Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Analysis of the Air-Reversed Brayton Heat Pump with Different Layouts of Turbochargers for Space Heating

Analysis of the Air-Reversed Brayton Heat Pump with Different Layouts of Turbochargers for Space... Article  Analysis of the Air‐Reversed Brayton Heat Pump with  Different Layouts of Turbochargers for Space Heating  1 2, 3 1 Shugang Wang  , Shuangshuang Li  *, Shuang Jiang   and Xiaozhou Wu      Faculty of Infrastructure Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China;  sgwang@dlut.edu.cn (S.W.); fonen519@dlut.edu.cn (X.W.)    College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Dalian University, Dalian 116622, China    College of Civil Engineering, Dalian Minzu University, Dalian 116600, China; shjiang@dlnu.edu.cn  *  Correspondence: lishuangshuang@dlu.edu.cn; Tel.: +86‐155‐4268‐6558  Abstract: The air‐reversed Brayton cycle produces charming, environmentally friendly effects by  using air as its refrigerant and has potential energy efficiency in applications related to space heating  and building heating. However, there exist several types of cycle that need to be discussed. In this  paper, six types of air‐reversed Brayton heat pump with a turbocharger, applicable under different  heating conditions, are developed. The expressions of the heating coefficient of performance (COP)  and the corresponding turbine pressure ratio are derived based on thermodynamic analysis. By  using these expressions, the effects of turbine pressure ratio on the COP under different working  conditions  are  theoretically  analyzed,  and  the  optimal  COPs  of  different  cycles  under  specific  working conditions are determined. It is observed that Cycles A and C have the highest heating  COPs, and there is an optimal pressure ratio for each cycle. The corresponding pressure ratio of the  optimal COP is different, concentrated in the range of 1.5–1.9. When the pressure ratio reaches the  optimal value, increasing the pressure ratio does not significantly improve the heating COP. Take  Cycle  F  as  an  example:  the  maximum  error  between  the  calculated  results  and  experimental  observation is lower than 5.6%. These results will enable further study of the air‐reversed Brayton  Citation: Wang, S.; Li, S.; Jiang, S.;  heat pump with a turbocharger from a different perspective.  Wu, X. Analysis of the Air‐Reversed  Brayton Heat Pump with Different  Layouts of Turbochargers for Space  Keywords: air‐reversed Brayton heat pump; turbocharger; system layout; pressure ratio; COP  Heating. Buildings 2022, 12, 870.  https://doi.org/10.3390/  buildings12070870  1. Introduction  Academic Editor: Rafik Belarbi  The  use  of  heat  pumps  for  space  heating  and  drying  is  one  of  the  solutions  for  Received: 29 April 2022  providing  a  stable  and  affordable  energy  supply  which  contributes  to  environmental  Accepted: 18 June 2022  protection and sustainable energy development. Although the theoretical coefficient of  Published: 21 June 2022  performance (COP) value is relatively low, air‐source devices may have great potential  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  for  development.  A  reversed  Brayton  cycle  using  air  as  the  green  working  fluid  is  a  neutral with  regard  to jurisdictional  potential alternative to conventional vapor compression systems of heating and drying  claims  in  published  maps  and  [1–3].  Recent  exploitation  of  the  unification  of  expansion/compression  into  a  single  institutional affiliations.  operation (compander) promotes the productization of air‐reversed Brayton heat pump  (air cycle heat pump) products [4,5].  Air as the working fluid in the reversed Brayton cycle is a potential substitute for the  Copyright:  ©  2022  by  the  authors.  conventional  vapor  compression  cycles.  However,  compared  with  conventional  vapor  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  compression heat pumps, the energy efficiency of a basic air cycle heat pump (air‐reversed  This article  is an open access article  Brayton heat pump) is lower under normal temperature conditions. Thus, a regenerated  distributed  under  the  terms  and  air cycle was utilized for improving the overall system performance. The performance of  conditions of the Creative Commons  an air cycle heat pump can be remarkably enhanced by adding a regenerator [1,6,7]. Based  Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  on finite‐time thermodynamics, an analytical solution was derived that demonstrated the  (https://creativecommons.org/license effects  of  pressure  ratio,  heat  exchanger  effectiveness,  and  the  ratio  between  the  inlet  s/by/4.0/).  Buildings 2022, 12, 870. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12070870  www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  2  of  16  temperature of the cooling fluid and that of the heating fluid of the heat reservoir on key  performance indices [8–12].  The  reversed  Brayton  cycle,  which  uses  air  as  a  refrigerant,  has  more  typical  operation  characteristics  compared  with  the  traditional  ones.  Most  notably,  the  regenerated air‐reversed Brayton heat pump is more suitable for application in cold and  frigid regions. It can not only break through the limits of the ambient temperature of air‐ source heat pumps but can also remove the heat exchange of the low‐temperature side  when using a semi‐open form, which means that the air can directly enter the compressor  and avoid various problems caused by evaporator frosting. A thermodynamic model of  an air cycle heat pump with a compressor and an expander was proposed by Zhang et al.;  heating capacity in line with heating load was found [13]. This thermodynamic model was  further developed by Yuan and Zhang, who added a regenerator so that the regenerated  air  cycle  heat  pump  could  not  only  ensure  heating  capacity  that  was  in  line  with  the  heating load but could also achieve a higher COP compared with trans‐critical CO2 heat  pumps under a large temperature difference [14]. A simulation model of an air cycle heat  pump water heater was developed by Yang et al., and it was found that this system could  save  the  heating‐up  period,  especially  when  operating  at  low  ambient  temperature  conditions [15]. As the expansion device in the market is too large for domestic and vehicle  heating usage, the existing experimental studies were primarily limited to improving the  structure of individual components such as the compressor and the expander [16–18].  A turbocharger was used in air cycle systems to substitute the compressor and the  expander.  It  miniaturized  the  air  cycle  system  and  also  simplified  the  system  design  without considering the matching and connection problems between the compressor and  the expander. A comprehensive report on an air cycle with a turbocharger was released  by  TNO  [19],  in  which  it  was  mentioned  that  a  pilot  plant  processed  air  in  open  and  recuperated cycles for freezing applications. Spence et al. [20,21] designed and established  a prototype for existing trailer refrigeration units for road transport, where the overall  COP was about 0.3 at the cryogenic temperature of −20 °C. Catalano et al. [22,23] designed  an air cycle using a turbocharger and roots blowers for refrigeration. A COP higher than  −42 °C. L 0.6 was reported for the turbine exit temperature of  i et al. [24–26] theoretically  and  experimentally  studied  the  air‐reversed  Brayton  heat  pump  system  with  an  automotive turbocharger. A thermodynamic model for this system was presented, and  the  relationships between  the system performance and the operating parameters were  illustrated.  Moreover,  a  test  bench  of  a  regenerated  air  cycle  heat  pump  with  a  turbocharger  was  presented,  and  the  measurement  results  illustrated  that  the  heating  capacity of the air cycle heat pump could match the heating load well.  However,  the  form  of  the  air‐reversed  Brayton  cycle  with  a  turbocharger  in  the  current  research  is  single,  and  the  application  scope  is  narrow.  As  the  functions  and  application  conditions  of  the  single‐cycle  form  are  limited,  it  is  necessary  to  derive  a  variety of cycle processes to improve this type of heat pump cycle form, and the difference  in cycle form can also lead to changes in heating characteristics. This paper develops a  different thermodynamic process for the air‐reversed Brayton cycle with a turbocharger.  The relations between the heating COPs and the turbine pressure ratio are established  based  on  reasonable  assumptions  and  the  thermodynamic  diagram.  Therefore,  an  in‐ depth look into the variation of performance parameters with pressure ratio parameters  in different cycles is achieved.  2. Theoretical Analysis of Different Types of Air Heat Pump with a Turbocharger  Compared with a traditional air‐source heat pump system, the air‐reversed Brayton  heat pump system with a turbocharger has great potential in low‐temperature heating,  energy  saving,  and  emission  reduction. As  the  turbocharger  is  used  to  replace  the  compressor and expander, and the blower is added as the power source, it is possible to  use  the  air‐reversed  Brayton  heat  pump  system  in  civil  building  winter  heating  and  domestic  hot  water  supplies and  other projects. By designing  various  thermodynamic  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  3  of  16  processes of the air‐reversed Brayton heat pump system with a turbocharger driven by a  blower, the service conditions and application scope of this kind of heat pump can be  widened, which endows this system with greater diversity.  2.1. Description of Different Cycle Structures and Characteristics  Considering the limitations of heating objective conditions and the diversity of user  needs, a single form of air‐reversed Brayton heat pump with a turbocharger cannot meet  all  the  application  conditions.  Furthermore,  a  variety  of  cycle  forms  have  their  own  heating characteristics and structural advantages. Therefore, it is necessary to design more  structural forms by designing combined modes of blowers and turbochargers, the number  of blowers and their setting positions, the number of heat exchangers in the system, and  their settings in the system position, etc. These forms can be extended from the six kinds  of new heat pump cycle with a turbocharger to different heat demands and conditions,  named Cycle A–Cycle F and shown in Figure 1. These six forms can not only provide  different terminal heat‐carrying fluids, such as water or air for heating and domestic hot  water, but can also discharge cooler air from the system that can be used for refrigeration.  In this  section,  heating is used as  an  example.  Although these  six  kinds  of  cycle  have  certain representativeness, the structure is not limited to these six forms. Its application  range can be further expanded by deriving other structures not covered in this paper.      (a)  (b)  (c)  (d)  (e)  (f)  Figure 1. Different cycles of the air‐reversed Brayton heat pump system with a turbocharger. 1:  compressor, 2: heat exchanger, 3: blower, 4: preheater (regenerative), 5: turbine, 6: fan coil, 7: oil  pump, 8: oil tank (P/T pressure sensor/temperature sensor). (a) Cycle A; (b) Cycle B; (c) Cycle C; (d)  Cycle D; (e) Cycle E; (f) Cycle F.  Except for Cycle F, which was set as having two blowers, all other cycles adopt one  blower as the power‐driving equipment, i.e., a single‐fan system. In Cycle A, the blower  is set before the compressor of the turbocharger, and the cold air in the environment is  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  4  of  16  initially  preheated  through  preheater  4. This  equipment  can  significantly  improve  the  heating performance of the system. Subsequently, the air first passes through the blower  3 and then enters the turbocharger compressor 1 to be heated up and boosted. The setting  of oil pump 7 and oil tank 8 ensures the normal, high‐speed operation of the turbocharger.  High‐temperature air through heat exchanger 2 is mainly used for the heat exchanger. The  fan coil unit 6 and similar equipment can be used for the heating end equipment. The  exothermic air still has some residual heat that is used as a heat source for preheater 4 to  preheat the air from the environment. Finally, the air is expanded through the turbocharge  turbine 5 and then diverted outside. In another semi‐open cycle, Cycle B, the blower is  placed in front of the turbine as shown in Figure 1b. The starting resistance is smaller than  in  Cycle  A.  These  two  forms  are  the  most  basic  modifications  of  the  traditional  air‐ reversed Brayton heat pump cycle.  Cycle C is also a series combination of a single fan and a compressor. The indoor air  first  enters  preheater  4  and  then  expands  and  cools  through  turbocharger  turbine  5.  Subsequently, it absorbs heat from the outdoor air heat source through heat exchanger 2.  After heating up through preheater 4, it enters turbocharger compressor 1 and blower 3  and is finally sent into the room directly. The simple system structure can improve the  temperature  of  the air  entering the  compressor and  reduce the  temperature  of  the air  entering the turbine, which improves the heating efficiency of the system. Considering  the  practical  application,  blower  3  is  set  after  the  turbocharger  compressor  1.  This  configuration can lower the exhaust pressure and temperature of the compressor, which  is convenient for the recovery of lubricating oil at the outlet of the compressor. The hot air  is directly fed into the room to reduce the heat loss caused by the end equipment. At the  same time, system requirements are reduced as the system operates under a low vacuum.  Cycles D and E are closed circulation cycles which are not affected by the ambient air  quality. However, due to  the  use  of two  heat  exchangers,  the  overall  efficiency  of the  whole machine is reduced, and the cost is higher than that of Cycles A and B. The above  cycles have the same flow rates of the compressor and the turbine. By adding another  blower, the system can be transformed into a dual‐blower system, which is closer to the  actual operating condition of the vehicle turbocharger. The circulation form of the dual‐ blower system, shown by Cycle F in Figure 1, is slightly more complicated than that of the  single‐blower system. One blower is connected in series with the compressor, which is  subsequently  in  parallel  with  another  blower.  The  air  flows  through  the  two  parallel  pipelines  and  is  mixed  together  and  then  sent  to  gas‐water  heat  exchanger  2  for  heat  transfer. Subsequently, the air is used to preheat the ambient air temperature and is finally  discharged outdoors.  The heat‐carrying fluid in the end equipment of the other cycles is water, except for  in Cycle C. The equipment is not only limited to the fan coil, but can also use the floor  radiant coil, radiator, etc., and is designed for a domestic hot water system. However, the  temperature of the hot water is affected to a certain extent. To ensure the optimal pressure  ratio of Cycle C, the air temperature as the circulating refrigerant is lower because the  closed heat exchanger must be used on the heat‐source side.  2.2. Analytical Expression of Heating COP  2.2.1. T‐s Diagram  At present, only a limited amount of research exists on the air‐reversed Brayton heat  pump system with a turbocharger and a blower. Theoretical analysis is mostly carried out  for the conventional, regenerated air‐reversed Brayton heat pump system. However, this  cannot truly reflect the heating characteristics of this system driven by a blower with a  turbocharger and the relationship between the related parameters and the heating COP.  Therefore, this section derives the expressions reflecting the analytical relation between  the COP and the pressure ratio based on the temperature entropy diagram (T‐s diagram)  of different heat pump forms and relevant assumptions.  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  5  of  16  Figure 2 depicts the T‐s diagram of each cycle shown in Figure 1, where the numbers  correspond to the position of the temperature/pressure sensor (T/P) in Figure 1. Curve 1– 2  in  Cycle  A  represents  the  compression  process  of  the  blower;  curves  2–3  and  5–6  represent  the  compression  and  expansion  processes  in  the  turbocharger,  respectively.  Curve 3–4 represents the heat release process of the heat exchanger; curves 4–5 and 0–1  represent the heat release and heat absorption of the preheater, respectively.  Curves 1–2 and 5–6 in Cycle B represent the compression and expansion processes in  the turbocharger, respectively. Curve 2–3 represents the heat release process of the heat  exchanger; curve 3–4 indicates the compression process of the blower; curves 4–5 and 0– 1 represent the heat release and heat absorption of the preheater, respectively. Curve 0–2  in Cycle C represents the compression process of the blower, and the hot air is directly  sent  to  the  end  users;  curves  1–2  and  4–5  represent  the  compression  and  expansion  processes in the turbocharger, respectively. Curve 5–6 represents the heat release process  of the heat exchanger; curves 3–4 and 6–1 represent the heat release and heat absorption  processes of the regenerator, respectively.   Cycles D and E are closed cycles. Taking Cycle E as an example, curves 2–3 and 5–6  represent  the  compression  and  expansion  processes  in  the  turbocharger,  respectively.  Curve 1–2 represents the compression process of the blower; curves 4–5 and 0–1 represent  the heat release and heat absorption process of the regenerator, respectively. Curve 6–0  represents the  heat absorption process of  the cold‐end heat  exchanger, the purpose of  which is to obtain heat from the heat source. Such a system form is suitable as the system  cannot  use  the  open  type,  which  is  conducive  to  ensuring  that  the  heat  pump  cycle  working medium is kept clean and has low water content.  Cycle F is a semi‐open cycle with two blowers. Curve 1–2 represents the compression  process of the  blower; curve  2–3 is the turbocharger compressor compression  process;  curve 1–8 represents the compression process of the parallel fan. Subsequently, point 8 is  mixed with points 3–4; curve 4–5 represents the heat release process of the heat exchanger;  curves 5–6 and 0–1 represent the heat release and heat absorption process of the preheater,  respectively; curve 6–7 represents the expansion of the turbine in the turbocharger. The  T‐s diagram based on these different forms of air‐reversed Brayton heat  pump with a  turbocharger  describes  the  air  state  and  thermodynamic  process  more  intuitively  and  vividly.  (a)  (b)  (c)  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  6  of  16     (d)  (e)  (f)  Figure 2. T‐s diagram of different air‐reversed Brayton heat pump systems with a turbocharger. (a)  Cycle A; (b) Cycle B; (c) Cycle C; (d) Cycle D; (e) Cycle E; (f) Cycle F.  2.2.2. Mathematical Modeling  The mathematical model of Cycle A can be found in study [24]. It can be gathered  from the system structure that the heating performance of Cycle B is slightly worse than  that  of  other  cycles.  Its  mathematical  model  is  not  described  in  this  paper.  The  mathematical  models  of  the  other  cycles  are  discussed  where  each  cycle’s  hypothesis  refers  to  Li  et  al.  [24,25].  The  mathematical  model  of  Cycle  C  can  be  established  by  referring to the above thermodynamic model and T‐s diagram.  The heating capacity of Cycle C is defined as:  Q =m h h =m c T T 1 3 4 1 p 3 4 (1) while the blower energy consumption and heating COP are given as follows:  W =m c T T f 1 3 2 (2) T T 3 4 (3) COP = = W T T f 3 2 The ideal gas equation is as follows:  pv=RT (4) The  adiabatic  process  of  the  blower  from  2–3  is  described  by  the  following  expressions:  𝑘 1 (5) T =T T γ 3s 2 2 2–3 T T 3s 2 (6) T T = 3 2 The turbine polytropic process can be written as:  k 1 (7) T =T =T γ 5 6s 6s 5–6 The compressor variable process is:  k 1 (8) T =T =T γ 2s 1 1 1–2 T T 2s 1 (9) T T =   2 1 c Buildings 2022, 12, 870  7  of  16  The following expression gives the turbine efficiency equation:  T T = T T η 5 6 5 6s (10) For a better representation, the following one dimensionless parameter is defined:  θ= (11) According to the balance equation of the turbocharger, the following hold:  T T =T T (12) 5 6 2 1 (13) T 1 η=T γ 1 5 1 1–2 1–3 b 1 η γ (14) 1–3 γ = +1  1-2 1–3 γ =   (15) 2–3 1–2 where 𝑎 1𝜀 𝜀 𝜃 ; 𝑏𝜃𝜀 𝜃𝜀 ; η=η η .The balance equation of the regenerator  c e is given as:  T T =T T =ε T T (16) 4 5 1 0 r 4 0 (17) T =aT 1 0 (18) T =bT   5 0 and the heating COP as:  γ 1 γ 1 2–3 2–3 4 T 1+ T 1+ 2 4 Q T T η η T 3 4 H f f COP = = = = γ 1 γ 1 W T T f 3 2 2–3 2–3 T 1+ T 1+ 1 2 2 η η f f γ 1 (19) 2–3 1+ η γ 1 f 1–2 a 1+ γ 1 2–3 The  variable  γ   is  a  function  of  γ .  Therefore,  COP   can  be  described  as  a  2–3 1–3 function of the pressure ratio.  Cycle E is a closed system, which is conducive to the stability of the lubricating oil  system and is not affected by environmental conditions. It is easy to exchange the cooling  and heating functions, and it also has cooling and heating functions. Therefore, the cooling  coefficient energy efficiency ratio (EER) + 1 is used to obtain the analytical expression of  COP in the calculations, and the heat transfer temperature difference is used to correct the  heat source temperature and heat sink temperature.  The cooling capacity can be written as:  Q =m h h =c m T T (20) 0 6 p 0 6 The  blower  energy  consumption and  cooling  EER  are  described by the  following  expressions:  W =mc T T (21) f p 2 1 Buildings 2022, 12, 870  8  of  16  Q T T 0 6 (22) EER= =   W T T f 2 1 The compressor and blower isentropic compression processes are described by the  following equation:  T =T γ 3s–1 1 (23) 5–6 while the turbine expansion process is:  k 1 (24) T =T =T γ 5 6s 6s 5–6 The balance equation of turbocharger can be written as follows:  T T =T T (25) 5 6 3 2 (26) T T η=T T 5 6s 3s–2 2 According to the approximate parallel hypothesis, we obtain:  T T =T T (27) 3s–2 2 3s–1 2s–1 (28) T T η=T T 5 6s 3s–1 2s–1 b 1 (29) γ =γ η 1   1–2 5–6 a γ 5–6 The heat transfer process of the recovery heat exchanger can be written as follows:  T T =T T =ε T T (30) 1 0 4 5 r 4 0 We define the following dimensionless parameter:  θ= (31) where  T =T + T T 2 2s–1 1 (32) T =T + T T (33) 3 2 3s–2 2 The EER can be written as only related to the turbine pressure and γ   as follows:  5–6 1 b [1 1 η ] T T γ 0 6 5–6 EER= = (34) T T 2 1 a γ 1 1–2 (35) COP=EER+1 The flow ratio of two blowers should be introduced as another variable for Cycle F  with two parallel blowers. However, the mass flow rate is only related to the performance  of the blowers; therefore, it is treated as a constant in the derivation of the expressions.  The  absolute  performance  of  the  system  is  lower  than  that  of  the  other  single‐blower  cycles; however, it is found through measurements that this cycle can ensure the efficient  operation of the turbocharger, which is more in line with the actual operating conditions  of  the  turbocharger  and  obtains  a  better  practical,  operational  effect  [26]. The  specific  calculation process is as follows.  The heating capacity is calculated as follows:  Q = m +m h h =c m +m T T (36) 2 1 4 5 p 2 1 4 5 Buildings 2022, 12, 870  9  of  16  where m1 and m2 are parallel mass flows in Figure 2f, and the blower energy consumption  is:  W =m c T T +m c T T f 2 p 8 1 1 p 2 1 (37) Assuming that the flow ratio G is a known quantity, i.e.,  G= (38) we can describe the heating COP as follows:  Q m +m c T T 2 1 p 4 5 COP = = (39) W m c T T +m c T T f 2 p 8 1 1 p 2 1 The variable process of two parallel blowers can be written as:  k 1 (40) T =T =T γ 2s 1 1 1–2 T T 2s 1 (41) T T = 2 1 k 1 (42) T =T =T γ   8s 1 1 6–7 T γ T γ 1 1 1 6–7 6–7 T =T + =T 1+ 8 1 1 η η f f (43) γ 1 6–7 =T θε ε +1 1+   0 r r and the heat transfer process of the recovery heat exchanger is described as follows:  T T =T T =ε T T (44) 5 6 1 0 r 5 0 (45) T =T θ θε +ε =bT 6 0 r r 0 (46) T =T θε ε +1 =aT   1 0 r r 0 The compressor variable process can be written as:  k 1 (47) T =T =T γ 3s 2 2 2–3 (48) T =T γ 6 7s 6–7 while the parallel blowers mixing process is:  m T +m T GT +T 1 3 2 8 3 8 T = = (49) m +m G+1 1 2 We define the following one dimensionless parameter:  T =θT (50) 5 0 The balance equation of turbocharger is given as follows:  m +m T T =m T T (51) 1 2 6 7 1 3 2 T T 3s 2 m +m T T η =m   (52) 1 2 6 7s 1 Buildings 2022, 12, 870  10  of  16  T T 3s 2 G+1 T T η =G   (53) 6 7s γ 1 1–2 (54) b G+1 1 η=aG 1+ γ 1   2–3 γ η 6–7 f Based on these assumptions, the following equations can be derived:  T γ T γ =T γ T (55) 1 1 2 2 6–7 1–2 2–3 (56) G+1 T T η=G T γ T γ 6 7s 1 1 6-7 1–2 (57) γ =γ γ   6–7 1–2 2–3 b G+1 1 (58) 1 η=γ γ   6–7 1–2 a G γ 6–7 b G+1 1 (59) γ =γ 1 η  1–2 6–7 a G γ 6–7 6–7 γ =   (60) 2–3 1–2 Based on the above expression, the calculation method of  COP   related to γ   can  6–7 be derived as follows:  Q m +m c T T 1+G c T T 2 1 p 4 5 p 4 5 COP = = = = W m c T T +m c T T c T T +Gc T T f 2 p 8 1 1 p 2 1 p 8 1 p 2 1 (61) γ 1 γ 1 6–7 1–2 Ga 1+ γ +a 1+ 2–3 η η f f ⎛ ⎞ 1+G θ G+1 ⎝ ⎠ γ 1 γ 1 6–7 1–2 a +aG η η f f 3. Results and Analysis  3.1. Theoretical Calculation Results  Using the above mathematical models to calculate the heating COP, the following  results were obtained according to the calculation results shown in Figures 3 and 4. It can  be noted that the heating performance of Cycle C and that of Cycle A were similar. They  were both the highest, followed by Cycles E, B, and F under all working conditions.  There was an optimal pressure ratio for all cycles under certain working conditions.  As the pressure ratio gradually reached the optimal value, the heating performance also  reached a peak value (the optimal COP). Afterwards, the heating COP could not increase  with an increase in the pressure ratio. When the ambient temperature was fixed at −15 °C  at the heating water temperature of 45 °C, the optimal pressure ratio was about 1.5–1.7 for  each single‐blower cycle. The optimal pressure ratio of the double‐blower cycle was close  to  1.8–1.9,  and  the  optimal  COP  ranged  from  1.22  to  1.27. When  the  water  supply  temperature dropped to 35 °C, the optimal pressure ratio of all cycles remained almost  unchanged, with the optimal COP in the range of 1.24–1.29. Therefore, the heating was  not influenced by the water temperature at a fixed ambient temperature. When the water  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  11  of  16  supply temperature was fixed, the optimal pressure ratio of each cycle showed a minor  decrease as the ambient temperature rose from −15 °C to 5 °C. It should be noted that the  optimal pressure ratio was not sensitive to the ambient temperature. Therefore, for the  air‐reversed  Brayton  heat  pump  systems  with  a  turbocharger  driven  by  blowers,  the  ambient temperature and the water supply temperature were not the main factors that  affected the optimal pressure ratio.  Figures 3 and 4 show that once the pressure ratio between the turbine inlet pressure  and the outlet pressure reaches a certain value, the COP of heating did not increase with  an increase in the pressure ratio. Therefore, for the reversed Brayton heat pump with a  single  blower,  this  heat  pump  maintained  a  high  heating  efficiency  when  the  turbine  pressure  ratio  was  greater  than  1.5.  For  Cycle  C,  when  the  water  supply  temperature  varied from 45 °C to 35 °C,  the optimal  COP increased by about 0.04 under the same  ambient  temperature. The  ambient  temperature  varied  from −15  °C  to  5  °C,  and  the  optimal COP rose by about 0.09 at the same water temperature. Therefore, the COP in the  optimal heating system was insensitive to the ambient temperature and the temperature  of hot water, which is also a significant advantage.  The calculation results also showed that the highest COP of the single‐fan heat pump  system under different working conditions was maintained in the range of 1.2–1.4. Taking  the example of Cycle A, it can be observed that the COP increased by at least 27% while  the turbocharger compressor efficiency and the turbine efficiency increased to 0.85 and  0.9, respectively [27]. Apparently, the heating performance of the system is significantly  improved as the efficiency of the turbocharger is improved. Therefore, it requires more  attention. In addition, the variation range of air refrigerant pressure was not large under  the  operating  conditions,  which  reduced  the  requirements  of  equipment  airtightness.  Consequently, it reduced the processing difficulty.  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Pressure Ratio (a)  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Pressure Ratio (b)  COP COP Buildings 2022, 12, 870  12  of  16  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Pressure Ratio (c)  Figure 3. Variation of COP versus pressure ratio at 45 ℃ hot water temperature. (a) Ambient  temperature of −15 °C. (b) Ambient temperature of −5 °C. (c) Ambient temperature of 5 °C.  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 11.2 1.4 1.6 1.82 Press ure Ratio (a)  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Pressure Ratio (b)  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Pressure Ratio (c)  Figure 4. Variation of COP versus pressure ratio at 35 °C hot water temperature. (a) Ambient  temperature of −15 °C. (b) Ambient temperature of −5 °C. (c) Ambient temperature of 5 °C.  COP COP COP COP Buildings 2022, 12, 870  13  of  16  3.2. Experimental Results  The  above  theoretical  results  pointed  to  the  way  to  establish  the  test  bench  and  provide  support  for  the  late  promotion.  The  relevant  experimental  rigs  are  shown  in  Figure  5,  which  integrate  the  traditional,  regenerated  air‐reversed  Brayton  heat  pump  cycle and the cycles with a turbocharger and blowers, as described in Section 2.1. Based  on a reconstruction of this test bench, more cycles under different working conditions  were  realized.  The  experimental  conditions  and  specific  results  were  provided  in  the  literature by Li et al. [26].  The  representative  Cycle  F,  which  was  simple  to  implement  in  the  existing  experimental bench, was selected as the typical one for comparison in this paper. Figure  6 shows the theoretical and measured results of Cycle F under the same initial conditions.  Here, the calculated results were in good agreement with the experimental observation,  and the maximum error was lower than 5.6%. Because of the assumption that the pressure  lines  are  approximately  parallel  within  a  certain  range  of  entropy  in‐crease  in  the  derivation of the formula [24], but the measured system energy consumption is close to a  fixed value, due to the use of a constant‐frequency blower as the power equipment in  actual measurement it was different from the power calculated by the enthalpy difference  in  the  calculation.  So,  there  were  some  deviations  between  the  calculated  and  experimental results. Moreover, the computation procedure neglected a few factors, such  as heat transfer from the heat pump system to the outside, friction resistance in the pipe,  and so on. In general, the expressions can be used to predict the ranges of turbine pressure  value and COP, which can simplify the calculation process, optimize the system form, and  achieve the optimal pressure ratio quickly when designing experiments or products.  (a)  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  14  of  16  (b)  (c)  Figure 5. Diagrams of the test bench of the air‐reversed Brayton heat pump with a turbocharger. (a)  One‐blower system. (b) Two‐blower system. (c) Photograph of the air cycle heat pump system.  Figure 6. Comparison of calculation and experimental results under different conditions (45 °C/35  °C hot water temperature).      Buildings 2022, 12, 870  15  of  16  4. Conclusions  Six types of air‐reversed Brayton heat pump system with turbochargers driven by  blowers  were  proposed  according  to  the  location  of  the  system  in  contact  with  the  environment  and  the  number  and  position  of  the  blowers.  The  thermodynamic  expressions  of  the  heating  COP  and  the  corresponding  turbine  pressure  ratio  were  derived and analyzed, respectively. The main conclusions were drawn as follows:  There is an optimal pressure ratio for each cycle. The optimal pressure ratio of the  single‐blower system is about 1.5–1.7, while that of the dual‐blower system is about 1.8– 1.9.  Cycle A (with a single blower before the compressor, open to the heat source side)  and Cycle C (with a single blower after the compressor, open to the heat sink side) have  the highest heating COPs and are worthy of more attention.  The  theoretical  results  of  Cycle  F  were  in  agreement  with  the  experimental  observations, with a maximum error of less than 5.6%.  5. Prospects  In this paper, the air‐reversed Brayton heat pump was mainly used for a heating  system.  However,  it  can  be  applied  under  circumstances  with  a  large  temperature  difference between the heat source and the sink, such as high‐temperature water supply  or cryogenic refrigeration,  high‐temperature drying, and combined heating with other  heat  pumps  which  meet  the  demands  of  different  heating  conditions  and  building  functions.  All  these  issues  need  to  be  further  studied. In  addition,  it  is  necessary  to  consider the dynamic coupling characteristics between the building thermal environment  and the air‐reversed Brayton heat pump system, as well as the association between the  energy consumption of the system and the building and climatic conditions throughout a  whole year.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, S.W.; methodology, S.W. and S.L.; investigation, S.L. and  S.W.; writing—original draft preparation, S.L. and S.J.; writing—review and editing, S.W., S.L., S.J.  and X.W. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research received the support from the PhD Start‐up Fund of the Natural Science  Foundation of Liaoning Province, China (grant number 2019‐BS‐055).  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable.  Informed Consent Statement: Not applicable.  Data Availability Statement: The data presented in this study are available on request from the  corresponding author.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  Nomenclature  Nomenclature 𝑐 specific heat at constant pressure (J/kgK) COP/EER coefficient of performance h enthalpy (J/kg) QH heating capacity (W) m mass flow rate (kg/s) QC cooling capacity (W) p pressure (Pa) T temperature (°C/K) R gas constant (J/Kmol) v specific volume (m /kg) Wf blower energy consumption(W) Greek symbols Subscripts 𝜂 effectiveness c compressor 𝜃 temperature ratio defined in Equation (11) f blower 𝜀 effectiveness of regenerator e expander; turbine a function of pressure ratio s isentropic     Buildings 2022, 12, 870  16  of  16  References  1. White, A.J. Thermodynamic analysis of the reversed Joule‐Brayton cycle heat pump for domestic heating. Appl. Energy 2009, 86,  2443–2450.  2. Braun, J.; Bansal, P.; Groll, E. Energy efficiency analysis of air cycle heat pump dryers. Int. J. Refrig. 2002, 25, 954–965.  3. Park, S.K.; Ahn, J.H.; Kim, T.S. Off‐design operating characteristics of an open‐cycle air refrigeration system. Int. J. Refrig. 2012,  35, 2311–2320.  4. Elland, H.X. Air Cycle Feasibility Using a Novel, Single Rotor Compander for Refrigeration and Heating. In Proceedings of the  IIR International Rankine 2020 Conference‐Heating, Cooling and Power Generation, Glasgow, UK, 27–31 July 2020.  5. Mundhra,  R.;  Mukhopadhyay,  A.  Thermodynamic  analysis  of  irreversible  reversed  brayton  cycle  heat  pump  with  finite  capacity finite conductance heat reservoirs. In Advances in Mechanical Engineering. Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering; Biswal,  B., Sarkar, B., Mahanta, P., Eds.; Springer: Singapore, 2020; pp. 763–775.  6. ASHRAE. Cogeneration Systems and Engine and Turbine Drives; ASHRAE: Atlanta, GA, USA, 2000.  7. Wang, S.G. Air Cycle Heat Pumps. In Handbook of Energy Systems in Green Buildings; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany,  2018.  8. Bi, Y.H.; Chen, L.G.; Sun, F.R. Exergy‐based ecological optimization for an endoreversible variable‐temperature heat reservoir  air heat pump cycle. Rev. Mex. Fis. 2009, 55, 112–119.  9. Bi,  Y.H.;  Chen,  L.G.;  Sun,  F.R.  Heating  load,  heating  load  density  and  COP  optimisations  for  an  endoreversible  variable  temperature heat reservoir air heat pump. J. Energy Inst. 2009, 82, 43–47.  10. Bi, Y.H.; Chen, L.G.; Sun, F.R. Exergetic efficiency optimization for an irreversible heat pump working on reversed Brayton  cycle. Pramana 2010, 74, 351–363.  11. Bi, Y.H.; Chen, L.G.; Sun, F.R. Heating load density optimization of an irreversible simple Brayton cycle heat pump coupled to  counter‐flow heat exchangers. Appl. Math. Model. 2012, 36, 1854–1863.  12. Chen, L.G.; Ni, N.; Sun, F.; Wu, C. Performance of real regenerated air heat pumps. Int. J. Power Energy Syst. 1999, 19, 231–238.  13. Zhang, C.L.; Yuan, H. An important feature of air heat pump cycle: Heating capacity in line with heating load. Energy 2014, 72,  405–413.  14. Yuan, H.; Zhang, C.L. Regenerated air cycle potentials in heat pump applications. Int. J. Refrig. 2015, 51, 1–11.  15. Yang, Y.; Yuan, H.; Peng, J.W.; Zhang, C.L. Performance modeling of air cycle heat pump water heater in cold Climate. Renew.  Energy 2015, 87, 1067–1075.  16. Dieckmann, J.; Erickson, A.; Harvey, A.; Toscano, W. Research and Development of an Air‐Cycle Heat‐Pump Water Heater; Foster‐ Miller Associates, Inc.: Waltham, MA, USA, 1979; pp. 1–341.  17. Edwards, T.C.; McDonald, A.T. ROVACS: A New Rotary‐Vane‐Cycle Air‐Conditioning and Refrigeration System; 720079; S.A.E.:  Warrendale, PA, USA, 1972.  18. Edwards, T.C. The Rovac Automotive Air Conditioning System; 750403; S.A.E.: Warrendale, PA, USA, 1975.  19. TNO. Cooling, Freezing and Heating with the Air Cycle, Documentation Sheet; TNO Environment. Energy and Process Innovation,  Department of Refrigeration and Heat Pump Technology: Apeldoorn, The Netherlands, 2003.  20. Spence, S.W.T.; Doran, W.J.; Artt, D.W. Design, construction and testing of an air‐cycle refrigeration system for road transport.  Int. J. Refrig. 2004, 27, 503–510.  21. Spence, S.W.T.; Doran, W.J.; Artt, D.W.; McCullough, G. Performance analysis of a feasible air‐cycle refrigeration system for  road transport. Int. J. Refrig. 2005, 28, 381–388.  22. Catalano, L.A.; Bellis, F.D.; Amirante, R. Improved inverse Joule Brayton air cycle using turbocharger units. In Proceedings of  the Conference on Thermal and Environmental Issues in Energy Systems, Sorrento, Italy, 6–19 May 2010; pp. 16–19.  23. Catalano, L.A.; Bellis, F.D.; Amirante, R. Development and testing of sustainable refrigeration plants. In Proceedings of the  ASME Turbo Expo, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 6–10 June 2011; pp. 1–8.  24. Li, S.S.; Wang, S.G.; Ma, Z.J. Using an air cycle heat pump system with a turbocharger to supply heating for full electric vehicles.  Int. J. Refrig. 2017, 77, 11–19.  25. Li, S.S.; Wang, S.G.; Ma, Z.J. Performance analysis of an air cycle heat pump system with a turbocharger driven by a blower.  Procedia Eng. 2017, 205, 2720–2727.  26. Li, S.S.; Wang, S.G.; Ma, Z.J.; Zhang, C.L. Experimental investigation of a regenerated air cycle heat pump heating system with  a turbocharger. Int. J. Refrig. 2019, 100, 48–54.  27. Zhang, C.L.; Yuan, H.; Cao, X. New insight into regenerated air heat pump cycle. Energy 2015, 91, 226–234.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buildings Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Analysis of the Air-Reversed Brayton Heat Pump with Different Layouts of Turbochargers for Space Heating

Buildings , Volume 12 (7) – Jun 21, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/analysis-of-the-air-reversed-brayton-heat-pump-with-different-layouts-kAIn3eSwSw
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2022 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2075-5309
DOI
10.3390/buildings12070870
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  Analysis of the Air‐Reversed Brayton Heat Pump with  Different Layouts of Turbochargers for Space Heating  1 2, 3 1 Shugang Wang  , Shuangshuang Li  *, Shuang Jiang   and Xiaozhou Wu      Faculty of Infrastructure Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China;  sgwang@dlut.edu.cn (S.W.); fonen519@dlut.edu.cn (X.W.)    College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Dalian University, Dalian 116622, China    College of Civil Engineering, Dalian Minzu University, Dalian 116600, China; shjiang@dlnu.edu.cn  *  Correspondence: lishuangshuang@dlu.edu.cn; Tel.: +86‐155‐4268‐6558  Abstract: The air‐reversed Brayton cycle produces charming, environmentally friendly effects by  using air as its refrigerant and has potential energy efficiency in applications related to space heating  and building heating. However, there exist several types of cycle that need to be discussed. In this  paper, six types of air‐reversed Brayton heat pump with a turbocharger, applicable under different  heating conditions, are developed. The expressions of the heating coefficient of performance (COP)  and the corresponding turbine pressure ratio are derived based on thermodynamic analysis. By  using these expressions, the effects of turbine pressure ratio on the COP under different working  conditions  are  theoretically  analyzed,  and  the  optimal  COPs  of  different  cycles  under  specific  working conditions are determined. It is observed that Cycles A and C have the highest heating  COPs, and there is an optimal pressure ratio for each cycle. The corresponding pressure ratio of the  optimal COP is different, concentrated in the range of 1.5–1.9. When the pressure ratio reaches the  optimal value, increasing the pressure ratio does not significantly improve the heating COP. Take  Cycle  F  as  an  example:  the  maximum  error  between  the  calculated  results  and  experimental  observation is lower than 5.6%. These results will enable further study of the air‐reversed Brayton  Citation: Wang, S.; Li, S.; Jiang, S.;  heat pump with a turbocharger from a different perspective.  Wu, X. Analysis of the Air‐Reversed  Brayton Heat Pump with Different  Layouts of Turbochargers for Space  Keywords: air‐reversed Brayton heat pump; turbocharger; system layout; pressure ratio; COP  Heating. Buildings 2022, 12, 870.  https://doi.org/10.3390/  buildings12070870  1. Introduction  Academic Editor: Rafik Belarbi  The  use  of  heat  pumps  for  space  heating  and  drying  is  one  of  the  solutions  for  Received: 29 April 2022  providing  a  stable  and  affordable  energy  supply  which  contributes  to  environmental  Accepted: 18 June 2022  protection and sustainable energy development. Although the theoretical coefficient of  Published: 21 June 2022  performance (COP) value is relatively low, air‐source devices may have great potential  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  for  development.  A  reversed  Brayton  cycle  using  air  as  the  green  working  fluid  is  a  neutral with  regard  to jurisdictional  potential alternative to conventional vapor compression systems of heating and drying  claims  in  published  maps  and  [1–3].  Recent  exploitation  of  the  unification  of  expansion/compression  into  a  single  institutional affiliations.  operation (compander) promotes the productization of air‐reversed Brayton heat pump  (air cycle heat pump) products [4,5].  Air as the working fluid in the reversed Brayton cycle is a potential substitute for the  Copyright:  ©  2022  by  the  authors.  conventional  vapor  compression  cycles.  However,  compared  with  conventional  vapor  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  compression heat pumps, the energy efficiency of a basic air cycle heat pump (air‐reversed  This article  is an open access article  Brayton heat pump) is lower under normal temperature conditions. Thus, a regenerated  distributed  under  the  terms  and  air cycle was utilized for improving the overall system performance. The performance of  conditions of the Creative Commons  an air cycle heat pump can be remarkably enhanced by adding a regenerator [1,6,7]. Based  Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  on finite‐time thermodynamics, an analytical solution was derived that demonstrated the  (https://creativecommons.org/license effects  of  pressure  ratio,  heat  exchanger  effectiveness,  and  the  ratio  between  the  inlet  s/by/4.0/).  Buildings 2022, 12, 870. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12070870  www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  2  of  16  temperature of the cooling fluid and that of the heating fluid of the heat reservoir on key  performance indices [8–12].  The  reversed  Brayton  cycle,  which  uses  air  as  a  refrigerant,  has  more  typical  operation  characteristics  compared  with  the  traditional  ones.  Most  notably,  the  regenerated air‐reversed Brayton heat pump is more suitable for application in cold and  frigid regions. It can not only break through the limits of the ambient temperature of air‐ source heat pumps but can also remove the heat exchange of the low‐temperature side  when using a semi‐open form, which means that the air can directly enter the compressor  and avoid various problems caused by evaporator frosting. A thermodynamic model of  an air cycle heat pump with a compressor and an expander was proposed by Zhang et al.;  heating capacity in line with heating load was found [13]. This thermodynamic model was  further developed by Yuan and Zhang, who added a regenerator so that the regenerated  air  cycle  heat  pump  could  not  only  ensure  heating  capacity  that  was  in  line  with  the  heating load but could also achieve a higher COP compared with trans‐critical CO2 heat  pumps under a large temperature difference [14]. A simulation model of an air cycle heat  pump water heater was developed by Yang et al., and it was found that this system could  save  the  heating‐up  period,  especially  when  operating  at  low  ambient  temperature  conditions [15]. As the expansion device in the market is too large for domestic and vehicle  heating usage, the existing experimental studies were primarily limited to improving the  structure of individual components such as the compressor and the expander [16–18].  A turbocharger was used in air cycle systems to substitute the compressor and the  expander.  It  miniaturized  the  air  cycle  system  and  also  simplified  the  system  design  without considering the matching and connection problems between the compressor and  the expander. A comprehensive report on an air cycle with a turbocharger was released  by  TNO  [19],  in  which  it  was  mentioned  that  a  pilot  plant  processed  air  in  open  and  recuperated cycles for freezing applications. Spence et al. [20,21] designed and established  a prototype for existing trailer refrigeration units for road transport, where the overall  COP was about 0.3 at the cryogenic temperature of −20 °C. Catalano et al. [22,23] designed  an air cycle using a turbocharger and roots blowers for refrigeration. A COP higher than  −42 °C. L 0.6 was reported for the turbine exit temperature of  i et al. [24–26] theoretically  and  experimentally  studied  the  air‐reversed  Brayton  heat  pump  system  with  an  automotive turbocharger. A thermodynamic model for this system was presented, and  the  relationships between  the system performance and the operating parameters were  illustrated.  Moreover,  a  test  bench  of  a  regenerated  air  cycle  heat  pump  with  a  turbocharger  was  presented,  and  the  measurement  results  illustrated  that  the  heating  capacity of the air cycle heat pump could match the heating load well.  However,  the  form  of  the  air‐reversed  Brayton  cycle  with  a  turbocharger  in  the  current  research  is  single,  and  the  application  scope  is  narrow.  As  the  functions  and  application  conditions  of  the  single‐cycle  form  are  limited,  it  is  necessary  to  derive  a  variety of cycle processes to improve this type of heat pump cycle form, and the difference  in cycle form can also lead to changes in heating characteristics. This paper develops a  different thermodynamic process for the air‐reversed Brayton cycle with a turbocharger.  The relations between the heating COPs and the turbine pressure ratio are established  based  on  reasonable  assumptions  and  the  thermodynamic  diagram.  Therefore,  an  in‐ depth look into the variation of performance parameters with pressure ratio parameters  in different cycles is achieved.  2. Theoretical Analysis of Different Types of Air Heat Pump with a Turbocharger  Compared with a traditional air‐source heat pump system, the air‐reversed Brayton  heat pump system with a turbocharger has great potential in low‐temperature heating,  energy  saving,  and  emission  reduction. As  the  turbocharger  is  used  to  replace  the  compressor and expander, and the blower is added as the power source, it is possible to  use  the  air‐reversed  Brayton  heat  pump  system  in  civil  building  winter  heating  and  domestic  hot  water  supplies and  other projects. By designing  various  thermodynamic  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  3  of  16  processes of the air‐reversed Brayton heat pump system with a turbocharger driven by a  blower, the service conditions and application scope of this kind of heat pump can be  widened, which endows this system with greater diversity.  2.1. Description of Different Cycle Structures and Characteristics  Considering the limitations of heating objective conditions and the diversity of user  needs, a single form of air‐reversed Brayton heat pump with a turbocharger cannot meet  all  the  application  conditions.  Furthermore,  a  variety  of  cycle  forms  have  their  own  heating characteristics and structural advantages. Therefore, it is necessary to design more  structural forms by designing combined modes of blowers and turbochargers, the number  of blowers and their setting positions, the number of heat exchangers in the system, and  their settings in the system position, etc. These forms can be extended from the six kinds  of new heat pump cycle with a turbocharger to different heat demands and conditions,  named Cycle A–Cycle F and shown in Figure 1. These six forms can not only provide  different terminal heat‐carrying fluids, such as water or air for heating and domestic hot  water, but can also discharge cooler air from the system that can be used for refrigeration.  In this  section,  heating is used as  an  example.  Although these  six  kinds  of  cycle  have  certain representativeness, the structure is not limited to these six forms. Its application  range can be further expanded by deriving other structures not covered in this paper.      (a)  (b)  (c)  (d)  (e)  (f)  Figure 1. Different cycles of the air‐reversed Brayton heat pump system with a turbocharger. 1:  compressor, 2: heat exchanger, 3: blower, 4: preheater (regenerative), 5: turbine, 6: fan coil, 7: oil  pump, 8: oil tank (P/T pressure sensor/temperature sensor). (a) Cycle A; (b) Cycle B; (c) Cycle C; (d)  Cycle D; (e) Cycle E; (f) Cycle F.  Except for Cycle F, which was set as having two blowers, all other cycles adopt one  blower as the power‐driving equipment, i.e., a single‐fan system. In Cycle A, the blower  is set before the compressor of the turbocharger, and the cold air in the environment is  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  4  of  16  initially  preheated  through  preheater  4. This  equipment  can  significantly  improve  the  heating performance of the system. Subsequently, the air first passes through the blower  3 and then enters the turbocharger compressor 1 to be heated up and boosted. The setting  of oil pump 7 and oil tank 8 ensures the normal, high‐speed operation of the turbocharger.  High‐temperature air through heat exchanger 2 is mainly used for the heat exchanger. The  fan coil unit 6 and similar equipment can be used for the heating end equipment. The  exothermic air still has some residual heat that is used as a heat source for preheater 4 to  preheat the air from the environment. Finally, the air is expanded through the turbocharge  turbine 5 and then diverted outside. In another semi‐open cycle, Cycle B, the blower is  placed in front of the turbine as shown in Figure 1b. The starting resistance is smaller than  in  Cycle  A.  These  two  forms  are  the  most  basic  modifications  of  the  traditional  air‐ reversed Brayton heat pump cycle.  Cycle C is also a series combination of a single fan and a compressor. The indoor air  first  enters  preheater  4  and  then  expands  and  cools  through  turbocharger  turbine  5.  Subsequently, it absorbs heat from the outdoor air heat source through heat exchanger 2.  After heating up through preheater 4, it enters turbocharger compressor 1 and blower 3  and is finally sent into the room directly. The simple system structure can improve the  temperature  of  the air  entering the  compressor and  reduce the  temperature  of  the air  entering the turbine, which improves the heating efficiency of the system. Considering  the  practical  application,  blower  3  is  set  after  the  turbocharger  compressor  1.  This  configuration can lower the exhaust pressure and temperature of the compressor, which  is convenient for the recovery of lubricating oil at the outlet of the compressor. The hot air  is directly fed into the room to reduce the heat loss caused by the end equipment. At the  same time, system requirements are reduced as the system operates under a low vacuum.  Cycles D and E are closed circulation cycles which are not affected by the ambient air  quality. However, due to  the  use  of two  heat  exchangers,  the  overall  efficiency  of the  whole machine is reduced, and the cost is higher than that of Cycles A and B. The above  cycles have the same flow rates of the compressor and the turbine. By adding another  blower, the system can be transformed into a dual‐blower system, which is closer to the  actual operating condition of the vehicle turbocharger. The circulation form of the dual‐ blower system, shown by Cycle F in Figure 1, is slightly more complicated than that of the  single‐blower system. One blower is connected in series with the compressor, which is  subsequently  in  parallel  with  another  blower.  The  air  flows  through  the  two  parallel  pipelines  and  is  mixed  together  and  then  sent  to  gas‐water  heat  exchanger  2  for  heat  transfer. Subsequently, the air is used to preheat the ambient air temperature and is finally  discharged outdoors.  The heat‐carrying fluid in the end equipment of the other cycles is water, except for  in Cycle C. The equipment is not only limited to the fan coil, but can also use the floor  radiant coil, radiator, etc., and is designed for a domestic hot water system. However, the  temperature of the hot water is affected to a certain extent. To ensure the optimal pressure  ratio of Cycle C, the air temperature as the circulating refrigerant is lower because the  closed heat exchanger must be used on the heat‐source side.  2.2. Analytical Expression of Heating COP  2.2.1. T‐s Diagram  At present, only a limited amount of research exists on the air‐reversed Brayton heat  pump system with a turbocharger and a blower. Theoretical analysis is mostly carried out  for the conventional, regenerated air‐reversed Brayton heat pump system. However, this  cannot truly reflect the heating characteristics of this system driven by a blower with a  turbocharger and the relationship between the related parameters and the heating COP.  Therefore, this section derives the expressions reflecting the analytical relation between  the COP and the pressure ratio based on the temperature entropy diagram (T‐s diagram)  of different heat pump forms and relevant assumptions.  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  5  of  16  Figure 2 depicts the T‐s diagram of each cycle shown in Figure 1, where the numbers  correspond to the position of the temperature/pressure sensor (T/P) in Figure 1. Curve 1– 2  in  Cycle  A  represents  the  compression  process  of  the  blower;  curves  2–3  and  5–6  represent  the  compression  and  expansion  processes  in  the  turbocharger,  respectively.  Curve 3–4 represents the heat release process of the heat exchanger; curves 4–5 and 0–1  represent the heat release and heat absorption of the preheater, respectively.  Curves 1–2 and 5–6 in Cycle B represent the compression and expansion processes in  the turbocharger, respectively. Curve 2–3 represents the heat release process of the heat  exchanger; curve 3–4 indicates the compression process of the blower; curves 4–5 and 0– 1 represent the heat release and heat absorption of the preheater, respectively. Curve 0–2  in Cycle C represents the compression process of the blower, and the hot air is directly  sent  to  the  end  users;  curves  1–2  and  4–5  represent  the  compression  and  expansion  processes in the turbocharger, respectively. Curve 5–6 represents the heat release process  of the heat exchanger; curves 3–4 and 6–1 represent the heat release and heat absorption  processes of the regenerator, respectively.   Cycles D and E are closed cycles. Taking Cycle E as an example, curves 2–3 and 5–6  represent  the  compression  and  expansion  processes  in  the  turbocharger,  respectively.  Curve 1–2 represents the compression process of the blower; curves 4–5 and 0–1 represent  the heat release and heat absorption process of the regenerator, respectively. Curve 6–0  represents the  heat absorption process of  the cold‐end heat  exchanger, the purpose of  which is to obtain heat from the heat source. Such a system form is suitable as the system  cannot  use  the  open  type,  which  is  conducive  to  ensuring  that  the  heat  pump  cycle  working medium is kept clean and has low water content.  Cycle F is a semi‐open cycle with two blowers. Curve 1–2 represents the compression  process of the  blower; curve  2–3 is the turbocharger compressor compression  process;  curve 1–8 represents the compression process of the parallel fan. Subsequently, point 8 is  mixed with points 3–4; curve 4–5 represents the heat release process of the heat exchanger;  curves 5–6 and 0–1 represent the heat release and heat absorption process of the preheater,  respectively; curve 6–7 represents the expansion of the turbine in the turbocharger. The  T‐s diagram based on these different forms of air‐reversed Brayton heat  pump with a  turbocharger  describes  the  air  state  and  thermodynamic  process  more  intuitively  and  vividly.  (a)  (b)  (c)  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  6  of  16     (d)  (e)  (f)  Figure 2. T‐s diagram of different air‐reversed Brayton heat pump systems with a turbocharger. (a)  Cycle A; (b) Cycle B; (c) Cycle C; (d) Cycle D; (e) Cycle E; (f) Cycle F.  2.2.2. Mathematical Modeling  The mathematical model of Cycle A can be found in study [24]. It can be gathered  from the system structure that the heating performance of Cycle B is slightly worse than  that  of  other  cycles.  Its  mathematical  model  is  not  described  in  this  paper.  The  mathematical  models  of  the  other  cycles  are  discussed  where  each  cycle’s  hypothesis  refers  to  Li  et  al.  [24,25].  The  mathematical  model  of  Cycle  C  can  be  established  by  referring to the above thermodynamic model and T‐s diagram.  The heating capacity of Cycle C is defined as:  Q =m h h =m c T T 1 3 4 1 p 3 4 (1) while the blower energy consumption and heating COP are given as follows:  W =m c T T f 1 3 2 (2) T T 3 4 (3) COP = = W T T f 3 2 The ideal gas equation is as follows:  pv=RT (4) The  adiabatic  process  of  the  blower  from  2–3  is  described  by  the  following  expressions:  𝑘 1 (5) T =T T γ 3s 2 2 2–3 T T 3s 2 (6) T T = 3 2 The turbine polytropic process can be written as:  k 1 (7) T =T =T γ 5 6s 6s 5–6 The compressor variable process is:  k 1 (8) T =T =T γ 2s 1 1 1–2 T T 2s 1 (9) T T =   2 1 c Buildings 2022, 12, 870  7  of  16  The following expression gives the turbine efficiency equation:  T T = T T η 5 6 5 6s (10) For a better representation, the following one dimensionless parameter is defined:  θ= (11) According to the balance equation of the turbocharger, the following hold:  T T =T T (12) 5 6 2 1 (13) T 1 η=T γ 1 5 1 1–2 1–3 b 1 η γ (14) 1–3 γ = +1  1-2 1–3 γ =   (15) 2–3 1–2 where 𝑎 1𝜀 𝜀 𝜃 ; 𝑏𝜃𝜀 𝜃𝜀 ; η=η η .The balance equation of the regenerator  c e is given as:  T T =T T =ε T T (16) 4 5 1 0 r 4 0 (17) T =aT 1 0 (18) T =bT   5 0 and the heating COP as:  γ 1 γ 1 2–3 2–3 4 T 1+ T 1+ 2 4 Q T T η η T 3 4 H f f COP = = = = γ 1 γ 1 W T T f 3 2 2–3 2–3 T 1+ T 1+ 1 2 2 η η f f γ 1 (19) 2–3 1+ η γ 1 f 1–2 a 1+ γ 1 2–3 The  variable  γ   is  a  function  of  γ .  Therefore,  COP   can  be  described  as  a  2–3 1–3 function of the pressure ratio.  Cycle E is a closed system, which is conducive to the stability of the lubricating oil  system and is not affected by environmental conditions. It is easy to exchange the cooling  and heating functions, and it also has cooling and heating functions. Therefore, the cooling  coefficient energy efficiency ratio (EER) + 1 is used to obtain the analytical expression of  COP in the calculations, and the heat transfer temperature difference is used to correct the  heat source temperature and heat sink temperature.  The cooling capacity can be written as:  Q =m h h =c m T T (20) 0 6 p 0 6 The  blower  energy  consumption and  cooling  EER  are  described by the  following  expressions:  W =mc T T (21) f p 2 1 Buildings 2022, 12, 870  8  of  16  Q T T 0 6 (22) EER= =   W T T f 2 1 The compressor and blower isentropic compression processes are described by the  following equation:  T =T γ 3s–1 1 (23) 5–6 while the turbine expansion process is:  k 1 (24) T =T =T γ 5 6s 6s 5–6 The balance equation of turbocharger can be written as follows:  T T =T T (25) 5 6 3 2 (26) T T η=T T 5 6s 3s–2 2 According to the approximate parallel hypothesis, we obtain:  T T =T T (27) 3s–2 2 3s–1 2s–1 (28) T T η=T T 5 6s 3s–1 2s–1 b 1 (29) γ =γ η 1   1–2 5–6 a γ 5–6 The heat transfer process of the recovery heat exchanger can be written as follows:  T T =T T =ε T T (30) 1 0 4 5 r 4 0 We define the following dimensionless parameter:  θ= (31) where  T =T + T T 2 2s–1 1 (32) T =T + T T (33) 3 2 3s–2 2 The EER can be written as only related to the turbine pressure and γ   as follows:  5–6 1 b [1 1 η ] T T γ 0 6 5–6 EER= = (34) T T 2 1 a γ 1 1–2 (35) COP=EER+1 The flow ratio of two blowers should be introduced as another variable for Cycle F  with two parallel blowers. However, the mass flow rate is only related to the performance  of the blowers; therefore, it is treated as a constant in the derivation of the expressions.  The  absolute  performance  of  the  system  is  lower  than  that  of  the  other  single‐blower  cycles; however, it is found through measurements that this cycle can ensure the efficient  operation of the turbocharger, which is more in line with the actual operating conditions  of  the  turbocharger  and  obtains  a  better  practical,  operational  effect  [26]. The  specific  calculation process is as follows.  The heating capacity is calculated as follows:  Q = m +m h h =c m +m T T (36) 2 1 4 5 p 2 1 4 5 Buildings 2022, 12, 870  9  of  16  where m1 and m2 are parallel mass flows in Figure 2f, and the blower energy consumption  is:  W =m c T T +m c T T f 2 p 8 1 1 p 2 1 (37) Assuming that the flow ratio G is a known quantity, i.e.,  G= (38) we can describe the heating COP as follows:  Q m +m c T T 2 1 p 4 5 COP = = (39) W m c T T +m c T T f 2 p 8 1 1 p 2 1 The variable process of two parallel blowers can be written as:  k 1 (40) T =T =T γ 2s 1 1 1–2 T T 2s 1 (41) T T = 2 1 k 1 (42) T =T =T γ   8s 1 1 6–7 T γ T γ 1 1 1 6–7 6–7 T =T + =T 1+ 8 1 1 η η f f (43) γ 1 6–7 =T θε ε +1 1+   0 r r and the heat transfer process of the recovery heat exchanger is described as follows:  T T =T T =ε T T (44) 5 6 1 0 r 5 0 (45) T =T θ θε +ε =bT 6 0 r r 0 (46) T =T θε ε +1 =aT   1 0 r r 0 The compressor variable process can be written as:  k 1 (47) T =T =T γ 3s 2 2 2–3 (48) T =T γ 6 7s 6–7 while the parallel blowers mixing process is:  m T +m T GT +T 1 3 2 8 3 8 T = = (49) m +m G+1 1 2 We define the following one dimensionless parameter:  T =θT (50) 5 0 The balance equation of turbocharger is given as follows:  m +m T T =m T T (51) 1 2 6 7 1 3 2 T T 3s 2 m +m T T η =m   (52) 1 2 6 7s 1 Buildings 2022, 12, 870  10  of  16  T T 3s 2 G+1 T T η =G   (53) 6 7s γ 1 1–2 (54) b G+1 1 η=aG 1+ γ 1   2–3 γ η 6–7 f Based on these assumptions, the following equations can be derived:  T γ T γ =T γ T (55) 1 1 2 2 6–7 1–2 2–3 (56) G+1 T T η=G T γ T γ 6 7s 1 1 6-7 1–2 (57) γ =γ γ   6–7 1–2 2–3 b G+1 1 (58) 1 η=γ γ   6–7 1–2 a G γ 6–7 b G+1 1 (59) γ =γ 1 η  1–2 6–7 a G γ 6–7 6–7 γ =   (60) 2–3 1–2 Based on the above expression, the calculation method of  COP   related to γ   can  6–7 be derived as follows:  Q m +m c T T 1+G c T T 2 1 p 4 5 p 4 5 COP = = = = W m c T T +m c T T c T T +Gc T T f 2 p 8 1 1 p 2 1 p 8 1 p 2 1 (61) γ 1 γ 1 6–7 1–2 Ga 1+ γ +a 1+ 2–3 η η f f ⎛ ⎞ 1+G θ G+1 ⎝ ⎠ γ 1 γ 1 6–7 1–2 a +aG η η f f 3. Results and Analysis  3.1. Theoretical Calculation Results  Using the above mathematical models to calculate the heating COP, the following  results were obtained according to the calculation results shown in Figures 3 and 4. It can  be noted that the heating performance of Cycle C and that of Cycle A were similar. They  were both the highest, followed by Cycles E, B, and F under all working conditions.  There was an optimal pressure ratio for all cycles under certain working conditions.  As the pressure ratio gradually reached the optimal value, the heating performance also  reached a peak value (the optimal COP). Afterwards, the heating COP could not increase  with an increase in the pressure ratio. When the ambient temperature was fixed at −15 °C  at the heating water temperature of 45 °C, the optimal pressure ratio was about 1.5–1.7 for  each single‐blower cycle. The optimal pressure ratio of the double‐blower cycle was close  to  1.8–1.9,  and  the  optimal  COP  ranged  from  1.22  to  1.27. When  the  water  supply  temperature dropped to 35 °C, the optimal pressure ratio of all cycles remained almost  unchanged, with the optimal COP in the range of 1.24–1.29. Therefore, the heating was  not influenced by the water temperature at a fixed ambient temperature. When the water  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  11  of  16  supply temperature was fixed, the optimal pressure ratio of each cycle showed a minor  decrease as the ambient temperature rose from −15 °C to 5 °C. It should be noted that the  optimal pressure ratio was not sensitive to the ambient temperature. Therefore, for the  air‐reversed  Brayton  heat  pump  systems  with  a  turbocharger  driven  by  blowers,  the  ambient temperature and the water supply temperature were not the main factors that  affected the optimal pressure ratio.  Figures 3 and 4 show that once the pressure ratio between the turbine inlet pressure  and the outlet pressure reaches a certain value, the COP of heating did not increase with  an increase in the pressure ratio. Therefore, for the reversed Brayton heat pump with a  single  blower,  this  heat  pump  maintained  a  high  heating  efficiency  when  the  turbine  pressure  ratio  was  greater  than  1.5.  For  Cycle  C,  when  the  water  supply  temperature  varied from 45 °C to 35 °C,  the optimal  COP increased by about 0.04 under the same  ambient  temperature. The  ambient  temperature  varied  from −15  °C  to  5  °C,  and  the  optimal COP rose by about 0.09 at the same water temperature. Therefore, the COP in the  optimal heating system was insensitive to the ambient temperature and the temperature  of hot water, which is also a significant advantage.  The calculation results also showed that the highest COP of the single‐fan heat pump  system under different working conditions was maintained in the range of 1.2–1.4. Taking  the example of Cycle A, it can be observed that the COP increased by at least 27% while  the turbocharger compressor efficiency and the turbine efficiency increased to 0.85 and  0.9, respectively [27]. Apparently, the heating performance of the system is significantly  improved as the efficiency of the turbocharger is improved. Therefore, it requires more  attention. In addition, the variation range of air refrigerant pressure was not large under  the  operating  conditions,  which  reduced  the  requirements  of  equipment  airtightness.  Consequently, it reduced the processing difficulty.  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Pressure Ratio (a)  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Pressure Ratio (b)  COP COP Buildings 2022, 12, 870  12  of  16  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Pressure Ratio (c)  Figure 3. Variation of COP versus pressure ratio at 45 ℃ hot water temperature. (a) Ambient  temperature of −15 °C. (b) Ambient temperature of −5 °C. (c) Ambient temperature of 5 °C.  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 11.2 1.4 1.6 1.82 Press ure Ratio (a)  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Pressure Ratio (b)  1.50 1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 0.70 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Pressure Ratio (c)  Figure 4. Variation of COP versus pressure ratio at 35 °C hot water temperature. (a) Ambient  temperature of −15 °C. (b) Ambient temperature of −5 °C. (c) Ambient temperature of 5 °C.  COP COP COP COP Buildings 2022, 12, 870  13  of  16  3.2. Experimental Results  The  above  theoretical  results  pointed  to  the  way  to  establish  the  test  bench  and  provide  support  for  the  late  promotion.  The  relevant  experimental  rigs  are  shown  in  Figure  5,  which  integrate  the  traditional,  regenerated  air‐reversed  Brayton  heat  pump  cycle and the cycles with a turbocharger and blowers, as described in Section 2.1. Based  on a reconstruction of this test bench, more cycles under different working conditions  were  realized.  The  experimental  conditions  and  specific  results  were  provided  in  the  literature by Li et al. [26].  The  representative  Cycle  F,  which  was  simple  to  implement  in  the  existing  experimental bench, was selected as the typical one for comparison in this paper. Figure  6 shows the theoretical and measured results of Cycle F under the same initial conditions.  Here, the calculated results were in good agreement with the experimental observation,  and the maximum error was lower than 5.6%. Because of the assumption that the pressure  lines  are  approximately  parallel  within  a  certain  range  of  entropy  in‐crease  in  the  derivation of the formula [24], but the measured system energy consumption is close to a  fixed value, due to the use of a constant‐frequency blower as the power equipment in  actual measurement it was different from the power calculated by the enthalpy difference  in  the  calculation.  So,  there  were  some  deviations  between  the  calculated  and  experimental results. Moreover, the computation procedure neglected a few factors, such  as heat transfer from the heat pump system to the outside, friction resistance in the pipe,  and so on. In general, the expressions can be used to predict the ranges of turbine pressure  value and COP, which can simplify the calculation process, optimize the system form, and  achieve the optimal pressure ratio quickly when designing experiments or products.  (a)  Buildings 2022, 12, 870  14  of  16  (b)  (c)  Figure 5. Diagrams of the test bench of the air‐reversed Brayton heat pump with a turbocharger. (a)  One‐blower system. (b) Two‐blower system. (c) Photograph of the air cycle heat pump system.  Figure 6. Comparison of calculation and experimental results under different conditions (45 °C/35  °C hot water temperature).      Buildings 2022, 12, 870  15  of  16  4. Conclusions  Six types of air‐reversed Brayton heat pump system with turbochargers driven by  blowers  were  proposed  according  to  the  location  of  the  system  in  contact  with  the  environment  and  the  number  and  position  of  the  blowers.  The  thermodynamic  expressions  of  the  heating  COP  and  the  corresponding  turbine  pressure  ratio  were  derived and analyzed, respectively. The main conclusions were drawn as follows:  There is an optimal pressure ratio for each cycle. The optimal pressure ratio of the  single‐blower system is about 1.5–1.7, while that of the dual‐blower system is about 1.8– 1.9.  Cycle A (with a single blower before the compressor, open to the heat source side)  and Cycle C (with a single blower after the compressor, open to the heat sink side) have  the highest heating COPs and are worthy of more attention.  The  theoretical  results  of  Cycle  F  were  in  agreement  with  the  experimental  observations, with a maximum error of less than 5.6%.  5. Prospects  In this paper, the air‐reversed Brayton heat pump was mainly used for a heating  system.  However,  it  can  be  applied  under  circumstances  with  a  large  temperature  difference between the heat source and the sink, such as high‐temperature water supply  or cryogenic refrigeration,  high‐temperature drying, and combined heating with other  heat  pumps  which  meet  the  demands  of  different  heating  conditions  and  building  functions.  All  these  issues  need  to  be  further  studied. In  addition,  it  is  necessary  to  consider the dynamic coupling characteristics between the building thermal environment  and the air‐reversed Brayton heat pump system, as well as the association between the  energy consumption of the system and the building and climatic conditions throughout a  whole year.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, S.W.; methodology, S.W. and S.L.; investigation, S.L. and  S.W.; writing—original draft preparation, S.L. and S.J.; writing—review and editing, S.W., S.L., S.J.  and X.W. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.  Funding: This research received the support from the PhD Start‐up Fund of the Natural Science  Foundation of Liaoning Province, China (grant number 2019‐BS‐055).  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable.  Informed Consent Statement: Not applicable.  Data Availability Statement: The data presented in this study are available on request from the  corresponding author.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  Nomenclature  Nomenclature 𝑐 specific heat at constant pressure (J/kgK) COP/EER coefficient of performance h enthalpy (J/kg) QH heating capacity (W) m mass flow rate (kg/s) QC cooling capacity (W) p pressure (Pa) T temperature (°C/K) R gas constant (J/Kmol) v specific volume (m /kg) Wf blower energy consumption(W) Greek symbols Subscripts 𝜂 effectiveness c compressor 𝜃 temperature ratio defined in Equation (11) f blower 𝜀 effectiveness of regenerator e expander; turbine a function of pressure ratio s isentropic     Buildings 2022, 12, 870  16  of  16  References  1. White, A.J. Thermodynamic analysis of the reversed Joule‐Brayton cycle heat pump for domestic heating. Appl. Energy 2009, 86,  2443–2450.  2. Braun, J.; Bansal, P.; Groll, E. Energy efficiency analysis of air cycle heat pump dryers. Int. J. Refrig. 2002, 25, 954–965.  3. Park, S.K.; Ahn, J.H.; Kim, T.S. Off‐design operating characteristics of an open‐cycle air refrigeration system. Int. J. Refrig. 2012,  35, 2311–2320.  4. Elland, H.X. Air Cycle Feasibility Using a Novel, Single Rotor Compander for Refrigeration and Heating. In Proceedings of the  IIR International Rankine 2020 Conference‐Heating, Cooling and Power Generation, Glasgow, UK, 27–31 July 2020.  5. Mundhra,  R.;  Mukhopadhyay,  A.  Thermodynamic  analysis  of  irreversible  reversed  brayton  cycle  heat  pump  with  finite  capacity finite conductance heat reservoirs. In Advances in Mechanical Engineering. Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering; Biswal,  B., Sarkar, B., Mahanta, P., Eds.; Springer: Singapore, 2020; pp. 763–775.  6. ASHRAE. Cogeneration Systems and Engine and Turbine Drives; ASHRAE: Atlanta, GA, USA, 2000.  7. Wang, S.G. Air Cycle Heat Pumps. In Handbook of Energy Systems in Green Buildings; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany,  2018.  8. Bi, Y.H.; Chen, L.G.; Sun, F.R. Exergy‐based ecological optimization for an endoreversible variable‐temperature heat reservoir  air heat pump cycle. Rev. Mex. Fis. 2009, 55, 112–119.  9. Bi,  Y.H.;  Chen,  L.G.;  Sun,  F.R.  Heating  load,  heating  load  density  and  COP  optimisations  for  an  endoreversible  variable  temperature heat reservoir air heat pump. J. Energy Inst. 2009, 82, 43–47.  10. Bi, Y.H.; Chen, L.G.; Sun, F.R. Exergetic efficiency optimization for an irreversible heat pump working on reversed Brayton  cycle. Pramana 2010, 74, 351–363.  11. Bi, Y.H.; Chen, L.G.; Sun, F.R. Heating load density optimization of an irreversible simple Brayton cycle heat pump coupled to  counter‐flow heat exchangers. Appl. Math. Model. 2012, 36, 1854–1863.  12. Chen, L.G.; Ni, N.; Sun, F.; Wu, C. Performance of real regenerated air heat pumps. Int. J. Power Energy Syst. 1999, 19, 231–238.  13. Zhang, C.L.; Yuan, H. An important feature of air heat pump cycle: Heating capacity in line with heating load. Energy 2014, 72,  405–413.  14. Yuan, H.; Zhang, C.L. Regenerated air cycle potentials in heat pump applications. Int. J. Refrig. 2015, 51, 1–11.  15. Yang, Y.; Yuan, H.; Peng, J.W.; Zhang, C.L. Performance modeling of air cycle heat pump water heater in cold Climate. Renew.  Energy 2015, 87, 1067–1075.  16. Dieckmann, J.; Erickson, A.; Harvey, A.; Toscano, W. Research and Development of an Air‐Cycle Heat‐Pump Water Heater; Foster‐ Miller Associates, Inc.: Waltham, MA, USA, 1979; pp. 1–341.  17. Edwards, T.C.; McDonald, A.T. ROVACS: A New Rotary‐Vane‐Cycle Air‐Conditioning and Refrigeration System; 720079; S.A.E.:  Warrendale, PA, USA, 1972.  18. Edwards, T.C. The Rovac Automotive Air Conditioning System; 750403; S.A.E.: Warrendale, PA, USA, 1975.  19. TNO. Cooling, Freezing and Heating with the Air Cycle, Documentation Sheet; TNO Environment. Energy and Process Innovation,  Department of Refrigeration and Heat Pump Technology: Apeldoorn, The Netherlands, 2003.  20. Spence, S.W.T.; Doran, W.J.; Artt, D.W. Design, construction and testing of an air‐cycle refrigeration system for road transport.  Int. J. Refrig. 2004, 27, 503–510.  21. Spence, S.W.T.; Doran, W.J.; Artt, D.W.; McCullough, G. Performance analysis of a feasible air‐cycle refrigeration system for  road transport. Int. J. Refrig. 2005, 28, 381–388.  22. Catalano, L.A.; Bellis, F.D.; Amirante, R. Improved inverse Joule Brayton air cycle using turbocharger units. In Proceedings of  the Conference on Thermal and Environmental Issues in Energy Systems, Sorrento, Italy, 6–19 May 2010; pp. 16–19.  23. Catalano, L.A.; Bellis, F.D.; Amirante, R. Development and testing of sustainable refrigeration plants. In Proceedings of the  ASME Turbo Expo, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 6–10 June 2011; pp. 1–8.  24. Li, S.S.; Wang, S.G.; Ma, Z.J. Using an air cycle heat pump system with a turbocharger to supply heating for full electric vehicles.  Int. J. Refrig. 2017, 77, 11–19.  25. Li, S.S.; Wang, S.G.; Ma, Z.J. Performance analysis of an air cycle heat pump system with a turbocharger driven by a blower.  Procedia Eng. 2017, 205, 2720–2727.  26. Li, S.S.; Wang, S.G.; Ma, Z.J.; Zhang, C.L. Experimental investigation of a regenerated air cycle heat pump heating system with  a turbocharger. Int. J. Refrig. 2019, 100, 48–54.  27. Zhang, C.L.; Yuan, H.; Cao, X. New insight into regenerated air heat pump cycle. Energy 2015, 91, 226–234. 

Journal

BuildingsMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Jun 21, 2022

Keywords: air-reversed Brayton heat pump; turbocharger; system layout; pressure ratio; COP

There are no references for this article.