‐ Terahertz Planar Meta‐Rotamers.  ogy [1–4]. Artificial atoms (called meta‐atoms) or molecules (called meta‐molecules), as  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796.  the basic structural elements for constructing metamaterials, are designed and fabricated  https://doi.org/10.3390/app11219796  to implement a device with the desired characteristics and functionalities. In particular,  the meta‐molecules created by engineering spatial arrangement or interatomic geometry  Academic Editor: Mira Naftaly  of different types of meta‐atoms achieve high‐level functionalities, such as plasmon‐in‐ duced transparency, multifunctional filtering, invisibility cloaking, tunable multiple res‐ Received: 22 September 2021  onators, reflective‐index engineering, and Fano resonance [5–18].  Accepted: 19 October 2021  Recently,  metamaterials  have  promoted  the  inclusive  development  of  terahertz  Published: 20 October 2021  (THz) materials and devices because of their resonant electromagnetic response, which  significantly improves the interaction between THz radiation and metamaterials. In par‐ Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neu‐ tral with regard to jurisdictional  ticular, developing THz devices and building a network connection in the THz frequen‐ claims in published maps and insti‐ cies have become key tasks for achieving sixth‐generation (6G) wireless communication  tutional affiliations.  [19,20]. This requires new techniques to manipulate the polarization, direction, amplifica‐ tion, collimation, resonance frequency, propagation, and phase of those THz waves. Thus,  a THz metamaterial is the best candidate for realizing a device with such functionalities.   Meta‐molecules  composed  of  different  types  of  meta‐atoms  are  fundamental  ele‐ Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Li‐ ments that control the transmission, reflection, and absorption of light and realize the  censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  tunability of resonance wavelength at the THz frequencies. Various electromagnetically  This article  is an open access article  induced transparency (EIT)‐analog optical systems based on THz metamaterials exhibit a  distributed under the terms and con‐ narrow transmission or reflection spectral band and plasmon‐induced transparency be‐ ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ havior [21–24]. The EIT‐like effects of bright–bright mode coupling, which occur when  tribution (CC BY) license (http://crea‐ two resonances of two different types of meta‐atoms are excited in close proximity in the  tivecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11219796  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  2  of  8  spectral domain, inevitably lead to resonance frequency detuning based on Fano‐type in‐ terference with ultrahigh quality factor (Q‐factor) [25–27]. Therefore, metamaterials com‐ posed of meta‐molecules are essential for fabricating versatile THz devices that require  the ability to control resonance modes and spectral features.   In  this  study,  we  numerically  investigated  a  Fano‐like‐resonant  planar  THz  met‐ amaterial composed of meta‐molecules consisting of two different types of meta‐atoms,  C‐ and Y‐shaped metallic rods. In addition, we demonstrated that meta‐rotamers based  only on the difference in the spatial position of their component meta‐atoms manifest tun‐ able Fano‐like resonance when optically isotropic, inner Y‐shaped meta‐atoms rotate. This  phenomenon is caused by cooperative effects due to the spatial coupling conditions of the  nodes and antinodes of the fundamental electric‐dipole resonance of Y‐shaped meta‐at‐ oms and higher‐order inductive–capacitive (LC) resonance of C‐shaped meta‐atoms. Our  study highlights the importance of metamaterials for achieving novel THz devices and  their high‐level functionalities.  2. Design and Methods  Figure 1a shows a representative unit cell of the proposed metamaterial numerically  simulated in this study. The two top virtual layers have two different types of meta‐atoms,  a C‐shaped metallic split‐ring resonator (SRR) with spatially varying geometric parame‐ ters and a Y‐shaped metallic rod with different rotation angles. The meta‐molecule shown  in the lowest layer of Figure 1a can be considered a unit cell of composite metamaterials,  produced by combining the SRR and the Y‐shaped rod.  Figure 1. (a) Schematic of the THz planar meta‐rotamer consisting of the C‐shaped SRR and Y‐ shaped metal rod. The physical dimensions of the meta‐molecules in the lattice are Px = Py = 120 μm.  The thicknesses of the meta‐molecules and dielectric substrate (bare silicon) are 150 nm and 200 μm,  respectively. (b) Schematic of the Y‐shaped meta‐atom. The corresponding size and rotations are as  follows: L = 40 μm; θy = 0°, 30°, and 60°. (c) Schematic of the C‐shaped SRR meta‐atom. The corre‐ sponding size and angular gaps are as follows: D = 100 μm; θc = 10°, 20°, and 30°.  The two types of meta‐atoms are structurally combined to be an analog of rotational  isomers (also called rotamers) in chemistry, in which the rotamers can be interconverted  by rotations. By combining the rotating Y‐shaped meta‐atoms to the fixed SRR meta‐atom,  the  arrangements  of  meta‐atoms  in  a  meta‐molecule  that  are  transformed  by  rotation  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  3  of  8  about the central axis of bonding can be exploited to generate different conformations that  provide a possible method to design promising THz devices.  The basic components (C‐shaped SRR and Y‐shaped rod) display optimal character‐ istics for fabricating the composite metamaterials, which can also be called meta‐rotamers.  The Y‐shaped meta‐atom is one of the simplest structures showing polarization‐insensi‐ tive  transmission  or  absorption  properties  because  of  its  higher‐order  rotational  sym‐ metry and folded‐slot resonators; moreover, it is available to fabricate multimode resona‐ tors and active control devices [28–33]. As shown in Figure 2a, the folded planar resonator  consisting of two arms placed in the direction of polarization of the incident THz waves  generates a dipole resonance with a resonant wavelength equal to twice the length of the  metal rod [31]. When the Y‐shaped meta‐atom rotates, the three arms alternately assume  the function of the folded planar resonator while exhibiting polarization‐independent op‐ tical properties, as shown in the inset of Figure 2a. Here, the normalization was carried  out by dividing the spectral amplitudes through the metamaterials by the spectral ampli‐ tude through bare silicon used as a substrate.  Figure 2. (a) Simulated THz amplitude spectra in the arrays of Y‐shaped meta‐atoms at the rotation  angles of θy = 0°, 30°, and 60°. The inset shows the values of resonance frequency. The upper image  shows the near electric field distribution at the resonance frequency at the rotation angle of θy = 0°.  (b) Simulated THz amplitude spectra in the arrays of C‐shaped SRR meta‐atoms at the angular gaps  of θc = 10°, 20°, and 30°. The upper images show the near electric field distributions at the resonances  appearing near the frequencies of 0.25 and 0.7 THz.  The C‐shaped SRR meta‐atom leads to dramatic structure‐dependent features. The  tunability of optical resonances can be achieved by varying the arc length of the C‐shaped,  polarization‐dependent characteristics due to high structural asymmetry, and the fabrica‐ tion of composite medium with simultaneously negative values of effective permeability  and permittivity. As a result, versatile and novel optical devices can be realized, such as  negative refractive index devices, superlenses, multifunctional filters, polarization devices,  and various types of resonators [34–38]. Figure 2b shows the simulated THz amplitude  spectra in the arrays of C‐shaped SRR meta‐atoms with angular gaps of θc = 10°, 20°, and  30°. As the total arc length of the C‐shape is shorter, the two odd resonances are blue‐ shifted because the resonance wavelength depends on the arc length of the C‐shape.  As in the aforementioned case, when the polarization of the incident light at normal  incidence is parallel to the gap of the C‐shaped SRR, the two odd resonances appearing  near the frequencies of 0.25 THz and 0.7 THz can be clearly observed. As can be inferred  from the two electric near‐field images on the top, one appears at the lower frequency and  corresponds to the fundamental LC resonance, whereas the other appears at the higher  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  4  of  8  frequency and corresponds to the second‐order LC resonance (also called quadrupole‐ mode resonance) [25]. The meta‐molecules are designed such that the electric‐dipole res‐ onance of the Y‐shaped meta‐atom can be overlapped on the quadrupole‐mode resonance  of the C‐shaped SRR in frequency.  All simulations were performed using COMSOL Multiphysics software, which is a  frequency‐domain solver based on the finite element method (FEM), to solve the Maxwell  equations. For the structure of the metamaterial unit cell, the unit element was surrounded  by periodic boundary conditions on four sides, and the top and bottom of the unit element  were considered as perfectly matched layers. The simulated structure was illuminated by  an x‐polarized plane wave at normal incidence. Most metals can be regarded as perfect  conductors at THz frequencies. Therefore, we obtained the values of permittivity, plasma  frequency, and  damping constant  of aluminum required for the simulations using the  Drude model [39]. In addition, the silicon layer with a thickness of 200 μm  was modeled  as a lossless dielectric substrate with a relative permittivity of 11.68.  3. Results and Discussion  Figure 3a demonstrates the simulated amplitude spectra of THz wave transmission  for the meta‐rotamer displayed in Figure 1a. For the two transition states of the meta‐ rotamers  with  different  angles  of  rotation  of θy  =  0° and  60°, the  transmission  spectra  clearly present two resonant dips corresponding to the frequencies of f1 and f2 at θy = 0°  and f’1 and f’2 at θy = 60°. f1 and f’1 represent the second‐order LC resonance of the C‐shaped  SRR, whereas f2 and f’2 represent the electric‐dipole resonance of the Y‐shaped rod.  To elucidate the characteristics of the resonances, we simulated the electric near‐field  distributions at the four resonant frequencies shown in Figure 3a. To clearly observe the  spatial shape of each resonance mode, we plotted the out‐of‐plane electric field (𝐸 ) dis‐ tributions at the distance of 8 μm above the surface of the meta‐rotamers, as shown in  Figure 3b. The figures of f2 and f’2 show that the dipole resonance mode corresponding to  the two arms of the Y‐shaped metal rod lying in the polarization direction of the incident  THz waves is well represented for both states of the meta‐atoms. In this case, only the  position of the electric near‐field pattern is changed because of the structural change of  the meta‐molecules, whereas the shape of the electric near‐field pattern and the position  of the resonant frequency do not change.  On the contrary, in the case of the second‐order LC resonance appearing at the fre‐ quencies of f1 and f’1, a completely different aspect is observed. The resonance mode for  the C‐shaped meta‐atom does not show a clear difference for the two states of meta‐rota‐ mers. However, when the angle of rotation is 0° for the Y‐shaped rod, the electric near‐ field is activated at the ends of its arms horizontal to the polarization. When the arms of  the Y‐shaped rod are adjacent to the standing wave antinodes of the second‐order LC  resonance, the electric near‐fields are strongly enhanced at the ends of its arms. This im‐ plies that the coherent near‐field coupling between the bright modes of two adjacent meta‐ atoms occurs when the antinodes of the two excited resonances are located close to each  other with a gap of 5 μm.  To  generate  a  stronger  coupling  effect,  the total  length  of the  C‐shaped  SRR  was  tuned; thus, the two resonant modes were close to each other in the spectrum. As the  angular gap changed from 10° to 30°, the second‐order LC resonance f’1 approached the  dipole resonance f’2 of the Y‐shaped rod, as shown by the red curves in Figure 3a,c,e. When  the antinode coupling of the two excited resonances at the meta‐rotamer state with θy = 0°  appeared, the second‐order LC resonance 𝑓   shifted to the longer wavelength regime. In‐ terestingly, the second‐order LC resonance changed significantly with an asymmetrical  line shape, whereas the dipole resonance was almost unchanged. This implies that, when  the standing wave antinodes of the two excited resonances are spatially overlapped, the  two resonances strongly interfere with each other, thereby generating Fano‐like resonance.  It is known that the strong red‐shift of f’1 in the spectral band is caused by the damping  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  5  of  8  phenomenon of localized surface waves, depending on the coupling strength between the  two standing wave antinodes [40,41].  Figure 3. (a,c,e) Simulated THz amplitude spectra in the meta‐rotamers consisting of the C‐shaped  SRR and Y‐shaped rod meta‐atoms, for the two different states of the meta‐rotamers with rotation  angles of θy = 0° and 60°, as shown by the black and red solid lines, respectively. Each THz amplitude  spectra were simulated in the three types of samples with different angular gaps of θc = 10°, 20°, and  30°, as shown in (a,c,e), respectively. (b,d,f) Spatial electric near‐field distributions for the meta‐ molecules at the resonances of 𝑓 , 𝑓 , 𝑓 , and 𝑓 . For the three types of samples with different an‐ gular gaps of θc = 10°, 20°, and 30°, 𝑓 = 0.63, 0.65, and 0.66 THz, 𝑓 = 0.74, 0.74, and 0.74 THz, 𝑓 =  0.66, 0.68, and 0.70 THz, and 𝑓 = 0.73, 0.73, and 0.73 THz, respectively.  To quantitatively understand the dependence of coupling strength on the state of  meta‐rotamer, we plotted the values of resonant frequency extracted from the simulations  versus the angular gap θc, for the structure with only C‐shaped SRR meta‐atoms and the  meta‐rotamers with two different states, which are determined by different angular gaps,  as shown by the black squares, red circles, and blue triangles in Figure 4a, respectively.  When the two standing wave antinodes were not aligned, the combined effect of the C‐  and Y‐shaped meta‐atoms appeared as a simple summation of each resonance without a  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  6  of  8  significant change in the resonant frequency, as shown by the red circles in Figure 4a. On  the contrary, the clear red‐shift of the second‐order LC resonance was visible because of  the  strong  coupling  when  the  standing  wave  antinodes  were  placed  opposite  to  each  other, as quantitatively compared in Figure 4b, which shows the values of resonant fre‐ quency shift, Δ𝑓   = f’1 −  𝑓   and Δ𝑓   = f’2 − 𝑓 .  The coupling strength is important in achieving resonance characteristics such as a  high Q‐factor. As shown in Figure 4c, the Q‐factor exhibits an interesting growth behavior  with the increase of the angular gap showing higher coupling strength between the two  resonances. Here, if the coupling strength is increased by approximating the two reso‐ nances in the spectrum, a larger Q‐factor can be expected. Although we expected to max‐ imize the Q‐factor and the resonance strength, there was a tradeoff between these factors,  which is a typical characteristic of the resonance phenomenon, as shown in the values of  resonance depth (blue squares). On the contrary, the Q‐factor and resonance depth ex‐ tracted from the dipole resonance of the Y‐shaped rods exhibited a slight difference by  varying the angular gap. Thus, the asymmetric feature of the Fano‐like resonance caused  by the strong coupling between each resonance of two different types of meta‐atoms sug‐ gests a method to control the resonant frequency and the Q‐factor.  Figure 4. (a) Resonant frequencies of the second‐order LC resonance obtained at three samples of  the C‐shaped meta‐atoms and two states of meta‐rotamers. (b) Frequency shift of the second‐order  LC resonance (Δ𝑓 ) and dipole resonance (Δ𝑓 ) as a function of angular gap θc. (c) Q‐factor (red  squares and circles, left scale) and resonance depth (blue squares and circles, right scale) for the two  resonances, 𝑓   (blue and red squares) and 𝑓   (red and blue circles), respectively.  4. Conclusions  In conclusion, we have demonstrated meta‐rotamers with Fano‐like resonance. The  meta‐rotamers based only on the  difference in the spatial  position of their  component  meta‐atoms, the C‐shaped SRR and Y‐shaped metal rod, can be interconverted by the ro‐ tation of the Y‐shaped meta‐atom. The resonant frequency and the Q‐factor can be con‐ trolled by asymmetric characteristics of Fano‐like resonance. This is because of the coop‐ erative effects determined by the spatial coupling conditions of nodes and antinodes of  the second‐order LC resonance by the C‐shaped SRR meta‐atoms and the dipole reso‐ Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  7  of  8  nance by the Y‐shaped meta‐atoms. The higher Q‐factor observed in the antinode–anti‐ node combination is due to the strong electric near‐field coupling between two resonant  modes located spectrally very close together. In addition, the red‐shift of the LC resonance  may be caused by the increase of effective inductance value in the condition of the anti‐ node–antinode coupling. We believe that the findings provide possibilities for exploring  metamaterial‐based THz devices, such as modulators, sensors, antennas, and switches,  requiring high sensitivity and multifunctions of spectral tunability and selectivity.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization and methodology, J.W.L.; writing—original draft prepa‐ ration, S.J.; writing—review and editing, J.W.L. and M.G.B.; data acquisition and analysis, S.J. and  M.G.B.; supervision, project administration, and funding acquisition, J.W.L. All authors have read  and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government  (MSIT) (Grant Number: NRF‐ 2019R1F1A1058851).  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable  Informed Consent Statement: Not applicable  Data Availability Statement: Data are contained within the article.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflicts of interest.  References  1. Cui, T.J.; Qi, M.Q.; Wan, X.; Zhao, J.; Cheng, Q. Coding metamaterials, digital metamaterials and programmable metamaterials.  Light: Sci. Appl. 2014, 3, e218, doi:10.1038/lsa.2014.99.  2. Jung, J.; Park, H.; Park, J.; Chang, T.; Shin, J. Broadband metamaterials and metasurfaces: A review from the perspectives of  materials and devices. Nanophotonics 2020, 9, 3165–3196, doi:10.1515/nanoph‐2020‐0111.  3. Lee,  J.‐H.;  Singer,  J.P.;  Thomas,  E.L.  Micro‐/nanostructured  mechanical  metamaterials.  Adv.  Mater.  2012,  24,  4782–4810,  doi:10.1002/adma.201201644.  4. Zheludev, N.I.; Kivshar, Y.S. From metamaterials to metadevices. Nat. Mater. 2012, 11, 917–924, doi:10.1038/nmat3431.  5. Lee, I.‐S.; Sohn, I.‐B.; Kang, C.; Kee, C.‐S.; Yang, J.‐K.; Lee, J.W. High refractive index metamaterials using corrugated metallic  slots. Opt. Express 2017, 25, 6365–6371, doi:10.1364/OE.25.006365.  6. Lee, J.W.; Seo, M.A.; Park, D.J.; Kim, D.S.; Jeoung, S.C.; Lienau, C.; Park, Q.H.; Planken, P.C.M. Shape resonance omni‐direc‐ tional terahertz filters with near‐unity transmittance. Opt. Express 2006, 14, 1253–1259, doi:10.1364/OE.14.001253.  7. Liu, N.; Langguth, L.; Weiss, T.; Kästel, J.; Fleischhauer, M.; Pfau, T.; Giessen, H. Plasmonic analogue of electromagnetically  induced transparency at the Drude damping limit. Nat. Mater. 2009, 8, 758–762, doi:10.1038/nmat2495.  8. Zhang, S.; Genov, D.A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, M.; Zhang, X. Plasmon‐induced transparency in metamaterials. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 101,  047401, doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.047401.  9. Ziemkiewicz, D.; Słowik, K.; Zielińska‐Raczyńska, S. Ultraslow long‐living plasmons with electromagnetically induced trans‐ parency. Opt. Lett. 2018, 43, 490–493, doi:10.1364/OL.43.000490.  10. Ling, Y.; Huang, L.; Hong, W.; Liu, T.; Luan, J.; Liu, W.; Lai, J.; Li, H. Polarization‐controlled dynamically switchable plasmon‐ induced transparency in plasmonic metamaterial. Nanoscale 2018, 10, 19517–19523, doi:10.1039/C8NR03564D.  11. Hentschel, M.; Saliba, M.; Vogelgesang, R.; Giessen, H.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Liu, N. Transition from isolated to collective modes in  , 2721–2726, doi:10.1021/nl101938p.  plasmonic oligomers. Nano Lett. 2010, 10 12. Papasimakis, N.; Fedotov, V.A.; Zheludev, N.I.; Prosvirnin, S.L. Metamaterial analog of electromagnetically induced transpar‐ ency. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 101, 253903, doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.253903.  13. Schurig, D.; Mock, J.J.; Justice, B.J.; Cummer, S.A.; Pendry, J.B.; Starr, A.F.; Smith, D.R. Metamaterial electromagnetic cloak at  microwave frequencies. Science 2006, 314, 977–980, doi:10.1126/science.1133628.  14. Liu, J.‐Q.; Yu, J.‐M. Electromagnetic resonances and their tunability in planar metamolecules isomer. Optik 2015, 126, 2858–2861,  doi:10.1016/j.ijleo.2015.07.033.  15. Omaghali, N.E.J.; Tkachenko, V.; Andreone, A.; Abbate, G. Optical sensing using dark mode excitation in an asymmetric dimer  metamaterial. Sensors 2014, 14, 272–282.  16. Yang, Z.‐J.; Wang, Q.‐Q.; Lin, H.‐Q. Cooperative effects of two optical dipole antennas coupled to plasmonic Fabry–Pérot cavity.  Nanoscale 2012, 4, 5308–5311, doi:10.1039/C2NR31513K.  17. Liu, N.; Weiss, T.; Mesch, M.; Langguth, L.; Eigenthaler, U.; Hirscher, M.; Sönnichsen, C.; Giessen, H. Planar metamaterial  analogue  of  electromagnetically  induced  transparency  for  plasmonic  sensing.  Nano  Lett.  2010,  10,  1103–1107,  doi:10.1021/nl902621d.  18. Liu, N.; Kaiser, S.; Giessen, H. Magnetoinductive and electroinductive coupling in plasmonic metamaterial molecules. Adv.  Mater. 2008, 20, 4521–4525, doi:10.1002/adma.200801917.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  8  of  8  19. Yang, P.; Xiao, Y.; Xiao, M.; Li, S. 6G wireless communications: Vision and potential techniques. IEEE Netw. 2019, 33, 70–75,  doi:10.1109/MNET.2019.1800418.  20. Dang, S.; Amin, O.; Shihada, B.; Alouini, M.‐S. What should 6G be? Nat. Electron. 2020, 3, 20–29, doi:10.1038/s41928‐019‐0355‐6.  21. Singh, R.; Rockstuhl, C.; Lederer, F.; Zhang, W. Coupling between a dark and a bright eigenmode in a terahertz metamaterial.  Phys. Rev. B 2009, 79, 085111, doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.79.085111.  22. Liu, M.; Tian, Z.; Zhang, X.; Gu, J.; Ouyang, C.; Han, J.; Zhang, W. Tailoring the plasmon‐induced transparency resonances in  terahertz metamaterials. Opt. Express 2017, 25, 19844–19855, doi:10.1364/OE.25.019844.  23. Baqir, M.A.; Choudhury, P.K.; Farmani, A.; Younas, T.; Arshad, J.; Mir, A.; Karimi, S. Tunable plasmon induced transparency  in graphene and hyperbolic metamaterial‐based structure. IEEE Photonics J. 2019, 11, 1–10, doi:10.1109/JPHOT.2019.2931586.   Han, X. Tunable fano resonances in an ultra‐small gap. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 2603.  24. Yao, F.; Li, F.; He, Z.; Liu, Y.; Xu, L.; 25. Al‐Naib, I.; Yang, Y.; Dignam, M.M.; Zhang, W.; Singh, R. Ultra‐high Q even eigenmode resonance in terahertz metamaterials.  Appl. Phys. Lett. 2015, 106, 011102, doi:10.1063/1.4905478.  26. Cong, L.; Manjappa, M.; Xu, N.; Al‐Naib, I.; Zhang, W.; Singh, R. Fano resonances in terahertz metasurfaces: A figure of merit  optimization. Adv. Opt. Mater. 2015, 3, 1537–1543, doi:10.1002/adom.201500207.  27. Yan, F.; Li, Q.; Wang, Z.; Tian, H.; Li, L. Extremely high Q‐factor terahertz metasurface using reconstructive coherent mode  resonance. Opt. Express 2021, 29, 7015–7023, doi:10.1364/OE.417367.  28. Grant, J.; Ma, Y.; Saha, S.; Khalid, A.; Cumming, D.R.S. Polarization insensitive, broadband terahertz metamaterial absorber.  Opt. Lett. 2011, 36, 3476–3478, doi:10.1364/OL.36.003476.  29. Du, C.; Zhou, D.; Guo, H.‐H.; Pang, Y.‐Q.; Shi, H.‐Y.; Liu, W.‐F.; Singh, C.; Trukhanov, S.; Trukhanov, A.; Xu, Z. Active control  scattering  manipulation  for  realization  of  switchable  EIT‐like  response  metamaterial.  Opt.  Commun.  2021,  483,  126664,  doi:10.1016/j.optcom.2020.126664.  30. Lee, J.‐W.; Yang, J.‐K.; Sohn, I.‐B.; Choi, H.‐K.; Kang, C.; Kee, C.‐S. Relationship between the order of rotation symmetry in  perforated apertures and terahertz transmission characteristics. Opt. Eng. 2012, 51, 119002.  31. Lee, J.W.; Yang, J.‐K.; Sohn, I.‐B.; Kang, C.; Kee, C.‐S. Folded slot resonator array with efficient terahertz transmission. Opt.  Commun. 2013, 293, 155–159, doi:10.1016/j.optcom.2012.11.099.  32. Lee, J.W.; Yang, J.‐K.; Sohn, I.‐B.; Yoo, H.K.; Kang, C.; Kee, C.‐S. Monopole resonators in planar plasmonic metamaterials. Opt.  Express 2014, 22, 18433–18438, doi:10.1364/OE.22.018433.  33. Song, M.‐S.; Lee, I.‐S.; Sohn, I.‐B.; Kang, C.; Kee, C.‐S.; Yang, J.‐K.; Lee, J.W. Characteristics of multi‐mode resonances in T‐shape  air slots. AIP Adv. 2015, 5, 047107, doi:10.1063/1.4917298.  34. Wang, Z.; Yao, K.; Chen, M.; Chen, H.; Liu, Y. Manipulating Smith–Purcell emission with babinet metasurfaces. Phys. Rev.  Letters 2016, 117, 157401, doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.157401.  35. Lapine,  M.;  Shadrivov,  I.V.;  Powell,  D.A.;  Kivshar,  Y.S.  Magnetoelastic  metamaterials.  Nat.  Mater.  2012,  11,  30–33,  doi:10.1038/nmat3168.  36. Lee, J.W.; Seo, M.A.; Kim, D.S.; Kang, J.H.; Park, Q.‐H. Polarization dependent transmission through asymmetric C‐shaped  holes. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2009, 94, 081102, doi:10.1063/1.3088851.  37. Smith, D.R.; Padilla, W.J.; Vier, D.C.; Nemat‐Nasser, S.C.; Schultz, S. Composite medium with simultaneously negative perme‐ ability and permittivity. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2000, 84, 4184–4187, doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4184.  38. Clark, A.W.; Sheridan, A.K.; Glidle, A.; Cumming, D.R.S.; Cooper, J.M. Tuneable visible resonances in crescent shaped nano‐ split‐ring resonators. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2007, 91, 093109, doi:10.1063/1.2772180.  39. Palik, E.D. (Ed.) Handbook of Optical Constants of Solids; Academic Press: Orlando, FL, USA, 1985.  40. Mock, J.J.; Hill, R.T.; Tsai, Y.‐J.; Chilkoti, A.; Smith, D.R. Probing dynamically tunable localized surface plasmon resonances of  film‐coupled nanoparticles by evanescent wave excitation. Nano Lett. 2012, 12, 1757–1764, doi:10.1021/nl204596h.  41. Trivedi, R.; Thomas, A.; Dhawan, A. Full‐wave electromagentic analysis of a plasmonic nanoparticle separated from a plas‐ monic film by a thin spacer layer. Opt. Express 2014, 22, 19970–19989, doi:10.1364/OE.22.019970.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Sciences Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Controllable Fano-like Resonance in Terahertz Planar Meta-Rotamers

Applied Sciences , Volume 11 (21) – Oct 20, 2021

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/controllable-fano-like-resonance-in-terahertz-planar-meta-rotamers-URVjjKihJN
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2021 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2076-3417
DOI
10.3390/app11219796
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Controllable Fano‐Like Resonance in Terahertz   Planar Meta‐Rotamers  Subin Jo, Min Gyu Bae and Joong Wook Lee *  Department of Physics and Optoelectronics Convergence Research Center, Chonnam National University,  Gwangju 61186, Korea; whtnqls1995@gmail.com (S.J.); baemingyu357@gmail.com (M.G.B.)  *  Correspondence: leejujc@chonnam.ac.kr  Abstract:  Meta‐molecules  composed  of  meta‐atoms  exhibit  various  electromagnetic  phenomena  owing to the interaction among the resonance modes of the meta‐atoms. In this study, we numeri‐ cally  investigated  Fano‐like‐resonant  planar  metamaterials  composed  of  meta‐molecules  at  te‐ rahertz (THz) frequencies. We present meta‐rotamers based only on the difference in the spatial  position of their component meta‐atoms (C‐ and Y‐shapes) that can be interconverted by rotations  and have tunable Fano‐like resonance. This is because of the cooperative effects determined by the  spatial coupling conditions of the nodes and antinodes of electric‐dipole and inductive–capacitive  (LC) resonances of the meta‐atoms. The findings of this study provide potential options for explor‐ ing novel THz devices and for engineering high‐level functionalities in metamaterial‐based devices.  Keywords: terahertz spectroscopy; metamaterials; modulators; active optics  1. Introduction  The creation of metamaterials, which are artificially constructed composite materials  Citation: Jo, S.; Bae, M.G.; Lee, J.W.  with exceptional properties, has become an extremely interesting area of research in var‐ Controllable Fano‐Like Resonance in  ious fields, such as optics, optoelectronics, electromagnetic field, acoustics, and thermol‐ Terahertz Planar Meta‐Rotamers.  ogy [1–4]. Artificial atoms (called meta‐atoms) or molecules (called meta‐molecules), as  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796.  the basic structural elements for constructing metamaterials, are designed and fabricated  https://doi.org/10.3390/app11219796  to implement a device with the desired characteristics and functionalities. In particular,  the meta‐molecules created by engineering spatial arrangement or interatomic geometry  Academic Editor: Mira Naftaly  of different types of meta‐atoms achieve high‐level functionalities, such as plasmon‐in‐ duced transparency, multifunctional filtering, invisibility cloaking, tunable multiple res‐ Received: 22 September 2021  onators, reflective‐index engineering, and Fano resonance [5–18].  Accepted: 19 October 2021  Recently,  metamaterials  have  promoted  the  inclusive  development  of  terahertz  Published: 20 October 2021  (THz) materials and devices because of their resonant electromagnetic response, which  significantly improves the interaction between THz radiation and metamaterials. In par‐ Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neu‐ tral with regard to jurisdictional  ticular, developing THz devices and building a network connection in the THz frequen‐ claims in published maps and insti‐ cies have become key tasks for achieving sixth‐generation (6G) wireless communication  tutional affiliations.  [19,20]. This requires new techniques to manipulate the polarization, direction, amplifica‐ tion, collimation, resonance frequency, propagation, and phase of those THz waves. Thus,  a THz metamaterial is the best candidate for realizing a device with such functionalities.   Meta‐molecules  composed  of  different  types  of  meta‐atoms  are  fundamental  ele‐ Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Li‐ ments that control the transmission, reflection, and absorption of light and realize the  censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  tunability of resonance wavelength at the THz frequencies. Various electromagnetically  This article  is an open access article  induced transparency (EIT)‐analog optical systems based on THz metamaterials exhibit a  distributed under the terms and con‐ narrow transmission or reflection spectral band and plasmon‐induced transparency be‐ ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ havior [21–24]. The EIT‐like effects of bright–bright mode coupling, which occur when  tribution (CC BY) license (http://crea‐ two resonances of two different types of meta‐atoms are excited in close proximity in the  tivecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11219796  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  2  of  8  spectral domain, inevitably lead to resonance frequency detuning based on Fano‐type in‐ terference with ultrahigh quality factor (Q‐factor) [25–27]. Therefore, metamaterials com‐ posed of meta‐molecules are essential for fabricating versatile THz devices that require  the ability to control resonance modes and spectral features.   In  this  study,  we  numerically  investigated  a  Fano‐like‐resonant  planar  THz  met‐ amaterial composed of meta‐molecules consisting of two different types of meta‐atoms,  C‐ and Y‐shaped metallic rods. In addition, we demonstrated that meta‐rotamers based  only on the difference in the spatial position of their component meta‐atoms manifest tun‐ able Fano‐like resonance when optically isotropic, inner Y‐shaped meta‐atoms rotate. This  phenomenon is caused by cooperative effects due to the spatial coupling conditions of the  nodes and antinodes of the fundamental electric‐dipole resonance of Y‐shaped meta‐at‐ oms and higher‐order inductive–capacitive (LC) resonance of C‐shaped meta‐atoms. Our  study highlights the importance of metamaterials for achieving novel THz devices and  their high‐level functionalities.  2. Design and Methods  Figure 1a shows a representative unit cell of the proposed metamaterial numerically  simulated in this study. The two top virtual layers have two different types of meta‐atoms,  a C‐shaped metallic split‐ring resonator (SRR) with spatially varying geometric parame‐ ters and a Y‐shaped metallic rod with different rotation angles. The meta‐molecule shown  in the lowest layer of Figure 1a can be considered a unit cell of composite metamaterials,  produced by combining the SRR and the Y‐shaped rod.  Figure 1. (a) Schematic of the THz planar meta‐rotamer consisting of the C‐shaped SRR and Y‐ shaped metal rod. The physical dimensions of the meta‐molecules in the lattice are Px = Py = 120 μm.  The thicknesses of the meta‐molecules and dielectric substrate (bare silicon) are 150 nm and 200 μm,  respectively. (b) Schematic of the Y‐shaped meta‐atom. The corresponding size and rotations are as  follows: L = 40 μm; θy = 0°, 30°, and 60°. (c) Schematic of the C‐shaped SRR meta‐atom. The corre‐ sponding size and angular gaps are as follows: D = 100 μm; θc = 10°, 20°, and 30°.  The two types of meta‐atoms are structurally combined to be an analog of rotational  isomers (also called rotamers) in chemistry, in which the rotamers can be interconverted  by rotations. By combining the rotating Y‐shaped meta‐atoms to the fixed SRR meta‐atom,  the  arrangements  of  meta‐atoms  in  a  meta‐molecule  that  are  transformed  by  rotation  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  3  of  8  about the central axis of bonding can be exploited to generate different conformations that  provide a possible method to design promising THz devices.  The basic components (C‐shaped SRR and Y‐shaped rod) display optimal character‐ istics for fabricating the composite metamaterials, which can also be called meta‐rotamers.  The Y‐shaped meta‐atom is one of the simplest structures showing polarization‐insensi‐ tive  transmission  or  absorption  properties  because  of  its  higher‐order  rotational  sym‐ metry and folded‐slot resonators; moreover, it is available to fabricate multimode resona‐ tors and active control devices [28–33]. As shown in Figure 2a, the folded planar resonator  consisting of two arms placed in the direction of polarization of the incident THz waves  generates a dipole resonance with a resonant wavelength equal to twice the length of the  metal rod [31]. When the Y‐shaped meta‐atom rotates, the three arms alternately assume  the function of the folded planar resonator while exhibiting polarization‐independent op‐ tical properties, as shown in the inset of Figure 2a. Here, the normalization was carried  out by dividing the spectral amplitudes through the metamaterials by the spectral ampli‐ tude through bare silicon used as a substrate.  Figure 2. (a) Simulated THz amplitude spectra in the arrays of Y‐shaped meta‐atoms at the rotation  angles of θy = 0°, 30°, and 60°. The inset shows the values of resonance frequency. The upper image  shows the near electric field distribution at the resonance frequency at the rotation angle of θy = 0°.  (b) Simulated THz amplitude spectra in the arrays of C‐shaped SRR meta‐atoms at the angular gaps  of θc = 10°, 20°, and 30°. The upper images show the near electric field distributions at the resonances  appearing near the frequencies of 0.25 and 0.7 THz.  The C‐shaped SRR meta‐atom leads to dramatic structure‐dependent features. The  tunability of optical resonances can be achieved by varying the arc length of the C‐shaped,  polarization‐dependent characteristics due to high structural asymmetry, and the fabrica‐ tion of composite medium with simultaneously negative values of effective permeability  and permittivity. As a result, versatile and novel optical devices can be realized, such as  negative refractive index devices, superlenses, multifunctional filters, polarization devices,  and various types of resonators [34–38]. Figure 2b shows the simulated THz amplitude  spectra in the arrays of C‐shaped SRR meta‐atoms with angular gaps of θc = 10°, 20°, and  30°. As the total arc length of the C‐shape is shorter, the two odd resonances are blue‐ shifted because the resonance wavelength depends on the arc length of the C‐shape.  As in the aforementioned case, when the polarization of the incident light at normal  incidence is parallel to the gap of the C‐shaped SRR, the two odd resonances appearing  near the frequencies of 0.25 THz and 0.7 THz can be clearly observed. As can be inferred  from the two electric near‐field images on the top, one appears at the lower frequency and  corresponds to the fundamental LC resonance, whereas the other appears at the higher  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  4  of  8  frequency and corresponds to the second‐order LC resonance (also called quadrupole‐ mode resonance) [25]. The meta‐molecules are designed such that the electric‐dipole res‐ onance of the Y‐shaped meta‐atom can be overlapped on the quadrupole‐mode resonance  of the C‐shaped SRR in frequency.  All simulations were performed using COMSOL Multiphysics software, which is a  frequency‐domain solver based on the finite element method (FEM), to solve the Maxwell  equations. For the structure of the metamaterial unit cell, the unit element was surrounded  by periodic boundary conditions on four sides, and the top and bottom of the unit element  were considered as perfectly matched layers. The simulated structure was illuminated by  an x‐polarized plane wave at normal incidence. Most metals can be regarded as perfect  conductors at THz frequencies. Therefore, we obtained the values of permittivity, plasma  frequency, and  damping constant  of aluminum required for the simulations using the  Drude model [39]. In addition, the silicon layer with a thickness of 200 μm  was modeled  as a lossless dielectric substrate with a relative permittivity of 11.68.  3. Results and Discussion  Figure 3a demonstrates the simulated amplitude spectra of THz wave transmission  for the meta‐rotamer displayed in Figure 1a. For the two transition states of the meta‐ rotamers  with  different  angles  of  rotation  of θy  =  0° and  60°, the  transmission  spectra  clearly present two resonant dips corresponding to the frequencies of f1 and f2 at θy = 0°  and f’1 and f’2 at θy = 60°. f1 and f’1 represent the second‐order LC resonance of the C‐shaped  SRR, whereas f2 and f’2 represent the electric‐dipole resonance of the Y‐shaped rod.  To elucidate the characteristics of the resonances, we simulated the electric near‐field  distributions at the four resonant frequencies shown in Figure 3a. To clearly observe the  spatial shape of each resonance mode, we plotted the out‐of‐plane electric field (𝐸 ) dis‐ tributions at the distance of 8 μm above the surface of the meta‐rotamers, as shown in  Figure 3b. The figures of f2 and f’2 show that the dipole resonance mode corresponding to  the two arms of the Y‐shaped metal rod lying in the polarization direction of the incident  THz waves is well represented for both states of the meta‐atoms. In this case, only the  position of the electric near‐field pattern is changed because of the structural change of  the meta‐molecules, whereas the shape of the electric near‐field pattern and the position  of the resonant frequency do not change.  On the contrary, in the case of the second‐order LC resonance appearing at the fre‐ quencies of f1 and f’1, a completely different aspect is observed. The resonance mode for  the C‐shaped meta‐atom does not show a clear difference for the two states of meta‐rota‐ mers. However, when the angle of rotation is 0° for the Y‐shaped rod, the electric near‐ field is activated at the ends of its arms horizontal to the polarization. When the arms of  the Y‐shaped rod are adjacent to the standing wave antinodes of the second‐order LC  resonance, the electric near‐fields are strongly enhanced at the ends of its arms. This im‐ plies that the coherent near‐field coupling between the bright modes of two adjacent meta‐ atoms occurs when the antinodes of the two excited resonances are located close to each  other with a gap of 5 μm.  To  generate  a  stronger  coupling  effect,  the total  length  of the  C‐shaped  SRR  was  tuned; thus, the two resonant modes were close to each other in the spectrum. As the  angular gap changed from 10° to 30°, the second‐order LC resonance f’1 approached the  dipole resonance f’2 of the Y‐shaped rod, as shown by the red curves in Figure 3a,c,e. When  the antinode coupling of the two excited resonances at the meta‐rotamer state with θy = 0°  appeared, the second‐order LC resonance 𝑓   shifted to the longer wavelength regime. In‐ terestingly, the second‐order LC resonance changed significantly with an asymmetrical  line shape, whereas the dipole resonance was almost unchanged. This implies that, when  the standing wave antinodes of the two excited resonances are spatially overlapped, the  two resonances strongly interfere with each other, thereby generating Fano‐like resonance.  It is known that the strong red‐shift of f’1 in the spectral band is caused by the damping  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  5  of  8  phenomenon of localized surface waves, depending on the coupling strength between the  two standing wave antinodes [40,41].  Figure 3. (a,c,e) Simulated THz amplitude spectra in the meta‐rotamers consisting of the C‐shaped  SRR and Y‐shaped rod meta‐atoms, for the two different states of the meta‐rotamers with rotation  angles of θy = 0° and 60°, as shown by the black and red solid lines, respectively. Each THz amplitude  spectra were simulated in the three types of samples with different angular gaps of θc = 10°, 20°, and  30°, as shown in (a,c,e), respectively. (b,d,f) Spatial electric near‐field distributions for the meta‐ molecules at the resonances of 𝑓 , 𝑓 , 𝑓 , and 𝑓 . For the three types of samples with different an‐ gular gaps of θc = 10°, 20°, and 30°, 𝑓 = 0.63, 0.65, and 0.66 THz, 𝑓 = 0.74, 0.74, and 0.74 THz, 𝑓 =  0.66, 0.68, and 0.70 THz, and 𝑓 = 0.73, 0.73, and 0.73 THz, respectively.  To quantitatively understand the dependence of coupling strength on the state of  meta‐rotamer, we plotted the values of resonant frequency extracted from the simulations  versus the angular gap θc, for the structure with only C‐shaped SRR meta‐atoms and the  meta‐rotamers with two different states, which are determined by different angular gaps,  as shown by the black squares, red circles, and blue triangles in Figure 4a, respectively.  When the two standing wave antinodes were not aligned, the combined effect of the C‐  and Y‐shaped meta‐atoms appeared as a simple summation of each resonance without a  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  6  of  8  significant change in the resonant frequency, as shown by the red circles in Figure 4a. On  the contrary, the clear red‐shift of the second‐order LC resonance was visible because of  the  strong  coupling  when  the  standing  wave  antinodes  were  placed  opposite  to  each  other, as quantitatively compared in Figure 4b, which shows the values of resonant fre‐ quency shift, Δ𝑓   = f’1 −  𝑓   and Δ𝑓   = f’2 − 𝑓 .  The coupling strength is important in achieving resonance characteristics such as a  high Q‐factor. As shown in Figure 4c, the Q‐factor exhibits an interesting growth behavior  with the increase of the angular gap showing higher coupling strength between the two  resonances. Here, if the coupling strength is increased by approximating the two reso‐ nances in the spectrum, a larger Q‐factor can be expected. Although we expected to max‐ imize the Q‐factor and the resonance strength, there was a tradeoff between these factors,  which is a typical characteristic of the resonance phenomenon, as shown in the values of  resonance depth (blue squares). On the contrary, the Q‐factor and resonance depth ex‐ tracted from the dipole resonance of the Y‐shaped rods exhibited a slight difference by  varying the angular gap. Thus, the asymmetric feature of the Fano‐like resonance caused  by the strong coupling between each resonance of two different types of meta‐atoms sug‐ gests a method to control the resonant frequency and the Q‐factor.  Figure 4. (a) Resonant frequencies of the second‐order LC resonance obtained at three samples of  the C‐shaped meta‐atoms and two states of meta‐rotamers. (b) Frequency shift of the second‐order  LC resonance (Δ𝑓 ) and dipole resonance (Δ𝑓 ) as a function of angular gap θc. (c) Q‐factor (red  squares and circles, left scale) and resonance depth (blue squares and circles, right scale) for the two  resonances, 𝑓   (blue and red squares) and 𝑓   (red and blue circles), respectively.  4. Conclusions  In conclusion, we have demonstrated meta‐rotamers with Fano‐like resonance. The  meta‐rotamers based only on the  difference in the spatial  position of their  component  meta‐atoms, the C‐shaped SRR and Y‐shaped metal rod, can be interconverted by the ro‐ tation of the Y‐shaped meta‐atom. The resonant frequency and the Q‐factor can be con‐ trolled by asymmetric characteristics of Fano‐like resonance. This is because of the coop‐ erative effects determined by the spatial coupling conditions of nodes and antinodes of  the second‐order LC resonance by the C‐shaped SRR meta‐atoms and the dipole reso‐ Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  7  of  8  nance by the Y‐shaped meta‐atoms. The higher Q‐factor observed in the antinode–anti‐ node combination is due to the strong electric near‐field coupling between two resonant  modes located spectrally very close together. In addition, the red‐shift of the LC resonance  may be caused by the increase of effective inductance value in the condition of the anti‐ node–antinode coupling. We believe that the findings provide possibilities for exploring  metamaterial‐based THz devices, such as modulators, sensors, antennas, and switches,  requiring high sensitivity and multifunctions of spectral tunability and selectivity.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization and methodology, J.W.L.; writing—original draft prepa‐ ration, S.J.; writing—review and editing, J.W.L. and M.G.B.; data acquisition and analysis, S.J. and  M.G.B.; supervision, project administration, and funding acquisition, J.W.L. All authors have read  and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government  (MSIT) (Grant Number: NRF‐ 2019R1F1A1058851).  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable  Informed Consent Statement: Not applicable  Data Availability Statement: Data are contained within the article.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflicts of interest.  References  1. Cui, T.J.; Qi, M.Q.; Wan, X.; Zhao, J.; Cheng, Q. Coding metamaterials, digital metamaterials and programmable metamaterials.  Light: Sci. Appl. 2014, 3, e218, doi:10.1038/lsa.2014.99.  2. Jung, J.; Park, H.; Park, J.; Chang, T.; Shin, J. Broadband metamaterials and metasurfaces: A review from the perspectives of  materials and devices. Nanophotonics 2020, 9, 3165–3196, doi:10.1515/nanoph‐2020‐0111.  3. Lee,  J.‐H.;  Singer,  J.P.;  Thomas,  E.L.  Micro‐/nanostructured  mechanical  metamaterials.  Adv.  Mater.  2012,  24,  4782–4810,  doi:10.1002/adma.201201644.  4. Zheludev, N.I.; Kivshar, Y.S. From metamaterials to metadevices. Nat. Mater. 2012, 11, 917–924, doi:10.1038/nmat3431.  5. Lee, I.‐S.; Sohn, I.‐B.; Kang, C.; Kee, C.‐S.; Yang, J.‐K.; Lee, J.W. High refractive index metamaterials using corrugated metallic  slots. Opt. Express 2017, 25, 6365–6371, doi:10.1364/OE.25.006365.  6. Lee, J.W.; Seo, M.A.; Park, D.J.; Kim, D.S.; Jeoung, S.C.; Lienau, C.; Park, Q.H.; Planken, P.C.M. Shape resonance omni‐direc‐ tional terahertz filters with near‐unity transmittance. Opt. Express 2006, 14, 1253–1259, doi:10.1364/OE.14.001253.  7. Liu, N.; Langguth, L.; Weiss, T.; Kästel, J.; Fleischhauer, M.; Pfau, T.; Giessen, H. Plasmonic analogue of electromagnetically  induced transparency at the Drude damping limit. Nat. Mater. 2009, 8, 758–762, doi:10.1038/nmat2495.  8. Zhang, S.; Genov, D.A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, M.; Zhang, X. Plasmon‐induced transparency in metamaterials. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 101,  047401, doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.047401.  9. Ziemkiewicz, D.; Słowik, K.; Zielińska‐Raczyńska, S. Ultraslow long‐living plasmons with electromagnetically induced trans‐ parency. Opt. Lett. 2018, 43, 490–493, doi:10.1364/OL.43.000490.  10. Ling, Y.; Huang, L.; Hong, W.; Liu, T.; Luan, J.; Liu, W.; Lai, J.; Li, H. Polarization‐controlled dynamically switchable plasmon‐ induced transparency in plasmonic metamaterial. Nanoscale 2018, 10, 19517–19523, doi:10.1039/C8NR03564D.  11. Hentschel, M.; Saliba, M.; Vogelgesang, R.; Giessen, H.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Liu, N. Transition from isolated to collective modes in  , 2721–2726, doi:10.1021/nl101938p.  plasmonic oligomers. Nano Lett. 2010, 10 12. Papasimakis, N.; Fedotov, V.A.; Zheludev, N.I.; Prosvirnin, S.L. Metamaterial analog of electromagnetically induced transpar‐ ency. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 101, 253903, doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.253903.  13. Schurig, D.; Mock, J.J.; Justice, B.J.; Cummer, S.A.; Pendry, J.B.; Starr, A.F.; Smith, D.R. Metamaterial electromagnetic cloak at  microwave frequencies. Science 2006, 314, 977–980, doi:10.1126/science.1133628.  14. Liu, J.‐Q.; Yu, J.‐M. Electromagnetic resonances and their tunability in planar metamolecules isomer. Optik 2015, 126, 2858–2861,  doi:10.1016/j.ijleo.2015.07.033.  15. Omaghali, N.E.J.; Tkachenko, V.; Andreone, A.; Abbate, G. Optical sensing using dark mode excitation in an asymmetric dimer  metamaterial. Sensors 2014, 14, 272–282.  16. Yang, Z.‐J.; Wang, Q.‐Q.; Lin, H.‐Q. Cooperative effects of two optical dipole antennas coupled to plasmonic Fabry–Pérot cavity.  Nanoscale 2012, 4, 5308–5311, doi:10.1039/C2NR31513K.  17. Liu, N.; Weiss, T.; Mesch, M.; Langguth, L.; Eigenthaler, U.; Hirscher, M.; Sönnichsen, C.; Giessen, H. Planar metamaterial  analogue  of  electromagnetically  induced  transparency  for  plasmonic  sensing.  Nano  Lett.  2010,  10,  1103–1107,  doi:10.1021/nl902621d.  18. Liu, N.; Kaiser, S.; Giessen, H. Magnetoinductive and electroinductive coupling in plasmonic metamaterial molecules. Adv.  Mater. 2008, 20, 4521–4525, doi:10.1002/adma.200801917.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9796  8  of  8  19. Yang, P.; Xiao, Y.; Xiao, M.; Li, S. 6G wireless communications: Vision and potential techniques. IEEE Netw. 2019, 33, 70–75,  doi:10.1109/MNET.2019.1800418.  20. Dang, S.; Amin, O.; Shihada, B.; Alouini, M.‐S. What should 6G be? Nat. Electron. 2020, 3, 20–29, doi:10.1038/s41928‐019‐0355‐6.  21. Singh, R.; Rockstuhl, C.; Lederer, F.; Zhang, W. Coupling between a dark and a bright eigenmode in a terahertz metamaterial.  Phys. Rev. B 2009, 79, 085111, doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.79.085111.  22. Liu, M.; Tian, Z.; Zhang, X.; Gu, J.; Ouyang, C.; Han, J.; Zhang, W. Tailoring the plasmon‐induced transparency resonances in  terahertz metamaterials. Opt. Express 2017, 25, 19844–19855, doi:10.1364/OE.25.019844.  23. Baqir, M.A.; Choudhury, P.K.; Farmani, A.; Younas, T.; Arshad, J.; Mir, A.; Karimi, S. Tunable plasmon induced transparency  in graphene and hyperbolic metamaterial‐based structure. IEEE Photonics J. 2019, 11, 1–10, doi:10.1109/JPHOT.2019.2931586.   Han, X. Tunable fano resonances in an ultra‐small gap. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 2603.  24. Yao, F.; Li, F.; He, Z.; Liu, Y.; Xu, L.; 25. Al‐Naib, I.; Yang, Y.; Dignam, M.M.; Zhang, W.; Singh, R. Ultra‐high Q even eigenmode resonance in terahertz metamaterials.  Appl. Phys. Lett. 2015, 106, 011102, doi:10.1063/1.4905478.  26. Cong, L.; Manjappa, M.; Xu, N.; Al‐Naib, I.; Zhang, W.; Singh, R. Fano resonances in terahertz metasurfaces: A figure of merit  optimization. Adv. Opt. Mater. 2015, 3, 1537–1543, doi:10.1002/adom.201500207.  27. Yan, F.; Li, Q.; Wang, Z.; Tian, H.; Li, L. Extremely high Q‐factor terahertz metasurface using reconstructive coherent mode  resonance. Opt. Express 2021, 29, 7015–7023, doi:10.1364/OE.417367.  28. Grant, J.; Ma, Y.; Saha, S.; Khalid, A.; Cumming, D.R.S. Polarization insensitive, broadband terahertz metamaterial absorber.  Opt. Lett. 2011, 36, 3476–3478, doi:10.1364/OL.36.003476.  29. Du, C.; Zhou, D.; Guo, H.‐H.; Pang, Y.‐Q.; Shi, H.‐Y.; Liu, W.‐F.; Singh, C.; Trukhanov, S.; Trukhanov, A.; Xu, Z. Active control  scattering  manipulation  for  realization  of  switchable  EIT‐like  response  metamaterial.  Opt.  Commun.  2021,  483,  126664,  doi:10.1016/j.optcom.2020.126664.  30. Lee, J.‐W.; Yang, J.‐K.; Sohn, I.‐B.; Choi, H.‐K.; Kang, C.; Kee, C.‐S. Relationship between the order of rotation symmetry in  perforated apertures and terahertz transmission characteristics. Opt. Eng. 2012, 51, 119002.  31. Lee, J.W.; Yang, J.‐K.; Sohn, I.‐B.; Kang, C.; Kee, C.‐S. Folded slot resonator array with efficient terahertz transmission. Opt.  Commun. 2013, 293, 155–159, doi:10.1016/j.optcom.2012.11.099.  32. Lee, J.W.; Yang, J.‐K.; Sohn, I.‐B.; Yoo, H.K.; Kang, C.; Kee, C.‐S. Monopole resonators in planar plasmonic metamaterials. Opt.  Express 2014, 22, 18433–18438, doi:10.1364/OE.22.018433.  33. Song, M.‐S.; Lee, I.‐S.; Sohn, I.‐B.; Kang, C.; Kee, C.‐S.; Yang, J.‐K.; Lee, J.W. Characteristics of multi‐mode resonances in T‐shape  air slots. AIP Adv. 2015, 5, 047107, doi:10.1063/1.4917298.  34. Wang, Z.; Yao, K.; Chen, M.; Chen, H.; Liu, Y. Manipulating Smith–Purcell emission with babinet metasurfaces. Phys. Rev.  Letters 2016, 117, 157401, doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.157401.  35. Lapine,  M.;  Shadrivov,  I.V.;  Powell,  D.A.;  Kivshar,  Y.S.  Magnetoelastic  metamaterials.  Nat.  Mater.  2012,  11,  30–33,  doi:10.1038/nmat3168.  36. Lee, J.W.; Seo, M.A.; Kim, D.S.; Kang, J.H.; Park, Q.‐H. Polarization dependent transmission through asymmetric C‐shaped  holes. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2009, 94, 081102, doi:10.1063/1.3088851.  37. Smith, D.R.; Padilla, W.J.; Vier, D.C.; Nemat‐Nasser, S.C.; Schultz, S. Composite medium with simultaneously negative perme‐ ability and permittivity. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2000, 84, 4184–4187, doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4184.  38. Clark, A.W.; Sheridan, A.K.; Glidle, A.; Cumming, D.R.S.; Cooper, J.M. Tuneable visible resonances in crescent shaped nano‐ split‐ring resonators. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2007, 91, 093109, doi:10.1063/1.2772180.  39. Palik, E.D. (Ed.) Handbook of Optical Constants of Solids; Academic Press: Orlando, FL, USA, 1985.  40. Mock, J.J.; Hill, R.T.; Tsai, Y.‐J.; Chilkoti, A.; Smith, D.R. Probing dynamically tunable localized surface plasmon resonances of  film‐coupled nanoparticles by evanescent wave excitation. Nano Lett. 2012, 12, 1757–1764, doi:10.1021/nl204596h.  41. Trivedi, R.; Thomas, A.; Dhawan, A. Full‐wave electromagentic analysis of a plasmonic nanoparticle separated from a plas‐ monic film by a thin spacer layer. Opt. Express 2014, 22, 19970–19989, doi:10.1364/OE.22.019970. 

Journal

Applied SciencesMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Oct 20, 2021

Keywords: terahertz spectroscopy; metamaterials; modulators; active optics

There are no references for this article.