Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Bio-Compost-Based Integrated Soil Fertility Management Improves Post-harvest Soil Structural and Elemental Quality in a Two-Year Conservation Agriculture Practice

Bio-Compost-Based Integrated Soil Fertility Management Improves Post-harvest Soil Structural and... Article  Bio‐Compost‐Based  Integrated  Soil  Fertility  Management   Improves  Post‐harvest  Soil  Structural  and  Elemental  Quality   in a Two‐Year Conservation Agriculture Practice  1, 1 1 1 Mohammad  Mofizur  Rahman  Jahangir  *,  Shanta  Islam  ,  Tazbeen  Tabara  Nitu  ,  Shihab  Uddin  ,   2 3 4 Abul Kalam Mohammad Ahsan Kabir  , Mohammad Bahadur Meah   and Rafiq Islam      Department of Soil Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh;   shantaislam0821@gmail.com (S.I.); tazbeen127@gmail.com (T.T.N.); shihab43151@bau.edu.bd (S.U.)    Department of Animal Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh;   ahsankabiras@bau.edu.bd    Department of Plant Pathology, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh;  bmeah.ppath@bau.edu.bd    Soil, Water and Bioenergy Resources, The Ohio State University South Centers, Piketon, OH 45661, USA;  islam.27@osu.edu  Citation: Jahangir, M.M.R.; Islam, S.;  *  Correspondence: mmrjahangir@bau.edu.bd  Nitu, T.T.; Uddin, S.; Kabir,  A.K.M.A.; Meah, M.B.; Islam, R.   Abstract: The impacts of integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) in conservation agriculture  Bio‐Compost‐Based Integrated Soil  need short‐term evaluation before continuation of its long‐term practice. A split‐split plot experi‐ Fertility Management Improves  ment with tillage (minimum tillage, MT vs. conventional tillage, CT) as the main plot, residue (20%  Post‐harvest Soil Structural   residue, R vs. no residue as a control, NR) as the sub‐plot, and compost (Trichocompost, LC; bio‐ and Elemental Quality in   slurry, BS; and recommended fertilization, RD) as the sub‐sub plot treatment was conducted for  a Two‐Year Conservation   two consecutive years. Composite soils were collected after harvesting the sixth crop of an annual  Agriculture Practice. Agronomy 2021,  mustard‐rice‐rice rotation to analyze for nutrient distribution and soil structural stability. The LC  11, 2101. https://doi.org/10.3390/  increased rice equivalent yield by 2% over RD and 4% over BS, and nitrogen (N) uptake by 11%  agronomy11112101  over RD and 10% over BS. Likewise, LC had higher soil organic carbon (SOC), N, and available  Academic Editor:   sulphur (S) than BS and RD. Conversion of CT to MT reduced rice equivalent yield by 11%, N up‐ Ambrogio Costanzo  take by 26%, and N‐use efficiency by 28%. Conversely, soil structural stability and elemental quality  was greater in MT than in CT, indicating the potential of MT to sequester C, N, P, and S in soil  Received: 14 September 2021  aggregates. Residue management increased rice yield in the second year by 4% and corresponding  Accepted: 7 October 2021  N uptake by 8%. While MT reduced the yield, our results suggest that ISFM with Trichocompost  Published: 20 October 2021  and residue retention under MT improves soil fertility and physical stability to sustain crop produc‐ tivity.  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neu‐ tral with regard to jurisdictional  Keywords:  conservation  agriculture;  integrated  soil  fertility  management;  trichocompost;  soil   claims in published maps and insti‐ quality; crop yield  tutional affiliations.  1. Introduction  Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Li‐ censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  By 2050, the world’s population is expected to increase by 2.4 billion, placing added  This article  is an open access article  pressure  on agricultural systems  for  food,  fuel, and  fiber  production,  and  challenging  distributed under the terms and con‐ their potential to achieve food security and environmental sustainability [1]. Cultivable  ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ lands all over the world are decreasing due to urbanization, rural settlement, and institu‐ tribution (CC BY) license (http://crea‐ tionalization [2]. Healthy soil is fundamental for sustained agricultural productivity and  tivecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  the maintenance of vital ecosystem processes. However, achieving an increase in agricul‐ tural production, while at the same time improving soil health, is a key research challenge  in response to global climate change effects. Current tillage practices are responsible for  the degradation of air‐soil‐water ecosystems [3,4]. The adverse impact of intensive tillage  Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11112101  www.mdpi.com/journal/agronomy  Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  2 of 17  practices on soil physical quality and organic carbon levels is a major challenge in tropical  rice‐growing regions [5]. Switching to minimum tillage (MT) with crop residue retention  is expected to influence the stoichiometrically linked carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus  (P), and sulphur (S) cycling processes in soil organic matter and decrease reactive N and  P losses to the environment, thus increasing use efficiency [6,7]. However, long‐term till‐ age effects on soil quality are still contradictory and depend on soil, climate, and manage‐ ment practices [8]. Therefore, assessment of short‐term tillage effects, along with other  soil‐crop management, is required to give insights into the long‐term continuation of the  practice. Past research argued that identifying sensitive and consistent indicators of soil  quality will allow early management decisions and quick remedial action [7,9].  Sustainable agriculture must find ways to minimize this nutrient inefficiency while  maintaining, or even increasing, crop productivity and soil quality. Sole or imbalanced  use of chemical fertilizers increases the cost of production, enhances nutrient losses to the  environment, and causes several air and water quality concerns, as well as degrades soil  health [10]. Soil conservation should be considered an important approach for managing  the risks of climate change through adaptation [11,12]. Thus, there is an urgent need to  preserve the soil resource, which is not renewable at the human time scale, and to aim for  its sustainable management. Agricultural soil’s C stock can be managed through appro‐ priate  choices  of  sustainable  agricultural  practices  [12,13],  such  as  the  use  of  organic  amendments, management of crop residues, and the use of soil amendments with organic  fertilizers rather than the sole application of chemical fertilizers [14,15]. Integrated soil  fertility management (ISFM) is one of the critical components to maintain and improve  agroecosystem services in conservation agriculture. The ISFM has attracted the interest of  scientists worldwide with its benefits for increased crop yield and sustainable soil health  [16]. Recently, Trichocompost, produced from Trichoderma sp., has been reported to im‐ prove crop yield by increasing availability of plant nutrients and water to plants through  their enlarged hyphae and by preventing pest infestation [17,18]. Understanding how a  proactive choice of organic amendment, as in the case of ISFM in MT systems, can help  reduce  the  requirements  for  N  application.  Waste  management  has  become  an  ever  greater burden on the world. Waste conversion to valuable composts has become a potent  technology for sustainable waste management [19]. However, bio‐composts preparation  using municipal and animal farm wastes for use in agriculture is more viable, although  these may contain some trace element that can pollute soils [20]. Nonetheless, animal farm  wastes are richer in N and other nutrients, homogenous, and easier to sort for bio‐compost  preparation, but their conversion to bio‐compost and evaluation for trace element con‐ tents and application in agriculture has not been reported. We hypothesize that organic  amendments in MT will enhance soil organic matter accumulation, which in turn will in‐ crease the storage of essential plant nutrients in soils. The specific objectives of the current  research are to: (i) assess the quality of Trichocompost with regard to chemical composi‐ tion and heavy metal contaminations, and (ii) investigate the effect of tillage, residue man‐ agement, and Trichocompost‐based ISFM on crop yield, N uptake and N‐use efficiency,  soil aggregate stability, and nutrient distribution.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Site Description  The experiment was conducted at the Soil Science Field Laboratory at the Bangladesh  Agricultural University, Mymensingh (24°54″ N Latitude, 90°50″ E Longitude, Altitude  18 m above ordnance datum). The mean temperature of the site is 25 °C. The soil was  Brahmaputra alluvium with soil organic C 1.62% and total nitrogen (TN) 0.11% with low  soil‐available P, S, and K and medium Zn content (Table 1). Soil texture is a silt loam in  −3 topsoil with a bulk density of 1.32 g cm . The mean annual rainfall is 2200 mm and hu‐   Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  3 of 17  midity is 79.85%. The site has been used in conventional tillage (CT) systems with an in‐ tensively managed rice‐based ecosystem for around 100 years, resulting in soil nutrient  mining and poor elemental quality.  Table 1. Initial soil properties before commencement of the experiment; n = 3.  Soil Or‐ Total   Available  Cad‐ Exchangeable  Available  Available  Nickel  Lead  Copper  pH  ganic Car‐ Nitrogen Phosphorus  mium  Potassium (K)  Sulphur (S)  Zinc (Zn)  (Ni)  (Pb)  (Cu)  bon (SOC)  (TN)   (P)  (Cd)    (%)  (ppm)  6.45  1.62  0.11  10.44  31.2  2.56  1.10  0.01  0.05  0.50  4.2  2.2. Preparation of Trichocompost  Horse, sheep, and goat dung were collected from the BAU animal farm, then sorted,  ground properly, and mixed at a ratio of 1:1:1 (horse:sheep:goat). Compost preparation  pits (length × width × depth = 92 cm × 50 cm × 88 cm) were previously prepared with  concrete. Trichoderma harzianum CP (IPM‐22) was collected and cultured in acidified po‐ tato dextrose agar (APDA) medium. It was then sub‐cultured on the same medium for  multiplication through incubation at room temperature (25 ± 1 °C). Then Trichoderma sus‐ pension (200 mL; spore density 4.5 × 10  CFU) was prepared from a 7‐day old culture.  Firstly, two‐thirds of the area of each pit was filled by composting materials before Tricho‐ derma suspension was applied. Finally, the pits were filled completely with the compost‐ ing material and mixed thoroughly with Trichoderma suspension. The composting materi‐ als in the compost pits were mixed well at 7‐day intervals and sampled for physical and  chemical quality analysis until the composts became mature in 45 days. The colony of  Trichoderma harzianum was visible like spider nets throughout the compost preparation  period.  2.3. Experimental Design  A split‐split plot experiment was established with two sets of tillage treatments viz.  MT vs. CT; two sets of residue retention treatments (20% of residue by plant height, R and  no residue, control, NR); and three sets of bio‐compost treatments (Trichocompost + rest  of the nutrients from fertilizers, bio‐slurry + rest of the nutrients from chemical fertilizers).  The entire field was replicated into three blocks, with each block being divided into two  main plots of tillage. Each main plot was divided into sub‐plots of residue retention, and  each sub‐plot was divided into three sub‐plots of bio‐composts. Each replicated plot was  10 m long × 5 m wide. The cropping pattern was mustard–rice–rice in an annual sequence  spanning a period of 12 months. In the MT system, light ploughing at 5 cm depth was  performed by one pass of a power tiller. By contrast, in the CT system, 15 cm deep plough‐ ing was performed by four passes of a power tiller. The design of the experiment is pro‐ vided in Supplementary Materials 1.  2.4. Crop Management and Plant and Soil Sampling  The recommended high yielding varieties of mustard (cv. BARI Shorisa14; Brassica  napus), transplanted Boro rice (cv. BRRI dhan28; Oryza sativa L.) and transplanted Aman  rice (cv. BRRI dhan71; Oryza sativa L.) were used as test crops. The recommended dose  −1 (RD) of N, P, K, S, and B were 90, 27, 40, 10, and 1 kg ha  for mustard; 120, 25, 60, 11, and  −1 −1 6 kg ha  for transplanted Boro rice; and 80, 18, 28, 6, and 1 kg ha  for transplanted Aman  rice (Fertilizer Recommendation Guide, 2012), respectively. The N, P, K, S, Zn, and B were  applied as urea, triple superphosphate (TSP), muriate of potash (MoP), gypsum, zinc sul‐ phate (ZnSO4.7H2O), and boric acid, respectively. In Trichocompost (TC) and bio‐slurry  (BS)‐based ISFM treatments, 25% of the nutrients was applied from the compost or bio‐ slurry and rest of the amounts were compensated from chemical fertilizer to fulfil the RD.    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  4 of 17  −1 Trichocompost and bio‐slurry were applied at the rate of 5.85 and 9.10 7 kg plot  for mus‐ −1 −1 tard, 7 and 10 kg plot  for boro rice, and 4.5 and 7 kg plot  for T. Aman rice, respectively.  While the total amount of TSP, MoP, gypsum, ZnSO4, and boric acid was applied during  final land preparation, the urea was applied in three equal splits for rice, and two equal  splits for mustard. For rice, urea was applied at 10, 30, and 50 days after transplanting,  and for wheat it was applied at 15 and 35 days after sowing following light irrigation.  Split application of urea is conventionally practiced for minimizing the loss of N by volat‐ ilization and denitrification, and to make it available to crops at their critical stage, which  enhances N‐use efficiency. All nutrients were compensated considering the nutrient con‐ tent in crop residues and organics following the integrated plant nutrition system ap‐ proach. Each crop was harvested at full maturity at a height leaving 20% residues and  grain yield was estimated. At harvest, crop yield data were collected from a randomly  selected geo‐referenced micro plot (4 m ) in the middle of each replicated plot for all crops.  For those plots that received residues, crops were cut leaving 20% (height basis) residues,  while those plots that received no residues were cut at the ground level. Yield of the resi‐ dues left in the plot were estimated separately and pooled together with the straw yield.  To evaluate the tillage, residue, and ISFM impact on temporal crop yields (deductive soil  quality), the rice equivalent yield (REY) was calculated. The straw yield of rice and grain  yield of mustard were converted to REY, based on the unit market price of straw and  mustard following Equation (1) below [21]:  𝑦𝑖𝑒𝑙𝑑 𝑡 ℎ𝑎 𝑢𝑛𝑖𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑅𝑖𝑐𝑒 𝑛𝑡𝑙𝑒𝑎𝐸𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑣 𝑑𝑌𝑖𝑒𝑙 𝑡 ℎ𝑎   (1) 𝑢𝑛𝑖𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑟𝑖𝑐𝑒 Composite soil samples were collected at 0–15 cm depth from each replicated plot  after harvesting the sixth crop in November 2018. After air drying at 25 °C for around two  weeks, one portion of the soil samples was used for soil aggregate properties and another  portion was used for soil chemical analysis. The representative grain and straw samples  were collected from 4 m  micro plots (five hills from each plot). Straw and grains from  these hills were separated, weighed, and dried in an oven at 65 °C for about 48 hours  before they were ground by a Ball Mill grinder (PM400, Germany). While calculating the  yield,  moisture  content  of  the  grains  was  adjusted  at  14%.  The  ground  samples  were  stored in paper bags in a desiccator until analysis. Rice grain and straw were analysed for  estimating TN content and N uptake per ha.  2.5. Measurement of Soil Aggregate Properties  For soil water stable aggregate analysis, air‐dried soil was broken down into aggre‐ gates, 5 mm sieved, and analysed for aggregate size distribution. Soil aggregate size dis‐ tribution was performed by using the wet sieving method to obtain water‐stable aggre‐ gates [22] using 250 g soil over a sequence of sieves using mesh sizes 2.0, 0.85, 0.30, 0.15,  and 0.053 mm. Soil aggregate fraction retained on each sieve, after being dispersed in wa‐ ter on a planetary shaker at a rate of 31 rpm, was transferred in a nickel cup and oven‐ dried at 65 °C until a constant weight was obtained. Respective mass of each aggregate  size of soil was converted to the relative percentage (over the total mass of aggregates).  Aggregate  mean  weight  diameter  (MWD)  was  determined  using  the  below  equation  [23,24].  i n mi .di i1 MWD  (2) i n mi i1 where mi and di are weight and the mean diameter of aggregate fraction i, respectively.      𝑝𝑟𝑖𝑐𝑒 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑑 𝑝𝑟𝑖𝑐𝑒 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑑 Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  5 of 17  2.6. Analysis of Soil Chemical Properties  Soil  samples  used  for  the  elemental  analysis  were  ground  in  a  ball  mill  grinder  (PM400, Germany) and sieved through a 2 mm sieve. The SOC was determined using the  chromic‐sulfuric acid oxidation method [25], and TN determined using the semi‐micro  Kjeldahl method [26]. Soil‐available P was determined by the Olsen method [27]. Availa‐ ble S was measured by colorimetric method [28]. The TN in grain and straw was deter‐ mined by semi‐micro Kjeldahl method [26]. In brief, 0.1 g of oven‐dried ground sample  (grain and  straw separately)  was taken  in a  digestion  flask and 1.1 g  catalyst mixture  (K2SO4:CuSO4.5H2O:Se = 100:10:1) and 3 mL 30% H2O2 and 5 mL H2SO4 were added to it.  The flask was swirled and allowed to stand for around 10 min. After cooling, the content  was taken in a 100 mL volumetric flask and the volume was filled to the mark with dis‐ tilled water and titrated with 0.01 N H2SO4.  Total concentration of heavy metals: cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), and  lead (Pb) in the final product of the Trichocompost was determined after six weeks of  composting using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Hitachi ZA3000). Bio‐slurry  compost was collected from a biogas plant as a solid residue left after biogas production.  Compost maturity was tested using standard laboratory methods e.g., C mineralization  pattern and germination index. It appeared that the composts became mature after six  weeks of composting.  2.7. Calculation of Plant Nutrient Uptake and Use Efficiency  Nitrogen uptake by rice plant was calculated by multiplying the N concentrations in  grain and straw by the total mass of grain and straw per ha [29]. Nitrogen use efficiency  (NUE), an indicator for the utilization of N in agriculture and food systems, was calculated  using Equation (3) below given by EUNEP [30].  𝑁 𝑖𝑛 ℎ𝑎𝑟𝑣𝑒𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑑 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑑𝑢𝑐𝑡𝑠 𝑘𝑔 ℎ𝑎 100   (3) 𝑁 𝑖𝑛𝑝𝑢𝑡 𝑘𝑔 ℎ𝑎 2.8. Statistical Analysis  A three‐way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed using tillage, residue,  and fertilizers as fixed variables and block as a random variable. The distribution of data  for normality was checked before ANOVA. Data were statistically analysed to ascertain  the  significant  differences in  the  main plot,  and  interactions  among  main  and  subplot  treatments at p < 0.05, unless otherwise mentioned. Pairwise comparisons were under‐ taken by Tukey’s HSD post‐hoc test. All the statistical analyses were performed on SPSS  Version  20  (IBM  SPSS  Statistics  for  Windows,  Version  20.0.  Armonk,  NY,  USA:  IBM  Corp.).  3. Results  3.1. Quality of the Prepared Trichocompost  The growth and development of Trichoderma harzianum in the compost were ensured  as the colony of the fungi was visible throughout the composting period and in the pre‐ pared compost. Organic carbon contents in the Trichocompost were comparatively higher  (approximately 28.11%) while that of the TN was low (1.50%), exhibiting a C:N of 18.8:1.0  −1 (Table 2). The available P and S of the prepared compost were 158.4 and 80.2 mg kg soil   −1 and exchangeable K was 45 meq. 100 g soil . The pH of the compost was alkaline (>7.0).  Before composting, the concentrations of heavy metals were in the order of zinc (Zn) >  lead (Pb) > nickel (Ni) > copper (Cu) > cadmium (Cd) (Figure 1). After seven weeks of  composting, Zn and Pb concentrations increased by 35 and 4%, respectively, over the ini‐ tial concentrations while the Cd, Ni and Cu concentrations decreased by 10%, 88%, and  38%, respectively. The heavy metal contents in soil after two years of cropping with Trich‐ ocompost along with their threshold values are presented in Table 3. Heavy metal content  𝑁𝑈𝐸 𝑜𝑢𝑡𝑝𝑢𝑡 Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  6 of 17  in soil before the commencement of the experiment and after two years of cropping with  Trichocompost was alike, except a slight increase in Zn. However, all heavy metal con‐ tents in soils were much less than the threshold values, indicating no sign of concerns for  heavy metal accumulation through Trichocompost. In addition, the soil was deficient in  Zn, which requires application of Zn fertilizer (i.e., ZnSO4.7H2O or ZnO). The increment  of Zn will help reduce its deficiency in the soil.  Table 2. Chemical properties of the prepared Trichocompost and bio‐slurry; n = 3.  Moisture  Avail. P  Avail. S  Exch. K  Organic   Organics  pH  Total N (%)  C/N Ratio  (%)  (ppm)  (ppm)  (meq./100g)  Matter (%)  LC  7.7 ± 0.02  14.2 ± 1.04  158.4 ± 13.0  80.2 ± 6.1  45 ± 8.4  48.9 ± 0.2  1.5 ± 0.1  18.8 ± 2.0  BS  6.8 ± 0.02  30.0 ± 3.0  60.6 ± 12.0  28.0 ± 4.2  30.4 ± 5.3  18.3 ± 3.2  1.0 ± 0.0  11.0 ± 2.3  i.e., LC = Trichocompost, and BS = Bio‐slurry.  3.5 Before composting 3.0 Seven wk. after composting 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 Cd Ni Cu Zn Pb Figure 1. Heavy metal concentrations in Trichocompost.  Table 3. Heavy metal contents in soils after two years of cropping with Trichoderma bio‐compost; the threshold values  for heavy metal contents in organic amendments in Bangladesh are given in parentheses.  Cr  Cd  Pb  Ni  Zn  Cu  (ppm)  <MDL (18.28)  0.01 (0.18)  0.50 (22.50)  0.05 (24.44)  1.51 (400)  3.91 (160)  i.e., MDL = method detection limit.  3.2. Management Impacts on System Productivity  In both 2017 and 2018, the rice equivalent yield (REY) was 11.3 and 11.4% higher in  CT than that in MT (p < 0.01) (Figure 2), respectively. Crop residue retention had signifi‐ cantly higher REY in plots under residue than no residue (p < 0.05) in 2018 (approximately  4% higher in R over the NR), but not in 2017 (p > 0.05). Equally, Trichocompost increased  the REY only in 2018, being 2% and 4% higher than in BS and RD, where the later two  were alike. There were no significant interaction effects of tillage, residue, and ISFM treat‐ ments.  Heavy metal conc. (ppm) Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  7 of 17  MT b Lsd: MT a Lsd: Till=1.77; Res=0.27; ISFM=0.55 CT Till=1.70; Res=0.74; ISFM=0.71 CT 8 8 4 4 0 0 RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No Residue Residue No Residue Figure 2. Management impacts on rice equivalent yield (REY) for two consecutive years (a) 2017  and (b) 2018.  3.3. Management Impacts on N Uptake and Use Efficiency in Transplanted Aman Rice (6th  Crop)  Grain N content was significantly higher in CT than in MT (p < 0.05) (Figure 3), ac‐ counting for 14% higher TN content in CT than in MT. Likewise, the grain N content was  significantly higher in the plots under residue than those with no residue (approximately  5% higher in R over the NR). The ISFM significantly influenced rice grain N content (p <  0.01) (approximately 1.57%, 1.57%, and 1.50%, respectively, in BS, LC, and RD). Grain N  content was 5% higher in LC and BS than in RD, where the former two were alike (Figure  3).  Lsd: MT Till=0.29; Res= 0.15; ISFM=0.11 CT 2.0 1.6 1.2 0.8 0.4 0.0 RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No-residue Figure 3. Management effect on grain total nitrogen (TN) content.  There was a significant influence of tillage and ISFM on N uptake and NUE by rice  (Figure 4a). Nitrogen uptake by rice paddy was significantly higher in CT than in MT (p <  0.01) (approximately 25% in CT over the MT). Concerning crop residue retention, grain N  uptake was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in residue‐treated plots than those with no resi‐ due (approximately 8% higher in R than in NR). Similarly, the ISFM did affect rice N up‐ take significantly (p < 0.05), being higher in LC by 11 and 10% than in BS and RD, respec‐ tively, where the latter two were similar to each other. Nitrogen‐use efficiency was higher  in CT than in MT (p < 0.01) by 36%. In contrast, NUE was similar in R to NR (p > 0.05)  -1 Rice Equivalent Yield (t ha ) Grain TN (%) -1 Rice Equivalent Yield (t ha ) Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  8 of 17  (Figure 4b). The LC had significantly higher NUE by 6% over BS and 7% over RD, where  BS and RD were alike. The mean values were 49.5, 52.5, and 49.0% in RD, LC, and BS,  respectively (Figure 4b).  b Lsd: MT a Lsd: MT Till=12 ; Res=18 ; ISFM =10 Till=2.42; Res=4.42; ISFM=2.14 200 CT CT 160 60 0 0 RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No-residue Residue No-residue Figure 4. Management impacts on N uptake and N‐use efficiency (NUE) for two consecutive  years (a) 2017 and (b) 2018.  3.4. Management Impacts on Soil Aggregate Mean Weight Diameter (MWD)  Soil aggregate MWD was significantly influenced by tillage (p < 0.05), ISFM (p < 0.05),  and crop residue retention (p < 0.05). Aggregate MWD was higher in MT by 11% than in  CT (Figure 5). The MWD, irrespective of crop residue retention, was 1.03, 1.10, and 1.14  mm in MT and 0.95, 1.04, and 1.08 mm in CT in RD, BS, and LC, respectively. The LC and  BS had higher MWD than the RD, where the former two were similar to each other. Con‐ sidering crop residue retention, MWD was higher in R plots by 19% than in NR plots. The  MWD, irrespective of ISFM, was 0.99 and 1.19 mm in MT and 0.94 and 1.11 mm in CT in  NR and R, respectively. The interaction effects of tillage, residues, and ISFM were non‐ significant.  Lsd: MT Till=0.08; Res=0.07; ISFM=0.09 1.4 CT 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No Residue Figure 5. Post‐harvest soil aggregate mean weight diameter (MWD) after two consecutive years of  integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) with crop residue and tillage practices.  -1 N uptake (kg ha ) Aggregate MWD (mm) N use efficiency (%) Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  9 of 17  3.5. Management Impacts on Post‐Harvest Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) and Total Nitrogen (TN)  Contents  The SOC content was significantly influenced by tillage (p < 0.01) and ISFM (p < 0.05),  but the effect was non‐significant (p > 0.05) for crop residue retention. The SOC was sig‐ nificantly higher in MT than in CT by 15% (p < 0.01) (Figure 6a). The ISFM significantly  influenced SOC contents (p < 0.05), showing the mean values of 1.97%, 2.04%, and 1.88%,  respectively, in BS, LC, and RD. The LC and BS had higher SOC by 9% and 5% than in  RD, where the former two were similar to each other. Soil TN content was significantly  influenced by ISFM (p < 0.05), but no significant influences were observed by tillage and  crop residue retention (Figure 6b). The TN was lower in RD (p < 0.05) by 12% and 6% than  in LC and BS, respectively, where LC and BS were similar to each other (p > 0.05). The  interaction effects of tillage, residue, and ISFM were non‐significant.  MT MT b Lsd: a Lsd: Till=0.016; Res=0.017; ISFM=0.010 CT 0.25 Till=0.13; Res=0.22 ; ISFM=0.18 CT 2.5 0.20 2.0 0.15 1.5 0.10 1.0 0.05 0.5 0.00 0.0 RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No-residue Residue No-residue Figure 6. Post‐harvest soil organic carbon (SOC) and TN contents after two consecutive years (a) 2017 and (b) 2018 of ISFM  with crop residue and tillage practices management impacts on post‐harvest soil.  3.6. Management Impacts on Post‐Harvest Soil‐Available P and S  Tillage and residue retention had significant influences on post‐harvest soil‐available  P (Figure 7a), showing 30% and 26% higher available P in MT (p < 0.05) and R (p < 0.05)  over the CT and NR, respectively (Figure 7a). The available P was similar in all ISFM  treatments (p > 0.05). Soil‐available S content was significantly higher in MT by 23% than  in CT (p < 0.05) (Figure 7b). However, available S in soils with residue (R) was similar to  that in NR (p > 0.05). Conversely, ISFM significantly influenced soil‐available S content,  where the RD had significantly lower available S than BS and LC (p < 0.05), where the  latter two were also significantly different (p < 0.05). Available S was higher in LC and BS  by 42% and 18%, respectively, over the RD, where the BS had higher available P by 16%  over the RD. No significant interaction effects were observed between tillage, residues,  and ISFM.  SOC (%) Soil TN (%) Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  10 of 17  MT MT a             Lsd: b    Lsd: 4.0 CT CT Till=4.72; Res=3.05; ISFM=5.54 Till=0.69; Res=0.62; ISFM=0.43 3.0 2.0 1.0 0 0.0 RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No-residue Residue No-residue Figure 7. Post‐harvest soil available P and S contents after two consecutive years (a) 2017 and (b) 2018 of ISFM with crop  residue and tillage practices management impacts on post‐harvest soil.  4. Discussion  4.1. Quality of Trichocompost  The Trichocompost was of good quality with regard to pH, moisture, SOM, and C:N  ratio. It was rich in available P and S (Table 2). A C:N ratio <25 indicates the state of com‐ posting, which helps increase mineral nutrient availability in soils for plant, while the C:N  ratio >25 indicates the immobilization of mineral nutrients, resulting in unavailability for  plants [31]. Heavy metals content in the Trichocompost was lower than in the mixture of  the composting materials. On the contrary, Zn content increased in the Trichocompost,  which will help increase Zn uptake by crops, especially in the Zn‐deficient soils [32]. The  decrease in Ni, Cd, and Cu concentration might have been caused by microbial assimila‐ tion in Trichoderma and other microbes or fixed with organic fractions. The rise in the Zn  concentration in compost may be attributable to solubilization of the insoluble forms of  Zn in the manures. However, the increase in Zn concentration will add high value to the  compost for amending rice paddy soils that are Zn deficient. Overall, Trichoderma sp. is a  quick decomposer and, upon its inoculation into composting materials, it enhances the  composting process [18]. When applied in soil, Matin et al. [18] also found that it increases  soil organic matter decomposition, resists pest infestation, and promotes plant growth.  4.2. Effect of Management Practices on the System Productivity  Significantly lower REY in the early stage of adoption of MT is not surprising because  our results were in agreement with past research [33], where the authors also reported  lower  crop  yield  in  MT  than  in  CT.  Similarly,  Alam  et  al.  [34]  and  Arvidsson  and  Håkansson [35] found significantly higher yield in deep tillage than in NT (no tillage) or  MT. In contrast to our results, Memon et al. [14] found higher grain yield in MT than in  CT in the rice‐wheat cropping systems of eastern China. This variation in the effects of  MT or CT on crop yields can also vary due to soil and climatic variations. However, long‐ term practices with reduced and CT tillage [36] showed opposite results to our short‐term  finding, suggesting that MT, over the long term, increases crop yield. Nandan et al. [37]  found higher crop yield under reduced or NT systems over the CT after six years of adop‐ tion of conservation tillage. NT or MT can increase rice yield over a continuous application  for around four to six years [15]; or six to seven years [38]. These findings were in agree‐ ment with Jahangir et al. [39], who stated that adoption of MT gives lower yield in the first  Available P (ppm) Available S (ppm) Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  11 of 17  few years (3–4) and then the yield turns opposite in later years if it is continued. This might  be due to the build‐up of organic matter in the MT practice that occurred with the progress  of cropping cycles [34].  Our results of crop residue retention on crop yield in a consecutive mustard‐rice‐rice  system, being similar in R to NR in the first year (2017), are opposite to many past research  reports. However, in the second year of continuation with the same cropping system, REY  was higher in R than in NR. This can be attributed to the required time lag to build up soil  physical and chemical quality for improving the crop yield. Hossain et al. [40] reported  residue yielded higher grain yield compared to no residue. Residue converts into miner‐ alized nutrients that cause sufficient crop growth and facilitate higher yield than no resi‐ due [41–43]. Increased rice yield by ISFM over the sole application of chemical fertilizer is  in agreement with other researches [44,45]. It is assumed that, compared to inorganic fer‐ tilizer, organic manure releases nutrients slowly and plants receive a steady supply of  nutrients with reduced N loss, which has a positive reflection on crop yield. However,  mineralization of livestock manures was found slower, releasing 25–42% more N than the  control over 90 days of incubation, resulting in slow N fertilization effects [46]. The slower  mineralization can be attributable to the equal REY in R and NR in the first year in our  study. However, slow mineralization can provide residual effects in the following year,  which was evident in our study. Roobroeck et al. [16] reported that ISFM can significantly  enhance the crop productivity and profitability of farmers. Bilkis et al. [17] reported that  integrated application of Trichocompost and cow dung bio‐slurry in rice field increases  rice yield, where Trichocompost was found to be more effective than the bio‐slurry. The  better performance of LC may be due to higher nutrient contents, including Zn, enlarging  soil volume for nutrient and water uptake by fungal hyphae, reducing pest infestation  [18], and functioning as a plant growth promoter [47]. In a rice paddy system, soils are  commonly identified as Zn deficient, resulting from fixation of Zn with other minerals,  which may have caused a better response to the added Zn with the LC.  4.3. Effect of Management Practices on N Uptake and Use Efficiency  Low NUE in our study is in agreement with other past research. In intensive agricul‐ tural production systems, more than 50% and up to 75% of the N applied to the field is  not used by the plant [48,49]. Low NUE in MT agrees with Yang et al. [50] who, in a 2‐ year experiment in China, found that NUE is comparatively lower under a no tillage field.  By contrast, Liu et al. [10], in a two‐year field study in China, observed no differences in  NUE between no‐tillage and conventional tillage systems. The variation in NUE may be  due to the variations in N mineralization in two tillage systems, resulting in the N release  and uptake by crops.  Similarly,  N  uptake  was  increased  in  R,  while  the  NUE  was  equal  in  R  and  NR.  Agegnehu et al. [51] found that the trend of plant N uptake increases in relation to organic  amendments and N levels are similar to the increments in the plant growth, yield, and soil  nutrient status. After conducting a 7‐year experiment, Takahashi et al. [52] suggested that  continuous application of rice straw contributes to the improvement of soil fertility and  the  promotion  of  growth  and  N  uptake  of  paddy  and  upland  crops.  Conversely,  Phongpan and Mosier [53], in a 1‐year experiment in Thailand, observed no difference in  N uptake between rice residue retention and no residue retention, which is in opposition  to our results. The authors also found no differences in NUE between residue retention  and no retention, which agrees with our findings.  The LC increased the NUE over the RD and BS by enhancing the N uptake in grain  and straw, while the yield was also higher in LC. Higher N uptake in LC‐treated soils  might have happened due to accumulation of N and other nutrients in soils from the  chronic bio‐compost application in six consecutive seasons that improved soil biological  and physic‐chemical conditions, which favored N release from LC‐treated soils at a faster  rate. Tillage systems with application of different organic and inorganic N sources may  enhance the mineralization rates of organic residues and release more nutrients, resulting    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  12 of 17  in greater N uptake. Similar to our results, Hu et al. [45], from a 35‐year study of organic  alone or integrated organic and inorganic fertilization, concluded that N uptake in the  manure  combined  with  mineral  fertilizer  treatments  were  higher  than  that  in  manure  alone or mineral fertilizer alone. They also found that use of manures alone, or with inor‐ ganic fertilizer, increases NUE in rice systems, which agrees with our results. However,  comparing our short‐term effects with their long‐term reports, it can be suggested that  continuation  with  ISFM  will  increase  NUE  in  intensively  managed  rice  ecosystems.  Equally, Liu et al. [10] found that combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizers  significantly increases NUE in rice‐based cropping systems.  4.4. Effect of Management Practices on Soil Aggregate MWD  The MWD is an important physical indicator of soil aggregate stability [54], reflecting  the proportion of macroaggregates to the total aggregates [55]. In our study, aggregate  MWD was higher in MT than in CT, indicating that rice soil under CT reduces aggregate  formation and enhances dispersion of larger aggregates. For rice cultivation, continuous  puddling operations increase slaking of soil aggregates and cause their breakdown into  microaggregates and primary soil particles [4,15,56]. Relatively improved soil aggregate  formation in the MT agrees with the results of other studies [57,58]. Physical disturbance  associated with CT results in a direct breakdown, slaking and an increased turnover of  aggregates, especially macroaggregates [59] and fragments of roots and mycorrhizal hy‐ phae, which are major binding agents for macroaggregate formation [60]. Frequent tillage  deteriorates soil structure and weakens soil aggregates, causing them to be dispersed [24].  In contrast, the MT reduces soil physical disturbance as well as reduces SOM decomposi‐ tion  rates  by  reducing  its  exposure  to  O2  and  sunlight.  Moreover,  the  MT  helps  form  macroaggregates by complexing microaggregates and primary soil particles with humi‐ fied SOC compounds, fungal hyphae, and plant roots [61].  A  significant  impact  of  crop  residue  retention  on  soil  aggregate  properties  might  have been due to the increased SOC, TN, and microbial biomass that contribute to im‐ proved soil aggregate formation, which is in agreement with past research [62]. The C:N  ratio of the residues determines their decomposition and subsequent utilization by mi‐ crobes to influence soil aggregate properties [63,64]. The high C:N ratio of rice straw (C:N  = 80) has lower mineralization rates, which can enhance soil aggregation due to its longer  persistence in soil as a particulate organic matter. Residue quality (such as C:N) alters the  rate of decomposition of the residue and, therefore, influences soil aggregation [65].  Improvements in aggregate MWD following additional organic amendments have  already been reported [66]. Application of organic manures improves soil aggregation by  increasing the organic matter content in soils, which functions as a binding agent for soil  aggregate formation and reduces slaking of macroaggregates. Application of organic fer‐ tilizer often increases SOC content [67] and the proportion of macroaggregates [68]. Also,  organic amendments may indirectly affect aggregate MWD by increasing above and be‐ lowground crop biomass and biological activity. Guo et al. [69] reported that soil aggre‐ gate MWD, which was strongly correlated with various fractions of SOC, significantly  increased with manure application. Mikha et al. [70] pointed out that manure application  promoted the formation of macroaggregates and increased aggregate MWD. Trichocom‐ post is a fungi‐bearing bio‐compost that can enhance soil aggregate formation by accu‐ mulating soil particles with fungal hyphae, especially in MT with crop residues.  4.5. Effect of Management Practices on Post‐Harvest OC and TN Contents in Soils  Numerous past authors have shown experimental evidence of higher SOC and TN  [37,71] in MT than in CT. These findings are in line with our short‐ term study, indicating  the potential of MT for enhancing SOC and TN. Conservation tillage is becoming an eco‐ nomical and ecologically viable option for conserving energy and providing favorable soil  conditions for sustainable crop production, SOC sequestration, and efficient N fertilizer    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  13 of 17  use [72]. Tian et al. [73] found 29% and 91% higher SOC in NT than in CT and RT, respec‐ tively. Adoption of some form of conservation tillage is generally beneficial for increasing  SOC levels and sequestering C in the topsoil [34]. In the case of CT, the organic source  may be easily subjective to oxidization, and microbes quickly consume the mineralized N  for their structure formation, which may be the reason behind the decrease of TN in CT  in post‐harvest soils. To the contrary, nitrification can be inhibited in MT under field con‐ ditions because of accumulation of organic matter and nutrients, such as N, at or near the  soil surface that may restrict N mineralization. In addition, lack of soil disturbance due to  factors such as no‐tillage systems helps to minimize organic matter loss and increase SOC  and N stocks over the years [74]. It occurs because under a no tillage system, crop residue  is made available to soil microorganisms at a slower rate for a longer duration and the soil  is in a less oxidative condition [75]. No differences in the post‐harvest soil C and N con‐ tents in soil after two consecutive years of residue management agree with other previous  authors [76]. This may be attributable to faster mineralization of rice residues, or a mixture  of rice residues with maize or wheat [76]. Datta et al. [76] also found higher decomposition  rates of rice residue when placed on the soil surface rather than incorporated into the soils.  In our study, the effect was similar in both tillage systems because the climatic condition  in our subtropical environment might have minimized the effect of partial or full incor‐ poration into the soils. However, continuation of residue management in rice‐based sys‐ tems enhances C sequestration after 4 or 6 years [15], and after 12 years [52]. In our study,  the ISFM with LC and BS were like the RD for SOC content. The combined application of  manures with inorganic fertilizers on SOC yielded similar results in our study to those  found by other authors [77]. However, the ISFM can enhance SOC content if it is continued  for several years. Zhao et al. [78], from a 4‐year experiment, suggested that supplementa‐ tion with compost strengthened the process of mutual promotion between carbon cycle  enzymes and macroaggregates, which would eventually be beneficial to SOC sequestra‐ tion. Bilkis et al. [17] reported that integrated application of Trichocompost in a rice field  increases SOC and N after a 2‐year cycle. Trichocompost is a rapid decomposer of SOM,  which can rapidly release C and N in soils and accumulate within soil aggregates.  4.6. Effect of Management Practices on Post‐Harvest Soil‐Available P and S Contents  No‐till reduces losses of phosphorus in runoff and the loss of nitrate through leach‐ ing, allowing accumulation in soils [79]. Equally, Asenso et al. [80] found higher available  P, S, and exchangeable K content in soils under NT and MT than the soils under deep  tillage,  probably  due  to  high  SOC  level  and  surface  application  of  mineral  fertilizers.  These results are in agreement with the findings of our research. From a 4‐year tillage  experiment, Alam et al. [34] found that MT and zero tillage significantly increased soil’s  available S, which is in line with the current research. Available S content in our soils were  comparatively low, which can be attributed to soil conditions while sampling after har‐ vesting of Aman rice when the soil was comparatively wet, which can cause soil available  S to be reduced. Bilkis et al. [17] from a study of 2 consecutive years of the integrated  application of Trichocompost, vermicompost, and bio‐slurry found that the integrated ap‐ plication of composts and inorganic fertilizers improves soil P and S content where Trich‐ ocompost showed the best performance. This is attributable to higher S‐containing or‐ ganic compounds in LC and BS, or mineralization of the S pools, which are more mobile  [81] and result in a higher amount of residual S than P. In addition, P can be fixed with  various soil minerals [82] and organic fractions (organo‐P chelation), which minimized  the effect of ISFM on the residual P content in soils. Along with the physical and chemical  properties, soil microbial composition and activities should be evaluated to investigate  the effects of composts and other organic materials on soil health. As the current research  had no scope to present microbial data, we recommend future research on microbial dy‐ namics that justifies composts effects on soil health [83] for sustainable food security and  soil fertility.    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  14 of 17  5. Conclusions  Short‐term evaluation of conservation agriculture with ISFM indicates that it is likely  to be a good practice for the sustenance of soil fertility. Minimum soil disturbance in min‐ imum tillage with crop residue improved soil aggregate properties and stored more C, N,  P, and S. Conventional tillage had higher rice equivalent yield, grain N contents, and up‐ take showing higher potential to supply more available N through mineralization. Corre‐ spondingly, the N‐use efficiency was also higher in conventional tillage because of higher  N uptake and accumulation in grain. Trichocompost and bio‐slurry have increased N up‐ take in rice when compared with the recommended fertilizer. The Trichoderma bio‐com‐ post indicated higher potential for increased crop production, as well as to improve soil  health; there was no threat to accumulate heavy metals in soils. The findings are based on  short‐term results, but it is important to evaluate medium and long‐term effects on soil  structural and elemental quality and crop yields.  Supplementary  Materials:  The  following  are  available  online  at  www.mdpi.com/2073‐ 4395/11/11/2101/s1, Supplementary Materials 1. Layout of the experimental plots.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, M.M.R.J., S.I., A.K.M.A.K. and M.B.M.; methodology,  M.M.R.J., and S.I.; software, S.I., T.T.N. and S.U.; validation, M.M.R.J., S.I., M.B.M. and A.K.M.A.K.;  formal analysis, M.M.R.J., S.I., T.T.N. and S.U.; investigation, M.M.R.J., S.I., A.K.M.A.K. and M.B.M.;  resources, M.M.R.J., and S.I.; data curation, M.M.R.J., S.I., and S.U.; writing—original draft prepa‐ ration,  M.M.R.J.,  S.I.,  and  T.T.N.;  writing—review  and  editing,  M.M.R.J.,  S.I.,  T.T.N.,  S.U.,  A.K.M.A.K.,  M.B.M.  and  R.I.;  visualization,  M.M.R.J.,  S.I.,  S.U.  and  R.I.;  supervision,  M.M.R.J.,  A.K.M.A.K. and M.B.M.; project administration, M.M.R.J.; funding acquisition, M.M.R.J., M.B.M.  and A.K.M.A.K. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: The research was funded by the Bangladesh Agricultural University Research Systems in  association with University Grants Commission Bangladesh (grant # 2017/261/BAU).  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable.  Informed Consent Statement:  Not applicable.  Data Availability Statement: The data that support this study will be shared upon reasonable re‐ quest to the corresponding author.  Acknowledgments: Thanks to Abdulla Al Mamun in the Department of Soil Science for his coop‐ eration during field and lab work. We would like to thank Bradford Sherman at The Ohio State  University for his contribution to review and edit the manuscript.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.  References  1. Delgado, J.A.; Groffman, P.M.; Nearing, M.A.; Goddard, T.; Reicosky, D.; Lal, R.; Kitchen, N.R.; Rice, C.W.; Towery, D.; Salon,  P. Conservation practices to mitigate and adapt to climate change. J. Soil Water Conserv. 2011, 66, 118–129.  2. Hasan, M.N.; Hossain, M.S.; Bari, M.A.; Islam, M.R. Agricultural Land Availability in Bangladesh; SRDI: Dhaka, Bangladesh, 2013;  p. 42.  3. Lal, R. Tillage effects on soil degradation, soil resilience, soil quality, and sustainability. Soil Till. Res. 1993, 27, 1–8.  4. Jahangir, M.M.R.; Jahiruddin, M.; Akter, H.; Pervin, R.; Islam, K.R. Cropping diversity with rice influences soil aggregate for‐ mation and nutrient storage under different tillage systems. J. Plant. Nutr. Soil Sci. 2021, 184, 150–162.  5. Chauhan, B.S.; Mahajan, G.; Sardana, V.; Timsina, J.; Jat, M.L. Productivity and sustainability of the rice–wheat cropping system  in the Indo–Gangetic Plains of the Indian subcontinent: Problems, opportunities, and strategies. Advan. Agron. 2012, 117, 315– 369.  6. Lal, R. Sequestering carbon and increasing productivity by conservation agriculture. J. Soil Water Conserv. 2015, 70, 56–62.  7. Martínez, J.M.; Galantini, J.A.; Duval, M.E.; López, F.M. Soil quality assessment based on soil organic matter pools under long‐ term tillage systems and following tillage conversion in a semi humid region. Soil Use Manage. 2020, 36, 400–409.  8. Huang, M.; Zhuo, X.; Cao, F.; Xia, B.; Zou, Y. No‐tillage effect on rice yield in China: A meta‐analysis. Field Crops. Res. 2015, 183,  126–137.  9. Awale, R.; Emeson, M.A.; Machado, S. Soil organic carbon pools as early indicators for soil organic matter stock changes under  different tillage practices in inland Pacific Northwest. Front. Ecol. Evol. 2017, 5, 96.    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  15 of 17  10. Liu, T.; Huang, J.; Chai, K.; Cao, C.; Li, C. Effects of N fertilizer sources and tillage practices on NH3 volatilization, grain yield,  and N use efficiency of rice fields in central China. Front. Plant Sci. 2018, 9, 385.  11. IPCC. Climate Change: Synthesis Report; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: Geneva, Switzerland, 2014.  12. Dey, A.; Dwivedi, B.S.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Datta, S.P.; Meena, M.C.; Jat, R.K.; Gupta, R.K.; Jat, M.L.; Singh, V.K.; Das, D.; et al.  Effect of conservation agriculture on soil organic and inorganic carbon sequestration, and their lability: A study from a rice– wheat cropping system on a calcareous soil of eastern Indo‐Gangetic Plains. Soil Use Manage. 2018, 36, 429–438.  13. Young, M.D.; Ros, G.H.; de Vries, W. A decision support framework assessing management impacts on crop yield, soil carbon  changes and nitrogen losses to the environment. Eur. J. Soil Sci. 2021, 72, 1590–1606.  14. Memon, M.S.; Guo, J.; Tagar, A.A.; Perveen, N.; Ji, C.; Memon, S.A.; Memon, N. The effects of tillage and straw incorporation  on soil organic carbon status, rice crop productivity, and sustainability in the rice‐wheat cropping system of Eastern China.  Sustainability 2018, 10, 961.  15. Jat, H.S.; Datta, A.; Choudhary, M.; Yadav, A.K.; Choudhary, V.; Sharma, P.C.; Gathala, M.K.; Jat, M.L.; McDonald, A. Effects  of tillage, crop establishment and diversification on soil organic carbon, aggregation, aggregate associated carbon and produc‐ tivity in cereal systems of semi‐arid Northwest India. Soil Till. Res. 2019, 190, 128–138.  16. Roobroeck, D.; Van Asten, P.J.A.; Jama, B.; Harawa, R.; Vanlauwe, B. Integrated Soil Fertility Management: Contributions of  framework and practices to Climate‐Smart Agriculture. In PRACTICE BRIEF Climate‐Smart Agriculture; CGIAR Research Pro‐ gram  on  Climate  Change,  Agriculture  and  Food  Security  (CCAFS):  Copenhagen,  Denmark,  2015.  Available  online:  https://hdl.handle.net/10568/69018 (accessed on 15 December 2020).  17. Bilkis, S.; Islam, M.R.; Jahiruddin, M.; Rahman, M.M. Integrated use of manure and fertilizers increases rice yield, nutrient  uptake and soil fertility in the Boro‐fallow‐T. Aman rice cropping pattern. SAARC J. Agric. 2017, 15, 147–161.  18. Matin, M.A.; Islam, M.N.; Muhammad, N.; Islam, M.R. Impact of Trichoderma enhanced composting technology on farmers’  livelihoods in Bangladesh. Int. J. Plant. Soil Sci. 2018, 25, 1–14.  19. Singh, D.P.; Prabha, R.; Renu, S.; Sahu, P.K.; Singh, V. Agrowaste bioconversion and microbial fortification have prospects for  soil health, crop productivity, and eco‐enterprising. Int. J. Recycl. Org. Waste Agric. 2019, 8, 457–472.  20. Fels, L.E.; Hayany, B.E.; Aguelmous, A.; Boutafda, A.; Zegzouti, Y.; Ghizlen, E.; Kouisni, L.; Hafidi, M. The Use of Microorgan‐ isms for the Biodegradation of Sewage Sludge and the Production of Bio‐compost for Sustainable Agriculture. In Biofertilizers  for Sustainable Agriculture and Environment; Giri, B., Prasad, R., Wu, Q.S., Varma, A., Eds.; Springer: Cham, Switzerland; New  York, NY, USA, 2019; pp. 301–316.  21. Islam,  M.R.;  Talukder,  M.M.H.;  Hoque,  M.A.;  Uddin,  S.;  Hoque,  T.S.;  Rea,  R.S.;  Kasim,  S.  Lime  and  Manure  Amendment  Improve Crop Yield and Soil Quality in Acidic Terrace Soil. Agriculture 2021, 22, under review.  22. De  Leenheer,  L.;  De  Boodt,  M.  Determination  of  aggregate  stability  by  change  in  mean  weight  diameter.  Meded.  Lundbouwhogeschool Gent 1967, 24, 290–300.  23. Van Bavel, C.H.M. Mean Weight‐Diameter of Soil Aggregates as a Statistical Index of Aggregation. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 1950, 14,  20–23.  24. Zheng, H.; Liu, W.; Zheng, J.; Luo, Y.; Li, R.; Wang, H. Effect of long‐term tillage on soil aggregates and aggregate‐associated  carbon in black soil of Northeast China. PLoS ONE 2018, 13, e0199523.  25. Walkley, A. A critical examination of a rapid method for determining organic carbon in soils‐effect of variations in digestion  conditions and of inorganic soil constituents. Soil Sci. 1947, 63, 251–264.  26. Fawcett, J.K. The semi‐micro Kjeldahl method for the determination of nitrogen. J. Med. Lab. Technol. 1954, 12, 1–22.  27. Olsen, S.R.; Cole, C.V.; Watanabe, F.S.; Dean, L.A. Estimation of Available Phosphorus in Soils by Extraction with Sodium Bicarbonate;  United States Department of Agriculture, Circular 939; United States Government Printing Office: Washington, DC, USA, 1954.  28. Williams, C.H.; Steinbergs, A. Soil sulfur fractions as chemical indices of available sulfur in some Australian soils. Aus. J. Agric.  Res. 1959, 10, 340–352.  29. Weih, M.; Hamnér, K.; Pourazari, P. Analyzing plant nutrient uptake and utilization efficiencies: Comparison between crops  and approaches. Plant. Soil 2018, 430, 7–21.  30. EUNEP. Nitrogen Use Efficiency (NUE)—An Indicator for the Utilization of Nitrogen in Agriculture and Food Systems; Wageningen  University: Wageningen, The Netherlands, 2015.  31. Masunga, R.H.; Uzokwe, V.N.; Mlay, P.D.; Odeh, I.; Singh, A.; Buchan, D.; de Neve, S. Nitrogen mineralization dynamics of  different valuable organic amendments commonly used in agriculture. Appl. Soil Ecol. 2016, 101, 185–193.  32. Zeb, H.; Hussain, A.; Naveed, M.; Ditta, A.; Ahmad, S.; Jamshaid, M.U.; Ahmad, H.T.; Hussain, M.B.; Aziz, R.; Haider, M.S.  Compost enriched with ZnO and Zn‐solubilizing bacteria improves yield and Zn‐fortification in flooded rice. Ital. J. Agron. 2018,  13, 310–316.  33. Rahman, M.S.; Haque, M.A.; Salam, M.A. Effect of different tillage practices on growth, yield and yield contributing characters  of transplanted Aman rice (BRRI Dhan‐33). Agron. J. 2004, 3, 103–110.  34. Alam, M.K.; Islam, M.M.; Salahin, N.; Hasanuzzaman, M. Effect of tillage practices on soil properties and crop productivity in  wheat‐mungbean‐rice  cropping  system  under  subtropical  climatic  conditions.  Sci.  World  J.  2014,  437283.  https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/437283.    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  16 of 17  35. Arvidsson, J.; Håkansson, I. Does soil compaction persist after ploughing—Results from 21 long‐term field experiments? Soil  Till. Res. 1996, 39, 175–198.  36. De Cárcer, P.S.; Sinaj, S.; Santonja, M.; Fossati, D.; Jeangros, B. Long‐term effects of crop succession, soil tillage and climate on  wheat yield and soil properties. Soil Till. Res. 2019, 190, 209–2019.  37. Nandan, R.; Singh, V.; Singh, S.S.; Kumar, V.; Hazra, K.K.; Nath, C.P.; Pooni, S.; Malik, R.K.; Bhattacharyya, R.; McDonald, A.  Impact of conservation tillage in rice–based cropping systems on soil aggregation, carbon pools and nutrients. Geoderma 2019,  340, 104–114.  38. Yadav, G.S.; Datta, R.; Pathan, S.I.; Lal, R.; Meena, R.S.; Babu, S.; Das, A.; Bhowmik, S.N.; Datta, M.; Saha, P.; et al. Effects of  conservation tillage and nutrient management practices on soil fertility and productivity of rice in North Eastern Region of  India. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1816, doi:10.3390/su9101816.  39. Jahangir, M.M.R.; Jahan, I.; Mumu, N.J. Management of soil resources for sustainable development under a changing climate.  J. Environ. Sci Nat. Resour 2018, 11, 159–170.  40. Hossain, I.; Sarker, M.J.U.; Hoque, M.A. Status of conservation agriculture‐based tillage technology for crop production in  Bangladesh. Bangladesh. J. Agric Res. 2015, 40, 235–248.  41. Lu, X. A meta‐analysis of the effects of crop residue returns on crop yields and water use efficiency. PLoS ONE 2020, 15, e0231740.  42. Srivastava, P.K.; Gupta, M.; Upadhyay, R.K.; Sharma, S.; Singh, N.; Tewari, S.K.; Singh, B. Effects of combined application of  vermin‐compost and mineral fertilizer on the growth of Allium cepa and soil fertility. J. Soil Sci. Plant. Nutr. 2012, 175, 101–107.  43. Uddin, U.; Nitu, T.T.; Milu, U.M.; Nasreen, S.S.; Hosenuzzaman, M.; Haque, M.E.; Hossain, B.; Jahiruddin, M.; Bell, R.W.; Müller,  C.; et al. Ammonia fluxes and emission factors under an intensively managed wetland rice ecosystem. Environ. Sci. Process.  Impacts 2021, 23, 132–143.  44. Haque, M.A.; Jahiruddin, M.; Islam, M.S.; Rahman, M.M.; Saleque, M.A. Effect of bioslurry on the yield of wheat and rice in the  wheat–rice cropping system. Agric. Res. 2018, 7, 432–442.  45. Hu, C.; Xia, X.G.; Chen, Y.F.; Qiao, Y.; Liu, D.H.; Fan, J.; Li, S.L. Yield, nitrogen use efficiency and balance response to thirty‐ five years of fertilization in paddy rice‐upland wheat cropping system. Plant. Soil Environ. 2019, 65, 55–62.  46. Abbasi, M.K.; Hina, M.; Khalique, A.; Khan, S.R. Mineralization of Three Organic Manures Used as Nitrogen Source in a Soil  Incubated under Laboratory Conditions. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant. Anal. 2007, 38, 1691–1711.  47. Celar, F.; Valic, N. Effects of Trichoderma spp. and Glicladium roseum culture filtrates on seed germination of vegetables and  maize. J. Plant. Dis. Protect. 2005, 112, 343–350.  48. Asghari, H.R.; Cavagnaro, T.R. Arbuscular mycorrhizae as enhance plant interception of leached nutrients. Funct. Plant. Biol. 2011,  38, 219–226.  49. San Francisco, S.; Urrutia, O.; Martin, V.; Peristeropoulos, A.; Garcia‐Mina, J.M. Efficiency of urease and nitrification inhibitors  in reducing ammonia volatilization from diverse nitrogen fertilizers applied to different soil types and wheat straw mulching.  J. Soc. Food Agric. 2011, 91, 1569–1575.  50. Yang, C.; Xu, S.; Liu, L.; Huang, M.; Zheng, T.; Wei, S.; Zhang, Y.; Deng, G.; Jiang, L. Nitrogen uptake and utilization by no‐ tillage rice under different soil moisture conditions—A model study under simulated soil conditions. Plant. Product Sci. 2015,  18, 118–127.  51. Agegnehu, G.; Nelson, P.N.; Bird, M.I. Crop yield, plant nutrient uptake and soil physicochemical properties under organic soil  amendments and nitrogen fertilization on nitisols. Soil Till. Res. 2016, 160, 1–13.  52. Takahashi, S.; Uenosono, S.; Ono, S. Short and long‐term effects of rice straw application on nitrogen uptake by crops and  nitrogen mineralization under flooded and upland conditions. Plant. Soil 2003, 251, 291–301.  53. Phongpan, S.; Mosier, A. Impact of organic residue management on nitrogen use efficiency in an annual rice cropping sequence  of lowland Central Thailand. Nutr. Cycl. Agroecosyst. 2003, 66, 233–240.  54. Li, L.Q.; Zhang, X.H.; Zhang, P.J.; Zheng, J.F.; Pan, G.X. Variation of organic carbon and nitrogen in aggregate size fractions of  a paddy soil under fertilization practices from Tai Lake Region, China. J. Sci. Food Agric. 2007, 87, 1052–1058.  55. Kihara, J.A.; Bationo, D.N.; Mugendi, C.; Martius, C.; Vlek, P.L.G. Conservation tillage, local organic resources and nitrogen  fertilizer combinations affect maize productivity, soil structure and nutrient balances in semi‐arid Kenya. Nutr. Cycl. Agroecosyst.  2011, 90, 213–225.  56. Amézketa, E.; Aragüés, R.; Carranza, R.; Urgel, B. Macro‐and micro‐aggregate stability of soils determined by a combination of  wet‐sieving and laser‐ray diffraction. Span. J. Agric. Res. 2003, 1, 83–94.  57. Nyamadzawo, G.; Nyamangara, J.; Nyamugafata, P.; Muzulu, A. Soil microbial biomass and mineralization of aggregate pro‐ tected carbon in fallow‐maize systems under conventional and no‐tillage in Central Zimbabwe. Soil Till. Res. 2009, 102, 151–157.  58. Fuentes, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Etchevers, J.; De León, F.; Guerrero, A.; Dendooven, L.; Verhulst, N.; Govaerts, B. Conservation agri‐ culture increased organic carbon in the topsoil macro‐aggregates and reduced soil CO2 emissions. Plant. Soil 2012, 355, 183–197.  59. Six, J.; Elliott, E.T.; Paustian, K. Soil macroaggregate turnover and microaggregate formation: A mechanism for C sequestration  under no‐tillage agriculture. Soil Biol. Biochem. 2000, 2, 2099–2103.  60. Bronick, C.J.; Lal, L. Soil structure and management: A review. Geoderma 2005, 124, 3–22.    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  17 of 17  61. Blanco‐Moure, N.; Moret‐Fernández, D.; López, M.V. Dynamics of aggregate destabilization by water in soils under long‐term  conservation tillage in semiarid Spain. Catena 2012, 99, 34–41.  62. Chu, J.; Zhang, T.; Chang, W.; Zhang, D.; Zulfiqar, S.; Fu, A. Impacts of cropping systems on aggregates associated organic  carbon and nitrogen in a semiarid highland agroecosystem. PLoS ONE 2016, 11, e0165018.  63. Tivet, F.; de Moraes Sá, J.C.; Lal, R.; Briedis, C.; Borszowskei, P.R.; dos Santos, J.B.; Farias, A.; Eurich, G.; Hartman, D.D.C.;  Nadolny, J.M.; et al. Aggregate C depletion by plowing and its restoration by diverse biomass‐C inputs under no‐till in sub‐ tropical and tropical regions of Brazil. Soil Till. Res. 2013, 126, 203–218.  64. Zhou, M.; Liu, C.; Wang, J.; Meng, Q.; Yuan, Y.; Ma, X.; Liu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Ding, G.; Zhang, J.; et al. Soil aggregate stability and  storage of soil organic carbon respond to cropping systems on Black Soils of Northeast China. Sci. Rep. 2020, 10, 265.  65. Sainju, U.M.; Whitehead, W.F.; Singh, B.P. Cover crops and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil aggregation and carbon and  nitrogen pools. Can. J. Soil Sci. 2003, 83, 155–165.  66. Caravaca, F.; Lax, A.; Albaladejo, J. Soil aggregate stability and organic matter in clay and fine silt fractions in urban refuse‐ amended semiarid soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 2001, 65, 1235–1238.  67. Yu, H.Y.; Ding, W.X.; Luo, J.F.; Geng, R.L.; Cai, Z.C. Long‐term application of organic manure and mineral fertilizers on aggre‐ gation and aggregate‐associated carbon in a sandy loam soil. Soil Till. Res. 2012, 124, 170–177.  68. Huang, S.; Peng, X.X.; Huang, Q.R.; Zhang, W.J. Soil aggregation and organic carbon fractions affected by long‐term fertilization  in a red soil of subtropical China. Geoderma 2010, 154, 364–369.  69. Guo, Z.; Zhang, L.; Yang, W.; Hua, L.; Cai, C. Aggregate stability under long‐term fertilization practices: The case of eroded  Ultisols of South‐Central China. Sustainability 2019, 11, 1169.  70. Mikha, M.M.; Hergert, G.W.; Benjamin, J.G.; Jabro, J.D.; Nielsen, R.A. Long‐term manure impacts on soil aggregates and aggre‐ gate‐associated carbon and nitrogen. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 2015, 79, 626–636.  71. Khorami, S.S.; Kazemeini, S.A.; Afzalinia, A.; Gathala, M.K. Changes in soil properties and productivity under different tillage  practices and wheat genotypes: A Short‐term study in Iran. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3273, doi:10.3390/su10093273.  72. Mazzoncini, M.; Sapkota, T.B.; Bàrberi, P.; Antichi, D.; Risalati, R. Long‐term effect of tillage, nitrogen fertilization and cover  crops on soil organic carbon and total nitrogen content. Soil Till. Res. 2011, 114, 165–174.  73. Tian, Q.; He, H.; Cheng, W.; Bai, Z.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, X. Factors controlling soil organic carbon stability along a temperate forest  altitudinal gradient. Sci. Rep. 2016, 6, 18783.  74. Diekow, J.; Mielniczuk, J.; Knicker, H.; Bayer, C.; Dick, D.P.; Kögel‐Knabner, I. Soil C and N stocks as affected by cropping  systems and N fertilization in the southern Brazil Acrisol managed under no‐tillage for 17 years. Soil Till. Res. 2005, 81, 87–95.  75. Kheyrodin, H.; Ghazvininan, K.; Taherian, M. Tillage and manure effect on soil microbial biomass and respiration, and on  enzyme activities. Afr. J. Biotechnol. 2012, 11, 14652–14659.  76. Datta, A.; Jat, H.S.; Yadav, A.K.; Choudhary, M.; Sharma, P.C.; Rai, M.; Kumar, L.; Majumder, S.P.; Choudhary, V.; Jat, M.L.  Carbon mineralization in soil as influenced by crop residue type and placement in an Alfisols of Northwest India. Carbon Manag.  2019, 10, 37–50.  77. Ren, T.; Wang, J.; Chen, Q.; Zhang, F.; Lu, S. The effects of manure and nitrogen fertilizer applications on soil organic carbon  and nitrogen in a high‐input cropping system. PLoS ONE 2014, 9, e97732.  78. Zhao, Z.; Zhang, C.; Li, F.; Gao, S.; Zhang, J. Effect of compost and inorganic fertilizer on organic carbon and activities of carbon  cycle enzymes in aggregates of an intensively cultivated Vertisol. PLoS ONE 2020, 15, e0229644.  79. Soane, B.; Bruce, C.; Ball, B.C.; Arvidsson, J.; Basch, G.; Moreno, F.; Roger‐Estade, J. No‐till in northern, western and south  western Europe: A review of problems and opportunities for crop production and the environment. Soil Till. Res. 2012, 118, 66– 87.  80. Asenso, E.; Li, J.; Hu, L.; Issaka, F.; Tian, K.; Zhang, L.; Chen, H. Tillage effects on soil biochemical properties and maize grown  in latosolic red soil of southern China. Appl. Environ. Soil Sci. 2018, 2018, 8426736.  81. Zhou, W.; Li, S.T.; Wang, H.; He, P.; Lin, B. Mineralization of organic sulfur and its importance as a reservoir of plant‐available  sulfur in upland soils of north China. Biol. Fert. Soils 1999, 30, 245–250.  82. Samuel, A.L.; Ebenezer, A.O. Mineralization rates of soil forms of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium as affected by organo‐ mineral fertilizer in sandy loam. Adv. Agric. 2014, 2014, 1–5. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/149209.  83. Durrer, A.; Gumiere, T.; Rumenos Guidetti Zagatto, M.; Petry Feiler, H.; Miranda Silva, A.M.; Henriques Longaresi, R.; Homma,  S.K.; Cardoso, E.J.B.N. Organic farming practices change the soil bacteria community, improving soil quality and maize crop  yields. PeerJ 2021, 9, e11985, doi:10.7717/peerj.11985.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Agronomy Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Bio-Compost-Based Integrated Soil Fertility Management Improves Post-harvest Soil Structural and Elemental Quality in a Two-Year Conservation Agriculture Practice

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/bio-compost-based-integrated-soil-fertility-management-improves-post-65l3UEtaaT
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2021 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2073-4395
DOI
10.3390/agronomy11112101
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Bio‐Compost‐Based  Integrated  Soil  Fertility  Management   Improves  Post‐harvest  Soil  Structural  and  Elemental  Quality   in a Two‐Year Conservation Agriculture Practice  1, 1 1 1 Mohammad  Mofizur  Rahman  Jahangir  *,  Shanta  Islam  ,  Tazbeen  Tabara  Nitu  ,  Shihab  Uddin  ,   2 3 4 Abul Kalam Mohammad Ahsan Kabir  , Mohammad Bahadur Meah   and Rafiq Islam      Department of Soil Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh;   shantaislam0821@gmail.com (S.I.); tazbeen127@gmail.com (T.T.N.); shihab43151@bau.edu.bd (S.U.)    Department of Animal Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh;   ahsankabiras@bau.edu.bd    Department of Plant Pathology, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh;  bmeah.ppath@bau.edu.bd    Soil, Water and Bioenergy Resources, The Ohio State University South Centers, Piketon, OH 45661, USA;  islam.27@osu.edu  Citation: Jahangir, M.M.R.; Islam, S.;  *  Correspondence: mmrjahangir@bau.edu.bd  Nitu, T.T.; Uddin, S.; Kabir,  A.K.M.A.; Meah, M.B.; Islam, R.   Abstract: The impacts of integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) in conservation agriculture  Bio‐Compost‐Based Integrated Soil  need short‐term evaluation before continuation of its long‐term practice. A split‐split plot experi‐ Fertility Management Improves  ment with tillage (minimum tillage, MT vs. conventional tillage, CT) as the main plot, residue (20%  Post‐harvest Soil Structural   residue, R vs. no residue as a control, NR) as the sub‐plot, and compost (Trichocompost, LC; bio‐ and Elemental Quality in   slurry, BS; and recommended fertilization, RD) as the sub‐sub plot treatment was conducted for  a Two‐Year Conservation   two consecutive years. Composite soils were collected after harvesting the sixth crop of an annual  Agriculture Practice. Agronomy 2021,  mustard‐rice‐rice rotation to analyze for nutrient distribution and soil structural stability. The LC  11, 2101. https://doi.org/10.3390/  increased rice equivalent yield by 2% over RD and 4% over BS, and nitrogen (N) uptake by 11%  agronomy11112101  over RD and 10% over BS. Likewise, LC had higher soil organic carbon (SOC), N, and available  Academic Editor:   sulphur (S) than BS and RD. Conversion of CT to MT reduced rice equivalent yield by 11%, N up‐ Ambrogio Costanzo  take by 26%, and N‐use efficiency by 28%. Conversely, soil structural stability and elemental quality  was greater in MT than in CT, indicating the potential of MT to sequester C, N, P, and S in soil  Received: 14 September 2021  aggregates. Residue management increased rice yield in the second year by 4% and corresponding  Accepted: 7 October 2021  N uptake by 8%. While MT reduced the yield, our results suggest that ISFM with Trichocompost  Published: 20 October 2021  and residue retention under MT improves soil fertility and physical stability to sustain crop produc‐ tivity.  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neu‐ tral with regard to jurisdictional  Keywords:  conservation  agriculture;  integrated  soil  fertility  management;  trichocompost;  soil   claims in published maps and insti‐ quality; crop yield  tutional affiliations.  1. Introduction  Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Li‐ censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  By 2050, the world’s population is expected to increase by 2.4 billion, placing added  This article  is an open access article  pressure  on agricultural systems  for  food,  fuel, and  fiber  production,  and  challenging  distributed under the terms and con‐ their potential to achieve food security and environmental sustainability [1]. Cultivable  ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ lands all over the world are decreasing due to urbanization, rural settlement, and institu‐ tribution (CC BY) license (http://crea‐ tionalization [2]. Healthy soil is fundamental for sustained agricultural productivity and  tivecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  the maintenance of vital ecosystem processes. However, achieving an increase in agricul‐ tural production, while at the same time improving soil health, is a key research challenge  in response to global climate change effects. Current tillage practices are responsible for  the degradation of air‐soil‐water ecosystems [3,4]. The adverse impact of intensive tillage  Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11112101  www.mdpi.com/journal/agronomy  Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  2 of 17  practices on soil physical quality and organic carbon levels is a major challenge in tropical  rice‐growing regions [5]. Switching to minimum tillage (MT) with crop residue retention  is expected to influence the stoichiometrically linked carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus  (P), and sulphur (S) cycling processes in soil organic matter and decrease reactive N and  P losses to the environment, thus increasing use efficiency [6,7]. However, long‐term till‐ age effects on soil quality are still contradictory and depend on soil, climate, and manage‐ ment practices [8]. Therefore, assessment of short‐term tillage effects, along with other  soil‐crop management, is required to give insights into the long‐term continuation of the  practice. Past research argued that identifying sensitive and consistent indicators of soil  quality will allow early management decisions and quick remedial action [7,9].  Sustainable agriculture must find ways to minimize this nutrient inefficiency while  maintaining, or even increasing, crop productivity and soil quality. Sole or imbalanced  use of chemical fertilizers increases the cost of production, enhances nutrient losses to the  environment, and causes several air and water quality concerns, as well as degrades soil  health [10]. Soil conservation should be considered an important approach for managing  the risks of climate change through adaptation [11,12]. Thus, there is an urgent need to  preserve the soil resource, which is not renewable at the human time scale, and to aim for  its sustainable management. Agricultural soil’s C stock can be managed through appro‐ priate  choices  of  sustainable  agricultural  practices  [12,13],  such  as  the  use  of  organic  amendments, management of crop residues, and the use of soil amendments with organic  fertilizers rather than the sole application of chemical fertilizers [14,15]. Integrated soil  fertility management (ISFM) is one of the critical components to maintain and improve  agroecosystem services in conservation agriculture. The ISFM has attracted the interest of  scientists worldwide with its benefits for increased crop yield and sustainable soil health  [16]. Recently, Trichocompost, produced from Trichoderma sp., has been reported to im‐ prove crop yield by increasing availability of plant nutrients and water to plants through  their enlarged hyphae and by preventing pest infestation [17,18]. Understanding how a  proactive choice of organic amendment, as in the case of ISFM in MT systems, can help  reduce  the  requirements  for  N  application.  Waste  management  has  become  an  ever  greater burden on the world. Waste conversion to valuable composts has become a potent  technology for sustainable waste management [19]. However, bio‐composts preparation  using municipal and animal farm wastes for use in agriculture is more viable, although  these may contain some trace element that can pollute soils [20]. Nonetheless, animal farm  wastes are richer in N and other nutrients, homogenous, and easier to sort for bio‐compost  preparation, but their conversion to bio‐compost and evaluation for trace element con‐ tents and application in agriculture has not been reported. We hypothesize that organic  amendments in MT will enhance soil organic matter accumulation, which in turn will in‐ crease the storage of essential plant nutrients in soils. The specific objectives of the current  research are to: (i) assess the quality of Trichocompost with regard to chemical composi‐ tion and heavy metal contaminations, and (ii) investigate the effect of tillage, residue man‐ agement, and Trichocompost‐based ISFM on crop yield, N uptake and N‐use efficiency,  soil aggregate stability, and nutrient distribution.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Site Description  The experiment was conducted at the Soil Science Field Laboratory at the Bangladesh  Agricultural University, Mymensingh (24°54″ N Latitude, 90°50″ E Longitude, Altitude  18 m above ordnance datum). The mean temperature of the site is 25 °C. The soil was  Brahmaputra alluvium with soil organic C 1.62% and total nitrogen (TN) 0.11% with low  soil‐available P, S, and K and medium Zn content (Table 1). Soil texture is a silt loam in  −3 topsoil with a bulk density of 1.32 g cm . The mean annual rainfall is 2200 mm and hu‐   Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  3 of 17  midity is 79.85%. The site has been used in conventional tillage (CT) systems with an in‐ tensively managed rice‐based ecosystem for around 100 years, resulting in soil nutrient  mining and poor elemental quality.  Table 1. Initial soil properties before commencement of the experiment; n = 3.  Soil Or‐ Total   Available  Cad‐ Exchangeable  Available  Available  Nickel  Lead  Copper  pH  ganic Car‐ Nitrogen Phosphorus  mium  Potassium (K)  Sulphur (S)  Zinc (Zn)  (Ni)  (Pb)  (Cu)  bon (SOC)  (TN)   (P)  (Cd)    (%)  (ppm)  6.45  1.62  0.11  10.44  31.2  2.56  1.10  0.01  0.05  0.50  4.2  2.2. Preparation of Trichocompost  Horse, sheep, and goat dung were collected from the BAU animal farm, then sorted,  ground properly, and mixed at a ratio of 1:1:1 (horse:sheep:goat). Compost preparation  pits (length × width × depth = 92 cm × 50 cm × 88 cm) were previously prepared with  concrete. Trichoderma harzianum CP (IPM‐22) was collected and cultured in acidified po‐ tato dextrose agar (APDA) medium. It was then sub‐cultured on the same medium for  multiplication through incubation at room temperature (25 ± 1 °C). Then Trichoderma sus‐ pension (200 mL; spore density 4.5 × 10  CFU) was prepared from a 7‐day old culture.  Firstly, two‐thirds of the area of each pit was filled by composting materials before Tricho‐ derma suspension was applied. Finally, the pits were filled completely with the compost‐ ing material and mixed thoroughly with Trichoderma suspension. The composting materi‐ als in the compost pits were mixed well at 7‐day intervals and sampled for physical and  chemical quality analysis until the composts became mature in 45 days. The colony of  Trichoderma harzianum was visible like spider nets throughout the compost preparation  period.  2.3. Experimental Design  A split‐split plot experiment was established with two sets of tillage treatments viz.  MT vs. CT; two sets of residue retention treatments (20% of residue by plant height, R and  no residue, control, NR); and three sets of bio‐compost treatments (Trichocompost + rest  of the nutrients from fertilizers, bio‐slurry + rest of the nutrients from chemical fertilizers).  The entire field was replicated into three blocks, with each block being divided into two  main plots of tillage. Each main plot was divided into sub‐plots of residue retention, and  each sub‐plot was divided into three sub‐plots of bio‐composts. Each replicated plot was  10 m long × 5 m wide. The cropping pattern was mustard–rice–rice in an annual sequence  spanning a period of 12 months. In the MT system, light ploughing at 5 cm depth was  performed by one pass of a power tiller. By contrast, in the CT system, 15 cm deep plough‐ ing was performed by four passes of a power tiller. The design of the experiment is pro‐ vided in Supplementary Materials 1.  2.4. Crop Management and Plant and Soil Sampling  The recommended high yielding varieties of mustard (cv. BARI Shorisa14; Brassica  napus), transplanted Boro rice (cv. BRRI dhan28; Oryza sativa L.) and transplanted Aman  rice (cv. BRRI dhan71; Oryza sativa L.) were used as test crops. The recommended dose  −1 (RD) of N, P, K, S, and B were 90, 27, 40, 10, and 1 kg ha  for mustard; 120, 25, 60, 11, and  −1 −1 6 kg ha  for transplanted Boro rice; and 80, 18, 28, 6, and 1 kg ha  for transplanted Aman  rice (Fertilizer Recommendation Guide, 2012), respectively. The N, P, K, S, Zn, and B were  applied as urea, triple superphosphate (TSP), muriate of potash (MoP), gypsum, zinc sul‐ phate (ZnSO4.7H2O), and boric acid, respectively. In Trichocompost (TC) and bio‐slurry  (BS)‐based ISFM treatments, 25% of the nutrients was applied from the compost or bio‐ slurry and rest of the amounts were compensated from chemical fertilizer to fulfil the RD.    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  4 of 17  −1 Trichocompost and bio‐slurry were applied at the rate of 5.85 and 9.10 7 kg plot  for mus‐ −1 −1 tard, 7 and 10 kg plot  for boro rice, and 4.5 and 7 kg plot  for T. Aman rice, respectively.  While the total amount of TSP, MoP, gypsum, ZnSO4, and boric acid was applied during  final land preparation, the urea was applied in three equal splits for rice, and two equal  splits for mustard. For rice, urea was applied at 10, 30, and 50 days after transplanting,  and for wheat it was applied at 15 and 35 days after sowing following light irrigation.  Split application of urea is conventionally practiced for minimizing the loss of N by volat‐ ilization and denitrification, and to make it available to crops at their critical stage, which  enhances N‐use efficiency. All nutrients were compensated considering the nutrient con‐ tent in crop residues and organics following the integrated plant nutrition system ap‐ proach. Each crop was harvested at full maturity at a height leaving 20% residues and  grain yield was estimated. At harvest, crop yield data were collected from a randomly  selected geo‐referenced micro plot (4 m ) in the middle of each replicated plot for all crops.  For those plots that received residues, crops were cut leaving 20% (height basis) residues,  while those plots that received no residues were cut at the ground level. Yield of the resi‐ dues left in the plot were estimated separately and pooled together with the straw yield.  To evaluate the tillage, residue, and ISFM impact on temporal crop yields (deductive soil  quality), the rice equivalent yield (REY) was calculated. The straw yield of rice and grain  yield of mustard were converted to REY, based on the unit market price of straw and  mustard following Equation (1) below [21]:  𝑦𝑖𝑒𝑙𝑑 𝑡 ℎ𝑎 𝑢𝑛𝑖𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑅𝑖𝑐𝑒 𝑛𝑡𝑙𝑒𝑎𝐸𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑣 𝑑𝑌𝑖𝑒𝑙 𝑡 ℎ𝑎   (1) 𝑢𝑛𝑖𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑟𝑖𝑐𝑒 Composite soil samples were collected at 0–15 cm depth from each replicated plot  after harvesting the sixth crop in November 2018. After air drying at 25 °C for around two  weeks, one portion of the soil samples was used for soil aggregate properties and another  portion was used for soil chemical analysis. The representative grain and straw samples  were collected from 4 m  micro plots (five hills from each plot). Straw and grains from  these hills were separated, weighed, and dried in an oven at 65 °C for about 48 hours  before they were ground by a Ball Mill grinder (PM400, Germany). While calculating the  yield,  moisture  content  of  the  grains  was  adjusted  at  14%.  The  ground  samples  were  stored in paper bags in a desiccator until analysis. Rice grain and straw were analysed for  estimating TN content and N uptake per ha.  2.5. Measurement of Soil Aggregate Properties  For soil water stable aggregate analysis, air‐dried soil was broken down into aggre‐ gates, 5 mm sieved, and analysed for aggregate size distribution. Soil aggregate size dis‐ tribution was performed by using the wet sieving method to obtain water‐stable aggre‐ gates [22] using 250 g soil over a sequence of sieves using mesh sizes 2.0, 0.85, 0.30, 0.15,  and 0.053 mm. Soil aggregate fraction retained on each sieve, after being dispersed in wa‐ ter on a planetary shaker at a rate of 31 rpm, was transferred in a nickel cup and oven‐ dried at 65 °C until a constant weight was obtained. Respective mass of each aggregate  size of soil was converted to the relative percentage (over the total mass of aggregates).  Aggregate  mean  weight  diameter  (MWD)  was  determined  using  the  below  equation  [23,24].  i n mi .di i1 MWD  (2) i n mi i1 where mi and di are weight and the mean diameter of aggregate fraction i, respectively.      𝑝𝑟𝑖𝑐𝑒 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑑 𝑝𝑟𝑖𝑐𝑒 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑑 Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  5 of 17  2.6. Analysis of Soil Chemical Properties  Soil  samples  used  for  the  elemental  analysis  were  ground  in  a  ball  mill  grinder  (PM400, Germany) and sieved through a 2 mm sieve. The SOC was determined using the  chromic‐sulfuric acid oxidation method [25], and TN determined using the semi‐micro  Kjeldahl method [26]. Soil‐available P was determined by the Olsen method [27]. Availa‐ ble S was measured by colorimetric method [28]. The TN in grain and straw was deter‐ mined by semi‐micro Kjeldahl method [26]. In brief, 0.1 g of oven‐dried ground sample  (grain and  straw separately)  was taken  in a  digestion  flask and 1.1 g  catalyst mixture  (K2SO4:CuSO4.5H2O:Se = 100:10:1) and 3 mL 30% H2O2 and 5 mL H2SO4 were added to it.  The flask was swirled and allowed to stand for around 10 min. After cooling, the content  was taken in a 100 mL volumetric flask and the volume was filled to the mark with dis‐ tilled water and titrated with 0.01 N H2SO4.  Total concentration of heavy metals: cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), and  lead (Pb) in the final product of the Trichocompost was determined after six weeks of  composting using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Hitachi ZA3000). Bio‐slurry  compost was collected from a biogas plant as a solid residue left after biogas production.  Compost maturity was tested using standard laboratory methods e.g., C mineralization  pattern and germination index. It appeared that the composts became mature after six  weeks of composting.  2.7. Calculation of Plant Nutrient Uptake and Use Efficiency  Nitrogen uptake by rice plant was calculated by multiplying the N concentrations in  grain and straw by the total mass of grain and straw per ha [29]. Nitrogen use efficiency  (NUE), an indicator for the utilization of N in agriculture and food systems, was calculated  using Equation (3) below given by EUNEP [30].  𝑁 𝑖𝑛 ℎ𝑎𝑟𝑣𝑒𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑑 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑑𝑢𝑐𝑡𝑠 𝑘𝑔 ℎ𝑎 100   (3) 𝑁 𝑖𝑛𝑝𝑢𝑡 𝑘𝑔 ℎ𝑎 2.8. Statistical Analysis  A three‐way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed using tillage, residue,  and fertilizers as fixed variables and block as a random variable. The distribution of data  for normality was checked before ANOVA. Data were statistically analysed to ascertain  the  significant  differences in  the  main plot,  and  interactions  among  main  and  subplot  treatments at p < 0.05, unless otherwise mentioned. Pairwise comparisons were under‐ taken by Tukey’s HSD post‐hoc test. All the statistical analyses were performed on SPSS  Version  20  (IBM  SPSS  Statistics  for  Windows,  Version  20.0.  Armonk,  NY,  USA:  IBM  Corp.).  3. Results  3.1. Quality of the Prepared Trichocompost  The growth and development of Trichoderma harzianum in the compost were ensured  as the colony of the fungi was visible throughout the composting period and in the pre‐ pared compost. Organic carbon contents in the Trichocompost were comparatively higher  (approximately 28.11%) while that of the TN was low (1.50%), exhibiting a C:N of 18.8:1.0  −1 (Table 2). The available P and S of the prepared compost were 158.4 and 80.2 mg kg soil   −1 and exchangeable K was 45 meq. 100 g soil . The pH of the compost was alkaline (>7.0).  Before composting, the concentrations of heavy metals were in the order of zinc (Zn) >  lead (Pb) > nickel (Ni) > copper (Cu) > cadmium (Cd) (Figure 1). After seven weeks of  composting, Zn and Pb concentrations increased by 35 and 4%, respectively, over the ini‐ tial concentrations while the Cd, Ni and Cu concentrations decreased by 10%, 88%, and  38%, respectively. The heavy metal contents in soil after two years of cropping with Trich‐ ocompost along with their threshold values are presented in Table 3. Heavy metal content  𝑁𝑈𝐸 𝑜𝑢𝑡𝑝𝑢𝑡 Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  6 of 17  in soil before the commencement of the experiment and after two years of cropping with  Trichocompost was alike, except a slight increase in Zn. However, all heavy metal con‐ tents in soils were much less than the threshold values, indicating no sign of concerns for  heavy metal accumulation through Trichocompost. In addition, the soil was deficient in  Zn, which requires application of Zn fertilizer (i.e., ZnSO4.7H2O or ZnO). The increment  of Zn will help reduce its deficiency in the soil.  Table 2. Chemical properties of the prepared Trichocompost and bio‐slurry; n = 3.  Moisture  Avail. P  Avail. S  Exch. K  Organic   Organics  pH  Total N (%)  C/N Ratio  (%)  (ppm)  (ppm)  (meq./100g)  Matter (%)  LC  7.7 ± 0.02  14.2 ± 1.04  158.4 ± 13.0  80.2 ± 6.1  45 ± 8.4  48.9 ± 0.2  1.5 ± 0.1  18.8 ± 2.0  BS  6.8 ± 0.02  30.0 ± 3.0  60.6 ± 12.0  28.0 ± 4.2  30.4 ± 5.3  18.3 ± 3.2  1.0 ± 0.0  11.0 ± 2.3  i.e., LC = Trichocompost, and BS = Bio‐slurry.  3.5 Before composting 3.0 Seven wk. after composting 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 Cd Ni Cu Zn Pb Figure 1. Heavy metal concentrations in Trichocompost.  Table 3. Heavy metal contents in soils after two years of cropping with Trichoderma bio‐compost; the threshold values  for heavy metal contents in organic amendments in Bangladesh are given in parentheses.  Cr  Cd  Pb  Ni  Zn  Cu  (ppm)  <MDL (18.28)  0.01 (0.18)  0.50 (22.50)  0.05 (24.44)  1.51 (400)  3.91 (160)  i.e., MDL = method detection limit.  3.2. Management Impacts on System Productivity  In both 2017 and 2018, the rice equivalent yield (REY) was 11.3 and 11.4% higher in  CT than that in MT (p < 0.01) (Figure 2), respectively. Crop residue retention had signifi‐ cantly higher REY in plots under residue than no residue (p < 0.05) in 2018 (approximately  4% higher in R over the NR), but not in 2017 (p > 0.05). Equally, Trichocompost increased  the REY only in 2018, being 2% and 4% higher than in BS and RD, where the later two  were alike. There were no significant interaction effects of tillage, residue, and ISFM treat‐ ments.  Heavy metal conc. (ppm) Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  7 of 17  MT b Lsd: MT a Lsd: Till=1.77; Res=0.27; ISFM=0.55 CT Till=1.70; Res=0.74; ISFM=0.71 CT 8 8 4 4 0 0 RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No Residue Residue No Residue Figure 2. Management impacts on rice equivalent yield (REY) for two consecutive years (a) 2017  and (b) 2018.  3.3. Management Impacts on N Uptake and Use Efficiency in Transplanted Aman Rice (6th  Crop)  Grain N content was significantly higher in CT than in MT (p < 0.05) (Figure 3), ac‐ counting for 14% higher TN content in CT than in MT. Likewise, the grain N content was  significantly higher in the plots under residue than those with no residue (approximately  5% higher in R over the NR). The ISFM significantly influenced rice grain N content (p <  0.01) (approximately 1.57%, 1.57%, and 1.50%, respectively, in BS, LC, and RD). Grain N  content was 5% higher in LC and BS than in RD, where the former two were alike (Figure  3).  Lsd: MT Till=0.29; Res= 0.15; ISFM=0.11 CT 2.0 1.6 1.2 0.8 0.4 0.0 RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No-residue Figure 3. Management effect on grain total nitrogen (TN) content.  There was a significant influence of tillage and ISFM on N uptake and NUE by rice  (Figure 4a). Nitrogen uptake by rice paddy was significantly higher in CT than in MT (p <  0.01) (approximately 25% in CT over the MT). Concerning crop residue retention, grain N  uptake was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in residue‐treated plots than those with no resi‐ due (approximately 8% higher in R than in NR). Similarly, the ISFM did affect rice N up‐ take significantly (p < 0.05), being higher in LC by 11 and 10% than in BS and RD, respec‐ tively, where the latter two were similar to each other. Nitrogen‐use efficiency was higher  in CT than in MT (p < 0.01) by 36%. In contrast, NUE was similar in R to NR (p > 0.05)  -1 Rice Equivalent Yield (t ha ) Grain TN (%) -1 Rice Equivalent Yield (t ha ) Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  8 of 17  (Figure 4b). The LC had significantly higher NUE by 6% over BS and 7% over RD, where  BS and RD were alike. The mean values were 49.5, 52.5, and 49.0% in RD, LC, and BS,  respectively (Figure 4b).  b Lsd: MT a Lsd: MT Till=12 ; Res=18 ; ISFM =10 Till=2.42; Res=4.42; ISFM=2.14 200 CT CT 160 60 0 0 RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No-residue Residue No-residue Figure 4. Management impacts on N uptake and N‐use efficiency (NUE) for two consecutive  years (a) 2017 and (b) 2018.  3.4. Management Impacts on Soil Aggregate Mean Weight Diameter (MWD)  Soil aggregate MWD was significantly influenced by tillage (p < 0.05), ISFM (p < 0.05),  and crop residue retention (p < 0.05). Aggregate MWD was higher in MT by 11% than in  CT (Figure 5). The MWD, irrespective of crop residue retention, was 1.03, 1.10, and 1.14  mm in MT and 0.95, 1.04, and 1.08 mm in CT in RD, BS, and LC, respectively. The LC and  BS had higher MWD than the RD, where the former two were similar to each other. Con‐ sidering crop residue retention, MWD was higher in R plots by 19% than in NR plots. The  MWD, irrespective of ISFM, was 0.99 and 1.19 mm in MT and 0.94 and 1.11 mm in CT in  NR and R, respectively. The interaction effects of tillage, residues, and ISFM were non‐ significant.  Lsd: MT Till=0.08; Res=0.07; ISFM=0.09 1.4 CT 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No Residue Figure 5. Post‐harvest soil aggregate mean weight diameter (MWD) after two consecutive years of  integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) with crop residue and tillage practices.  -1 N uptake (kg ha ) Aggregate MWD (mm) N use efficiency (%) Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  9 of 17  3.5. Management Impacts on Post‐Harvest Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) and Total Nitrogen (TN)  Contents  The SOC content was significantly influenced by tillage (p < 0.01) and ISFM (p < 0.05),  but the effect was non‐significant (p > 0.05) for crop residue retention. The SOC was sig‐ nificantly higher in MT than in CT by 15% (p < 0.01) (Figure 6a). The ISFM significantly  influenced SOC contents (p < 0.05), showing the mean values of 1.97%, 2.04%, and 1.88%,  respectively, in BS, LC, and RD. The LC and BS had higher SOC by 9% and 5% than in  RD, where the former two were similar to each other. Soil TN content was significantly  influenced by ISFM (p < 0.05), but no significant influences were observed by tillage and  crop residue retention (Figure 6b). The TN was lower in RD (p < 0.05) by 12% and 6% than  in LC and BS, respectively, where LC and BS were similar to each other (p > 0.05). The  interaction effects of tillage, residue, and ISFM were non‐significant.  MT MT b Lsd: a Lsd: Till=0.016; Res=0.017; ISFM=0.010 CT 0.25 Till=0.13; Res=0.22 ; ISFM=0.18 CT 2.5 0.20 2.0 0.15 1.5 0.10 1.0 0.05 0.5 0.00 0.0 RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No-residue Residue No-residue Figure 6. Post‐harvest soil organic carbon (SOC) and TN contents after two consecutive years (a) 2017 and (b) 2018 of ISFM  with crop residue and tillage practices management impacts on post‐harvest soil.  3.6. Management Impacts on Post‐Harvest Soil‐Available P and S  Tillage and residue retention had significant influences on post‐harvest soil‐available  P (Figure 7a), showing 30% and 26% higher available P in MT (p < 0.05) and R (p < 0.05)  over the CT and NR, respectively (Figure 7a). The available P was similar in all ISFM  treatments (p > 0.05). Soil‐available S content was significantly higher in MT by 23% than  in CT (p < 0.05) (Figure 7b). However, available S in soils with residue (R) was similar to  that in NR (p > 0.05). Conversely, ISFM significantly influenced soil‐available S content,  where the RD had significantly lower available S than BS and LC (p < 0.05), where the  latter two were also significantly different (p < 0.05). Available S was higher in LC and BS  by 42% and 18%, respectively, over the RD, where the BS had higher available P by 16%  over the RD. No significant interaction effects were observed between tillage, residues,  and ISFM.  SOC (%) Soil TN (%) Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  10 of 17  MT MT a             Lsd: b    Lsd: 4.0 CT CT Till=4.72; Res=3.05; ISFM=5.54 Till=0.69; Res=0.62; ISFM=0.43 3.0 2.0 1.0 0 0.0 RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS RD LC BS Residue No-residue Residue No-residue Figure 7. Post‐harvest soil available P and S contents after two consecutive years (a) 2017 and (b) 2018 of ISFM with crop  residue and tillage practices management impacts on post‐harvest soil.  4. Discussion  4.1. Quality of Trichocompost  The Trichocompost was of good quality with regard to pH, moisture, SOM, and C:N  ratio. It was rich in available P and S (Table 2). A C:N ratio <25 indicates the state of com‐ posting, which helps increase mineral nutrient availability in soils for plant, while the C:N  ratio >25 indicates the immobilization of mineral nutrients, resulting in unavailability for  plants [31]. Heavy metals content in the Trichocompost was lower than in the mixture of  the composting materials. On the contrary, Zn content increased in the Trichocompost,  which will help increase Zn uptake by crops, especially in the Zn‐deficient soils [32]. The  decrease in Ni, Cd, and Cu concentration might have been caused by microbial assimila‐ tion in Trichoderma and other microbes or fixed with organic fractions. The rise in the Zn  concentration in compost may be attributable to solubilization of the insoluble forms of  Zn in the manures. However, the increase in Zn concentration will add high value to the  compost for amending rice paddy soils that are Zn deficient. Overall, Trichoderma sp. is a  quick decomposer and, upon its inoculation into composting materials, it enhances the  composting process [18]. When applied in soil, Matin et al. [18] also found that it increases  soil organic matter decomposition, resists pest infestation, and promotes plant growth.  4.2. Effect of Management Practices on the System Productivity  Significantly lower REY in the early stage of adoption of MT is not surprising because  our results were in agreement with past research [33], where the authors also reported  lower  crop  yield  in  MT  than  in  CT.  Similarly,  Alam  et  al.  [34]  and  Arvidsson  and  Håkansson [35] found significantly higher yield in deep tillage than in NT (no tillage) or  MT. In contrast to our results, Memon et al. [14] found higher grain yield in MT than in  CT in the rice‐wheat cropping systems of eastern China. This variation in the effects of  MT or CT on crop yields can also vary due to soil and climatic variations. However, long‐ term practices with reduced and CT tillage [36] showed opposite results to our short‐term  finding, suggesting that MT, over the long term, increases crop yield. Nandan et al. [37]  found higher crop yield under reduced or NT systems over the CT after six years of adop‐ tion of conservation tillage. NT or MT can increase rice yield over a continuous application  for around four to six years [15]; or six to seven years [38]. These findings were in agree‐ ment with Jahangir et al. [39], who stated that adoption of MT gives lower yield in the first  Available P (ppm) Available S (ppm) Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  11 of 17  few years (3–4) and then the yield turns opposite in later years if it is continued. This might  be due to the build‐up of organic matter in the MT practice that occurred with the progress  of cropping cycles [34].  Our results of crop residue retention on crop yield in a consecutive mustard‐rice‐rice  system, being similar in R to NR in the first year (2017), are opposite to many past research  reports. However, in the second year of continuation with the same cropping system, REY  was higher in R than in NR. This can be attributed to the required time lag to build up soil  physical and chemical quality for improving the crop yield. Hossain et al. [40] reported  residue yielded higher grain yield compared to no residue. Residue converts into miner‐ alized nutrients that cause sufficient crop growth and facilitate higher yield than no resi‐ due [41–43]. Increased rice yield by ISFM over the sole application of chemical fertilizer is  in agreement with other researches [44,45]. It is assumed that, compared to inorganic fer‐ tilizer, organic manure releases nutrients slowly and plants receive a steady supply of  nutrients with reduced N loss, which has a positive reflection on crop yield. However,  mineralization of livestock manures was found slower, releasing 25–42% more N than the  control over 90 days of incubation, resulting in slow N fertilization effects [46]. The slower  mineralization can be attributable to the equal REY in R and NR in the first year in our  study. However, slow mineralization can provide residual effects in the following year,  which was evident in our study. Roobroeck et al. [16] reported that ISFM can significantly  enhance the crop productivity and profitability of farmers. Bilkis et al. [17] reported that  integrated application of Trichocompost and cow dung bio‐slurry in rice field increases  rice yield, where Trichocompost was found to be more effective than the bio‐slurry. The  better performance of LC may be due to higher nutrient contents, including Zn, enlarging  soil volume for nutrient and water uptake by fungal hyphae, reducing pest infestation  [18], and functioning as a plant growth promoter [47]. In a rice paddy system, soils are  commonly identified as Zn deficient, resulting from fixation of Zn with other minerals,  which may have caused a better response to the added Zn with the LC.  4.3. Effect of Management Practices on N Uptake and Use Efficiency  Low NUE in our study is in agreement with other past research. In intensive agricul‐ tural production systems, more than 50% and up to 75% of the N applied to the field is  not used by the plant [48,49]. Low NUE in MT agrees with Yang et al. [50] who, in a 2‐ year experiment in China, found that NUE is comparatively lower under a no tillage field.  By contrast, Liu et al. [10], in a two‐year field study in China, observed no differences in  NUE between no‐tillage and conventional tillage systems. The variation in NUE may be  due to the variations in N mineralization in two tillage systems, resulting in the N release  and uptake by crops.  Similarly,  N  uptake  was  increased  in  R,  while  the  NUE  was  equal  in  R  and  NR.  Agegnehu et al. [51] found that the trend of plant N uptake increases in relation to organic  amendments and N levels are similar to the increments in the plant growth, yield, and soil  nutrient status. After conducting a 7‐year experiment, Takahashi et al. [52] suggested that  continuous application of rice straw contributes to the improvement of soil fertility and  the  promotion  of  growth  and  N  uptake  of  paddy  and  upland  crops.  Conversely,  Phongpan and Mosier [53], in a 1‐year experiment in Thailand, observed no difference in  N uptake between rice residue retention and no residue retention, which is in opposition  to our results. The authors also found no differences in NUE between residue retention  and no retention, which agrees with our findings.  The LC increased the NUE over the RD and BS by enhancing the N uptake in grain  and straw, while the yield was also higher in LC. Higher N uptake in LC‐treated soils  might have happened due to accumulation of N and other nutrients in soils from the  chronic bio‐compost application in six consecutive seasons that improved soil biological  and physic‐chemical conditions, which favored N release from LC‐treated soils at a faster  rate. Tillage systems with application of different organic and inorganic N sources may  enhance the mineralization rates of organic residues and release more nutrients, resulting    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  12 of 17  in greater N uptake. Similar to our results, Hu et al. [45], from a 35‐year study of organic  alone or integrated organic and inorganic fertilization, concluded that N uptake in the  manure  combined  with  mineral  fertilizer  treatments  were  higher  than  that  in  manure  alone or mineral fertilizer alone. They also found that use of manures alone, or with inor‐ ganic fertilizer, increases NUE in rice systems, which agrees with our results. However,  comparing our short‐term effects with their long‐term reports, it can be suggested that  continuation  with  ISFM  will  increase  NUE  in  intensively  managed  rice  ecosystems.  Equally, Liu et al. [10] found that combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizers  significantly increases NUE in rice‐based cropping systems.  4.4. Effect of Management Practices on Soil Aggregate MWD  The MWD is an important physical indicator of soil aggregate stability [54], reflecting  the proportion of macroaggregates to the total aggregates [55]. In our study, aggregate  MWD was higher in MT than in CT, indicating that rice soil under CT reduces aggregate  formation and enhances dispersion of larger aggregates. For rice cultivation, continuous  puddling operations increase slaking of soil aggregates and cause their breakdown into  microaggregates and primary soil particles [4,15,56]. Relatively improved soil aggregate  formation in the MT agrees with the results of other studies [57,58]. Physical disturbance  associated with CT results in a direct breakdown, slaking and an increased turnover of  aggregates, especially macroaggregates [59] and fragments of roots and mycorrhizal hy‐ phae, which are major binding agents for macroaggregate formation [60]. Frequent tillage  deteriorates soil structure and weakens soil aggregates, causing them to be dispersed [24].  In contrast, the MT reduces soil physical disturbance as well as reduces SOM decomposi‐ tion  rates  by  reducing  its  exposure  to  O2  and  sunlight.  Moreover,  the  MT  helps  form  macroaggregates by complexing microaggregates and primary soil particles with humi‐ fied SOC compounds, fungal hyphae, and plant roots [61].  A  significant  impact  of  crop  residue  retention  on  soil  aggregate  properties  might  have been due to the increased SOC, TN, and microbial biomass that contribute to im‐ proved soil aggregate formation, which is in agreement with past research [62]. The C:N  ratio of the residues determines their decomposition and subsequent utilization by mi‐ crobes to influence soil aggregate properties [63,64]. The high C:N ratio of rice straw (C:N  = 80) has lower mineralization rates, which can enhance soil aggregation due to its longer  persistence in soil as a particulate organic matter. Residue quality (such as C:N) alters the  rate of decomposition of the residue and, therefore, influences soil aggregation [65].  Improvements in aggregate MWD following additional organic amendments have  already been reported [66]. Application of organic manures improves soil aggregation by  increasing the organic matter content in soils, which functions as a binding agent for soil  aggregate formation and reduces slaking of macroaggregates. Application of organic fer‐ tilizer often increases SOC content [67] and the proportion of macroaggregates [68]. Also,  organic amendments may indirectly affect aggregate MWD by increasing above and be‐ lowground crop biomass and biological activity. Guo et al. [69] reported that soil aggre‐ gate MWD, which was strongly correlated with various fractions of SOC, significantly  increased with manure application. Mikha et al. [70] pointed out that manure application  promoted the formation of macroaggregates and increased aggregate MWD. Trichocom‐ post is a fungi‐bearing bio‐compost that can enhance soil aggregate formation by accu‐ mulating soil particles with fungal hyphae, especially in MT with crop residues.  4.5. Effect of Management Practices on Post‐Harvest OC and TN Contents in Soils  Numerous past authors have shown experimental evidence of higher SOC and TN  [37,71] in MT than in CT. These findings are in line with our short‐ term study, indicating  the potential of MT for enhancing SOC and TN. Conservation tillage is becoming an eco‐ nomical and ecologically viable option for conserving energy and providing favorable soil  conditions for sustainable crop production, SOC sequestration, and efficient N fertilizer    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  13 of 17  use [72]. Tian et al. [73] found 29% and 91% higher SOC in NT than in CT and RT, respec‐ tively. Adoption of some form of conservation tillage is generally beneficial for increasing  SOC levels and sequestering C in the topsoil [34]. In the case of CT, the organic source  may be easily subjective to oxidization, and microbes quickly consume the mineralized N  for their structure formation, which may be the reason behind the decrease of TN in CT  in post‐harvest soils. To the contrary, nitrification can be inhibited in MT under field con‐ ditions because of accumulation of organic matter and nutrients, such as N, at or near the  soil surface that may restrict N mineralization. In addition, lack of soil disturbance due to  factors such as no‐tillage systems helps to minimize organic matter loss and increase SOC  and N stocks over the years [74]. It occurs because under a no tillage system, crop residue  is made available to soil microorganisms at a slower rate for a longer duration and the soil  is in a less oxidative condition [75]. No differences in the post‐harvest soil C and N con‐ tents in soil after two consecutive years of residue management agree with other previous  authors [76]. This may be attributable to faster mineralization of rice residues, or a mixture  of rice residues with maize or wheat [76]. Datta et al. [76] also found higher decomposition  rates of rice residue when placed on the soil surface rather than incorporated into the soils.  In our study, the effect was similar in both tillage systems because the climatic condition  in our subtropical environment might have minimized the effect of partial or full incor‐ poration into the soils. However, continuation of residue management in rice‐based sys‐ tems enhances C sequestration after 4 or 6 years [15], and after 12 years [52]. In our study,  the ISFM with LC and BS were like the RD for SOC content. The combined application of  manures with inorganic fertilizers on SOC yielded similar results in our study to those  found by other authors [77]. However, the ISFM can enhance SOC content if it is continued  for several years. Zhao et al. [78], from a 4‐year experiment, suggested that supplementa‐ tion with compost strengthened the process of mutual promotion between carbon cycle  enzymes and macroaggregates, which would eventually be beneficial to SOC sequestra‐ tion. Bilkis et al. [17] reported that integrated application of Trichocompost in a rice field  increases SOC and N after a 2‐year cycle. Trichocompost is a rapid decomposer of SOM,  which can rapidly release C and N in soils and accumulate within soil aggregates.  4.6. Effect of Management Practices on Post‐Harvest Soil‐Available P and S Contents  No‐till reduces losses of phosphorus in runoff and the loss of nitrate through leach‐ ing, allowing accumulation in soils [79]. Equally, Asenso et al. [80] found higher available  P, S, and exchangeable K content in soils under NT and MT than the soils under deep  tillage,  probably  due  to  high  SOC  level  and  surface  application  of  mineral  fertilizers.  These results are in agreement with the findings of our research. From a 4‐year tillage  experiment, Alam et al. [34] found that MT and zero tillage significantly increased soil’s  available S, which is in line with the current research. Available S content in our soils were  comparatively low, which can be attributed to soil conditions while sampling after har‐ vesting of Aman rice when the soil was comparatively wet, which can cause soil available  S to be reduced. Bilkis et al. [17] from a study of 2 consecutive years of the integrated  application of Trichocompost, vermicompost, and bio‐slurry found that the integrated ap‐ plication of composts and inorganic fertilizers improves soil P and S content where Trich‐ ocompost showed the best performance. This is attributable to higher S‐containing or‐ ganic compounds in LC and BS, or mineralization of the S pools, which are more mobile  [81] and result in a higher amount of residual S than P. In addition, P can be fixed with  various soil minerals [82] and organic fractions (organo‐P chelation), which minimized  the effect of ISFM on the residual P content in soils. Along with the physical and chemical  properties, soil microbial composition and activities should be evaluated to investigate  the effects of composts and other organic materials on soil health. As the current research  had no scope to present microbial data, we recommend future research on microbial dy‐ namics that justifies composts effects on soil health [83] for sustainable food security and  soil fertility.    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  14 of 17  5. Conclusions  Short‐term evaluation of conservation agriculture with ISFM indicates that it is likely  to be a good practice for the sustenance of soil fertility. Minimum soil disturbance in min‐ imum tillage with crop residue improved soil aggregate properties and stored more C, N,  P, and S. Conventional tillage had higher rice equivalent yield, grain N contents, and up‐ take showing higher potential to supply more available N through mineralization. Corre‐ spondingly, the N‐use efficiency was also higher in conventional tillage because of higher  N uptake and accumulation in grain. Trichocompost and bio‐slurry have increased N up‐ take in rice when compared with the recommended fertilizer. The Trichoderma bio‐com‐ post indicated higher potential for increased crop production, as well as to improve soil  health; there was no threat to accumulate heavy metals in soils. The findings are based on  short‐term results, but it is important to evaluate medium and long‐term effects on soil  structural and elemental quality and crop yields.  Supplementary  Materials:  The  following  are  available  online  at  www.mdpi.com/2073‐ 4395/11/11/2101/s1, Supplementary Materials 1. Layout of the experimental plots.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, M.M.R.J., S.I., A.K.M.A.K. and M.B.M.; methodology,  M.M.R.J., and S.I.; software, S.I., T.T.N. and S.U.; validation, M.M.R.J., S.I., M.B.M. and A.K.M.A.K.;  formal analysis, M.M.R.J., S.I., T.T.N. and S.U.; investigation, M.M.R.J., S.I., A.K.M.A.K. and M.B.M.;  resources, M.M.R.J., and S.I.; data curation, M.M.R.J., S.I., and S.U.; writing—original draft prepa‐ ration,  M.M.R.J.,  S.I.,  and  T.T.N.;  writing—review  and  editing,  M.M.R.J.,  S.I.,  T.T.N.,  S.U.,  A.K.M.A.K.,  M.B.M.  and  R.I.;  visualization,  M.M.R.J.,  S.I.,  S.U.  and  R.I.;  supervision,  M.M.R.J.,  A.K.M.A.K. and M.B.M.; project administration, M.M.R.J.; funding acquisition, M.M.R.J., M.B.M.  and A.K.M.A.K. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: The research was funded by the Bangladesh Agricultural University Research Systems in  association with University Grants Commission Bangladesh (grant # 2017/261/BAU).  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable.  Informed Consent Statement:  Not applicable.  Data Availability Statement: The data that support this study will be shared upon reasonable re‐ quest to the corresponding author.  Acknowledgments: Thanks to Abdulla Al Mamun in the Department of Soil Science for his coop‐ eration during field and lab work. We would like to thank Bradford Sherman at The Ohio State  University for his contribution to review and edit the manuscript.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.  References  1. Delgado, J.A.; Groffman, P.M.; Nearing, M.A.; Goddard, T.; Reicosky, D.; Lal, R.; Kitchen, N.R.; Rice, C.W.; Towery, D.; Salon,  P. Conservation practices to mitigate and adapt to climate change. J. Soil Water Conserv. 2011, 66, 118–129.  2. Hasan, M.N.; Hossain, M.S.; Bari, M.A.; Islam, M.R. Agricultural Land Availability in Bangladesh; SRDI: Dhaka, Bangladesh, 2013;  p. 42.  3. Lal, R. Tillage effects on soil degradation, soil resilience, soil quality, and sustainability. Soil Till. Res. 1993, 27, 1–8.  4. Jahangir, M.M.R.; Jahiruddin, M.; Akter, H.; Pervin, R.; Islam, K.R. Cropping diversity with rice influences soil aggregate for‐ mation and nutrient storage under different tillage systems. J. Plant. Nutr. Soil Sci. 2021, 184, 150–162.  5. Chauhan, B.S.; Mahajan, G.; Sardana, V.; Timsina, J.; Jat, M.L. Productivity and sustainability of the rice–wheat cropping system  in the Indo–Gangetic Plains of the Indian subcontinent: Problems, opportunities, and strategies. Advan. Agron. 2012, 117, 315– 369.  6. Lal, R. Sequestering carbon and increasing productivity by conservation agriculture. J. Soil Water Conserv. 2015, 70, 56–62.  7. Martínez, J.M.; Galantini, J.A.; Duval, M.E.; López, F.M. Soil quality assessment based on soil organic matter pools under long‐ term tillage systems and following tillage conversion in a semi humid region. Soil Use Manage. 2020, 36, 400–409.  8. Huang, M.; Zhuo, X.; Cao, F.; Xia, B.; Zou, Y. No‐tillage effect on rice yield in China: A meta‐analysis. Field Crops. Res. 2015, 183,  126–137.  9. Awale, R.; Emeson, M.A.; Machado, S. Soil organic carbon pools as early indicators for soil organic matter stock changes under  different tillage practices in inland Pacific Northwest. Front. Ecol. Evol. 2017, 5, 96.    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  15 of 17  10. Liu, T.; Huang, J.; Chai, K.; Cao, C.; Li, C. Effects of N fertilizer sources and tillage practices on NH3 volatilization, grain yield,  and N use efficiency of rice fields in central China. Front. Plant Sci. 2018, 9, 385.  11. IPCC. Climate Change: Synthesis Report; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: Geneva, Switzerland, 2014.  12. Dey, A.; Dwivedi, B.S.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Datta, S.P.; Meena, M.C.; Jat, R.K.; Gupta, R.K.; Jat, M.L.; Singh, V.K.; Das, D.; et al.  Effect of conservation agriculture on soil organic and inorganic carbon sequestration, and their lability: A study from a rice– wheat cropping system on a calcareous soil of eastern Indo‐Gangetic Plains. Soil Use Manage. 2018, 36, 429–438.  13. Young, M.D.; Ros, G.H.; de Vries, W. A decision support framework assessing management impacts on crop yield, soil carbon  changes and nitrogen losses to the environment. Eur. J. Soil Sci. 2021, 72, 1590–1606.  14. Memon, M.S.; Guo, J.; Tagar, A.A.; Perveen, N.; Ji, C.; Memon, S.A.; Memon, N. The effects of tillage and straw incorporation  on soil organic carbon status, rice crop productivity, and sustainability in the rice‐wheat cropping system of Eastern China.  Sustainability 2018, 10, 961.  15. Jat, H.S.; Datta, A.; Choudhary, M.; Yadav, A.K.; Choudhary, V.; Sharma, P.C.; Gathala, M.K.; Jat, M.L.; McDonald, A. Effects  of tillage, crop establishment and diversification on soil organic carbon, aggregation, aggregate associated carbon and produc‐ tivity in cereal systems of semi‐arid Northwest India. Soil Till. Res. 2019, 190, 128–138.  16. Roobroeck, D.; Van Asten, P.J.A.; Jama, B.; Harawa, R.; Vanlauwe, B. Integrated Soil Fertility Management: Contributions of  framework and practices to Climate‐Smart Agriculture. In PRACTICE BRIEF Climate‐Smart Agriculture; CGIAR Research Pro‐ gram  on  Climate  Change,  Agriculture  and  Food  Security  (CCAFS):  Copenhagen,  Denmark,  2015.  Available  online:  https://hdl.handle.net/10568/69018 (accessed on 15 December 2020).  17. Bilkis, S.; Islam, M.R.; Jahiruddin, M.; Rahman, M.M. Integrated use of manure and fertilizers increases rice yield, nutrient  uptake and soil fertility in the Boro‐fallow‐T. Aman rice cropping pattern. SAARC J. Agric. 2017, 15, 147–161.  18. Matin, M.A.; Islam, M.N.; Muhammad, N.; Islam, M.R. Impact of Trichoderma enhanced composting technology on farmers’  livelihoods in Bangladesh. Int. J. Plant. Soil Sci. 2018, 25, 1–14.  19. Singh, D.P.; Prabha, R.; Renu, S.; Sahu, P.K.; Singh, V. Agrowaste bioconversion and microbial fortification have prospects for  soil health, crop productivity, and eco‐enterprising. Int. J. Recycl. Org. Waste Agric. 2019, 8, 457–472.  20. Fels, L.E.; Hayany, B.E.; Aguelmous, A.; Boutafda, A.; Zegzouti, Y.; Ghizlen, E.; Kouisni, L.; Hafidi, M. The Use of Microorgan‐ isms for the Biodegradation of Sewage Sludge and the Production of Bio‐compost for Sustainable Agriculture. In Biofertilizers  for Sustainable Agriculture and Environment; Giri, B., Prasad, R., Wu, Q.S., Varma, A., Eds.; Springer: Cham, Switzerland; New  York, NY, USA, 2019; pp. 301–316.  21. Islam,  M.R.;  Talukder,  M.M.H.;  Hoque,  M.A.;  Uddin,  S.;  Hoque,  T.S.;  Rea,  R.S.;  Kasim,  S.  Lime  and  Manure  Amendment  Improve Crop Yield and Soil Quality in Acidic Terrace Soil. Agriculture 2021, 22, under review.  22. De  Leenheer,  L.;  De  Boodt,  M.  Determination  of  aggregate  stability  by  change  in  mean  weight  diameter.  Meded.  Lundbouwhogeschool Gent 1967, 24, 290–300.  23. Van Bavel, C.H.M. Mean Weight‐Diameter of Soil Aggregates as a Statistical Index of Aggregation. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 1950, 14,  20–23.  24. Zheng, H.; Liu, W.; Zheng, J.; Luo, Y.; Li, R.; Wang, H. Effect of long‐term tillage on soil aggregates and aggregate‐associated  carbon in black soil of Northeast China. PLoS ONE 2018, 13, e0199523.  25. Walkley, A. A critical examination of a rapid method for determining organic carbon in soils‐effect of variations in digestion  conditions and of inorganic soil constituents. Soil Sci. 1947, 63, 251–264.  26. Fawcett, J.K. The semi‐micro Kjeldahl method for the determination of nitrogen. J. Med. Lab. Technol. 1954, 12, 1–22.  27. Olsen, S.R.; Cole, C.V.; Watanabe, F.S.; Dean, L.A. Estimation of Available Phosphorus in Soils by Extraction with Sodium Bicarbonate;  United States Department of Agriculture, Circular 939; United States Government Printing Office: Washington, DC, USA, 1954.  28. Williams, C.H.; Steinbergs, A. Soil sulfur fractions as chemical indices of available sulfur in some Australian soils. Aus. J. Agric.  Res. 1959, 10, 340–352.  29. Weih, M.; Hamnér, K.; Pourazari, P. Analyzing plant nutrient uptake and utilization efficiencies: Comparison between crops  and approaches. Plant. Soil 2018, 430, 7–21.  30. EUNEP. Nitrogen Use Efficiency (NUE)—An Indicator for the Utilization of Nitrogen in Agriculture and Food Systems; Wageningen  University: Wageningen, The Netherlands, 2015.  31. Masunga, R.H.; Uzokwe, V.N.; Mlay, P.D.; Odeh, I.; Singh, A.; Buchan, D.; de Neve, S. Nitrogen mineralization dynamics of  different valuable organic amendments commonly used in agriculture. Appl. Soil Ecol. 2016, 101, 185–193.  32. Zeb, H.; Hussain, A.; Naveed, M.; Ditta, A.; Ahmad, S.; Jamshaid, M.U.; Ahmad, H.T.; Hussain, M.B.; Aziz, R.; Haider, M.S.  Compost enriched with ZnO and Zn‐solubilizing bacteria improves yield and Zn‐fortification in flooded rice. Ital. J. Agron. 2018,  13, 310–316.  33. Rahman, M.S.; Haque, M.A.; Salam, M.A. Effect of different tillage practices on growth, yield and yield contributing characters  of transplanted Aman rice (BRRI Dhan‐33). Agron. J. 2004, 3, 103–110.  34. Alam, M.K.; Islam, M.M.; Salahin, N.; Hasanuzzaman, M. Effect of tillage practices on soil properties and crop productivity in  wheat‐mungbean‐rice  cropping  system  under  subtropical  climatic  conditions.  Sci.  World  J.  2014,  437283.  https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/437283.    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  16 of 17  35. Arvidsson, J.; Håkansson, I. Does soil compaction persist after ploughing—Results from 21 long‐term field experiments? Soil  Till. Res. 1996, 39, 175–198.  36. De Cárcer, P.S.; Sinaj, S.; Santonja, M.; Fossati, D.; Jeangros, B. Long‐term effects of crop succession, soil tillage and climate on  wheat yield and soil properties. Soil Till. Res. 2019, 190, 209–2019.  37. Nandan, R.; Singh, V.; Singh, S.S.; Kumar, V.; Hazra, K.K.; Nath, C.P.; Pooni, S.; Malik, R.K.; Bhattacharyya, R.; McDonald, A.  Impact of conservation tillage in rice–based cropping systems on soil aggregation, carbon pools and nutrients. Geoderma 2019,  340, 104–114.  38. Yadav, G.S.; Datta, R.; Pathan, S.I.; Lal, R.; Meena, R.S.; Babu, S.; Das, A.; Bhowmik, S.N.; Datta, M.; Saha, P.; et al. Effects of  conservation tillage and nutrient management practices on soil fertility and productivity of rice in North Eastern Region of  India. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1816, doi:10.3390/su9101816.  39. Jahangir, M.M.R.; Jahan, I.; Mumu, N.J. Management of soil resources for sustainable development under a changing climate.  J. Environ. Sci Nat. Resour 2018, 11, 159–170.  40. Hossain, I.; Sarker, M.J.U.; Hoque, M.A. Status of conservation agriculture‐based tillage technology for crop production in  Bangladesh. Bangladesh. J. Agric Res. 2015, 40, 235–248.  41. Lu, X. A meta‐analysis of the effects of crop residue returns on crop yields and water use efficiency. PLoS ONE 2020, 15, e0231740.  42. Srivastava, P.K.; Gupta, M.; Upadhyay, R.K.; Sharma, S.; Singh, N.; Tewari, S.K.; Singh, B. Effects of combined application of  vermin‐compost and mineral fertilizer on the growth of Allium cepa and soil fertility. J. Soil Sci. Plant. Nutr. 2012, 175, 101–107.  43. Uddin, U.; Nitu, T.T.; Milu, U.M.; Nasreen, S.S.; Hosenuzzaman, M.; Haque, M.E.; Hossain, B.; Jahiruddin, M.; Bell, R.W.; Müller,  C.; et al. Ammonia fluxes and emission factors under an intensively managed wetland rice ecosystem. Environ. Sci. Process.  Impacts 2021, 23, 132–143.  44. Haque, M.A.; Jahiruddin, M.; Islam, M.S.; Rahman, M.M.; Saleque, M.A. Effect of bioslurry on the yield of wheat and rice in the  wheat–rice cropping system. Agric. Res. 2018, 7, 432–442.  45. Hu, C.; Xia, X.G.; Chen, Y.F.; Qiao, Y.; Liu, D.H.; Fan, J.; Li, S.L. Yield, nitrogen use efficiency and balance response to thirty‐ five years of fertilization in paddy rice‐upland wheat cropping system. Plant. Soil Environ. 2019, 65, 55–62.  46. Abbasi, M.K.; Hina, M.; Khalique, A.; Khan, S.R. Mineralization of Three Organic Manures Used as Nitrogen Source in a Soil  Incubated under Laboratory Conditions. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant. Anal. 2007, 38, 1691–1711.  47. Celar, F.; Valic, N. Effects of Trichoderma spp. and Glicladium roseum culture filtrates on seed germination of vegetables and  maize. J. Plant. Dis. Protect. 2005, 112, 343–350.  48. Asghari, H.R.; Cavagnaro, T.R. Arbuscular mycorrhizae as enhance plant interception of leached nutrients. Funct. Plant. Biol. 2011,  38, 219–226.  49. San Francisco, S.; Urrutia, O.; Martin, V.; Peristeropoulos, A.; Garcia‐Mina, J.M. Efficiency of urease and nitrification inhibitors  in reducing ammonia volatilization from diverse nitrogen fertilizers applied to different soil types and wheat straw mulching.  J. Soc. Food Agric. 2011, 91, 1569–1575.  50. Yang, C.; Xu, S.; Liu, L.; Huang, M.; Zheng, T.; Wei, S.; Zhang, Y.; Deng, G.; Jiang, L. Nitrogen uptake and utilization by no‐ tillage rice under different soil moisture conditions—A model study under simulated soil conditions. Plant. Product Sci. 2015,  18, 118–127.  51. Agegnehu, G.; Nelson, P.N.; Bird, M.I. Crop yield, plant nutrient uptake and soil physicochemical properties under organic soil  amendments and nitrogen fertilization on nitisols. Soil Till. Res. 2016, 160, 1–13.  52. Takahashi, S.; Uenosono, S.; Ono, S. Short and long‐term effects of rice straw application on nitrogen uptake by crops and  nitrogen mineralization under flooded and upland conditions. Plant. Soil 2003, 251, 291–301.  53. Phongpan, S.; Mosier, A. Impact of organic residue management on nitrogen use efficiency in an annual rice cropping sequence  of lowland Central Thailand. Nutr. Cycl. Agroecosyst. 2003, 66, 233–240.  54. Li, L.Q.; Zhang, X.H.; Zhang, P.J.; Zheng, J.F.; Pan, G.X. Variation of organic carbon and nitrogen in aggregate size fractions of  a paddy soil under fertilization practices from Tai Lake Region, China. J. Sci. Food Agric. 2007, 87, 1052–1058.  55. Kihara, J.A.; Bationo, D.N.; Mugendi, C.; Martius, C.; Vlek, P.L.G. Conservation tillage, local organic resources and nitrogen  fertilizer combinations affect maize productivity, soil structure and nutrient balances in semi‐arid Kenya. Nutr. Cycl. Agroecosyst.  2011, 90, 213–225.  56. Amézketa, E.; Aragüés, R.; Carranza, R.; Urgel, B. Macro‐and micro‐aggregate stability of soils determined by a combination of  wet‐sieving and laser‐ray diffraction. Span. J. Agric. Res. 2003, 1, 83–94.  57. Nyamadzawo, G.; Nyamangara, J.; Nyamugafata, P.; Muzulu, A. Soil microbial biomass and mineralization of aggregate pro‐ tected carbon in fallow‐maize systems under conventional and no‐tillage in Central Zimbabwe. Soil Till. Res. 2009, 102, 151–157.  58. Fuentes, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Etchevers, J.; De León, F.; Guerrero, A.; Dendooven, L.; Verhulst, N.; Govaerts, B. Conservation agri‐ culture increased organic carbon in the topsoil macro‐aggregates and reduced soil CO2 emissions. Plant. Soil 2012, 355, 183–197.  59. Six, J.; Elliott, E.T.; Paustian, K. Soil macroaggregate turnover and microaggregate formation: A mechanism for C sequestration  under no‐tillage agriculture. Soil Biol. Biochem. 2000, 2, 2099–2103.  60. Bronick, C.J.; Lal, L. Soil structure and management: A review. Geoderma 2005, 124, 3–22.    Agronomy 2021, 11, 2101  17 of 17  61. Blanco‐Moure, N.; Moret‐Fernández, D.; López, M.V. Dynamics of aggregate destabilization by water in soils under long‐term  conservation tillage in semiarid Spain. Catena 2012, 99, 34–41.  62. Chu, J.; Zhang, T.; Chang, W.; Zhang, D.; Zulfiqar, S.; Fu, A. Impacts of cropping systems on aggregates associated organic  carbon and nitrogen in a semiarid highland agroecosystem. PLoS ONE 2016, 11, e0165018.  63. Tivet, F.; de Moraes Sá, J.C.; Lal, R.; Briedis, C.; Borszowskei, P.R.; dos Santos, J.B.; Farias, A.; Eurich, G.; Hartman, D.D.C.;  Nadolny, J.M.; et al. Aggregate C depletion by plowing and its restoration by diverse biomass‐C inputs under no‐till in sub‐ tropical and tropical regions of Brazil. Soil Till. Res. 2013, 126, 203–218.  64. Zhou, M.; Liu, C.; Wang, J.; Meng, Q.; Yuan, Y.; Ma, X.; Liu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Ding, G.; Zhang, J.; et al. Soil aggregate stability and  storage of soil organic carbon respond to cropping systems on Black Soils of Northeast China. Sci. Rep. 2020, 10, 265.  65. Sainju, U.M.; Whitehead, W.F.; Singh, B.P. Cover crops and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil aggregation and carbon and  nitrogen pools. Can. J. Soil Sci. 2003, 83, 155–165.  66. Caravaca, F.; Lax, A.; Albaladejo, J. Soil aggregate stability and organic matter in clay and fine silt fractions in urban refuse‐ amended semiarid soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 2001, 65, 1235–1238.  67. Yu, H.Y.; Ding, W.X.; Luo, J.F.; Geng, R.L.; Cai, Z.C. Long‐term application of organic manure and mineral fertilizers on aggre‐ gation and aggregate‐associated carbon in a sandy loam soil. Soil Till. Res. 2012, 124, 170–177.  68. Huang, S.; Peng, X.X.; Huang, Q.R.; Zhang, W.J. Soil aggregation and organic carbon fractions affected by long‐term fertilization  in a red soil of subtropical China. Geoderma 2010, 154, 364–369.  69. Guo, Z.; Zhang, L.; Yang, W.; Hua, L.; Cai, C. Aggregate stability under long‐term fertilization practices: The case of eroded  Ultisols of South‐Central China. Sustainability 2019, 11, 1169.  70. Mikha, M.M.; Hergert, G.W.; Benjamin, J.G.; Jabro, J.D.; Nielsen, R.A. Long‐term manure impacts on soil aggregates and aggre‐ gate‐associated carbon and nitrogen. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 2015, 79, 626–636.  71. Khorami, S.S.; Kazemeini, S.A.; Afzalinia, A.; Gathala, M.K. Changes in soil properties and productivity under different tillage  practices and wheat genotypes: A Short‐term study in Iran. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3273, doi:10.3390/su10093273.  72. Mazzoncini, M.; Sapkota, T.B.; Bàrberi, P.; Antichi, D.; Risalati, R. Long‐term effect of tillage, nitrogen fertilization and cover  crops on soil organic carbon and total nitrogen content. Soil Till. Res. 2011, 114, 165–174.  73. Tian, Q.; He, H.; Cheng, W.; Bai, Z.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, X. Factors controlling soil organic carbon stability along a temperate forest  altitudinal gradient. Sci. Rep. 2016, 6, 18783.  74. Diekow, J.; Mielniczuk, J.; Knicker, H.; Bayer, C.; Dick, D.P.; Kögel‐Knabner, I. Soil C and N stocks as affected by cropping  systems and N fertilization in the southern Brazil Acrisol managed under no‐tillage for 17 years. Soil Till. Res. 2005, 81, 87–95.  75. Kheyrodin, H.; Ghazvininan, K.; Taherian, M. Tillage and manure effect on soil microbial biomass and respiration, and on  enzyme activities. Afr. J. Biotechnol. 2012, 11, 14652–14659.  76. Datta, A.; Jat, H.S.; Yadav, A.K.; Choudhary, M.; Sharma, P.C.; Rai, M.; Kumar, L.; Majumder, S.P.; Choudhary, V.; Jat, M.L.  Carbon mineralization in soil as influenced by crop residue type and placement in an Alfisols of Northwest India. Carbon Manag.  2019, 10, 37–50.  77. Ren, T.; Wang, J.; Chen, Q.; Zhang, F.; Lu, S. The effects of manure and nitrogen fertilizer applications on soil organic carbon  and nitrogen in a high‐input cropping system. PLoS ONE 2014, 9, e97732.  78. Zhao, Z.; Zhang, C.; Li, F.; Gao, S.; Zhang, J. Effect of compost and inorganic fertilizer on organic carbon and activities of carbon  cycle enzymes in aggregates of an intensively cultivated Vertisol. PLoS ONE 2020, 15, e0229644.  79. Soane, B.; Bruce, C.; Ball, B.C.; Arvidsson, J.; Basch, G.; Moreno, F.; Roger‐Estade, J. No‐till in northern, western and south  western Europe: A review of problems and opportunities for crop production and the environment. Soil Till. Res. 2012, 118, 66– 87.  80. Asenso, E.; Li, J.; Hu, L.; Issaka, F.; Tian, K.; Zhang, L.; Chen, H. Tillage effects on soil biochemical properties and maize grown  in latosolic red soil of southern China. Appl. Environ. Soil Sci. 2018, 2018, 8426736.  81. Zhou, W.; Li, S.T.; Wang, H.; He, P.; Lin, B. Mineralization of organic sulfur and its importance as a reservoir of plant‐available  sulfur in upland soils of north China. Biol. Fert. Soils 1999, 30, 245–250.  82. Samuel, A.L.; Ebenezer, A.O. Mineralization rates of soil forms of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium as affected by organo‐ mineral fertilizer in sandy loam. Adv. Agric. 2014, 2014, 1–5. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/149209.  83. Durrer, A.; Gumiere, T.; Rumenos Guidetti Zagatto, M.; Petry Feiler, H.; Miranda Silva, A.M.; Henriques Longaresi, R.; Homma,  S.K.; Cardoso, E.J.B.N. Organic farming practices change the soil bacteria community, improving soil quality and maize crop  yields. PeerJ 2021, 9, e11985, doi:10.7717/peerj.11985. 

Journal

AgronomyMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Oct 20, 2021

Keywords: conservation agriculture; integrated soil fertility management; trichocompost; soil quality; crop yield

There are no references for this article.