Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Characterization of Infant Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Delivery with Range Sensor Feedback on Performance

Characterization of Infant Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Delivery with Range Sensor Feedback on... Article  Characterization of Infant Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation   Delivery with Range Sensor Feedback on Performance  1 1, 1,2, 3 2 Farah M. Alkhafaji  , Ghaidaa A. Khalid  *, Ali Al‐Naji  *, Basheer M. Hussein   and Javaan Chahl      Medical Instrumentation Techniques Engineering, Electrical Engineering Technical College,   Middle Technical University, Baghdad 10022, Iraq; bdc0024@mtu.edu.iq    UniSA STEM, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia;   Javaan.Chahl@unisa.edu.au    Laser and Optoelectronic Physics, College of Education for Pure Sciences, University of Kerbala,   Karbala 56001, Iraq; basheer.m@uokerbala.edu.iq  *  Correspondence: ghaidaakhalid@mtu.edu.iq (G.A.K.); ali_al_naji@mtu.edu.iq (A.A.‐N.)  Abstract: Cardiac arrest (CA) in infants is an issue worldwide, which causes significant morbidity  and mortality rates. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a technique performed in case of CA  to save victimsʹ lives. However, CPR is often not performed effectively, even when delivered by  qualified rescuers. Therefore, international guidelines have proposed applying a CPR feedback de‐ vice to achieve high‐quality application of CPR to enhance survival rates. Currently, no feedback  device is available to guide learners through infant CPR performance in contrast to a number of  adult CPR feedback devices. This study presents a real‐time feedback system to improve infant CPR  performance by medical staff and laypersons using a commercial CPR infant manikin. The proposed  system uses an IR sensor to compare CPR performance obtained with no feedback and with a real‐ time feedback system. Performance was validated by analysis of the CPR parameters actually de‐ livered against the recommended target parameters. Results show that the real‐time feedback sys‐ tem significantly improves the quality of chest compression parameters. The two‐thumb compres‐ Citation: Alkhafaji, F.M.;   sion technique is the achievable and appropriate mechanism applied to infant subjects for deliver‐ Khalid, G.A.; Al‐Naji, A.;   ing high‐quality CPR. Under the social distancing constraints imposed by the SARS‐CoV‐2 pan‐ Hussein, B.M.; Chahl, J.   demic, the results from the training device were sent to a CPR training center and provided each  Characterization of Infant   participant with CPR proficiency.  Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation   Delivery with Range Sensor   Feedback on Performance. Appl. Sci.  Keywords: cardiopulmonary resuscitation; SARS‐CoV‐2;  cardiac arrest; chest compression; pan‐ 2021, 11, 9813. https://doi.org/  demic; chest compression; manikins; feedback; infant  10.3390/app11219813  Received: 13 July 2021  Accepted: 3 October 2021  1. Introduction  Published: 20 October 2021  Cardiac arrest (CA) is an issue for infants around the world, which causes undesira‐ ble morbidity and mortality rates. Subjects who have CA need instant cardiopulmonary  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neu‐ resuscitation (CPR) to save their lives. The purpose of CPR is to supply vital organs with  tral with regard to jurisdictional  claims in published maps and insti‐ sufficient oxygen‐rich blood [1]. It is a first aid technique that allows the prevention of  tutional affiliations.  physiological damage while awaiting the arrival of more advanced medical intervention.  It is essential to perform CPR as quickly after arrest as possible, because when cardiac  arrest occurs, oxygen is no longer circulated to the brain tissues, which will result in the  loss of brain function [1]. Other muscle tissues in the body are considered to be regenera‐ Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Li‐ tive, unlike brain tissues. The CPR process involves performing alternating chest com‐ censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  pression (CC) and artificial ventilation to physically preserve the full function of the brain  This article  is an open access article  of a subject who has cardiac arrest [1–3]. It is essential to increase the cardiac arrest sur‐ distributed under the terms and con‐ vival rate of infant populations. Therefore, high‐quality CPR is a significant factor in con‐ ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ trolling  the  survival  rate.  When  high‐quality  infant  CPR  is  performed,  morbidity  and  tribution (CC BY) license (http://crea‐ complications are substantially reduced. Hence, in terms of increasing the infant survival  tivecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11219813  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  2  of  14  rate from cardiac arrest, significant studies and research has been undertaken by special‐ ists working in CPR, who have presented CPR standards and recommendations. These  standards and recommendations provide a reliable information system to supervise and  document the measured quality of CC [4].   There are two types of compression techniques taught when delivering infant CPR.  The Two‐Finger (TF) and the Two‐Thumb (TT) technique [4–6], as shown in Figure 1. The  TT technique is achieved by squeezing the thorax between the two thumbs [7]. The TF  technique is achieved by placing the two fingers above the lower third of the sternum and  applying chest compression [6]. Thus, the only differences between the two techniques  are the position of the hand. Different researchers have evaluated the effectiveness of these  techniques using animal surrogates [8,9] and infant CPR models [5,10,11] These studies  showed that performing the TT technique when delivering CPR reduces the rescuer fa‐ tigue compared to the TF technique [10]. Thus, the TT technique was advised for perform‐ ing infant CPR [5–11]. The American Heart Association (AHA) and the International Liai‐ son Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) have chosen the TT technique for delivering  infant CPR [12]. The CPR standards are recommended by the AHA guidelines [12–14] and  consider the key factors to assess the CPR quality such as: chest compression depths, chest  release force, chest compression rate, and compression duty cycle.  Those individuals who apply the CPR process must secure a recognized set of skills  in delivering successful CPR that could save a subjectʹs life [14,15]. Pediatric CPR differs  from  adult  CPR  because  children  are  anatomically  and  physiologically  different  from  adults [16]. In infants, cardiac arrest is not considered to be the only reason for which CPR  needs to be delivered [17]. Also both hypoxia, which is ‘’deficiency in the amount of O2  reaching tissues’’, and asphyxia (suffocation) are considered to be reasons for delivering  of CPR [13,17]. It is challenging to identify the cause as well as the effect of infant cardiac  arrest. Thus, CPR is considered to be a more difficult skill to perform on an infant or young  child than adult CPR. Therefore, a training method is required to educate people about  infant CPR techniques to improve the quality and rate of CPR success on infants suffering  from  CA  [14,18].  For  CPR  to  be  efficient,  and  training  to  be  consistent,  recommended  standards  should  be  achieved.  It  is  believed  that  instantaneous  performance  feedback  could affect the performance of chest compression quality during simulated infant CPR.  A study by Martin et al. [19], Kandasamy et al. [20], and Lakomek et al. [21]were con‐ ducted to investigate the feedback effect on CPR performance. Based on the outcomes  from these studies, it was suggested that implementing CPR aided real‐time feedback sys‐ tems can improve chest compression technique.  Currently, no feedback device is available to guide learners through infant CPR per‐ formance compared to a number of adult CPR feedback device. This study presents a real‐ time feedback system to improve infant CPR performance by medical staff and laypersons  using commercial infant manikin. The proposed system is based on an IR sensor to ana‐ lyse the CPR performance obtained with no‐feedback and with a real‐time feedback sys‐ tem. The aim of this study is to investigate and improve the CPR performance of the res‐ cuer when delivered during simulated infant CPR.  The principal contributions of the proposed system are listed as follows: 1) Establish‐ ing background knowledge as necessary to be able to evaluate the effects of the real‐time  feedback system on CPR quality. 2) Propose a real‐time interaction system based on an IR  sensor to monitor and extract the CPR parameters and improve CPR performance in any  environmental settings. 3) Propose developing a real‐time feedback system to monitor  and improve infant CPR performance for both medical staff and laypersons. 4) Analyze  infant CPR performance with no‐feedback and with a real‐time feedback system and eval‐ uate the CPR parameters delivered within the recommended target line as the main con‐ sideration. 5) Analysis of CPR performance based on the effect of using the TF and TT  compression techniques and appraise the appropriate and achievable mechanism applied  in infant populations for delivering high‐quality infant CPR.    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  3  of  14  This paper is structured as follows: Section 2 presents the materials and methods,  including participants and experimental setup. Section 3 reports the experimental results  of the proposed infant CPR feedback system with comparison to the recommended guide‐ line [12–14] of chest compression parameters. Section 4 discusses the results. Finally, Sec‐ tion 5 concludes the work presented in this study.  (a)  (b)  Figure 1. The Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) compressions techniques; (a) the Two‐Finger  (TF) method, and (b) the Two‐Thumb (TT) method.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Participants   Simulated CPR performance was conducted across two populations, with particu‐ larly  different  levels  of  expertise:  medical  staff  resuscitators  and  lay  resuscitators  (i.e.,  those who have no experience in CPR). A group of fifty persons (29 males and 21 females)  with ages ranging between (18–56 years) was offered to participate in CPR performance  on a commercial infant manikin. The participants were distributed based on their experi‐ ence in CPR into two groups. Twenty‐five medical staff resuscitators and twenty‐five lay  resuscitators enrolled for this study. Before conducting the experiments, the participants  were  briefed  on  the  experimental  procedure  before  beginning  simulated  CPR  perfor‐ mance. Each participant performed four categories of infant CPR on a professional infant  manikin: (1) No feedback CPR performance using the TT compression technique. (2) Feed‐ back CPR performance using the TT compression technique. (3) No feedback CPR perfor‐ mance using the TF compression technique. (4) Feedback CPR performance using the TF  compression technique. Individual participants’ results were shown to each participant  after their simulated CPR performance completion.  2.2. Experimental Setup  This section describes the design and development of a real‐time feedback system  used to improve the rescuers’ performance of infant CPR working with infant popula‐ tions, the full details of the technical description available in the supplementary file. The  proposed system as shown in Figure 2 a, b comprises (1) a commercial infant manikin  (Prestan infant manikin LLC 2020, USA) was used by the participants as the infant subject.  (2) The laser displacement sensor used to measure the first CPR parameter which is  chest compression depth (displacement) during the compression process. (3) An Arduino  Uno Microcontroller controlled the work of the displacement sensors by sending com‐ mands to the sensors to start measuring the compression depth during TT and TF com‐ pression techniques and presenting the measures on the serial monitor of the Arduino. (4)  MATLAB software (R2019a) received the readings of sensors from the Arduino in real‐   Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  4  of  14  time and summed the reading of both sensors to calculate the actual compression depth.  The other CPR quality parameters, compression release force, compression rate and com‐ pression  duty  cycle,  achieved  in  the  compression  stage  were  calculated  using  the  MATLAB software. (5) The performance feedback was provided by real‐time program  implemented using MATLAB software to both monitor and assist participants while per‐ forming CPR on the simulated infant training manikin. The CPR parameters were pre‐ sented using a custom graphical user interface (GUI), see Figure 3. Applying the social  distance condition imposed by the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic that made it difficult to gather  all the participant in the CPR training center. Thus, a GSM chip (A9 module) controlled  by the Arduino microcontroller was used to send the training results to the CPR training  center to provide each participant with CPR certificate. The GUI of the proposed system  contained a send option used for sending the achieved CPR performance result to CPR  training center. The achieved CPR quality measures were sent from the MATLAB pro‐ gram to the Arduino microcontroller through a USB cable to a GSM module which trans‐ ferred the data to the CPR training center, see Figure 4. The measured data from each  group were presented as mean ± SD and median value. The statistical significance of the  differences between the groups was determined by two tails, paired samples of student’s  test (T test). The significance level for all analyses was set as P‐value < 0.05.  (a)  (b)  Figure 2. (a) shows the prototype of proposed system; (b) shows the electronic components of the proposed system.  Figure 3. shows the user interface of the proposed system.    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  5  of  14  .  Figure 4. The overall system design of the infant CPR real‐time feedback system.  3. Results  In this section, the results obtained are presented in two phases, the medical rescuer’s  CPR performance and lay rescuer’s CPR performance. Measured output is presented in  terms of chest compression depths, chest release force, chest compression rates and com‐ pression duty cycle. There is a supplementary material available related to this research,  see Tables S1–S4 in the supplementary file.  3.1. CPR Performance with No‐Feedback and with Real‐Time Feedback System  3.1.1. Chest Compression Depth  The medical participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique  see Figure 5a. The mean value of chest compression depth during no performance feed‐ back was 32.8 ± 2.6 mm compared to the chest compression depth parameter mean value  of 38.2 ± 2.7 mm with feedback performance. During CPR, there was an improvement in  the compression depth parameter with performance feedback of approximately 16% com‐ pared to the CPR performance without feedback. The median values of the compression  depth parameter with and without feedback were 33 mm and 38 mm, respectively. The  difference and percentage of difference between the no feedback and feedback groups  were  5% and  15%,  respectively.  There  was a  significant difference  in  the  compression  depth parameter when assisted with performance feedback compared to unassisted per‐ formance (P‐value < 0.05).  In addition, when medically trained participants performed infant CPR using the TF  compression technique, see Figure 5a. The mean value of the chest compression depth  parameter without feedback was 30.2 ± 2.07 mm compared to the chest compression depth  parameter mean value of 36.8 ± 1.13 mm with performance feedback. During CPR, there  was  an  improvement  in  the  compression  depth  parameter  with  feedback  of  approxi‐ mately 22% compared to the CPR performance without feedback. The median values of  the compression depth parameter with no feedback and feedback performance were 30  mm and 37 mm, respectively. The difference and percentage of difference between the no  feedback and feedback group were 7% and 23%. There was a significant difference in the  compression  depth  parameter  with  feedback‐assisted  performance  compared  to  unas‐ sisted performance (P < 0.05).  Related to lay participants, when infant CPR was performed using the TT compres‐ sion technique, see Figure 5a. The mean value of the chest compression depth parameter  with no performance feedback was 30.28 ± 3.30 mm compared to the chest compression  depth parameter mean value of 36.84 ± 2.16 mm with performance feedback. During CPR,    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  6  of  14  there was an improvement in the compression depth parameter with the performance  feedback of approximately 22% compared to CPR performance without feedback. The  median values of the compression depth parameter during no feedback and feedback per‐ formance were 31 mm and 37 mm, respectively. The difference and percentage of differ‐ ence between the no feedback and feedback group were 6% and 19%. There was a signif‐ icant difference in the compression depth parameter with feedback‐assisted performance  compared to the unassisted performance (P‐value < 0.05).  In addition, when the lay participants performed infant CPR using the TF compres‐ sion technique, see Figure 5a. The mean value of chest compression depth parameter dur‐ ing no feedback performance was 29.76 ± 2.17 mm compared to the chest compression  depth parameter mean value of 36 ± 1.87 mm during feedback performance. During CPR,  there was an improvement in the compression depth parameter with the feedback perfor‐ mance of approximately 21% compared to the CPR performance without feedback. The  median values of the compression depth parameter with no feedback and feedback per‐ formances were 30 mm and 36 mm, respectively. The difference and percentage of differ‐ ence between the no feedback and feedback group were 6% and 20%. There was a signif‐ icant difference in the compression depth parameter with feedback‐assisted performance  compared to the unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  3.1.2. Chest Release Force  The medical participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique,  see Figure  -b. The mean value of the achieved chest release force with no feedback on  performance was 3.58 ± 0.70 kg compared to the chest release force parameter mean value  of 2.15 ± 0.42 kg with feedback. The median value of the chest release force parameter with  no feedback and feedback were 3.6 kg and 2.2 kg, respectively. The difference and per‐ centage of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were 1.4% and 39%.  During CPR, there was an improvement in the chest release force parameter with feed‐ back approximately 40% compared to the CPR performance without feedback. There was  a significant difference in the chest release force parameter during feedback‐assisted per‐ formance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  In addition, the medical participants performed infant CPR using the TF compression  technique, see Figure 5b. The mean value of the achieved chest release force during no  feedback was 3.35 ± 0.40 kg compared to the chest release force parameter mean value of  2.11 ± 0.38 kg with feedback. During CPR, there was an improvement in the chest release  force parameter with feedback of approximately 37% compared to the CPR performance  without feedback. The median value of the chest release force parameter with no feedback  and feedback on performances were 3.5 kg and 2.1 kg, respectively. The difference and  percentage of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were 1.4% and 40%  consequently. There was a significant difference in the chest release force parameter with  feedback‐assisted performance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  The lay participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique, see  Figure 5b. The mean value of the achieved chest release force using the TT compression  mechanism with no performance feedback was 3.88 ± 0.91kg compared to the chest release  force parameter mean value 2.44 ± 0.60 kg with feedback. During CPR, there was an im‐ provement in the chest release force parameter with feedback of approximately 37% com‐ pared to the CPR performance without feedback. The median value of the chest release  force parameter during no feedback and feedback performance were 3.8 kg and 2.4 kg,  respectively. The difference and percentage of difference between the no feedback and  feedback group were 1.4% and 37%. There was a significant difference in the chest release  force  parameter  with  feedback‐assisted  performance  compared  to  unassisted  perfor‐ mance (P < 0.05).  In addition, when lay participants performed infant CPR using the TF compression  technique, see Figure 5b. The mean value of the achieved chest release force during no    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  7  of  14  performance feedback was 3.55 ± 0.67 kg compared to the chest release force parameter  mean value of 2.14 ± 0.72 kg during feedback performance. During CPR, there was an  improvement in the chest release force parameter with the feedback of approximately 40%  compared to the CPR performance without feedback. The median value of the chest re‐ lease force parameter during no feedback and feedback performance were 3.6 kg and 2.1  kg, respectively. The difference and percentage of difference between the no feedback and  feedback group were 1.5% and 42%. There was a significant difference in the chest release  force  parameter  with  feedback‐assisted  performance  compared  to  unassisted  perfor‐ mance (P < 0.05).  3.1.3. Compression Rate  The medical participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique,  see Figure 5c. The mean value of the achieved chest compression rate using the TT com‐ pression mechanism during no performance feedback was 83.96 ± 8.87 cycle/min com‐ pared to the compression rate parameter mean value 106.68 ± 8.43 cycle/min with feed‐ back. The median value of the compression rate parameter with no feedback and feedback  performance were 85 cycle/min and 110 cycle/min, respectively. The difference and per‐ centage of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were 25% and 29%.  During CPR, there was an improvement in the compression rate parameter with the feed‐ back of approximately 27% compared to the CPR performance without feedback. There  was a significant difference in the compression rate parameter with feedback‐assisted per‐ formance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  In addition, the medical participants performed infant CPR using the TF compression  technique, see Figure 5c. The mean value of the achieved chest compression rate during  no feedback was 81.84 ± 6.65 cycle/min compared to the compression rate parameter mean  value 101.36 ± 5.16 cycle/min during feedback. During CPR, there was an improvement in  the  compression  rate  parameter  with the  feedback‐performance of approximately 24%  compared to CPR performance without feedback. The median value of the compression  rate parameter during no feedback and feedback performance were 78 cycle/min and 101  cycle/min, respectively. The difference and percentage of difference between the no feed‐ back and feedback group were 23% and 29%. There was a significant difference in the  compression rate parameter with feedback‐assisted performance compared to unassisted  performance (P < 0.05).  Lay participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique, see Fig‐ ure 5c. The mean value of the achieved chest compression rate using the TT compression  mechanism during no performance feedback was 79.64 ± 12.70 cycle/min compared to the  compression rate parameter mean value 104.28 ± 8.53 cycle/min during performance feed‐ back. During CPR, there was an improvement in the compression rate parameter during  the feedback performance of approximately 31% compared to CPR performance without  feedback. The median value of the compression rate parameter during no feedback and  feedback performance were 78 cycle/min and 108 cycle/min, respectively. The difference  and percentage of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were 30% and  38%. There was a significant difference in the compression rate parameter with feedback‐ assisted performance compared to the unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  In  addition, the  lay  participants  performed  infant  CPR using the  TF  compression  technique, see Figure 5c. The mean value of the achieved chest compression rate during  no performance feedback was 78.8 ± 6.59 cycle/min compared to the compression rate pa‐ rameter mean value 99.84 ± 10.69 cycle/min during performance feedback. During CPR,  there was an improvement in the compression rate parameter during the feedback per‐ formance of approximately 27% compared to CPR performance without feedback. The  median value of the compression rate parameter during no feedback and feedback per‐ formance were 78 cycle/min and 102 cycle/min, respectively. The difference and percent‐ age of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were 24% and 31%. There    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  8  of  14  was a significant difference in the compression rate parameter with feedback‐assisted per‐ formance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  3.1.4. Compression Duty Cycle  The medical participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique,  see Figure 5d. The mean value of the achieved chest compression duty cycle mechanism  during no performance feedback was 46.68 ± 3.71% compared to the compression duty  cycle  parameter  mean  value  48.8  ±  1.95%  during  performance  feedback.  During  CPR,  there was an improvement in the compression duty cycle parameter during the feedback  performance of approximately 5% compared to CPR performance without feedback. The  median value of the compression duty cycle parameter during no feedback and feedback  performance were 46% and 49%, respectively. The difference and percentage of difference  between the no feedback and feedback group were 3% and 7%. There was a significant  difference in the compression duty cycle parameter with feedback‐assisted performance  compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  The medical participants performed infant CPR using the TF compression technique,  see Figure 5d. The mean value of the achieved chest compression duty cycle using the TF  compression mechanism during no performance feedback was 43.36 ± 1.89% compared to  the compression duty cycle parameter mean value 46.04 ± 2.02% with feedback. During  CPR, there was an improvement in the compression duty cycle parameter with the feed‐ back performance of approximately 6% compared to CPR performance without feedback.  The median value of the compression duty cycle parameter with no feedback and feed‐ back performance were 43% and 46%, respectively. The difference and percentage of dif‐ ference between the no feedback and feedback group were 3% and 7%. There was a sig‐ nificant difference in compression duty cycle parameter with feedback‐assisted perfor‐ mance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05). Thus, the feedback system im‐ proved the quality of the compression duty cycle parameter during CPR performance.  The lay participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique, see  Figure 5d. The mean value of the achieved chest compression duty cycle during no per‐ formance feedback was 44.68 ± 1.93% compared to the compression duty cycle parameter  mean value 46.92 ± 2.44% during feedback. During CPR, there was an improvement in the  compression duty cycle parameter with the feedback of approximately 5% compared to  CPR performance without feedback. The median value of the compression duty cycle pa‐ rameter during no feedback and feedback performance were 45% and 47%real‐time. The  difference and percentage of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were  2% and 4%. There was a significant difference in the compression duty cycle parameter  with feedback‐assisted compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  The lay participants performed infant CPR using the TF compression technique, see  Figure 5d. The mean value of the achieved chest compression duty cycle during no per‐ formance feedback was 43.2 ± 2.60% compared to compression duty cycle parameter mean  value 45.16 ± 2.03% during feedback. During CPR, there was an improvement in the com‐ pression duty cycle parameter with the feedback of approximately 5% compared to CPR  performance without feedback. The median value of the compression duty cycle parame‐ ter during no feedback and feedback performances were 43% and 45%, respectively. The  difference and percentage of the difference between the no feedback and feedback group  were 2% and 5%. There was a significant difference in the compression duty cycle param‐ eter with feedback‐assisted performance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  9  of  14  TT TF FB NFB FB NFB Medical staff Lay persons (a)  TT TF FB NFBFBNFB Medical staff Lay persons (b)  TT TF FB NFB FB NFB Medical staff Lay persons (c)  TT TF FB NFBFBNFB Medical staff Lay persons (d)  Figure 5. Mean value of the four CPR parameters achieved during no feedback and feedback CPR performance using TT  and TF compression technique (a) the chest compression depth parameter; (b) the chest release force parameter; (c) the  Compression rate/min Compression depth(mm) Duty cycle% Release force(Kg) Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  10  of  14  chest compression rate parameter; (d) the compression duty cycle parameter; and the dashed line represents the guideline  range of each CPR parameter.  To assess overall CPR quality during infant CPR, the proportion of rescuers that sim‐ ultaneously achieved the recommended targets of all CPR parameters was calculated for  each group, medical rescuers and lay rescuers during no feedback and feedback CPR us‐ ing the TT and TF chest compression techniques. The overall CPR quality achieved by  both medical rescuers and layperson groups with feedback and without feedback from  CPR using TT and TF compression techniques is shown in Figure 6.   100% 90% 80% 72 70% 60 No feedback 60% 50% 40% Feedback 30% 20% 12 10% 00 0 0% TT TF TT TF Medical rescuers Lay rescuers Figure 6. The overall CPR quality performance during TT and TF.  4. Discussion  An infant suffering from cardiac arrest (CA) generally has a high probability of im‐ mediate mortality and poor prognosis after a CA episode [1–5]. Therefore, the rescuer’s  quality of infant CPR should be improved during in and out of hospital cardiac arrest.  Literature studies have reported that rescuers delivered poor chest compression quality  during the performance of infant CPR without feedback and suggested using a real‐time  feedback system while performing infant CPR for monitoring and measuring the quality  of infant CPR during CA [22–24]. In addition, CPR performance with a feedback assistance  system required less time and fewer instructors as compared to no performance feedback  [25]. Few studies have presented an optimal infant CPR feedback system in contrast to an  adequate number of adult  CPR systems. Some  previous studies  investigated the  chest  compression technique TT and TF during CPR performance and tried to decide the opti‐ mal  chest  compression  technique  for  infant  CPR  performance  [5,23,26–28].  This  study  aimed to develop a real‐time CPR feedback system for monitoring, measuring, and im‐ proving the quality of chest compression depth, compression rate, chest release force and  compression duty cycle during simulated CPR performance on an infant manikin. This  section discusses the results of a series of investigations, comparing these results against  literature studies and current CPR international guidelines [12–14,29]. From the results it  can be seen that, in general, the assistance of the feedback CPR system has a significant  effect on the quality of chest compressions during simulated infant CPR. Moreover, the  internationally  recommended  targets  [12–14,29]  of  the  four  CPR  parameters  were  achieved with the proposed feedback CPR system.  As the study was presented using two CPR methods (TT and TF), it can be seen that,  in general, when feedback was not provided to the rescuer, the quality of compression  depth decreased. Interestingly, when observing the feedback group, the mean compres‐ sion depth achieved by rescuers was observed to be the highest. In addition, with feed‐ back on CPR performance, the rescuers achieved deeper chest compression depth through  Overall CPR quality % Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  11  of  14  the TT compression technique. The compression depths achieved in this study were con‐ sistent with the literature [19,20]  Related to chest release force, the recommended international target for chest release  force is at least 0.5 Kg and not to exceed 2.5 kg [29]. This study detected rescuers’ failure  to achieve the recommended target of chest release force without feedback infant CPR.  This was comparable with previous studies that reported the role of the feedback system  is to improve the rescuers’ infant CPR performance [30,31]. However, it was observed that  participants achieved the target of chest release force during simulated infant CPR using  TT compression technique more easily than the TF technique, which is consistent with the  outcomes reported in previous studies [26,32]. Related to the compression rate, the rec‐ ommended target for compression rate was rarely achieved by rescuers who were in the  group performing CPR without feedback, and most often, rescuers were not able to reach  the minimum required target, which is 100 𝑚𝑖𝑛 . The feedback group demonstrated a  significant difference across the two CPR methods. However, the rescuers achieved the  recommended target compression rate during simulated infant CPR more easily when  using the TT compression technique than the TF technique. This was consistent with the  compression  rate  parameter  reported  by  [6,32]  and  [33].  The  compression  duty  cycle  proved difficult to maintain, particularly when feedback was not provided. This could be  due to difficulty in understanding how to maintain the duty cycle within the required  limits, or due to a loss of concentration, perhaps as a result of focusing on the compression  rates and depths. A relatively significant improvement occurred with the group provided  with feedback, since overall, the international recommended targets were achieved. More  rescuers reached the recommended guideline of duty cycle through chest compression  using the TT technique than the TF technique. This performance was in agreement with  the reported studies in [27] and [34]. The study also investigated the effect of real‐time  performance feedback during simulated infant chest compressions in accordance with the  method described by [19,35]. The researcher showed that feedback produced an overall  improvement in the quality of chest compression, significantly improving the quality of  chest  compression  depths,  chest  compression  rates  and  compression  duty  cycles.  Alt‐ hough, that study focused only on the TT technique. The results of this current study have  produced similar outcomes to [19,35]. Comparing the current study with [19,35] , it can be  seen that the group of rescuers with feedback had significantly increased performance  quality for four of the quality measurements. The rescuer group without feedback demon‐ strated a deterioration in performance quality; most participants failed to achieve all four  (compression depth, compression rates, release force and duty cycle) quality targets.  Overall, the study analysis related to the four quality parameters of CPR performance  on an infant manikin, the chest compression depth, chest release force, compression rate  and compression duty cycle has demonstrated that the TT compression technique is better  to achieve the recommended target of CPR quality parameters. Therefore, the TT com‐ pression technique was advised for infant CPR performance. The proposed system in this  study could be used to assist rescuers in improving the quality of CPR performance.  The limitations of the study represented by (1) the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic prevent  rescuers from achieving rescue breath parameters. (2) Ending of the result did not include  the sampled signal since the GSM could not send more than 26 characters in one message.  5. Conclusion  Currently,  infant  CPR  training  is  usually  performed  without  a  feedback  system,  which may cause poor CPR performance delivered by rescuers in comparison to the ade‐ quate numbers of adult CPR feedback systems. This study presents a real‐time feedback  system to assist rescuers to achieve quality measures of CPR parameters. This study in‐ vestigated the CPR performance delivered by medical rescuers and lay rescuers on a com‐ mercial infant manikin without an assisting feedback system and with a real‐time assist‐ ing feedback system. The results showed some ineffective CPR performance during no  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  12  of  14  feedback CPR performance against improved CPR quality measures during CPR perfor‐ mance with the assisting feedback system. Furthermore, this study showed that the TT  compression technique is preferable to the TF compression technique when performing  infant CPR. Further, the proposed system’s capability of transmitting CPR performance is  very valuable because it supports remote CPR training under the social distancing condi‐ tions of the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic.  Supplementary  Materials:  The  following  are  available  online  at  www.mdpi.com/2076‐ 3417/11/21/9813/s1, Table S1: The result of medical rescuers group during feedback and no feedback  CPR performance of the CPR quality parameters by TT compression technique.; Table S2: The result  of medical rescuers group during feedback and no feedback CPR performance of the CPR quality  parameters by TF compression technique.; Table S3: The result of lay rescuers group during feed‐ back and no feedback CPR performance of the CPR quality parameters by TT compression method.;  Table S4: The result of lay rescuers group during feedback and no feedback CPR performance of the  CPR quality parameters by TF compression method.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, A.A.‐N. and G.A.K.; methodology, G.A.K. and F.M.A.;  software, G.A.K. and B.M.H.; validation, F.M.A. and G.A.K.; formal analysis, F.M.A. and G.A.K.;  investigation, F.M.A., G.A.K.  and A.A.‐N.; resources,  F.M.A., G.A.K.  and  B.M.H.; data  curation,  F.M.A., G.A.K. and A.A.‐N.; writing—original draft preparation, F.M.A., and G.A.K.; project fund‐ ing, J.C; writing—review and editing, F.M.A., G.A.K., A.A.‐N. and J.C; visualization, F.M.A., G.A.K.,  and A.A.‐N.; project administration, G.A.K., A.A.‐N. and J.C. All authors have read and agreed to  the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: The research has received no funding.  Institutional Review Board Statement: The study followed the guidelines of the Declaration of  Helsinki, and approved by the Ministry of Health and Environment, Training and Human Devel‐ opment Centre, Iraq (Protocol number: 84/21).  Informed Consent Statement: Informed consent  was  obtained  from all subjects involved  in the  study to publish this paper.  Data Availability Statement: Not applicable.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflicts of interest.  References  1. Mendler, M.R.; Weber, C.; Hassan, M.A.; Huang, L.; Waitz, M.; Mayer, B.; Hummler, H.D. Effect of Different Respiratory Modes  on Return of Spontaneous Circulation in a Newborn Piglet Model of Hypoxic Cardiac Arrest. Neonatology 2015, 109, 22–30.  https://doi.org/10.1159/000439020.  2. Solevåg, A.L.; Schmölzer, G.M.; O’Reilly, M.; Lu, M.; Lee, T.‐F.; Hornberger, L.K.; Nakstad, B.; Cheung, P.‐Y. Myocardial per‐ fusion and oxidative stress after 21% vs. 100% oxygen ventilation and uninterrupted chest compressions in severely asphyxiated  piglets. Resuscitation 2016, 106, 7–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.06.014.  3. Cunningham, L.M.; Mattu, A.; O’Connor, R.E.; Brady, W.J. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation for cardiac arrest: The importance  of  uninterrupted  chest  compressions  in  cardiac  arrest  resuscitation.  Am.  J.  Emerg.  Med.  2012,  30,  1630–1638.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2012.02.015.  4. Nolan,  J.  High‐quality  cardiopulmonary  resuscitation.  Curr.  Opin.  Crit.  Care  2014,  20,  227–233.  https://doi.org/10.1097/mcc.0000000000000083.  5. Dorfsman, M.L.; Menegazzi, J.J.; Wadas, R.J.; Auble, T.E. Two‐thumb vs. two‐finger chest compression in an infant model of  prolonged  cardiopulmonary  resuscitation.  Acad.  Emerg.  Med.  2000,  7,  1077–1082.  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1553‐ 2712.2000.tb01255.x.  6. Tsou, J.‐Y.; Kao, C.‐L.; Chang, C.‐J.; Tu, Y.‐F.; Su, F.‐C.; Chi, C.‐H. Biomechanics of two‐thumb versus two‐finger chest compres‐ sion  for  cardiopulmonary  resuscitation  in  an  infant  manikin  model.  Eur.  J.  Emerg.  Med.  2020,  27,  132–136.  https://doi.org/10.1097/mej.0000000000000631.  7. Alkhafaji, F.M.; Khalid, G.A.; Al‐Naji, A. Application of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Mechanism in Infant Population: A  Short Review. IOP Conf. Ser. Mater. Sci. Eng. 2021, 1105, 012077. https://doi.org/10.1088/1757‐899x/1105/1/012077.  8. Menegazzi, J.J.; Auble, T.E.; Nicklas, K.A.; Hosack, G.M.; Rack, L.; Goode, J.S. Two‐thumb versus two‐finger chest compression  during  CPR  in  a  swine  infant  model  of  cardiac  arrest.  Ann.  Emerg.  Med.  1993,  22,  240–243.  https://doi.org/10.1016/s0196‐ 0644(05)80212‐4.  9. Houri, P.K.; Frank, L.R.; Menegazzi, J.J.; Taylor, R. A randomized, controlled trial of two‐thumb vs two‐finger chest compres‐ sion in a swine infant model of cardiac arrest [see comment]. Prehosp. Emerg. Care 1997, 1.    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  13  of  14  10. Haque, I.U.; Udassi, J.P.; Udassi, S.; Theriaque, D.W.; Shuster, J.J.; Zaritsky, A.L. Chest compression quality and rescuer fatigue  with  increased  compression  to  ventilation  ratio  during  single  rescuer  pediatric  CPR.  Resuscitation  2008,  79,  82–89.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2008.04.026.  11. Whitelaw, C.C.; Slywka, B.; Goldsmith, L. Comparison of a two‐finger versus two‐thumb method for chest compressions by  healthcare providers in an infant mechanical model. Resuscitation 2000, 43, 213–216. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0300‐9572(99)00145‐ 8.  12. Merchant, R.M.; Topjian, A.A.; Panchal, A.R.; Cheng, A.; Aziz, K.; Berg, K.M.; Lavonas, E.J.; Magid, D.J. Part 1: Executive Sum‐ mary: 2020 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.  Circulation 2020, 142, S337–S357. https://doi.org/10.1161/cir.0000000000000918.  13. De Caen, A.R.; Kleinman, M.E.; Chameides, L.; Atkins, D.L.; Berg, R.A.; Berg, M.D.; Bhanji, F.; Biarent, D.; Bingham, R.; Coova‐ dia, A.H. Part 10: Paediatric basic and advanced life support: International consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation and  emergency cardiovascular care science with treatment recommendations. Resuscitation 2010, 81, 213–259. DOI: 10.1016/j.resus‐ citation.2010.08.028  14. Atkins, D.L.; Berger, S.; Duff, J.P.; Gonzales, J.C.; Hunt, E.A.; Joyner, B.L.; Maeney, P.A.; Niles, D.E.; Samson, R.A.; Schexnayder,  S.M. Part 11: Pediatric basic life support and cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: 2015 American Heart Association guide‐ lines  update  for  cardiopulmonary  resuscitation  and  emergency  cardiovascular  care.  Circulation,  2015,  132,  S519–S525.  https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000265  15. Biarent, D.; Bingham, R.; Eich, C.; López‐Herce, J.; Maconochie, I.; Rodríguez‐Núnez, A.; Rajka, T.; Zideman, D. European Re‐ suscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2010 Section 6. Paediatric life support. Resuscitation 2010, 81, 1364–1388.  16. Atkins, D.L.; Berger, S. Improving Outcomes from Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Young Children and Adolescents. Pediatr.  Cardiol. 2011, 33, 474–483. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00246‐011‐0084‐8.  17. Bardai, A.; Berdowski, J.; van der Werf, C.; Blom, M.T.; Ceelen, M.; van Langen, I.M.; Tijssen, J.G.; Wilde, A.A.; Koster, R.W.;  Tan, H.L. Incidence, Causes, and Outcomes of Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children A Comprehensive, Prospective, Pop‐ ulation‐Based Study in the Netherlands. J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. 2011, 57, 1822–1828.  18. Udassi, J.P.; Udassi, S.; Theriaque, D.W.; Shuster, J.J.; Zaritsky, A.L.; Haque, I.U. Effect of alternative chest compression tech‐ niques  in  infant  and  child  on  rescuer  performance.  Pediatr.  Crit.  Care  Med.  2009,  10,  328–333.  https://doi.org/10.1097/pcc.0b013e31819886ab.  19. Martin, P.; Theobald, P.; Kemp, A.; Maguire, S.; Maconochie, I.; Jones, M. Real‐time feedback can improve infant manikin car‐ diopulmonary  resuscitation  by  up  to  79%—A  randomised  controlled  trial.  Resuscitation  2013,  84,  1125–1130.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2013.03.029.  20. Kandasamy, J.; Theobald, P.S.; Maconochie, I.K.; Jones, M.D. Can real‐time feedback improve the simulated infant cardiopul‐ monary  resuscitation  performance  of  basic  life  support  and  lay  rescuers?.  Arch.  Dis.  Child.  2019,  104,  793–801.  https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild‐2018‐316576.  21. Lakomek, F.; Lukas, R.‐P.; Brinkrolf, P.; Mennewisch A.; Steinsiek, N.; Gutendorf, P.; Sudowe, H.; Heller, M.; Kwiecien, R.;  Zarbock, A. et al. Erratum: Real‐time feedback improves chest compression quality in out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest: A prospec‐ tive cohort study Plos One, 2020, 15, e0229431. Doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0229431.  22. Abella, B.S.; Edelson, D.P.; Kim, S.; Retzer, E.; Myklebust, H.; Barry, A.M.; O’Hearn, N.; Hoek, T.L.V.; Becker, L.B. CPR quality  improvement during in‐hospital cardiac arrest using a real‐time audiovisual feedback system. Resuscitation 2007, 73, 54–61.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2006.10.027.  23. Lin, Y.; Cheng, A.; Grant, V.J.; Currie, G.R.; Hecker, K.G. Improving CPR quality with distributed practice and real‐time feed‐ back in pediatric healthcare providers—A randomized controlled trial. Resuscitation 2018, 130, 6–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.re‐ suscitation.2018.06.025.  24. Krasteva, V.; Jekova, I.; Didon, J.‐P. An audiovisual feedback device for compression depth, rate and complete chest recoil can  improve  the  CPR  performance  of  lay  persons  during  self‐training  on  a  manikin.  Physiol.  Meas.  2011,  32,  687–699.  https://doi.org/10.1088/0967‐3334/32/6/006.  25. Gregson, R.K.; Cole, T.; Skellett, S.; Bagkeris, E.; Welsby, D.; Peters, M. Randomised crossover trial of rate feedback and force  during  chest  compressions  for  paediatric  cardiopulmonary  resuscitation.  Arch.  Dis.  Child.  2016,  102,  403–409.  https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild‐2016‐310691.  26. Jiang, J.; Zou, Y.; Shi, W.; Zhu, Y.; Tao, R.; Jiang, Y.; Lu, Y.; Tong, J. Two‐thumb–encircling hands technique is more advisable  than 2‐finger technique when lone rescuer performs cardiopulmonary resuscitation on infant manikin. Am. J. Emerg. Med. 2015,  33, 531–534. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2015.01.025.  27. Christman, C.; Hemway, R.J.; Wyckoff, M.H.; Perlman, J.M. The two‐thumb is superior to the two‐finger method for adminis‐ tering chest compressions in a manikin model of neonatal resuscitation. Arch. Dis. Child. Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2010, 96, F99–F101.  https://doi.org/10.1136/adc.2009.180406.  28. Huynh, T.K.; Hemway, R.J.; Perlman, J.M. The Two‐Thumb Technique Using an Elevated Surface is Preferable for Teaching  Infant Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. J. Pediatr. 2012, 161, 658–661. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.03.019.  29. Kleinman, M.E.; De Caen, A.R.; Chameides, L.; Atkins, D.L.; Berg, R.A.; Berg, M.C.; Bhanji, F.; Biarent, D.; Bingham, R.; Coova‐ dia, A.H. Part 10: Pediatric basic and advanced life support: 2010 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation  and  Emergency  Cardiovascular  Care  Science  with  Treatment  Recommendations.  Circulation,  2010,  122,  971093.  https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.971093    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  14  of  14  30. Kitamura, T.; Iwami, T.; Kawamura, T.; Nagao, K.; Tanaka, H.; Nadkarni, V.M.; Berg, R.A.; Hiraide, A. Conventional and chest‐ compression‐ only cardiopulmonary resuscitation by bystanders for children who have out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrests: A pro‐ spective, nationwide, populationbased cohort study. Lancet 2010, 375, 1347–1354.  31. López‐Herce, J.; García, C.; Dominguez‐Sampedro, P.; Rodriguez‐Nunez, A.; Carrillo, A.; Calvo, C.; Delgado, M.A.; Spanish  Study Group of Cardiopulmonary Arrest in Children. Outcome of Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiorespiratory Arrest in Children. Pedi‐ atr. Emerg. Care 2005, 21, 807–815. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.pec.0000190230.43104.a8.  32. Udassi, S.; Udassi, J.P.; Lamb, M.A.; Theriaque, D.W.; Shuster, J.J.; Zaritsky, A.L.; Haque, I.U. Two‐thumb technique is superior  to two‐finger technique during lone rescuer infant manikin CPR. Resuscitation 2010, 81, 712–717. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resus‐ citation.2009.12.029.  33. Reynolds, C.; Cox, J.; Livingstone, V.; Dempsey, E.M. Rescuer Exertion and Fatigue Using Two‐Thumb vs. Two‐Finger Method  During  Simulated  Neonatal  Cardiopulmonary  Resuscitation.  Front.  Pediatr.  2020,  8,  133.  https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2020.00133.  34. Millin, M.G.; Bogumil, D.; Fishe, J.N.; Burke, R.V. Comparing the two‐finger versus two‐thumb technique for single person  infant  CPR:  A  systematic  review  and  meta‐analysis.  Resuscitation  2020,  148,  161–172.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscita‐ tion.2019.12.039  35. Martin, P.S.; Kemp, A.M.; Theobald, P.; Maguire, S.A.; Jones, M.D. Do chest compressions during simulated infant CPR comply  with international recommendations?. Arch. Dis. Child. 2012, 98, 576–581. https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild‐2012‐302583.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Sciences Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Characterization of Infant Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Delivery with Range Sensor Feedback on Performance

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/characterization-of-infant-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-delivery-with-cRGs7KZYeM
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2021 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2076-3417
DOI
10.3390/app11219813
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Characterization of Infant Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation   Delivery with Range Sensor Feedback on Performance  1 1, 1,2, 3 2 Farah M. Alkhafaji  , Ghaidaa A. Khalid  *, Ali Al‐Naji  *, Basheer M. Hussein   and Javaan Chahl      Medical Instrumentation Techniques Engineering, Electrical Engineering Technical College,   Middle Technical University, Baghdad 10022, Iraq; bdc0024@mtu.edu.iq    UniSA STEM, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia;   Javaan.Chahl@unisa.edu.au    Laser and Optoelectronic Physics, College of Education for Pure Sciences, University of Kerbala,   Karbala 56001, Iraq; basheer.m@uokerbala.edu.iq  *  Correspondence: ghaidaakhalid@mtu.edu.iq (G.A.K.); ali_al_naji@mtu.edu.iq (A.A.‐N.)  Abstract: Cardiac arrest (CA) in infants is an issue worldwide, which causes significant morbidity  and mortality rates. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a technique performed in case of CA  to save victimsʹ lives. However, CPR is often not performed effectively, even when delivered by  qualified rescuers. Therefore, international guidelines have proposed applying a CPR feedback de‐ vice to achieve high‐quality application of CPR to enhance survival rates. Currently, no feedback  device is available to guide learners through infant CPR performance in contrast to a number of  adult CPR feedback devices. This study presents a real‐time feedback system to improve infant CPR  performance by medical staff and laypersons using a commercial CPR infant manikin. The proposed  system uses an IR sensor to compare CPR performance obtained with no feedback and with a real‐ time feedback system. Performance was validated by analysis of the CPR parameters actually de‐ livered against the recommended target parameters. Results show that the real‐time feedback sys‐ tem significantly improves the quality of chest compression parameters. The two‐thumb compres‐ Citation: Alkhafaji, F.M.;   sion technique is the achievable and appropriate mechanism applied to infant subjects for deliver‐ Khalid, G.A.; Al‐Naji, A.;   ing high‐quality CPR. Under the social distancing constraints imposed by the SARS‐CoV‐2 pan‐ Hussein, B.M.; Chahl, J.   demic, the results from the training device were sent to a CPR training center and provided each  Characterization of Infant   participant with CPR proficiency.  Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation   Delivery with Range Sensor   Feedback on Performance. Appl. Sci.  Keywords: cardiopulmonary resuscitation; SARS‐CoV‐2;  cardiac arrest; chest compression; pan‐ 2021, 11, 9813. https://doi.org/  demic; chest compression; manikins; feedback; infant  10.3390/app11219813  Received: 13 July 2021  Accepted: 3 October 2021  1. Introduction  Published: 20 October 2021  Cardiac arrest (CA) is an issue for infants around the world, which causes undesira‐ ble morbidity and mortality rates. Subjects who have CA need instant cardiopulmonary  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neu‐ resuscitation (CPR) to save their lives. The purpose of CPR is to supply vital organs with  tral with regard to jurisdictional  claims in published maps and insti‐ sufficient oxygen‐rich blood [1]. It is a first aid technique that allows the prevention of  tutional affiliations.  physiological damage while awaiting the arrival of more advanced medical intervention.  It is essential to perform CPR as quickly after arrest as possible, because when cardiac  arrest occurs, oxygen is no longer circulated to the brain tissues, which will result in the  loss of brain function [1]. Other muscle tissues in the body are considered to be regenera‐ Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Li‐ tive, unlike brain tissues. The CPR process involves performing alternating chest com‐ censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  pression (CC) and artificial ventilation to physically preserve the full function of the brain  This article  is an open access article  of a subject who has cardiac arrest [1–3]. It is essential to increase the cardiac arrest sur‐ distributed under the terms and con‐ vival rate of infant populations. Therefore, high‐quality CPR is a significant factor in con‐ ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ trolling  the  survival  rate.  When  high‐quality  infant  CPR  is  performed,  morbidity  and  tribution (CC BY) license (http://crea‐ complications are substantially reduced. Hence, in terms of increasing the infant survival  tivecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11219813  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  2  of  14  rate from cardiac arrest, significant studies and research has been undertaken by special‐ ists working in CPR, who have presented CPR standards and recommendations. These  standards and recommendations provide a reliable information system to supervise and  document the measured quality of CC [4].   There are two types of compression techniques taught when delivering infant CPR.  The Two‐Finger (TF) and the Two‐Thumb (TT) technique [4–6], as shown in Figure 1. The  TT technique is achieved by squeezing the thorax between the two thumbs [7]. The TF  technique is achieved by placing the two fingers above the lower third of the sternum and  applying chest compression [6]. Thus, the only differences between the two techniques  are the position of the hand. Different researchers have evaluated the effectiveness of these  techniques using animal surrogates [8,9] and infant CPR models [5,10,11] These studies  showed that performing the TT technique when delivering CPR reduces the rescuer fa‐ tigue compared to the TF technique [10]. Thus, the TT technique was advised for perform‐ ing infant CPR [5–11]. The American Heart Association (AHA) and the International Liai‐ son Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) have chosen the TT technique for delivering  infant CPR [12]. The CPR standards are recommended by the AHA guidelines [12–14] and  consider the key factors to assess the CPR quality such as: chest compression depths, chest  release force, chest compression rate, and compression duty cycle.  Those individuals who apply the CPR process must secure a recognized set of skills  in delivering successful CPR that could save a subjectʹs life [14,15]. Pediatric CPR differs  from  adult  CPR  because  children  are  anatomically  and  physiologically  different  from  adults [16]. In infants, cardiac arrest is not considered to be the only reason for which CPR  needs to be delivered [17]. Also both hypoxia, which is ‘’deficiency in the amount of O2  reaching tissues’’, and asphyxia (suffocation) are considered to be reasons for delivering  of CPR [13,17]. It is challenging to identify the cause as well as the effect of infant cardiac  arrest. Thus, CPR is considered to be a more difficult skill to perform on an infant or young  child than adult CPR. Therefore, a training method is required to educate people about  infant CPR techniques to improve the quality and rate of CPR success on infants suffering  from  CA  [14,18].  For  CPR  to  be  efficient,  and  training  to  be  consistent,  recommended  standards  should  be  achieved.  It  is  believed  that  instantaneous  performance  feedback  could affect the performance of chest compression quality during simulated infant CPR.  A study by Martin et al. [19], Kandasamy et al. [20], and Lakomek et al. [21]were con‐ ducted to investigate the feedback effect on CPR performance. Based on the outcomes  from these studies, it was suggested that implementing CPR aided real‐time feedback sys‐ tems can improve chest compression technique.  Currently, no feedback device is available to guide learners through infant CPR per‐ formance compared to a number of adult CPR feedback device. This study presents a real‐ time feedback system to improve infant CPR performance by medical staff and laypersons  using commercial infant manikin. The proposed system is based on an IR sensor to ana‐ lyse the CPR performance obtained with no‐feedback and with a real‐time feedback sys‐ tem. The aim of this study is to investigate and improve the CPR performance of the res‐ cuer when delivered during simulated infant CPR.  The principal contributions of the proposed system are listed as follows: 1) Establish‐ ing background knowledge as necessary to be able to evaluate the effects of the real‐time  feedback system on CPR quality. 2) Propose a real‐time interaction system based on an IR  sensor to monitor and extract the CPR parameters and improve CPR performance in any  environmental settings. 3) Propose developing a real‐time feedback system to monitor  and improve infant CPR performance for both medical staff and laypersons. 4) Analyze  infant CPR performance with no‐feedback and with a real‐time feedback system and eval‐ uate the CPR parameters delivered within the recommended target line as the main con‐ sideration. 5) Analysis of CPR performance based on the effect of using the TF and TT  compression techniques and appraise the appropriate and achievable mechanism applied  in infant populations for delivering high‐quality infant CPR.    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  3  of  14  This paper is structured as follows: Section 2 presents the materials and methods,  including participants and experimental setup. Section 3 reports the experimental results  of the proposed infant CPR feedback system with comparison to the recommended guide‐ line [12–14] of chest compression parameters. Section 4 discusses the results. Finally, Sec‐ tion 5 concludes the work presented in this study.  (a)  (b)  Figure 1. The Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) compressions techniques; (a) the Two‐Finger  (TF) method, and (b) the Two‐Thumb (TT) method.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Participants   Simulated CPR performance was conducted across two populations, with particu‐ larly  different  levels  of  expertise:  medical  staff  resuscitators  and  lay  resuscitators  (i.e.,  those who have no experience in CPR). A group of fifty persons (29 males and 21 females)  with ages ranging between (18–56 years) was offered to participate in CPR performance  on a commercial infant manikin. The participants were distributed based on their experi‐ ence in CPR into two groups. Twenty‐five medical staff resuscitators and twenty‐five lay  resuscitators enrolled for this study. Before conducting the experiments, the participants  were  briefed  on  the  experimental  procedure  before  beginning  simulated  CPR  perfor‐ mance. Each participant performed four categories of infant CPR on a professional infant  manikin: (1) No feedback CPR performance using the TT compression technique. (2) Feed‐ back CPR performance using the TT compression technique. (3) No feedback CPR perfor‐ mance using the TF compression technique. (4) Feedback CPR performance using the TF  compression technique. Individual participants’ results were shown to each participant  after their simulated CPR performance completion.  2.2. Experimental Setup  This section describes the design and development of a real‐time feedback system  used to improve the rescuers’ performance of infant CPR working with infant popula‐ tions, the full details of the technical description available in the supplementary file. The  proposed system as shown in Figure 2 a, b comprises (1) a commercial infant manikin  (Prestan infant manikin LLC 2020, USA) was used by the participants as the infant subject.  (2) The laser displacement sensor used to measure the first CPR parameter which is  chest compression depth (displacement) during the compression process. (3) An Arduino  Uno Microcontroller controlled the work of the displacement sensors by sending com‐ mands to the sensors to start measuring the compression depth during TT and TF com‐ pression techniques and presenting the measures on the serial monitor of the Arduino. (4)  MATLAB software (R2019a) received the readings of sensors from the Arduino in real‐   Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  4  of  14  time and summed the reading of both sensors to calculate the actual compression depth.  The other CPR quality parameters, compression release force, compression rate and com‐ pression  duty  cycle,  achieved  in  the  compression  stage  were  calculated  using  the  MATLAB software. (5) The performance feedback was provided by real‐time program  implemented using MATLAB software to both monitor and assist participants while per‐ forming CPR on the simulated infant training manikin. The CPR parameters were pre‐ sented using a custom graphical user interface (GUI), see Figure 3. Applying the social  distance condition imposed by the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic that made it difficult to gather  all the participant in the CPR training center. Thus, a GSM chip (A9 module) controlled  by the Arduino microcontroller was used to send the training results to the CPR training  center to provide each participant with CPR certificate. The GUI of the proposed system  contained a send option used for sending the achieved CPR performance result to CPR  training center. The achieved CPR quality measures were sent from the MATLAB pro‐ gram to the Arduino microcontroller through a USB cable to a GSM module which trans‐ ferred the data to the CPR training center, see Figure 4. The measured data from each  group were presented as mean ± SD and median value. The statistical significance of the  differences between the groups was determined by two tails, paired samples of student’s  test (T test). The significance level for all analyses was set as P‐value < 0.05.  (a)  (b)  Figure 2. (a) shows the prototype of proposed system; (b) shows the electronic components of the proposed system.  Figure 3. shows the user interface of the proposed system.    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  5  of  14  .  Figure 4. The overall system design of the infant CPR real‐time feedback system.  3. Results  In this section, the results obtained are presented in two phases, the medical rescuer’s  CPR performance and lay rescuer’s CPR performance. Measured output is presented in  terms of chest compression depths, chest release force, chest compression rates and com‐ pression duty cycle. There is a supplementary material available related to this research,  see Tables S1–S4 in the supplementary file.  3.1. CPR Performance with No‐Feedback and with Real‐Time Feedback System  3.1.1. Chest Compression Depth  The medical participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique  see Figure 5a. The mean value of chest compression depth during no performance feed‐ back was 32.8 ± 2.6 mm compared to the chest compression depth parameter mean value  of 38.2 ± 2.7 mm with feedback performance. During CPR, there was an improvement in  the compression depth parameter with performance feedback of approximately 16% com‐ pared to the CPR performance without feedback. The median values of the compression  depth parameter with and without feedback were 33 mm and 38 mm, respectively. The  difference and percentage of difference between the no feedback and feedback groups  were  5% and  15%,  respectively.  There  was a  significant difference  in  the  compression  depth parameter when assisted with performance feedback compared to unassisted per‐ formance (P‐value < 0.05).  In addition, when medically trained participants performed infant CPR using the TF  compression technique, see Figure 5a. The mean value of the chest compression depth  parameter without feedback was 30.2 ± 2.07 mm compared to the chest compression depth  parameter mean value of 36.8 ± 1.13 mm with performance feedback. During CPR, there  was  an  improvement  in  the  compression  depth  parameter  with  feedback  of  approxi‐ mately 22% compared to the CPR performance without feedback. The median values of  the compression depth parameter with no feedback and feedback performance were 30  mm and 37 mm, respectively. The difference and percentage of difference between the no  feedback and feedback group were 7% and 23%. There was a significant difference in the  compression  depth  parameter  with  feedback‐assisted  performance  compared  to  unas‐ sisted performance (P < 0.05).  Related to lay participants, when infant CPR was performed using the TT compres‐ sion technique, see Figure 5a. The mean value of the chest compression depth parameter  with no performance feedback was 30.28 ± 3.30 mm compared to the chest compression  depth parameter mean value of 36.84 ± 2.16 mm with performance feedback. During CPR,    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  6  of  14  there was an improvement in the compression depth parameter with the performance  feedback of approximately 22% compared to CPR performance without feedback. The  median values of the compression depth parameter during no feedback and feedback per‐ formance were 31 mm and 37 mm, respectively. The difference and percentage of differ‐ ence between the no feedback and feedback group were 6% and 19%. There was a signif‐ icant difference in the compression depth parameter with feedback‐assisted performance  compared to the unassisted performance (P‐value < 0.05).  In addition, when the lay participants performed infant CPR using the TF compres‐ sion technique, see Figure 5a. The mean value of chest compression depth parameter dur‐ ing no feedback performance was 29.76 ± 2.17 mm compared to the chest compression  depth parameter mean value of 36 ± 1.87 mm during feedback performance. During CPR,  there was an improvement in the compression depth parameter with the feedback perfor‐ mance of approximately 21% compared to the CPR performance without feedback. The  median values of the compression depth parameter with no feedback and feedback per‐ formances were 30 mm and 36 mm, respectively. The difference and percentage of differ‐ ence between the no feedback and feedback group were 6% and 20%. There was a signif‐ icant difference in the compression depth parameter with feedback‐assisted performance  compared to the unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  3.1.2. Chest Release Force  The medical participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique,  see Figure  -b. The mean value of the achieved chest release force with no feedback on  performance was 3.58 ± 0.70 kg compared to the chest release force parameter mean value  of 2.15 ± 0.42 kg with feedback. The median value of the chest release force parameter with  no feedback and feedback were 3.6 kg and 2.2 kg, respectively. The difference and per‐ centage of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were 1.4% and 39%.  During CPR, there was an improvement in the chest release force parameter with feed‐ back approximately 40% compared to the CPR performance without feedback. There was  a significant difference in the chest release force parameter during feedback‐assisted per‐ formance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  In addition, the medical participants performed infant CPR using the TF compression  technique, see Figure 5b. The mean value of the achieved chest release force during no  feedback was 3.35 ± 0.40 kg compared to the chest release force parameter mean value of  2.11 ± 0.38 kg with feedback. During CPR, there was an improvement in the chest release  force parameter with feedback of approximately 37% compared to the CPR performance  without feedback. The median value of the chest release force parameter with no feedback  and feedback on performances were 3.5 kg and 2.1 kg, respectively. The difference and  percentage of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were 1.4% and 40%  consequently. There was a significant difference in the chest release force parameter with  feedback‐assisted performance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  The lay participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique, see  Figure 5b. The mean value of the achieved chest release force using the TT compression  mechanism with no performance feedback was 3.88 ± 0.91kg compared to the chest release  force parameter mean value 2.44 ± 0.60 kg with feedback. During CPR, there was an im‐ provement in the chest release force parameter with feedback of approximately 37% com‐ pared to the CPR performance without feedback. The median value of the chest release  force parameter during no feedback and feedback performance were 3.8 kg and 2.4 kg,  respectively. The difference and percentage of difference between the no feedback and  feedback group were 1.4% and 37%. There was a significant difference in the chest release  force  parameter  with  feedback‐assisted  performance  compared  to  unassisted  perfor‐ mance (P < 0.05).  In addition, when lay participants performed infant CPR using the TF compression  technique, see Figure 5b. The mean value of the achieved chest release force during no    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  7  of  14  performance feedback was 3.55 ± 0.67 kg compared to the chest release force parameter  mean value of 2.14 ± 0.72 kg during feedback performance. During CPR, there was an  improvement in the chest release force parameter with the feedback of approximately 40%  compared to the CPR performance without feedback. The median value of the chest re‐ lease force parameter during no feedback and feedback performance were 3.6 kg and 2.1  kg, respectively. The difference and percentage of difference between the no feedback and  feedback group were 1.5% and 42%. There was a significant difference in the chest release  force  parameter  with  feedback‐assisted  performance  compared  to  unassisted  perfor‐ mance (P < 0.05).  3.1.3. Compression Rate  The medical participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique,  see Figure 5c. The mean value of the achieved chest compression rate using the TT com‐ pression mechanism during no performance feedback was 83.96 ± 8.87 cycle/min com‐ pared to the compression rate parameter mean value 106.68 ± 8.43 cycle/min with feed‐ back. The median value of the compression rate parameter with no feedback and feedback  performance were 85 cycle/min and 110 cycle/min, respectively. The difference and per‐ centage of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were 25% and 29%.  During CPR, there was an improvement in the compression rate parameter with the feed‐ back of approximately 27% compared to the CPR performance without feedback. There  was a significant difference in the compression rate parameter with feedback‐assisted per‐ formance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  In addition, the medical participants performed infant CPR using the TF compression  technique, see Figure 5c. The mean value of the achieved chest compression rate during  no feedback was 81.84 ± 6.65 cycle/min compared to the compression rate parameter mean  value 101.36 ± 5.16 cycle/min during feedback. During CPR, there was an improvement in  the  compression  rate  parameter  with the  feedback‐performance of approximately 24%  compared to CPR performance without feedback. The median value of the compression  rate parameter during no feedback and feedback performance were 78 cycle/min and 101  cycle/min, respectively. The difference and percentage of difference between the no feed‐ back and feedback group were 23% and 29%. There was a significant difference in the  compression rate parameter with feedback‐assisted performance compared to unassisted  performance (P < 0.05).  Lay participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique, see Fig‐ ure 5c. The mean value of the achieved chest compression rate using the TT compression  mechanism during no performance feedback was 79.64 ± 12.70 cycle/min compared to the  compression rate parameter mean value 104.28 ± 8.53 cycle/min during performance feed‐ back. During CPR, there was an improvement in the compression rate parameter during  the feedback performance of approximately 31% compared to CPR performance without  feedback. The median value of the compression rate parameter during no feedback and  feedback performance were 78 cycle/min and 108 cycle/min, respectively. The difference  and percentage of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were 30% and  38%. There was a significant difference in the compression rate parameter with feedback‐ assisted performance compared to the unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  In  addition, the  lay  participants  performed  infant  CPR using the  TF  compression  technique, see Figure 5c. The mean value of the achieved chest compression rate during  no performance feedback was 78.8 ± 6.59 cycle/min compared to the compression rate pa‐ rameter mean value 99.84 ± 10.69 cycle/min during performance feedback. During CPR,  there was an improvement in the compression rate parameter during the feedback per‐ formance of approximately 27% compared to CPR performance without feedback. The  median value of the compression rate parameter during no feedback and feedback per‐ formance were 78 cycle/min and 102 cycle/min, respectively. The difference and percent‐ age of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were 24% and 31%. There    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  8  of  14  was a significant difference in the compression rate parameter with feedback‐assisted per‐ formance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  3.1.4. Compression Duty Cycle  The medical participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique,  see Figure 5d. The mean value of the achieved chest compression duty cycle mechanism  during no performance feedback was 46.68 ± 3.71% compared to the compression duty  cycle  parameter  mean  value  48.8  ±  1.95%  during  performance  feedback.  During  CPR,  there was an improvement in the compression duty cycle parameter during the feedback  performance of approximately 5% compared to CPR performance without feedback. The  median value of the compression duty cycle parameter during no feedback and feedback  performance were 46% and 49%, respectively. The difference and percentage of difference  between the no feedback and feedback group were 3% and 7%. There was a significant  difference in the compression duty cycle parameter with feedback‐assisted performance  compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  The medical participants performed infant CPR using the TF compression technique,  see Figure 5d. The mean value of the achieved chest compression duty cycle using the TF  compression mechanism during no performance feedback was 43.36 ± 1.89% compared to  the compression duty cycle parameter mean value 46.04 ± 2.02% with feedback. During  CPR, there was an improvement in the compression duty cycle parameter with the feed‐ back performance of approximately 6% compared to CPR performance without feedback.  The median value of the compression duty cycle parameter with no feedback and feed‐ back performance were 43% and 46%, respectively. The difference and percentage of dif‐ ference between the no feedback and feedback group were 3% and 7%. There was a sig‐ nificant difference in compression duty cycle parameter with feedback‐assisted perfor‐ mance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05). Thus, the feedback system im‐ proved the quality of the compression duty cycle parameter during CPR performance.  The lay participants performed infant CPR using the TT compression technique, see  Figure 5d. The mean value of the achieved chest compression duty cycle during no per‐ formance feedback was 44.68 ± 1.93% compared to the compression duty cycle parameter  mean value 46.92 ± 2.44% during feedback. During CPR, there was an improvement in the  compression duty cycle parameter with the feedback of approximately 5% compared to  CPR performance without feedback. The median value of the compression duty cycle pa‐ rameter during no feedback and feedback performance were 45% and 47%real‐time. The  difference and percentage of difference between the no feedback and feedback group were  2% and 4%. There was a significant difference in the compression duty cycle parameter  with feedback‐assisted compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).  The lay participants performed infant CPR using the TF compression technique, see  Figure 5d. The mean value of the achieved chest compression duty cycle during no per‐ formance feedback was 43.2 ± 2.60% compared to compression duty cycle parameter mean  value 45.16 ± 2.03% during feedback. During CPR, there was an improvement in the com‐ pression duty cycle parameter with the feedback of approximately 5% compared to CPR  performance without feedback. The median value of the compression duty cycle parame‐ ter during no feedback and feedback performances were 43% and 45%, respectively. The  difference and percentage of the difference between the no feedback and feedback group  were 2% and 5%. There was a significant difference in the compression duty cycle param‐ eter with feedback‐assisted performance compared to unassisted performance (P < 0.05).    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  9  of  14  TT TF FB NFB FB NFB Medical staff Lay persons (a)  TT TF FB NFBFBNFB Medical staff Lay persons (b)  TT TF FB NFB FB NFB Medical staff Lay persons (c)  TT TF FB NFBFBNFB Medical staff Lay persons (d)  Figure 5. Mean value of the four CPR parameters achieved during no feedback and feedback CPR performance using TT  and TF compression technique (a) the chest compression depth parameter; (b) the chest release force parameter; (c) the  Compression rate/min Compression depth(mm) Duty cycle% Release force(Kg) Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  10  of  14  chest compression rate parameter; (d) the compression duty cycle parameter; and the dashed line represents the guideline  range of each CPR parameter.  To assess overall CPR quality during infant CPR, the proportion of rescuers that sim‐ ultaneously achieved the recommended targets of all CPR parameters was calculated for  each group, medical rescuers and lay rescuers during no feedback and feedback CPR us‐ ing the TT and TF chest compression techniques. The overall CPR quality achieved by  both medical rescuers and layperson groups with feedback and without feedback from  CPR using TT and TF compression techniques is shown in Figure 6.   100% 90% 80% 72 70% 60 No feedback 60% 50% 40% Feedback 30% 20% 12 10% 00 0 0% TT TF TT TF Medical rescuers Lay rescuers Figure 6. The overall CPR quality performance during TT and TF.  4. Discussion  An infant suffering from cardiac arrest (CA) generally has a high probability of im‐ mediate mortality and poor prognosis after a CA episode [1–5]. Therefore, the rescuer’s  quality of infant CPR should be improved during in and out of hospital cardiac arrest.  Literature studies have reported that rescuers delivered poor chest compression quality  during the performance of infant CPR without feedback and suggested using a real‐time  feedback system while performing infant CPR for monitoring and measuring the quality  of infant CPR during CA [22–24]. In addition, CPR performance with a feedback assistance  system required less time and fewer instructors as compared to no performance feedback  [25]. Few studies have presented an optimal infant CPR feedback system in contrast to an  adequate number of adult  CPR systems. Some  previous studies  investigated the  chest  compression technique TT and TF during CPR performance and tried to decide the opti‐ mal  chest  compression  technique  for  infant  CPR  performance  [5,23,26–28].  This  study  aimed to develop a real‐time CPR feedback system for monitoring, measuring, and im‐ proving the quality of chest compression depth, compression rate, chest release force and  compression duty cycle during simulated CPR performance on an infant manikin. This  section discusses the results of a series of investigations, comparing these results against  literature studies and current CPR international guidelines [12–14,29]. From the results it  can be seen that, in general, the assistance of the feedback CPR system has a significant  effect on the quality of chest compressions during simulated infant CPR. Moreover, the  internationally  recommended  targets  [12–14,29]  of  the  four  CPR  parameters  were  achieved with the proposed feedback CPR system.  As the study was presented using two CPR methods (TT and TF), it can be seen that,  in general, when feedback was not provided to the rescuer, the quality of compression  depth decreased. Interestingly, when observing the feedback group, the mean compres‐ sion depth achieved by rescuers was observed to be the highest. In addition, with feed‐ back on CPR performance, the rescuers achieved deeper chest compression depth through  Overall CPR quality % Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  11  of  14  the TT compression technique. The compression depths achieved in this study were con‐ sistent with the literature [19,20]  Related to chest release force, the recommended international target for chest release  force is at least 0.5 Kg and not to exceed 2.5 kg [29]. This study detected rescuers’ failure  to achieve the recommended target of chest release force without feedback infant CPR.  This was comparable with previous studies that reported the role of the feedback system  is to improve the rescuers’ infant CPR performance [30,31]. However, it was observed that  participants achieved the target of chest release force during simulated infant CPR using  TT compression technique more easily than the TF technique, which is consistent with the  outcomes reported in previous studies [26,32]. Related to the compression rate, the rec‐ ommended target for compression rate was rarely achieved by rescuers who were in the  group performing CPR without feedback, and most often, rescuers were not able to reach  the minimum required target, which is 100 𝑚𝑖𝑛 . The feedback group demonstrated a  significant difference across the two CPR methods. However, the rescuers achieved the  recommended target compression rate during simulated infant CPR more easily when  using the TT compression technique than the TF technique. This was consistent with the  compression  rate  parameter  reported  by  [6,32]  and  [33].  The  compression  duty  cycle  proved difficult to maintain, particularly when feedback was not provided. This could be  due to difficulty in understanding how to maintain the duty cycle within the required  limits, or due to a loss of concentration, perhaps as a result of focusing on the compression  rates and depths. A relatively significant improvement occurred with the group provided  with feedback, since overall, the international recommended targets were achieved. More  rescuers reached the recommended guideline of duty cycle through chest compression  using the TT technique than the TF technique. This performance was in agreement with  the reported studies in [27] and [34]. The study also investigated the effect of real‐time  performance feedback during simulated infant chest compressions in accordance with the  method described by [19,35]. The researcher showed that feedback produced an overall  improvement in the quality of chest compression, significantly improving the quality of  chest  compression  depths,  chest  compression  rates  and  compression  duty  cycles.  Alt‐ hough, that study focused only on the TT technique. The results of this current study have  produced similar outcomes to [19,35]. Comparing the current study with [19,35] , it can be  seen that the group of rescuers with feedback had significantly increased performance  quality for four of the quality measurements. The rescuer group without feedback demon‐ strated a deterioration in performance quality; most participants failed to achieve all four  (compression depth, compression rates, release force and duty cycle) quality targets.  Overall, the study analysis related to the four quality parameters of CPR performance  on an infant manikin, the chest compression depth, chest release force, compression rate  and compression duty cycle has demonstrated that the TT compression technique is better  to achieve the recommended target of CPR quality parameters. Therefore, the TT com‐ pression technique was advised for infant CPR performance. The proposed system in this  study could be used to assist rescuers in improving the quality of CPR performance.  The limitations of the study represented by (1) the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic prevent  rescuers from achieving rescue breath parameters. (2) Ending of the result did not include  the sampled signal since the GSM could not send more than 26 characters in one message.  5. Conclusion  Currently,  infant  CPR  training  is  usually  performed  without  a  feedback  system,  which may cause poor CPR performance delivered by rescuers in comparison to the ade‐ quate numbers of adult CPR feedback systems. This study presents a real‐time feedback  system to assist rescuers to achieve quality measures of CPR parameters. This study in‐ vestigated the CPR performance delivered by medical rescuers and lay rescuers on a com‐ mercial infant manikin without an assisting feedback system and with a real‐time assist‐ ing feedback system. The results showed some ineffective CPR performance during no  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  12  of  14  feedback CPR performance against improved CPR quality measures during CPR perfor‐ mance with the assisting feedback system. Furthermore, this study showed that the TT  compression technique is preferable to the TF compression technique when performing  infant CPR. Further, the proposed system’s capability of transmitting CPR performance is  very valuable because it supports remote CPR training under the social distancing condi‐ tions of the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic.  Supplementary  Materials:  The  following  are  available  online  at  www.mdpi.com/2076‐ 3417/11/21/9813/s1, Table S1: The result of medical rescuers group during feedback and no feedback  CPR performance of the CPR quality parameters by TT compression technique.; Table S2: The result  of medical rescuers group during feedback and no feedback CPR performance of the CPR quality  parameters by TF compression technique.; Table S3: The result of lay rescuers group during feed‐ back and no feedback CPR performance of the CPR quality parameters by TT compression method.;  Table S4: The result of lay rescuers group during feedback and no feedback CPR performance of the  CPR quality parameters by TF compression method.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, A.A.‐N. and G.A.K.; methodology, G.A.K. and F.M.A.;  software, G.A.K. and B.M.H.; validation, F.M.A. and G.A.K.; formal analysis, F.M.A. and G.A.K.;  investigation, F.M.A., G.A.K.  and A.A.‐N.; resources,  F.M.A., G.A.K.  and  B.M.H.; data  curation,  F.M.A., G.A.K. and A.A.‐N.; writing—original draft preparation, F.M.A., and G.A.K.; project fund‐ ing, J.C; writing—review and editing, F.M.A., G.A.K., A.A.‐N. and J.C; visualization, F.M.A., G.A.K.,  and A.A.‐N.; project administration, G.A.K., A.A.‐N. and J.C. All authors have read and agreed to  the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: The research has received no funding.  Institutional Review Board Statement: The study followed the guidelines of the Declaration of  Helsinki, and approved by the Ministry of Health and Environment, Training and Human Devel‐ opment Centre, Iraq (Protocol number: 84/21).  Informed Consent Statement: Informed consent  was  obtained  from all subjects involved  in the  study to publish this paper.  Data Availability Statement: Not applicable.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflicts of interest.  References  1. Mendler, M.R.; Weber, C.; Hassan, M.A.; Huang, L.; Waitz, M.; Mayer, B.; Hummler, H.D. Effect of Different Respiratory Modes  on Return of Spontaneous Circulation in a Newborn Piglet Model of Hypoxic Cardiac Arrest. Neonatology 2015, 109, 22–30.  https://doi.org/10.1159/000439020.  2. Solevåg, A.L.; Schmölzer, G.M.; O’Reilly, M.; Lu, M.; Lee, T.‐F.; Hornberger, L.K.; Nakstad, B.; Cheung, P.‐Y. Myocardial per‐ fusion and oxidative stress after 21% vs. 100% oxygen ventilation and uninterrupted chest compressions in severely asphyxiated  piglets. Resuscitation 2016, 106, 7–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.06.014.  3. Cunningham, L.M.; Mattu, A.; O’Connor, R.E.; Brady, W.J. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation for cardiac arrest: The importance  of  uninterrupted  chest  compressions  in  cardiac  arrest  resuscitation.  Am.  J.  Emerg.  Med.  2012,  30,  1630–1638.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2012.02.015.  4. Nolan,  J.  High‐quality  cardiopulmonary  resuscitation.  Curr.  Opin.  Crit.  Care  2014,  20,  227–233.  https://doi.org/10.1097/mcc.0000000000000083.  5. Dorfsman, M.L.; Menegazzi, J.J.; Wadas, R.J.; Auble, T.E. Two‐thumb vs. two‐finger chest compression in an infant model of  prolonged  cardiopulmonary  resuscitation.  Acad.  Emerg.  Med.  2000,  7,  1077–1082.  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1553‐ 2712.2000.tb01255.x.  6. Tsou, J.‐Y.; Kao, C.‐L.; Chang, C.‐J.; Tu, Y.‐F.; Su, F.‐C.; Chi, C.‐H. Biomechanics of two‐thumb versus two‐finger chest compres‐ sion  for  cardiopulmonary  resuscitation  in  an  infant  manikin  model.  Eur.  J.  Emerg.  Med.  2020,  27,  132–136.  https://doi.org/10.1097/mej.0000000000000631.  7. Alkhafaji, F.M.; Khalid, G.A.; Al‐Naji, A. Application of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Mechanism in Infant Population: A  Short Review. IOP Conf. Ser. Mater. Sci. Eng. 2021, 1105, 012077. https://doi.org/10.1088/1757‐899x/1105/1/012077.  8. Menegazzi, J.J.; Auble, T.E.; Nicklas, K.A.; Hosack, G.M.; Rack, L.; Goode, J.S. Two‐thumb versus two‐finger chest compression  during  CPR  in  a  swine  infant  model  of  cardiac  arrest.  Ann.  Emerg.  Med.  1993,  22,  240–243.  https://doi.org/10.1016/s0196‐ 0644(05)80212‐4.  9. Houri, P.K.; Frank, L.R.; Menegazzi, J.J.; Taylor, R. A randomized, controlled trial of two‐thumb vs two‐finger chest compres‐ sion in a swine infant model of cardiac arrest [see comment]. Prehosp. Emerg. Care 1997, 1.    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  13  of  14  10. Haque, I.U.; Udassi, J.P.; Udassi, S.; Theriaque, D.W.; Shuster, J.J.; Zaritsky, A.L. Chest compression quality and rescuer fatigue  with  increased  compression  to  ventilation  ratio  during  single  rescuer  pediatric  CPR.  Resuscitation  2008,  79,  82–89.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2008.04.026.  11. Whitelaw, C.C.; Slywka, B.; Goldsmith, L. Comparison of a two‐finger versus two‐thumb method for chest compressions by  healthcare providers in an infant mechanical model. Resuscitation 2000, 43, 213–216. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0300‐9572(99)00145‐ 8.  12. Merchant, R.M.; Topjian, A.A.; Panchal, A.R.; Cheng, A.; Aziz, K.; Berg, K.M.; Lavonas, E.J.; Magid, D.J. Part 1: Executive Sum‐ mary: 2020 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.  Circulation 2020, 142, S337–S357. https://doi.org/10.1161/cir.0000000000000918.  13. De Caen, A.R.; Kleinman, M.E.; Chameides, L.; Atkins, D.L.; Berg, R.A.; Berg, M.D.; Bhanji, F.; Biarent, D.; Bingham, R.; Coova‐ dia, A.H. Part 10: Paediatric basic and advanced life support: International consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation and  emergency cardiovascular care science with treatment recommendations. Resuscitation 2010, 81, 213–259. DOI: 10.1016/j.resus‐ citation.2010.08.028  14. Atkins, D.L.; Berger, S.; Duff, J.P.; Gonzales, J.C.; Hunt, E.A.; Joyner, B.L.; Maeney, P.A.; Niles, D.E.; Samson, R.A.; Schexnayder,  S.M. Part 11: Pediatric basic life support and cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: 2015 American Heart Association guide‐ lines  update  for  cardiopulmonary  resuscitation  and  emergency  cardiovascular  care.  Circulation,  2015,  132,  S519–S525.  https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000265  15. Biarent, D.; Bingham, R.; Eich, C.; López‐Herce, J.; Maconochie, I.; Rodríguez‐Núnez, A.; Rajka, T.; Zideman, D. European Re‐ suscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2010 Section 6. Paediatric life support. Resuscitation 2010, 81, 1364–1388.  16. Atkins, D.L.; Berger, S. Improving Outcomes from Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Young Children and Adolescents. Pediatr.  Cardiol. 2011, 33, 474–483. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00246‐011‐0084‐8.  17. Bardai, A.; Berdowski, J.; van der Werf, C.; Blom, M.T.; Ceelen, M.; van Langen, I.M.; Tijssen, J.G.; Wilde, A.A.; Koster, R.W.;  Tan, H.L. Incidence, Causes, and Outcomes of Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children A Comprehensive, Prospective, Pop‐ ulation‐Based Study in the Netherlands. J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. 2011, 57, 1822–1828.  18. Udassi, J.P.; Udassi, S.; Theriaque, D.W.; Shuster, J.J.; Zaritsky, A.L.; Haque, I.U. Effect of alternative chest compression tech‐ niques  in  infant  and  child  on  rescuer  performance.  Pediatr.  Crit.  Care  Med.  2009,  10,  328–333.  https://doi.org/10.1097/pcc.0b013e31819886ab.  19. Martin, P.; Theobald, P.; Kemp, A.; Maguire, S.; Maconochie, I.; Jones, M. Real‐time feedback can improve infant manikin car‐ diopulmonary  resuscitation  by  up  to  79%—A  randomised  controlled  trial.  Resuscitation  2013,  84,  1125–1130.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2013.03.029.  20. Kandasamy, J.; Theobald, P.S.; Maconochie, I.K.; Jones, M.D. Can real‐time feedback improve the simulated infant cardiopul‐ monary  resuscitation  performance  of  basic  life  support  and  lay  rescuers?.  Arch.  Dis.  Child.  2019,  104,  793–801.  https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild‐2018‐316576.  21. Lakomek, F.; Lukas, R.‐P.; Brinkrolf, P.; Mennewisch A.; Steinsiek, N.; Gutendorf, P.; Sudowe, H.; Heller, M.; Kwiecien, R.;  Zarbock, A. et al. Erratum: Real‐time feedback improves chest compression quality in out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest: A prospec‐ tive cohort study Plos One, 2020, 15, e0229431. Doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0229431.  22. Abella, B.S.; Edelson, D.P.; Kim, S.; Retzer, E.; Myklebust, H.; Barry, A.M.; O’Hearn, N.; Hoek, T.L.V.; Becker, L.B. CPR quality  improvement during in‐hospital cardiac arrest using a real‐time audiovisual feedback system. Resuscitation 2007, 73, 54–61.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2006.10.027.  23. Lin, Y.; Cheng, A.; Grant, V.J.; Currie, G.R.; Hecker, K.G. Improving CPR quality with distributed practice and real‐time feed‐ back in pediatric healthcare providers—A randomized controlled trial. Resuscitation 2018, 130, 6–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.re‐ suscitation.2018.06.025.  24. Krasteva, V.; Jekova, I.; Didon, J.‐P. An audiovisual feedback device for compression depth, rate and complete chest recoil can  improve  the  CPR  performance  of  lay  persons  during  self‐training  on  a  manikin.  Physiol.  Meas.  2011,  32,  687–699.  https://doi.org/10.1088/0967‐3334/32/6/006.  25. Gregson, R.K.; Cole, T.; Skellett, S.; Bagkeris, E.; Welsby, D.; Peters, M. Randomised crossover trial of rate feedback and force  during  chest  compressions  for  paediatric  cardiopulmonary  resuscitation.  Arch.  Dis.  Child.  2016,  102,  403–409.  https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild‐2016‐310691.  26. Jiang, J.; Zou, Y.; Shi, W.; Zhu, Y.; Tao, R.; Jiang, Y.; Lu, Y.; Tong, J. Two‐thumb–encircling hands technique is more advisable  than 2‐finger technique when lone rescuer performs cardiopulmonary resuscitation on infant manikin. Am. J. Emerg. Med. 2015,  33, 531–534. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2015.01.025.  27. Christman, C.; Hemway, R.J.; Wyckoff, M.H.; Perlman, J.M. The two‐thumb is superior to the two‐finger method for adminis‐ tering chest compressions in a manikin model of neonatal resuscitation. Arch. Dis. Child. Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2010, 96, F99–F101.  https://doi.org/10.1136/adc.2009.180406.  28. Huynh, T.K.; Hemway, R.J.; Perlman, J.M. The Two‐Thumb Technique Using an Elevated Surface is Preferable for Teaching  Infant Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. J. Pediatr. 2012, 161, 658–661. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.03.019.  29. Kleinman, M.E.; De Caen, A.R.; Chameides, L.; Atkins, D.L.; Berg, R.A.; Berg, M.C.; Bhanji, F.; Biarent, D.; Bingham, R.; Coova‐ dia, A.H. Part 10: Pediatric basic and advanced life support: 2010 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation  and  Emergency  Cardiovascular  Care  Science  with  Treatment  Recommendations.  Circulation,  2010,  122,  971093.  https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.971093    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9813  14  of  14  30. Kitamura, T.; Iwami, T.; Kawamura, T.; Nagao, K.; Tanaka, H.; Nadkarni, V.M.; Berg, R.A.; Hiraide, A. Conventional and chest‐ compression‐ only cardiopulmonary resuscitation by bystanders for children who have out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrests: A pro‐ spective, nationwide, populationbased cohort study. Lancet 2010, 375, 1347–1354.  31. López‐Herce, J.; García, C.; Dominguez‐Sampedro, P.; Rodriguez‐Nunez, A.; Carrillo, A.; Calvo, C.; Delgado, M.A.; Spanish  Study Group of Cardiopulmonary Arrest in Children. Outcome of Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiorespiratory Arrest in Children. Pedi‐ atr. Emerg. Care 2005, 21, 807–815. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.pec.0000190230.43104.a8.  32. Udassi, S.; Udassi, J.P.; Lamb, M.A.; Theriaque, D.W.; Shuster, J.J.; Zaritsky, A.L.; Haque, I.U. Two‐thumb technique is superior  to two‐finger technique during lone rescuer infant manikin CPR. Resuscitation 2010, 81, 712–717. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resus‐ citation.2009.12.029.  33. Reynolds, C.; Cox, J.; Livingstone, V.; Dempsey, E.M. Rescuer Exertion and Fatigue Using Two‐Thumb vs. Two‐Finger Method  During  Simulated  Neonatal  Cardiopulmonary  Resuscitation.  Front.  Pediatr.  2020,  8,  133.  https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2020.00133.  34. Millin, M.G.; Bogumil, D.; Fishe, J.N.; Burke, R.V. Comparing the two‐finger versus two‐thumb technique for single person  infant  CPR:  A  systematic  review  and  meta‐analysis.  Resuscitation  2020,  148,  161–172.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscita‐ tion.2019.12.039  35. Martin, P.S.; Kemp, A.M.; Theobald, P.; Maguire, S.A.; Jones, M.D. Do chest compressions during simulated infant CPR comply  with international recommendations?. Arch. Dis. Child. 2012, 98, 576–581. https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild‐2012‐302583. 

Journal

Applied SciencesMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Oct 20, 2021

Keywords: cardiopulmonary resuscitation; SARS-CoV-2; cardiac arrest; chest compression; pandemic; chest compression; manikins; feedback; infant

There are no references for this article.