Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Fast and Non-Destructive Prediction Model for Remaining Life of Rigid Pavement with or without Asphalt Overlay

A Fast and Non-Destructive Prediction Model for Remaining Life of Rigid Pavement with or without... Article  A Fast and Non‐Destructive Prediction Model for Remaining  Life of Rigid Pavement with or without Asphalt Overlay  1 2 3,4, 1 3 3 3 Xuan Hong  , Weilin Tan  , Chunlong Xiong  *, Zhixiong Qiu  , Jiangmiao Yu  , Duanyi Wang  , Xiaopeng Wei  ,  3,4 4 Weixiong Li   and Zhaodong Wang      Guangdong Expressway Co., Ltd., Guangzhou 510100, China; xuanh@gdfreeway.com (X.H.);   qiuzx@gdfreeway.com (Z.Q.)    Guangdong Kaiyang Expressway Co., Ltd., Jiangmen 529200, China; twlin@gdfreeway.com    School of Civil Engineering and Transportation, South China University of Technology,   Guangzhou 510640, China; yujm@scut.edu.cn (J.Y.); tcdywang@scut.edu.cn (D.W.);  202121010608@mail.scut.edu.cn (X.W.); 201810101689@mail.scut.edu.cn (W.L.)    Guangzhou Xiaoning Roadway Engineering Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd.,   Guangzhou 510641, China; zhaodongwang@xndl3.wecom.work  *  Correspondence: cthgclx@mail.scut.edu.cn  Abstract: Remaining life is an important indicator of pavement residual effective service time and  is directly related to maintenance decision‐making with limited funds. This paper proposes a fast  and non‐destructive model to predict the remaining life of rigid PCC (Portland cement concrete)  pavement, with or without asphalt overlay. Firstly, a model was constructed according to the cur‐ rent Chinese design specifications for concrete pavement integrating an inverse design concept. Sec‐ ondly, the prediction model was applied to three typical pavement sections with 1430, 1250 and  1000 slabs, respectively. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) was utilized to determine the geometric  Citation: Hong, X.; Tan, W.; Xiong,  parameters in the predictive model and the physical state of the pavement. A falling weight detector  C.; Qiu, Z.; Yu, J.; Wang, D.; Wei, X.;  (FWD) was utilized for determination of the mechanical parameters. A more reasonable equivalent  Li, W.; Wang, Z. A Fast and   elastic modulus of foundation was back‐calculated instead of using the limited model in the design  Non‐Destructive Prediction Model  specification. Thirdly, the remaining life was predicted based on the current mechanical and geo‐ for Remaining Life of Rigid   metric parameters. The distributions of the remaining life of the three pavement sections was sta‐ Pavement with or without Asphalt  tistically analyzed. Finally, a decision‐making system to inform maintenance strategy was proposed  Overlay. Buildings 2022, 12, 868.  based on the remaining life and the technical condition of each slab. The results showed that the  https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings  12070868  relationship between the remaining life and the mechanical parameters, geometric parameters and  the physical state of the pavement was highly consistent with engineering experience. The success  Academic Editors: Xiaopei Cai,  rate of the prediction model was as high as 96%. The proposed fast and non‐destructive prediction  Huayang Yu and Tao Wang  model  showed  good  engineering  applicability  and  feasibility.  The  decision‐making  system  was  Received: 18 May 2022  shown to be feasible in terms of economic benefits.  Accepted: 17 June 2022  Published: 21 June 2022  Keywords: remaining life; rigid PCC pavement; GPR; FWD; inverse design concept  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  neu‐   tral  with  regard  to  jurisdictional  claims in published maps and institu‐ tional affiliations.  1. Introduction  1.1. Background  Portland  cement  concrete  (PCC)  pavement,  with  or  without  asphalt  overlay,  is  widely used because of its good durability, stability, strong bearing capacity, long service  Copyright: © 2022 by the authors. Li‐ life, and low maintenance cost [1,2]. In recent years, with the rapid development of the  censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  economy, the amount of traffic has increased sharply, and axle loads have become in‐ This article  is an open access article  distributed under the terms and con‐ creasingly heavy. PCC pavements usually show serious performance degradation before  ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ they reach the intended service life [3,4]. The concept of the remaining life of a pavement  tribution (CC BY) license (https://cre‐ is based on the premise of directly repairing particular road damage or designing an as‐ ativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  phalt overlay to cover the original surface defects [5,6]. Remaining life represents the rest  Buildings 2022, 12, 868. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12070868  www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  2  of  19  of valid service life until a failure is reached in the PCC pavement as a result of exposure  to traffic and environmental forces [7]. The concept of remaining life is helpful for making  optimal use of the capacity for in‐service pavement repair and facilitating decision‐mak‐ ing for reconstruction or rehabilitation with limited existing resources [8,9].  The remaining life of a PCC pavement can be understood in terms of two categories:  functional and structural [10,11]. The functional category relates to surface problems and  mainly relies on pavement surface indicators that can be directly detected. The most rep‐ resentative method is the serviceability approach involving the combining of performance  prediction equations and triggering thresholds for maintenance or rehabilitation [12–14].  In contrast, structural remaining life relates to internal problems and mechanical indica‐ tors that cannot be detected directly [15]. Currently, there is no recognized approach to  the verification of structural remaining life. Prediction methods for the assessment of the  in‐site structural remaining life of PCC pavement have developed little over recent dec‐ ades. The most representative method is the 1993 AASHTO NDT approach using field  test mechanical data [16]. Another structural remaining life (fatigue life) prediction ap‐ proach is based on laboratory‐measured material mechanical degradation [17]. Addition‐ ally, statistical approaches, based on quite large amounts of data (especially concerning  maintenance implementation time) are used to directly calculate the service life of a par‐ ticular PCC pavement [18]. The existing methods for predicting the remaining life of rigid  PCC pavement utilize various concepts ranging from the purely empirical to the entirely  mechanistic. However, it has always been a difficult and complex problem to accurately  predict the remaining life of rigid PCC pavement.  A review of the literature indicates that surface functional failure does not have a  simple relationship with pavement inner condition [19–23]. The predicted functional re‐ maining life of an in‐service pavement with a recent new overlay may be seriously over‐ estimated. The new overlay may be prematurely destroyed before the functional remain‐ ing life is reached. Consideration of the structural remaining life is more reasonable and  scientific. Firstly, with respect to the 1993 AASHTO NDT approach, this requires details  of the effective thickness, determined by modulus back‐calculation, and the original slab  thickness, using an empirical graphic procedure. Unfortunately, the effective thickness is  subjectively  assessed  and  is  arguably  unreliable  [24].  The  modulus  back‐calculation  method used is based on a flexible pavement which, theoretically, is not applicable to rigid  PCC pavement [25]. Secondly, the mechanical degradation approach, which is based on a  fatigue criterion for concrete materials, does not consider the combination of structure and  thickness [26,27]. Lastly, the statistical approach is the most direct and most closely related  to the field situation, but has considerable drawbacks, including that the time taken for  statistical analysis is extensive, and the failure time is difficult to accurately assess. More‐ over, the regular or periodic road maintenance occurring will have a significant impact on  the remaining life of the pavement. For different projects, there will also be environmental  and traffic differences. Thus, statistically based prediction of the remaining life of a par‐ ticular pavement might be limited to this situation and be purely empirically based.  To address the shortcomings discussed above, a methodology which incorporates an  inverse design concept for prediction of the remaining life of a rigid PCC pavement was  proposed. Three typical pavement sections were selected for application of the prediction  model. Non‐destructive detecting technology, including GPR and FWD, was utilized to  obtain data on pavement technical condition.  1.2. Objective and Scope  The motivation for the study  was the development of a  remaining life prediction  model of rigid PCC pavement, with or without asphalt overlay, applying integrated non‐ destructive detection technologies to provide details of on‐site pavement parameters to  improve the speed of prediction, accuracy, and representativeness.     Buildings 2022, 12, 868  3  of  19  2. Concept and Methodology Development  2.1. Inverse Design Concept  In this study, a methodology for predicting the remaining life of rigid PCC pavement  is proposed which is based mainly on an inverse design concept, in contrast to the tradi‐ tional forward design procedure described in the JTG D40‐2011 Specifications for Design  of Highway Cement Concrete Pavement [28]. The forward design approach determines  the road parameters, including road materials and thickness combinations, according to  the assumed number of axles load and required pavement conditions. However, the in‐ verse design concept involves evaluation of pavement condition based on the current state  of pavement materials, structure thickness combinations, and current and future traffic  trends [29].  2.2. Methodology Development  2.2.1. Remaining Life Prediction Model  Combining the current state and the predicted future traffic volume, the remaining  service life of a PCC pavement is calculated using an inverse design concept as described  below.  In the forward design, the cumulative number of axle loads during the design period,  e , is calculated using Equation (1) according to measured traffic parameters, such as the  initial traffic volume and the traffic volume growth rate [28].  N 1  1 365    (1)  N    where,    is the annual average growth rate of traffic over the design life. The initial num‐ ber of axle loads,  , is determined based on traffic volume survey and calculated ac‐ cording to Equations (2) and (3) [30].  N AADTT DDF LDF VCDF EALF    (2)  1 mm m2   PND NA mij mij mi   EALF c c   (3)   m 12    NT P NA ij ms mi    where,  AADTT  is the two‐way annual average daily traffic volume of 2‐axle 6‐wheel  and above vehicles;  DDF   is a direction factor determined based on the ratio of the num‐ ber of vehicles in the two directions;  LDF   is a lane coefficient determined according to  the ratio of the number of vehicles in the design lane;  VCDF   is the type distribution  coefficient of m‐class vehicles;  EALF   is the conversion factor of the equivalent design  axle load for m‐class vehicles;  NA   is the total number of i axle types in m‐class vehicles;  mi NT   is the total number of m‐class vehicles;  P   is the single‐axle axle load of i‐type axle  m mij in j‐level axle load range of m‐class vehicles;  P   is the uniaxial weight of design axle load  ( usually 100 kN in China); and  ND   is the number of i‐type axles in the j‐level axle load  mij range in m‐class vehicles. Factor  c   is the axle group factor—1 for a single axis, 2.6 for a  double shaft and 3.8 for a triple shaft—based on engineering experience in China. Factor  c   is the wheel coefficient—1 for a double wheel and 4.5 for a single wheel.  Therefore, the design life,  t , can be calculated and deduced as Equation (4) based on  Equations (1)–(3).  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  4  of  19   t log  1 log1    (4)   365N  1 The design life is a set target value. The general forward design procedure involves  the following steps: (1) assumes the initial pavement parameters, such as thickness, mod‐ ulus, strength; (2) statistically predict the cumulative number of axial loads in the target  design life period; (3) input the pavement parameters and the cumulative number of axial  loads into the mechanical model; (4) calculate the load‐temperature coupling stress of the  bottom of the cement concrete slab; and (5) adjust the initial pavement parameters until  the load‐temperature coupling stress is less than the flexural tensile strength of the de‐ signed cement concrete. The finalized pavement parameters are the design results that  can meet the goal of the design life.  From the perspective of inverse design, where  t  is regarded as the remaining life of  the pavement,  N   should be no larger than the cumulative number of axial loads pre‐ dicted based on Equation (1), but the number of axial loads that the current pavement can  still bear, which is directly related to the current pavement parameters.  In the general forward design procedure,  k   is the fatigue stress coefficient consid‐ ering the cumulative fatigue effect of load stress during the design reference period, which  represents the pavement parameters and has a relationship with the number of axial loads  that the current pavement can still withstand. Their relationship can be expressed as Equa‐ tion (5) [28]:  kN    (5)  fe In Equation (5), the value of     is generally 0.057 when Portland cement concrete is  used in the surface layer and 0.065 for the base layer. In the prediction model of the re‐ maining life of rigid PCC pavement,  t , can be deduced and expressed as Equation (6).  1    t log  1 log 1    (6)   365N  In Equation (6), the current number of axle loads,  , can be calculated as Equation  (2), and the annual average growth rate of traffic can be calculated based on the historical  traffic data.  k   is a mechanical index relating to the current pavement parameters, such  as thickness, modulus and strength and the cumulative fatigue effect of load‐temperature  coupling stress.  2.2.2. Determination of Model Parameters  In order to obtain  k   for the current pavement structure, it is necessary to carry out  the analysis from the perspective of pavement mechanics calculations. In Equation (6),  k   is calculated as Equation (7) [28].  kk  k   (7)   fpr pscr where,  k   is the compressive coefficient (usually 1.15 for highway and 1.10 for first class  highway);   is the stress reduction factor (usually 0.85); and    is the stress generated  k  r ps by the design axle load at the critical position of a four‐side free plate calculated as Equa‐ tions (8)–(10) [28].   3 0.70 2 0.94   1.47 10 rh P   (8)  ps c s Buildings 2022, 12, 868  5  of  19  where,  P   is the uniaxial weight of the design axle load (usually 100 kN); and  r  is the  relative stiffness radius of the concrete layer. The factor,  h , is the concrete layer thickness  [28].  1/3 rD  1.21 E   (9)   ct where,  E   is the equivalent elastic modulus of the foundation underneath the concrete  layer.; and  D   is the relative stiffness radius of the concrete layer [28].  Eh cc D    c (10)  12 1  where,  E   is the concrete layer bending modulus;    is the Poisson ratio of concrete,  c c which is a constant during the elastic deformation phase of the material, and    is usually  0.15 of the cement concrete.  The driving load fatigue stress generated at the critical load position in a rigid con‐ crete slab,     in Equation (7), is deduced and calculated as Equation (11). It reflects the  pr mechanical equilibrium state of the pavement; that is, the flexural tensile strength of the  cement concrete is exactly equal to the load‐temperature coupling stress of the bottom of  the rigid PCC pavement.      (11)  pr tr where,  f   is the standard value of the bending strength of cement concrete. The design  value is usually 5 MPa but the on‐site measured value is usually different from the design  value.  f   can also be deduced and calculated as Equation (12).     is the reliability coef‐ r r ficient related to the target reliability, variation level and variation coefficient (usually 1.64  for highway and 1.28 for first‐class highway).  0.96 f  (12)   0.09    is the driving load fatigue stress generated at the critical load position in a rigid  tr concrete slab calculated as Equation (13) [28].    k   (13)  tr t t,max where,  k   is the temperature fatigue stress coefficient calculated as Equation (14) [28].     t,max  kac    (14)  tt t    f tr ,max   where,  a ,  b ,  c   are  the  model  parameters  considering  the  natural  environment  in  t t t which the road is located. For roads in Guangdong province in China,  a   is usually 0.841,  b   is usually 1.323, and  c   is usually 0.058.     is the maximum temperature stress of  t t t,max a concrete slab under a maximum temperature gradient calculated as Equation (15) [28].   Eh T c ccg (15)    B   tL ,max 2 Buildings 2022, 12, 868  6  of  19  where,     is the concrete linear expansion coefficient (for Portland cement concrete the  −5 coefficient is usually 1.1 × 10 /°C); and   is the 50‐year maximum temperature gradient  at the location of the road. For roads in Guangdong province, the statistical result of    is 88 °C/m. The factor,   , the correction factor of the temperature gradient, can be ob‐ tained by regression analysis as Equation (16), according to the current specification. Its  correlation coefficient value can be as high as 0.99.   18.56hh 8.58 1.29  (16)  aa   is the temperature stress coefficient of integrated temperature warping stress and  internal stress calculated as Equations (17)–(19) [28].  4.48h Be 1.77 C 0.131 1C    (17)  LL L sinh cos  cosh sin C  1   (18)  cos sin  sinh cosh     (19)  3r where,  C   is the temperature warping stress coefficient of the concrete slab. Factor  L  is  the length of the slab.  When the rigid PCC pavement is covered with the asphalt overlay, the remaining life  prediction model may be different from the prediction model in Equation (6). It must con‐ sider the effect of the overlay on the concrete layer’s load‐induced fatigue stress and tem‐ perature‐induced fatigue stress. Equations (8) and (13) are adjusted by Formulas (20) and  (21).    1  h    (20)  psa a a ps   1  h    (21)  tra a a tr where,     is the load‐induced stress generated by the axle load at the critical position  psa of the concrete slab with the asphalt overlay; factor     is the temperature‐induced stress  tra generated by the axle load at the critical position of the concrete slab with asphalt overlay;  factor  h   is the thickness of the overlay; and     and     are the model factors obtained  a a a by regression analysis as Equations (22) and (23), based on the current specification. Their  correlation coefficients are 0.986 and 0.972, respectively.   2.69 0.001  3.77h   (22)  ac ʹ 3  1.98 0.01810Eh 2.94   (23)  ac c In sum, Equations (7)–(23) describe in detail the acquisition or calculation method for  each parameter in the remaining life of the rigid PCC pavement prediction model in Equa‐ tion (6). Some of the parameters that are determined by experience have been described  in the above text; some of the other parameters that need to be obtained are classified in  Table 1.  In Table 1, the traffic data can be obtained by data survey with the help of the local  transportation management department. The geometry and the mechanical parameters of  the rigid PCC pavement can be obtained by replacing rapid and non‐destructive field  tests,  such  as  GPR  and  FWD,  for  traditional  single‐point  core  drilling  and  laboratory  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  7  of  19  testing. The total number of geometry and mechanical parameters is only five for rigid  pavement with asphalt overlay and only four for rigid pavement without asphalt overlay,  which greatly simplifies the life prediction model in Equation (6).  Table 1. Model parameters needing to be determined.  Classification  Parameters  Expressions  Methods in This Research  two‐way annual average daily traffic volume  AADDT   of 2‐axle and 6‐wheel and above vehicles  direction factor  DDF lane coefficient  LDF type distribution coefficient of m‐class  VCDF   Measured by imaging, weighing and  vehicles  other equipment installed on site by  NA   total number of i axle types in m‐class vehicles  mi the management department  Traffic data  NT   total number of m‐class vehicles  number of i‐type axle in the j‐level axle load  ND   mij range in m‐class vehicles  single‐axle axle load of i‐type axle in j‐level  P   mij axle load range of m‐class vehicles  annual average growth rate of truck traffic  Calculated based on historical traffic     during the reference period  data  thickness of asphalt overlay and concrete slab,  h ,  h ,  L  Geometry  Fast detection by radar  a c length of slab  E   concrete layer bending modulus  Mechanical  Detected by falling weight deflector  equivalent elastic modulus of foundation  parameter  and backcalculated modulus  E   underneath the concrete layer  3. Field Testing  3.1. Pavement Sections  Three rigid pavement sections, with or without asphalt overlay of the same length,  from the Guangdong Province in China, were selected as study objects. Basic information  for the three pavements is shown in Table 2.  Table 2. Basic information for the pavement sections.  Section  S118 TP  S118 HO  XL  Type  Rigid  Rigid with asphalt overlay  Rigid  Grade  First class  First class  Highway  Length/km  5  5  5  Age/a  26  27  22  Asphalt overlay 3 cm  Concrete layer 28 cm  Concrete layer 28 cm  + concrete layer 25 cm  + limestone stabilized base 20 cm  Structure combination  + cement stabilized base 24 cm  + gravel layer 50 cm  + gravel layer 20 cm  + subgrade  + subgrade  + subgrade  3.2. Data Collection and Process  3.2.1. Traffic Data  Traffic data was surveyed with the help of the local transportation management de‐ partment, to convert the vehicle loads of different axle loads of different axle types of dif‐ ferent vehicle types into standard design axle loads. At present, some mature commercial  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  8  of  19  websites can be used to convert traffic axle loads with the above basic survey data, such  as goodpave.com (accessed on 20 February 2022) [31] and daokedaopave.com (accessed  on 25 February 2022) [32].  3.2.2. Geometrical Data  Three‐dimensional(3D) ground penetrating radar (GPR) was used to detect the pave‐ ment layer thickness and slab length. The radar was produced by KONTUR, the radar  host was GEOSCOPE MK IV, and the ground‐coupled antenna was type DXG1820 with a  frequency bandwidth of 200–3000 MHz. GPR was used to find physical defects, such as  voids, broken slabs, uneven settlement of subgrades, etc. Measurements were taken con‐ tinuously at speeds ranging from 20 km/h to 30 km/h. Trigger spacing, time window and  dwell time were set separately at 2.5 cm, 25 ns and 3 us, respectively. The survey width  was no more than 1.5 m, with each lane assessed three times for full‐width inspection [33].  Approximately 15 km was inspected separately for each of the sections S118‐TP, S118‐HO  and XL. The principle and components of GPR are shown in Figure 1a. Inspection using  GPR is shown in Figure 1b.  (a)  (b)  Figure 1. Structure condition and thickness inspection: (a) Principle of GPR; (b) On‐site inspection  using GPR.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  9  of  19  3.2.3. Mechanical Parameters  FWD was applied to determine the concrete layer bending modulus and the equiva‐ lent elastic modulus of the foundation underneath the concrete layer using advanced and  proven modulus back‐calculation technology. The FWD was produced by Grontmij Carl  Bro; the model used was Phonix PRI2100. The FWD inspection speed was approximately  2~3 km/h. An impulse load of 100 ± 2.5 kN was applied in the center area of each PCC slab  [34]. For rigid pavement with an asphalt overlay, the boundary of the slab can first be  determined by 3D GPR and an RTK (real‐time kinematic) positioning system. There were  about 1430, 1250 and 1000 test points separately for S118‐TP, S118‐HO and XL. For each  point,  deflections,  air  temperature,  road  surface  temperature,  and  chainage  were  rec‐ orded. The technical principle of FWD and the inspection process are shown in Figure 2.  To  reduce  dynamic  fluctuation  effects,  it  is  necessary  to  ensure  that  there  are  no  heavy vehicles passing when the FWD is working. The road surface should be smooth  and free from debris to reduce deviation of the sensors. Although temperature and hu‐ midity have little influence on the modulus of a rigid PCC pavement, the temperature  change range was set to be less than 3 °C, and the humidity changed as little as possible.  The concrete layer bending modulus and the equivalent elastic modulus of foundation  were both back‐calculated using software reported in previous research [35].  (a) (b) Figure 2. Inspection of pavement deflection basin: (a) technical principle of FWD; (b) FWD inspec‐ tion.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  10  of  19  4. Results and Analysis  4.1. Traffic Data  The two‐way annual average daily traffic volume of 2‐axle and 6‐wheel and above  vehicles ( AADDT ), the proportion of vehicles in two driving directions ( DDF ) and the  proportion of vehicles in each lane in each direction ( LDF ) are shown in Table 3. The  proportion of 2–11 types of vehicles ( VCDF ) is shown in Table 4 and the proportion of    and  ) is shown in  vehicles with each axle type in each type of vehicle (ratio of  NA NT mi m Table 5. The proportion of vehicles in different axle load weight ranges in each axle‐type  vehicle (ratio of  ND   and  NA ) is the axle weight distribution coefficient. The axle  mij mi weight distribution coefficient of single‐axle single‐tire of class 2–11 vehicles of S118 TP is  shown in Figure 3.  Based on the above survey data,  N   of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL were calculated  as 12,890, 9956 and 18,848, respectively using Equations (2) and (3) with the assistance of  the daokedaopave.com website (accessed on 25 February 2022).  Table 3. General traffic parameters.  Parameters  S118 TP  S118 HO  XL  25,780  16,593  48,956  AADDT   0.5  0.6  0.55  DDF   1  1  0.7  LDF      1.5%  1.2%  7.0%  Table 4. Proportion of vehicle types 2–11 ( VCDF ).  Type of Vehicle  S118 TP  S118 HO  XL  2  17.80   28.90   22.00   3  33.00   43.80   23.30   4  3.40   5.50   2.70   5  0.00   0.00   0.00   6  12.50   9.40   8.30   7  4.40   2.00   7.50   8  9.10   4.60   17.10   9  10.60   3.40   8.50   10  8.50   2.30   10.60   11  0.70   0.10   0.00   Table 5. Proportion of vehicles with each axle type in each type of vehicle ( NA / NT ).  mi m S118 TP  S118 HO  XL  Type of  Single Axle  Single Axle  Double  Triple  Single Axle  Single Axle  Double  Triple Single Axle  Single Axle  Double  Triple  Vehicle  Single Tire  Double Tire  Shaft  Shaft  Single Tire  Double Tire  Shaft  Shaft  Single Tire  Double Tire  Shaft  Shaft  2  1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   0.99   0.01   0.00   3  1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   4  1.00   0.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   0.00   5  1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   6  2.00   0.38   0.62   0.00   2.00   0.43   0.57   0.00   2.00   0.50   0.50   0.00   7  1.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   8  1.00   0.56   0.89   0.56   1.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.93   0.14   0.93   9  1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   10  2.00   1.00   0.04   0.96   2.00   1.00   0.09   0.91   2.00   1.00   0.15   0.85   11  0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   Buildings 2022, 12, 868  11  of  19  Figure 3. Axle weight distribution coefficient of single‐axle single‐tire of class 2–11 vehicles of S118  TP.  4.2. Geometrical Data  From the GPR post‐processed data, the number of slabs in the design lane of S118 TP,  S118 HO, and XL were 1430, 1250 and 1000, respectively. The mean length of the slabs of  S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL were 3.5 m, 4.0 m and 5.0 m, respectively. Their coefficients of  variation were 1%, 2% and 0%, respectively. The length of slabs on the same section fluc‐ tuated normally, but the values were relatively consistent. The slab length distributions  of the design lanes of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL are shown in Figure 4.  The mean thickness of the slabs of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL were 26.9 cm, 24.3 cm  and 26.3 cm, respectively Their coefficients of variation were 8%, 6% and 3%, respectively  Differences in the thickness of the slabs for the same pavement section were not obvious.  The slab thickness distributions of the design lanes of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL are shown  in Figure 5. The geometrical data for slabs were affected by the construction error control  standards of different highway grades.  The mean thickness of the asphalt overlay of S118 HO was 3.0 cm and its coefficient  of variation was 36%. The asphalt overlay thickness distribution of the design lane of S118  HO is shown in Figure 6. The thickness of the asphalt overlay was related to the flatness  of the cement slab surface, the construction quality control, and the compression defor‐ mation caused by the vehicle load.     Buildings 2022, 12, 868  12  of  19  Figure 4. Slab length distribution of the design lanes of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL.  Figure 5. Slab thickness distribution of the design lanes of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL.  Figure 6. Asphalt overlay thickness distribution of the design lane of S118 HO.  4.3. Mechanical Parameters  The equivalent elastic modulus of the foundation underneath the concrete layer is an  important indicator for PCC pavement forward design [36] and is also a factor for predict‐ ing rest of life during inverse design. The current specification provides a model for cal‐ culating the equivalent elastic modulus of the foundation based on the deflections. How‐ ever, the application scope of the model is limited to the cement concrete pavement with‐ out asphalt overlay. The self‐weight of the asphalt overlay and the interlayer bonding be‐ tween the slab and the overlay will limit the bending deformation of the slab under load  and reduce the measured deflection value. The model will overestimate the equivalent  elastic modulus of foundation by about 8% based on the actual data.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  13  of  19  To obtain a more reasonable equivalent elastic modulus of foundation, a back‐calcu‐ lation model is constructed. Two‐ or three‐layer mechanical models in the back‐calcula‐ tion process for rigid pavement, with or without asphalt overlay, were adapted from the  multilayer (more than two or three layers) mechanical model shown in Figure 7. Through  this model, the equivalent elastic modulus of foundation, the concrete layer bending mod‐ ulus, and the modulus of asphalt overlay can be obtained at the same time.  The equivalent elastic moduli for the foundation distributions of the design lane of  S118 TP, S118 HO and XL are shown in Figure 8. The mean of XL was 423 MPa, which  was the largest among the three sections and its coefficient of variation was about 15%,  representing the smallest. The mean of S118 TP was relatively larger than that of S118 HO  but it had the largest variability of about 41%. The bearing capacity of the structure un‐ derneath the concrete layer of XL was the highest and its uniformity was best, that of S118  its uniformity was better than the uniformity of S118 TP.  HO was the lowest but  The concrete layer bending modulus distributions of the design lanes of S118 TP,  S118 HO and XL is shown in Figure 9. The concrete layer bending modulus of S118 TP  ranged from 12,187 MPa to 61,455 MPa with a mean value of 31,334 MPa; the variability  was about 17.8%. That of S118 HO ranged from 10,659 MPa to 48,025 MPa with a mean  value of 29,853 MPa with a variability of about 19.3%. That of XL ranged from 16,385 MPa  to 61,214 MPa with a mean value of 37,685 MPa with a variability of about 20.8%. The data  showed that XL had the largest mean concrete layer bending modulus, but also had a  relatively large coefficient of variation. The concrete layer bending modulus results for  S118 TP and S118 HO were relatively less biased, but S118 TP had the smallest variability.  These  phenomena  may  have resulted from the extent of fine construction and quality  management of pavements depending on the highway grade and the traffic volume.  In order to verify the accuracy of the back‐calculated results, the modulus of the drill‐ ing cylindrical specimen of slabs was tested by conducting splitting bending‐tension tests  indoors [24]. From the splitting bending‐tension test results of 30 random drilling core  samples in different pavement sections, the ratio of the back‐calculated modulus and the  test bending modulus ranged from 0.9 to 1.1 with a mean ratio of 1.01. The back‐calculated  results were very close to the results obtained in the laboratory.  Figure 7. Model transferring for the back‐calculation method.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  14  of  19  Figure 8. Equivalent elastic modulus of foundation distribution for the design lanes of S118 TP, S118  HO and XL.  Figure 9. Concrete layer bending modulus distribution for the design lanes of S118 TP, S118 HO and  XL.  4.4. Feasibility of the Prediction Model  A simple program based on the proposed prediction model was independently de‐ veloped using Microsoft office software, and the remaining life of the pavement structure  corresponding to each slab in the three pavement sections was calculated.  Based on the prediction results, the number of slabs of the 1430 slabs of S118 TP which  could not be predicted was only 47, all 1250 slabs of S118 HO could be predicted, and  there were only 15 slabs which could not be predicted of the 1000 slabs of XL. The success  rate of the prediction model when applied to the three pavement sections was as high as  96%.  To verify the reliability of the predicted remaining life results, the technical condition  characteristics of the pavement sections in the different remaining life intervals were clas‐ sified; the results are shown in Table 6. The bending modulus of slab  E   was significantly  positively related to the remaining life and the correlation coefficients were all over 0.7.  The thickness of the slabs of S118 TP and XL were significantly positively related to the  remaining life and the correlation coefficients were over 0.8. The thickness of the slab of  S118 HO was also positively related to the remaining life; however, the correlation coeffi‐ cient was less than 0.5. The thickness of the asphalt overlay was weakly positively related  to the remaining life. The equivalent elastic modulus of foundation  E   of S118 TP and XL  was weakly negatively related to the remaining life; however, the equivalent elastic mod‐ ulus of the foundation of S118 HO was weakly positively correlated with the remaining  life.  The results indicate that the statistical remaining life intervals had a high level of  correspondence  with  the  physical  state  of  the  pavement.  The  lower  the  predicted  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  15  of  19  remaining life, the worse the corresponding technical condition of  the pavement. This  suggests that the prediction model proposed in this research has good engineering ap‐ plicability and feasibility.  Table 6. Technical condition characteristics of the pavement in different remaining life intervals.  E   E   h   h   c t c a Intervals  Physical State  S118  S118  S118  S118 HO  XL  S118 HO  XL  S118 HO  XL  S118 HO  TP  TP  TP  Obvious physical defects such  as voids, broken slabs, severe  Less than 0.1a  27,430  27,465  36,813  377  296  424  26.0  24.1  26.3  2.9  reflective cracks in overlay and  pumping, etc.  Slight physical defects such as  voids, broken slabs, severe  0.1a–1a  32,006  33,873  49,915  338  296  414  26.9  24.7  26.5  3.3  reflective cracks in overlay and  pumping, etc.  Uneven subgrade settlement  1a–5a  32,992  35,688  51,498  314  305  407  27.3  24.9  26.6  3.5  under the slab, reflective  cracks in overlay, etc.  Slight reflective cracks in  5a–10a  34,455  37,440  52,933  327  305  384  27.2  24.8  26.3  3.2  overlay, etc.  10a–15a  33,549  37,676  53,557  309  309  369  28.0  25.0  26.5  3.4  Intact  More than 15a  37,190  39,961  55,540  321  295  429  28.3  25.3  27.0  3.3  Intact  4.5. Application of the Prediction Model  The distributions of predicted remaining life of the three pavement sections for dif‐ ferent intervals is shown in Figure 10. Most of slabs of S118 HO and XL were close to the  end of their service life taking the fatigue cracking of the slabs under the joint influence of  fatigue stress and temperature stress as the criterion. The remaining life of more than 70%  of slabs in S118 HO was less than 0.1a; this proportion was more than 90% in XL. S118 TP  performed relatively better. The remaining life of 45.7% slabs in S118 TP was less than  0.1a; in the other five life intervals, S118 TP had a higher proportion.  The mean remaining life of S118 TP, S118 HO and XL was about 2.7a, 2.2a and 2.1a  respectively. Based on Table 2, the three pavement sections have been used for about 26a,  27a and 22a. Thus, their actual years of use were about 29a, 29a, and 24a. Compared to the  30‐year design life of highway and first‐class highway cement pavements, the difference  was most pronounced for the XL section, with the S118 TP and S118 HO sections only  losing 1a. This phenomenon may be related to the limestone stabilized base layer used in  XL which is a kind of pavement material that is not resistant to water washing, especially  in hot and rainy areas. At the same time, it may also relate to the rapid growth in traffic.  The traffic volume of XL showed the largest growth rate of 7%.  In general, the distribution of the remaining life and the corresponding technical con‐ dition of the pavement may be helpful for determining the maintenance strategy of the  project. This is related to the reasonable arrangement of limited maintenance funds and  the  maintenance  priority  of  different  sub‐sections.  The  shorter  the  remaining  life,  the  higher the maintenance treatment priority. The maintenance plan for different sub‐sec‐ tions can be decided based on the detection results of GPR and FWD. The logic flow of  the maintenance decision‐making system is shown in Figure 11.  Considering XL as an example, the investment analysis of the future maintenance  plan showed that the EIRR (economic internal rate of return) was 15.5% greater than the  social discount rate of 8% and the ENPV (economic net present value) was 1.05 million   investment are feasible in  RMB greater than zero. The maintenance plan and maintenance terms of economic benefits.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  16  of  19  Figure 10. Distribution of predicted remaining life of three pavement sections in different inter‐ vals.  Figure 11. Logic flow of maintenance decision‐making system.  5. Conclusions  The paper proposes a fast and non‐destructive model for predicting the remaining  life of PCC rigid pavement, with or without asphalt overlay. The prediction model was  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  17  of  19  applied to three typical pavement sections. GPR was utilized to assess the geometric pa‐ rameters for the predictive model and the physical state of the pavement, and FWD was  utilized to assess the mechanical parameters. The main conclusions are as follows:  (1) A remaining life prediction model for rigid PCC pavement, with or without asphalt  overlay, was proposed based on an inverse design concept and an elastic foundation  single‐layer slab model. Only four to five parameters require to be detected with the  application  of  integrated  non‐destructive  detection  technologies  on  site,  which  greatly simplifies the life prediction process and improves the presentation of pre‐ diction results, with large amounts of data acquired quickly and non‐destructively.  (2) A  two‐  or  three‐layer  mechanical  model  in  the  back‐calculation  process  for  rigid  pavement,  with  or  without  asphalt  overlay,  was  transferred  from  the  multilayer  (more than two or three layers) mechanical model to determine the equivalent elastic  modulus of foundation underneath the concrete layer and the concrete layer bending  modulus. The ratios of the back‐calculated modulus and the laboratory test modulus  ranged from 0.9 to 1.1, with a mean ratio of 1.01.  The success rate of the prediction model when applied to three pavement sections  (3) was as high as 96%. The remaining statistically based life intervals showed good cor‐ respondence with the mechanical parameters, geometric parameters, and the physi‐ cal state of the pavement. The prediction model proposed in this research has good  engineering applicability and feasibility.  (4) A maintenance treatment decision‐making system was proposed based on the distri‐ bution of the remaining life and the corresponding technical condition of the pave‐ ment. This was shown to be feasible in terms of economic benefits, on the basis that  the pavement condition was above the minimum required standard.  In the future, we will compare our study results to those from previous research stud‐ ies to evaluate the model’s advantages in terms of prediction accuracy, speed, and repre‐ sentativeness.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, C.X., J.Y. and D.W.; methodology, C.X. and Z.Q.; inves‐ tigation, X.H., W.T., Z.W., W.L. and X.W.; formal analysis, W.L., X.W. and W.T.; writing—review  and editing, D.W. and X.H. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the man‐ uscript.  Funding: The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support provided by the “National  Natural Science Foundation of China” (52178426).  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable.  Informed Consent Statement: Informed consent  was  obtained  from all subjects involved  in the  study.  Data Availability Statement: The data presented in this study are available on request from the  corresponding author.  Acknowledgments: The authors also want to thank the Research Project of Guangdong Provincial  Communications Group on Key Technology of Pavement Balanced Durability Design and Solid  Waste Recycling for its support. All the help and support are greatly appreciated.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  Reference  1. DeSantis, J.W.; Sachs, S.G.; Vandenbossche, J.M. Faulting development in concrete pavements and overlays. Int. J. Pavement Eng.  2020, 21, 1445–1460.  2. Choi, J.‐h. Strategy for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from maintenance and rehabilitation of highway pavement. J. Clean.  Prod. 2019, 209, 88–100.  3. Chorzepa, M.G.; Johnson, C.; Durham, S.; Kim, S.S. Forensic Investigation of Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements in  Fair and Poor Condition. J. Perform. Constr. Facil. 2018, 32, 04018031.  4. Abdelaty,  A.;  Jeong,  H.D.;  Smadi,  O.  Barriers  to  Implementing  Data‐Driven  Pavement  Treatment  Performance  Evaluation  Process. J. Transp. Eng. Part B Pavements 2018, 144, 04017022.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  18  of  19  5. Bhattacharya, B.B.; Gotlif, A.; Darter, M.I.; Khazanovich, L. Impact of Joint Spacing on Bonded Concrete Overlay of Existing  Asphalt Pavement in the AASHTOWare Pavement ME Design Software. J. Transp. Eng. Part B Pavements 2019, 145, 04019018.  6. Qiao,  J.Y.;  Du,  R.;  Labi,  S.;  Fricker,  J.D.;  Sinha,  K.C.  Policy  implications  of  standalone  timing  versus  holistic  timing  of  infrastructure interventions: Findings based on pavement surface roughness. Transp. Res. Part A Policy Pract. 2021, 148, 79–99.  7. Xu, B.; Zhang, W.; Mei, J.; Yue, G.; Yang, L. Optimization of Structure Parameters of Airfield Jointed Concrete Pavements under  Temperature Gradient and Aircraft Loads. Adv. Mater. Sci. Eng. 2019, 2019, 3251590.  8. Wang,  H.;  Thakkar,  C.;  Chen,  X.;  Murrel,  S.  Life‐cycle  assessment  of  airport  pavement  design  alternatives  for  energy  and  environmental impacts. J. Clean. Prod. 2016, 133, 163–171.  9. Qiao, Y.; Labi, S.; Fricker, J.; Sinha, K.C. Costs and effectiveness of standard treatments applied to flexible and rigid pavements:  Case study in Indiana, USA. Infrastruct. Asset Manag. 2019, 6, 15–29.  10. Carvalho, A.F.C.; Santos, L.G.d.P. Maintenance of airport pavements: The use of visual inspection and IRI in the definition of  degradation trends. Int. J. Pavement Eng. 2017, 20, 425–431.  11. Khan, T.U.; Norton, S.T.; Keegan, K.; Gould, J.S.; Jacques, C.D. Use of Multiple Non‐Destructive Evaluation Approaches in  Connecticut to Establish Accurate Joint Repair and Replacement Estimates for Composite Pavement Rehabilitation. Airfield  Highw. Pavements 2017, 2017, 201–208.  12. Yu, J.; Zhang, X.; Xiong, C. A methodology for evaluating micro‐surfacing treatment on asphalt pavement based on grey system  models and grey rational degree theory. Constr. Build. Mater. 2017, 150, 214–226.  13. Kirillov, A.M.; Zavyalov, M.A. Prediction of Remaining Service Life of Asphalt Pavements. Vestn. MGSU 2018, 3, 356–367.  14. Setyawan, A.; Nainggolan, J.; Budiarto, A. Predicting the Remaining Service Life of Road Using Pavement Condition Index.  Procedia Eng. 2015, 125, 417–423.  15. Goenaga,  B.;  Fuentes,  L.;  Mora,  O.  A  Practical  Approach  to  Incorporate  Roughness‐Induced  Dynamic  Loads  in  Pavement  Design and Performance Prediction. Arab. J. Sci. Eng. 2018, 44, 4339–4348.  16. Zhang, Y.; Vennapusa, P.; White, D.J. Assessment Of Designed And Measured Mechanistic Parameters Of Concrete Pavement  Foundation. Balt. J. Road Bridge Eng. 2019, 14, 37–57.  17. NSharifi, P.; Chen, S.; You, Z.; van Dam, T.; Gilbertson, C. A review on the best practices in concrete pavement design and  materials in wet‐freeze climates similar to Michigan. J. Traffic Transp. Eng. 2019, 6, 245–255.  18. Shi,  X.;  Mukhopadhyay,  A.;  Zollinger,  D.;  Grasley,  Z.  Economic  input‐output  life  cycle  assessment  of  concrete  pavement  containing recycled concrete aggregate. J. Clean. Prod. 2019, 225, 414–425.  19. MKashif; Naseem, A.; Iqbal, N.; de Winne, P.; de Backer, H. Evaluating the Early‐Age Crack Induction in Advanced Reinforced  Concrete Pavement Using Partial Surface Saw‐Cuts. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1659.  20. Rasol, M.; Pais, J.C.; Pérez‐Gracia, V.; Solla, M.; Fernandes, F.M.; Fontul, S.; Ayala‐Cabrera, D.; Schmidt, F.; Assadollahi, H. GPR  monitoring for road transport infrastructure: A systematic review and machine learning insights. Constr. Build. Mater. 2022, 324,  126686.  21. Yu, H.; Zhu, Z.; Leng, Z.; Wu, C.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, D.; Oeser, M. Effect of mixing sequence on asphalt mixtures containing  waste tire rubber and warm mix surfactants. J. Clean. Prod. 2020, 246, 119008.  22. Yu,  H.; Leng, Z.; Zhou, Z.; Shih, K.; Xiao, F.; Gao, Z.  Optimization  of  preparation  procedure of  liquid  warm mix additive  modified asphalt rubber. J. Clean. Prod. 2017, 141, 336–345.  23. Yu, H.; Deng, G.; Zhang, Z.; Zhu, M.; Gong, M.; Oeser, M. Workability of rubberized asphalt from a perspective of particle effect.  Transp. Res. Part D Transp. Environ. 2021, 91, 102712.  24. Yu,  J.;  Xiong,  C.;  Zhang,  X.;  Li,  W.  More  accurate  modulus  back‐calculation  by  reducing  noise  information  from  in  situ– measured asphalt pavement deflection basin using regression model. Constr. Build. Mater. 2018, 158, 1026–1034.  25. Kheradmandi, N.; Modarres, A. Precision of back‐calculation analysis and independent parameters‐based models in estimating  the pavement layers modulus‐Field and experimental study. Constr. Build. Mater. 2018, 171, 598–610.  26. Ge, Z.; Wang, H.; Zhang, Q.; Xiong, C. Glass fiber reinforced asphalt membrane for interlayer bonding between asphalt overlay  and concrete pavement. Constr. Build. Mater. 2015, 101, 918–925.  27. Mohamed, M.; Skinner, A.; Abdel‐Rahim, A.; Kassem, E.; Chang, K. Deterioration Characteristics of Waterborne Pavement  Markings Subjected to Different Operating Conditions. J. Transp. Eng. Part B Pavements 2019, 145, 04019003.  28. Mo, T. JTG D 40‐2011 Specifications for Design of Highway Cement Concrete Pavement; People’s Communications Publishing House:  Beijing, China, 2011.  29. White, G. Stochastic strength rating of flexible airport pavements using construction data. Int. J. Pavement Eng. 2018, 21, 1–12.  30. Ministry  of  Transport  of  the  People’s  Republic  of  China.  Specifications  for  Design  of  Highway  Asphalt  Pavement;  Ministry  of  Transport of the People’s Republic of China: Beijing, China, 2017.  31. Goodpave. Available online: http://www.goodpave.com/ (accessed on 20 February 2022).  32. Daokedaopave. Available online: http://www. daokedaopave.com/ (accessed on 25 February 2022).  33. Kang, M.‐S.; Kim, N.; Lee, J.J.; An, Y.‐K. Deep learning‐based automated underground cavity detection using three‐dimensional  ground penetrating radar. Struct. Health Monit. 2019, 19, 173–185.   of flexible pavements.  Int. J.  34. Rabbi, M.F.; Mishra, D. Using FWD deflection basin parameters for network‐level assessment Pavement Eng. 2019, 22, 1–15.     Buildings 2022, 12, 868  19  of  19  35. Xiong,  C.;  Yu,  J.;  Zhang,  X.  Use  of  NDT  systems  to  investigate  pavement  reconstruction  needs  and  improve  maintenance  treatment decision‐making. Int. J. Pavement Eng. 2021, 1–15.  36. Pantelidis, L. The equivalent modulus of elasticity of layered soil mediums for designing shallow foundations with the Winkler  spring hypothesis: A critical review. Eng. Struct. 2019, 201, 109452.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buildings Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

A Fast and Non-Destructive Prediction Model for Remaining Life of Rigid Pavement with or without Asphalt Overlay

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/a-fast-and-non-destructive-prediction-model-for-remaining-life-of-rdXtieV18W
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2022 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2075-5309
DOI
10.3390/buildings12070868
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  A Fast and Non‐Destructive Prediction Model for Remaining  Life of Rigid Pavement with or without Asphalt Overlay  1 2 3,4, 1 3 3 3 Xuan Hong  , Weilin Tan  , Chunlong Xiong  *, Zhixiong Qiu  , Jiangmiao Yu  , Duanyi Wang  , Xiaopeng Wei  ,  3,4 4 Weixiong Li   and Zhaodong Wang      Guangdong Expressway Co., Ltd., Guangzhou 510100, China; xuanh@gdfreeway.com (X.H.);   qiuzx@gdfreeway.com (Z.Q.)    Guangdong Kaiyang Expressway Co., Ltd., Jiangmen 529200, China; twlin@gdfreeway.com    School of Civil Engineering and Transportation, South China University of Technology,   Guangzhou 510640, China; yujm@scut.edu.cn (J.Y.); tcdywang@scut.edu.cn (D.W.);  202121010608@mail.scut.edu.cn (X.W.); 201810101689@mail.scut.edu.cn (W.L.)    Guangzhou Xiaoning Roadway Engineering Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd.,   Guangzhou 510641, China; zhaodongwang@xndl3.wecom.work  *  Correspondence: cthgclx@mail.scut.edu.cn  Abstract: Remaining life is an important indicator of pavement residual effective service time and  is directly related to maintenance decision‐making with limited funds. This paper proposes a fast  and non‐destructive model to predict the remaining life of rigid PCC (Portland cement concrete)  pavement, with or without asphalt overlay. Firstly, a model was constructed according to the cur‐ rent Chinese design specifications for concrete pavement integrating an inverse design concept. Sec‐ ondly, the prediction model was applied to three typical pavement sections with 1430, 1250 and  1000 slabs, respectively. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) was utilized to determine the geometric  Citation: Hong, X.; Tan, W.; Xiong,  parameters in the predictive model and the physical state of the pavement. A falling weight detector  C.; Qiu, Z.; Yu, J.; Wang, D.; Wei, X.;  (FWD) was utilized for determination of the mechanical parameters. A more reasonable equivalent  Li, W.; Wang, Z. A Fast and   elastic modulus of foundation was back‐calculated instead of using the limited model in the design  Non‐Destructive Prediction Model  specification. Thirdly, the remaining life was predicted based on the current mechanical and geo‐ for Remaining Life of Rigid   metric parameters. The distributions of the remaining life of the three pavement sections was sta‐ Pavement with or without Asphalt  tistically analyzed. Finally, a decision‐making system to inform maintenance strategy was proposed  Overlay. Buildings 2022, 12, 868.  based on the remaining life and the technical condition of each slab. The results showed that the  https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings  12070868  relationship between the remaining life and the mechanical parameters, geometric parameters and  the physical state of the pavement was highly consistent with engineering experience. The success  Academic Editors: Xiaopei Cai,  rate of the prediction model was as high as 96%. The proposed fast and non‐destructive prediction  Huayang Yu and Tao Wang  model  showed  good  engineering  applicability  and  feasibility.  The  decision‐making  system  was  Received: 18 May 2022  shown to be feasible in terms of economic benefits.  Accepted: 17 June 2022  Published: 21 June 2022  Keywords: remaining life; rigid PCC pavement; GPR; FWD; inverse design concept  Publisher’s  Note:  MDPI  stays  neu‐   tral  with  regard  to  jurisdictional  claims in published maps and institu‐ tional affiliations.  1. Introduction  1.1. Background  Portland  cement  concrete  (PCC)  pavement,  with  or  without  asphalt  overlay,  is  widely used because of its good durability, stability, strong bearing capacity, long service  Copyright: © 2022 by the authors. Li‐ life, and low maintenance cost [1,2]. In recent years, with the rapid development of the  censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  economy, the amount of traffic has increased sharply, and axle loads have become in‐ This article  is an open access article  distributed under the terms and con‐ creasingly heavy. PCC pavements usually show serious performance degradation before  ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ they reach the intended service life [3,4]. The concept of the remaining life of a pavement  tribution (CC BY) license (https://cre‐ is based on the premise of directly repairing particular road damage or designing an as‐ ativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  phalt overlay to cover the original surface defects [5,6]. Remaining life represents the rest  Buildings 2022, 12, 868. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12070868  www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  2  of  19  of valid service life until a failure is reached in the PCC pavement as a result of exposure  to traffic and environmental forces [7]. The concept of remaining life is helpful for making  optimal use of the capacity for in‐service pavement repair and facilitating decision‐mak‐ ing for reconstruction or rehabilitation with limited existing resources [8,9].  The remaining life of a PCC pavement can be understood in terms of two categories:  functional and structural [10,11]. The functional category relates to surface problems and  mainly relies on pavement surface indicators that can be directly detected. The most rep‐ resentative method is the serviceability approach involving the combining of performance  prediction equations and triggering thresholds for maintenance or rehabilitation [12–14].  In contrast, structural remaining life relates to internal problems and mechanical indica‐ tors that cannot be detected directly [15]. Currently, there is no recognized approach to  the verification of structural remaining life. Prediction methods for the assessment of the  in‐site structural remaining life of PCC pavement have developed little over recent dec‐ ades. The most representative method is the 1993 AASHTO NDT approach using field  test mechanical data [16]. Another structural remaining life (fatigue life) prediction ap‐ proach is based on laboratory‐measured material mechanical degradation [17]. Addition‐ ally, statistical approaches, based on quite large amounts of data (especially concerning  maintenance implementation time) are used to directly calculate the service life of a par‐ ticular PCC pavement [18]. The existing methods for predicting the remaining life of rigid  PCC pavement utilize various concepts ranging from the purely empirical to the entirely  mechanistic. However, it has always been a difficult and complex problem to accurately  predict the remaining life of rigid PCC pavement.  A review of the literature indicates that surface functional failure does not have a  simple relationship with pavement inner condition [19–23]. The predicted functional re‐ maining life of an in‐service pavement with a recent new overlay may be seriously over‐ estimated. The new overlay may be prematurely destroyed before the functional remain‐ ing life is reached. Consideration of the structural remaining life is more reasonable and  scientific. Firstly, with respect to the 1993 AASHTO NDT approach, this requires details  of the effective thickness, determined by modulus back‐calculation, and the original slab  thickness, using an empirical graphic procedure. Unfortunately, the effective thickness is  subjectively  assessed  and  is  arguably  unreliable  [24].  The  modulus  back‐calculation  method used is based on a flexible pavement which, theoretically, is not applicable to rigid  PCC pavement [25]. Secondly, the mechanical degradation approach, which is based on a  fatigue criterion for concrete materials, does not consider the combination of structure and  thickness [26,27]. Lastly, the statistical approach is the most direct and most closely related  to the field situation, but has considerable drawbacks, including that the time taken for  statistical analysis is extensive, and the failure time is difficult to accurately assess. More‐ over, the regular or periodic road maintenance occurring will have a significant impact on  the remaining life of the pavement. For different projects, there will also be environmental  and traffic differences. Thus, statistically based prediction of the remaining life of a par‐ ticular pavement might be limited to this situation and be purely empirically based.  To address the shortcomings discussed above, a methodology which incorporates an  inverse design concept for prediction of the remaining life of a rigid PCC pavement was  proposed. Three typical pavement sections were selected for application of the prediction  model. Non‐destructive detecting technology, including GPR and FWD, was utilized to  obtain data on pavement technical condition.  1.2. Objective and Scope  The motivation for the study  was the development of a  remaining life prediction  model of rigid PCC pavement, with or without asphalt overlay, applying integrated non‐ destructive detection technologies to provide details of on‐site pavement parameters to  improve the speed of prediction, accuracy, and representativeness.     Buildings 2022, 12, 868  3  of  19  2. Concept and Methodology Development  2.1. Inverse Design Concept  In this study, a methodology for predicting the remaining life of rigid PCC pavement  is proposed which is based mainly on an inverse design concept, in contrast to the tradi‐ tional forward design procedure described in the JTG D40‐2011 Specifications for Design  of Highway Cement Concrete Pavement [28]. The forward design approach determines  the road parameters, including road materials and thickness combinations, according to  the assumed number of axles load and required pavement conditions. However, the in‐ verse design concept involves evaluation of pavement condition based on the current state  of pavement materials, structure thickness combinations, and current and future traffic  trends [29].  2.2. Methodology Development  2.2.1. Remaining Life Prediction Model  Combining the current state and the predicted future traffic volume, the remaining  service life of a PCC pavement is calculated using an inverse design concept as described  below.  In the forward design, the cumulative number of axle loads during the design period,  e , is calculated using Equation (1) according to measured traffic parameters, such as the  initial traffic volume and the traffic volume growth rate [28].  N 1  1 365    (1)  N    where,    is the annual average growth rate of traffic over the design life. The initial num‐ ber of axle loads,  , is determined based on traffic volume survey and calculated ac‐ cording to Equations (2) and (3) [30].  N AADTT DDF LDF VCDF EALF    (2)  1 mm m2   PND NA mij mij mi   EALF c c   (3)   m 12    NT P NA ij ms mi    where,  AADTT  is the two‐way annual average daily traffic volume of 2‐axle 6‐wheel  and above vehicles;  DDF   is a direction factor determined based on the ratio of the num‐ ber of vehicles in the two directions;  LDF   is a lane coefficient determined according to  the ratio of the number of vehicles in the design lane;  VCDF   is the type distribution  coefficient of m‐class vehicles;  EALF   is the conversion factor of the equivalent design  axle load for m‐class vehicles;  NA   is the total number of i axle types in m‐class vehicles;  mi NT   is the total number of m‐class vehicles;  P   is the single‐axle axle load of i‐type axle  m mij in j‐level axle load range of m‐class vehicles;  P   is the uniaxial weight of design axle load  ( usually 100 kN in China); and  ND   is the number of i‐type axles in the j‐level axle load  mij range in m‐class vehicles. Factor  c   is the axle group factor—1 for a single axis, 2.6 for a  double shaft and 3.8 for a triple shaft—based on engineering experience in China. Factor  c   is the wheel coefficient—1 for a double wheel and 4.5 for a single wheel.  Therefore, the design life,  t , can be calculated and deduced as Equation (4) based on  Equations (1)–(3).  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  4  of  19   t log  1 log1    (4)   365N  1 The design life is a set target value. The general forward design procedure involves  the following steps: (1) assumes the initial pavement parameters, such as thickness, mod‐ ulus, strength; (2) statistically predict the cumulative number of axial loads in the target  design life period; (3) input the pavement parameters and the cumulative number of axial  loads into the mechanical model; (4) calculate the load‐temperature coupling stress of the  bottom of the cement concrete slab; and (5) adjust the initial pavement parameters until  the load‐temperature coupling stress is less than the flexural tensile strength of the de‐ signed cement concrete. The finalized pavement parameters are the design results that  can meet the goal of the design life.  From the perspective of inverse design, where  t  is regarded as the remaining life of  the pavement,  N   should be no larger than the cumulative number of axial loads pre‐ dicted based on Equation (1), but the number of axial loads that the current pavement can  still bear, which is directly related to the current pavement parameters.  In the general forward design procedure,  k   is the fatigue stress coefficient consid‐ ering the cumulative fatigue effect of load stress during the design reference period, which  represents the pavement parameters and has a relationship with the number of axial loads  that the current pavement can still withstand. Their relationship can be expressed as Equa‐ tion (5) [28]:  kN    (5)  fe In Equation (5), the value of     is generally 0.057 when Portland cement concrete is  used in the surface layer and 0.065 for the base layer. In the prediction model of the re‐ maining life of rigid PCC pavement,  t , can be deduced and expressed as Equation (6).  1    t log  1 log 1    (6)   365N  In Equation (6), the current number of axle loads,  , can be calculated as Equation  (2), and the annual average growth rate of traffic can be calculated based on the historical  traffic data.  k   is a mechanical index relating to the current pavement parameters, such  as thickness, modulus and strength and the cumulative fatigue effect of load‐temperature  coupling stress.  2.2.2. Determination of Model Parameters  In order to obtain  k   for the current pavement structure, it is necessary to carry out  the analysis from the perspective of pavement mechanics calculations. In Equation (6),  k   is calculated as Equation (7) [28].  kk  k   (7)   fpr pscr where,  k   is the compressive coefficient (usually 1.15 for highway and 1.10 for first class  highway);   is the stress reduction factor (usually 0.85); and    is the stress generated  k  r ps by the design axle load at the critical position of a four‐side free plate calculated as Equa‐ tions (8)–(10) [28].   3 0.70 2 0.94   1.47 10 rh P   (8)  ps c s Buildings 2022, 12, 868  5  of  19  where,  P   is the uniaxial weight of the design axle load (usually 100 kN); and  r  is the  relative stiffness radius of the concrete layer. The factor,  h , is the concrete layer thickness  [28].  1/3 rD  1.21 E   (9)   ct where,  E   is the equivalent elastic modulus of the foundation underneath the concrete  layer.; and  D   is the relative stiffness radius of the concrete layer [28].  Eh cc D    c (10)  12 1  where,  E   is the concrete layer bending modulus;    is the Poisson ratio of concrete,  c c which is a constant during the elastic deformation phase of the material, and    is usually  0.15 of the cement concrete.  The driving load fatigue stress generated at the critical load position in a rigid con‐ crete slab,     in Equation (7), is deduced and calculated as Equation (11). It reflects the  pr mechanical equilibrium state of the pavement; that is, the flexural tensile strength of the  cement concrete is exactly equal to the load‐temperature coupling stress of the bottom of  the rigid PCC pavement.      (11)  pr tr where,  f   is the standard value of the bending strength of cement concrete. The design  value is usually 5 MPa but the on‐site measured value is usually different from the design  value.  f   can also be deduced and calculated as Equation (12).     is the reliability coef‐ r r ficient related to the target reliability, variation level and variation coefficient (usually 1.64  for highway and 1.28 for first‐class highway).  0.96 f  (12)   0.09    is the driving load fatigue stress generated at the critical load position in a rigid  tr concrete slab calculated as Equation (13) [28].    k   (13)  tr t t,max where,  k   is the temperature fatigue stress coefficient calculated as Equation (14) [28].     t,max  kac    (14)  tt t    f tr ,max   where,  a ,  b ,  c   are  the  model  parameters  considering  the  natural  environment  in  t t t which the road is located. For roads in Guangdong province in China,  a   is usually 0.841,  b   is usually 1.323, and  c   is usually 0.058.     is the maximum temperature stress of  t t t,max a concrete slab under a maximum temperature gradient calculated as Equation (15) [28].   Eh T c ccg (15)    B   tL ,max 2 Buildings 2022, 12, 868  6  of  19  where,     is the concrete linear expansion coefficient (for Portland cement concrete the  −5 coefficient is usually 1.1 × 10 /°C); and   is the 50‐year maximum temperature gradient  at the location of the road. For roads in Guangdong province, the statistical result of    is 88 °C/m. The factor,   , the correction factor of the temperature gradient, can be ob‐ tained by regression analysis as Equation (16), according to the current specification. Its  correlation coefficient value can be as high as 0.99.   18.56hh 8.58 1.29  (16)  aa   is the temperature stress coefficient of integrated temperature warping stress and  internal stress calculated as Equations (17)–(19) [28].  4.48h Be 1.77 C 0.131 1C    (17)  LL L sinh cos  cosh sin C  1   (18)  cos sin  sinh cosh     (19)  3r where,  C   is the temperature warping stress coefficient of the concrete slab. Factor  L  is  the length of the slab.  When the rigid PCC pavement is covered with the asphalt overlay, the remaining life  prediction model may be different from the prediction model in Equation (6). It must con‐ sider the effect of the overlay on the concrete layer’s load‐induced fatigue stress and tem‐ perature‐induced fatigue stress. Equations (8) and (13) are adjusted by Formulas (20) and  (21).    1  h    (20)  psa a a ps   1  h    (21)  tra a a tr where,     is the load‐induced stress generated by the axle load at the critical position  psa of the concrete slab with the asphalt overlay; factor     is the temperature‐induced stress  tra generated by the axle load at the critical position of the concrete slab with asphalt overlay;  factor  h   is the thickness of the overlay; and     and     are the model factors obtained  a a a by regression analysis as Equations (22) and (23), based on the current specification. Their  correlation coefficients are 0.986 and 0.972, respectively.   2.69 0.001  3.77h   (22)  ac ʹ 3  1.98 0.01810Eh 2.94   (23)  ac c In sum, Equations (7)–(23) describe in detail the acquisition or calculation method for  each parameter in the remaining life of the rigid PCC pavement prediction model in Equa‐ tion (6). Some of the parameters that are determined by experience have been described  in the above text; some of the other parameters that need to be obtained are classified in  Table 1.  In Table 1, the traffic data can be obtained by data survey with the help of the local  transportation management department. The geometry and the mechanical parameters of  the rigid PCC pavement can be obtained by replacing rapid and non‐destructive field  tests,  such  as  GPR  and  FWD,  for  traditional  single‐point  core  drilling  and  laboratory  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  7  of  19  testing. The total number of geometry and mechanical parameters is only five for rigid  pavement with asphalt overlay and only four for rigid pavement without asphalt overlay,  which greatly simplifies the life prediction model in Equation (6).  Table 1. Model parameters needing to be determined.  Classification  Parameters  Expressions  Methods in This Research  two‐way annual average daily traffic volume  AADDT   of 2‐axle and 6‐wheel and above vehicles  direction factor  DDF lane coefficient  LDF type distribution coefficient of m‐class  VCDF   Measured by imaging, weighing and  vehicles  other equipment installed on site by  NA   total number of i axle types in m‐class vehicles  mi the management department  Traffic data  NT   total number of m‐class vehicles  number of i‐type axle in the j‐level axle load  ND   mij range in m‐class vehicles  single‐axle axle load of i‐type axle in j‐level  P   mij axle load range of m‐class vehicles  annual average growth rate of truck traffic  Calculated based on historical traffic     during the reference period  data  thickness of asphalt overlay and concrete slab,  h ,  h ,  L  Geometry  Fast detection by radar  a c length of slab  E   concrete layer bending modulus  Mechanical  Detected by falling weight deflector  equivalent elastic modulus of foundation  parameter  and backcalculated modulus  E   underneath the concrete layer  3. Field Testing  3.1. Pavement Sections  Three rigid pavement sections, with or without asphalt overlay of the same length,  from the Guangdong Province in China, were selected as study objects. Basic information  for the three pavements is shown in Table 2.  Table 2. Basic information for the pavement sections.  Section  S118 TP  S118 HO  XL  Type  Rigid  Rigid with asphalt overlay  Rigid  Grade  First class  First class  Highway  Length/km  5  5  5  Age/a  26  27  22  Asphalt overlay 3 cm  Concrete layer 28 cm  Concrete layer 28 cm  + concrete layer 25 cm  + limestone stabilized base 20 cm  Structure combination  + cement stabilized base 24 cm  + gravel layer 50 cm  + gravel layer 20 cm  + subgrade  + subgrade  + subgrade  3.2. Data Collection and Process  3.2.1. Traffic Data  Traffic data was surveyed with the help of the local transportation management de‐ partment, to convert the vehicle loads of different axle loads of different axle types of dif‐ ferent vehicle types into standard design axle loads. At present, some mature commercial  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  8  of  19  websites can be used to convert traffic axle loads with the above basic survey data, such  as goodpave.com (accessed on 20 February 2022) [31] and daokedaopave.com (accessed  on 25 February 2022) [32].  3.2.2. Geometrical Data  Three‐dimensional(3D) ground penetrating radar (GPR) was used to detect the pave‐ ment layer thickness and slab length. The radar was produced by KONTUR, the radar  host was GEOSCOPE MK IV, and the ground‐coupled antenna was type DXG1820 with a  frequency bandwidth of 200–3000 MHz. GPR was used to find physical defects, such as  voids, broken slabs, uneven settlement of subgrades, etc. Measurements were taken con‐ tinuously at speeds ranging from 20 km/h to 30 km/h. Trigger spacing, time window and  dwell time were set separately at 2.5 cm, 25 ns and 3 us, respectively. The survey width  was no more than 1.5 m, with each lane assessed three times for full‐width inspection [33].  Approximately 15 km was inspected separately for each of the sections S118‐TP, S118‐HO  and XL. The principle and components of GPR are shown in Figure 1a. Inspection using  GPR is shown in Figure 1b.  (a)  (b)  Figure 1. Structure condition and thickness inspection: (a) Principle of GPR; (b) On‐site inspection  using GPR.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  9  of  19  3.2.3. Mechanical Parameters  FWD was applied to determine the concrete layer bending modulus and the equiva‐ lent elastic modulus of the foundation underneath the concrete layer using advanced and  proven modulus back‐calculation technology. The FWD was produced by Grontmij Carl  Bro; the model used was Phonix PRI2100. The FWD inspection speed was approximately  2~3 km/h. An impulse load of 100 ± 2.5 kN was applied in the center area of each PCC slab  [34]. For rigid pavement with an asphalt overlay, the boundary of the slab can first be  determined by 3D GPR and an RTK (real‐time kinematic) positioning system. There were  about 1430, 1250 and 1000 test points separately for S118‐TP, S118‐HO and XL. For each  point,  deflections,  air  temperature,  road  surface  temperature,  and  chainage  were  rec‐ orded. The technical principle of FWD and the inspection process are shown in Figure 2.  To  reduce  dynamic  fluctuation  effects,  it  is  necessary  to  ensure  that  there  are  no  heavy vehicles passing when the FWD is working. The road surface should be smooth  and free from debris to reduce deviation of the sensors. Although temperature and hu‐ midity have little influence on the modulus of a rigid PCC pavement, the temperature  change range was set to be less than 3 °C, and the humidity changed as little as possible.  The concrete layer bending modulus and the equivalent elastic modulus of foundation  were both back‐calculated using software reported in previous research [35].  (a) (b) Figure 2. Inspection of pavement deflection basin: (a) technical principle of FWD; (b) FWD inspec‐ tion.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  10  of  19  4. Results and Analysis  4.1. Traffic Data  The two‐way annual average daily traffic volume of 2‐axle and 6‐wheel and above  vehicles ( AADDT ), the proportion of vehicles in two driving directions ( DDF ) and the  proportion of vehicles in each lane in each direction ( LDF ) are shown in Table 3. The  proportion of 2–11 types of vehicles ( VCDF ) is shown in Table 4 and the proportion of    and  ) is shown in  vehicles with each axle type in each type of vehicle (ratio of  NA NT mi m Table 5. The proportion of vehicles in different axle load weight ranges in each axle‐type  vehicle (ratio of  ND   and  NA ) is the axle weight distribution coefficient. The axle  mij mi weight distribution coefficient of single‐axle single‐tire of class 2–11 vehicles of S118 TP is  shown in Figure 3.  Based on the above survey data,  N   of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL were calculated  as 12,890, 9956 and 18,848, respectively using Equations (2) and (3) with the assistance of  the daokedaopave.com website (accessed on 25 February 2022).  Table 3. General traffic parameters.  Parameters  S118 TP  S118 HO  XL  25,780  16,593  48,956  AADDT   0.5  0.6  0.55  DDF   1  1  0.7  LDF      1.5%  1.2%  7.0%  Table 4. Proportion of vehicle types 2–11 ( VCDF ).  Type of Vehicle  S118 TP  S118 HO  XL  2  17.80   28.90   22.00   3  33.00   43.80   23.30   4  3.40   5.50   2.70   5  0.00   0.00   0.00   6  12.50   9.40   8.30   7  4.40   2.00   7.50   8  9.10   4.60   17.10   9  10.60   3.40   8.50   10  8.50   2.30   10.60   11  0.70   0.10   0.00   Table 5. Proportion of vehicles with each axle type in each type of vehicle ( NA / NT ).  mi m S118 TP  S118 HO  XL  Type of  Single Axle  Single Axle  Double  Triple  Single Axle  Single Axle  Double  Triple Single Axle  Single Axle  Double  Triple  Vehicle  Single Tire  Double Tire  Shaft  Shaft  Single Tire  Double Tire  Shaft  Shaft  Single Tire  Double Tire  Shaft  Shaft  2  1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   0.99   0.01   0.00   3  1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   4  1.00   0.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   0.00   5  1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   0.00   1.00   6  2.00   0.38   0.62   0.00   2.00   0.43   0.57   0.00   2.00   0.50   0.50   0.00   7  1.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   8  1.00   0.56   0.89   0.56   1.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   0.93   0.14   0.93   9  1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   1.00   0.00   1.00   1.00   10  2.00   1.00   0.04   0.96   2.00   1.00   0.09   0.91   2.00   1.00   0.15   0.85   11  0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   0.00   Buildings 2022, 12, 868  11  of  19  Figure 3. Axle weight distribution coefficient of single‐axle single‐tire of class 2–11 vehicles of S118  TP.  4.2. Geometrical Data  From the GPR post‐processed data, the number of slabs in the design lane of S118 TP,  S118 HO, and XL were 1430, 1250 and 1000, respectively. The mean length of the slabs of  S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL were 3.5 m, 4.0 m and 5.0 m, respectively. Their coefficients of  variation were 1%, 2% and 0%, respectively. The length of slabs on the same section fluc‐ tuated normally, but the values were relatively consistent. The slab length distributions  of the design lanes of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL are shown in Figure 4.  The mean thickness of the slabs of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL were 26.9 cm, 24.3 cm  and 26.3 cm, respectively Their coefficients of variation were 8%, 6% and 3%, respectively  Differences in the thickness of the slabs for the same pavement section were not obvious.  The slab thickness distributions of the design lanes of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL are shown  in Figure 5. The geometrical data for slabs were affected by the construction error control  standards of different highway grades.  The mean thickness of the asphalt overlay of S118 HO was 3.0 cm and its coefficient  of variation was 36%. The asphalt overlay thickness distribution of the design lane of S118  HO is shown in Figure 6. The thickness of the asphalt overlay was related to the flatness  of the cement slab surface, the construction quality control, and the compression defor‐ mation caused by the vehicle load.     Buildings 2022, 12, 868  12  of  19  Figure 4. Slab length distribution of the design lanes of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL.  Figure 5. Slab thickness distribution of the design lanes of S118 TP, S118 HO, and XL.  Figure 6. Asphalt overlay thickness distribution of the design lane of S118 HO.  4.3. Mechanical Parameters  The equivalent elastic modulus of the foundation underneath the concrete layer is an  important indicator for PCC pavement forward design [36] and is also a factor for predict‐ ing rest of life during inverse design. The current specification provides a model for cal‐ culating the equivalent elastic modulus of the foundation based on the deflections. How‐ ever, the application scope of the model is limited to the cement concrete pavement with‐ out asphalt overlay. The self‐weight of the asphalt overlay and the interlayer bonding be‐ tween the slab and the overlay will limit the bending deformation of the slab under load  and reduce the measured deflection value. The model will overestimate the equivalent  elastic modulus of foundation by about 8% based on the actual data.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  13  of  19  To obtain a more reasonable equivalent elastic modulus of foundation, a back‐calcu‐ lation model is constructed. Two‐ or three‐layer mechanical models in the back‐calcula‐ tion process for rigid pavement, with or without asphalt overlay, were adapted from the  multilayer (more than two or three layers) mechanical model shown in Figure 7. Through  this model, the equivalent elastic modulus of foundation, the concrete layer bending mod‐ ulus, and the modulus of asphalt overlay can be obtained at the same time.  The equivalent elastic moduli for the foundation distributions of the design lane of  S118 TP, S118 HO and XL are shown in Figure 8. The mean of XL was 423 MPa, which  was the largest among the three sections and its coefficient of variation was about 15%,  representing the smallest. The mean of S118 TP was relatively larger than that of S118 HO  but it had the largest variability of about 41%. The bearing capacity of the structure un‐ derneath the concrete layer of XL was the highest and its uniformity was best, that of S118  its uniformity was better than the uniformity of S118 TP.  HO was the lowest but  The concrete layer bending modulus distributions of the design lanes of S118 TP,  S118 HO and XL is shown in Figure 9. The concrete layer bending modulus of S118 TP  ranged from 12,187 MPa to 61,455 MPa with a mean value of 31,334 MPa; the variability  was about 17.8%. That of S118 HO ranged from 10,659 MPa to 48,025 MPa with a mean  value of 29,853 MPa with a variability of about 19.3%. That of XL ranged from 16,385 MPa  to 61,214 MPa with a mean value of 37,685 MPa with a variability of about 20.8%. The data  showed that XL had the largest mean concrete layer bending modulus, but also had a  relatively large coefficient of variation. The concrete layer bending modulus results for  S118 TP and S118 HO were relatively less biased, but S118 TP had the smallest variability.  These  phenomena  may  have resulted from the extent of fine construction and quality  management of pavements depending on the highway grade and the traffic volume.  In order to verify the accuracy of the back‐calculated results, the modulus of the drill‐ ing cylindrical specimen of slabs was tested by conducting splitting bending‐tension tests  indoors [24]. From the splitting bending‐tension test results of 30 random drilling core  samples in different pavement sections, the ratio of the back‐calculated modulus and the  test bending modulus ranged from 0.9 to 1.1 with a mean ratio of 1.01. The back‐calculated  results were very close to the results obtained in the laboratory.  Figure 7. Model transferring for the back‐calculation method.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  14  of  19  Figure 8. Equivalent elastic modulus of foundation distribution for the design lanes of S118 TP, S118  HO and XL.  Figure 9. Concrete layer bending modulus distribution for the design lanes of S118 TP, S118 HO and  XL.  4.4. Feasibility of the Prediction Model  A simple program based on the proposed prediction model was independently de‐ veloped using Microsoft office software, and the remaining life of the pavement structure  corresponding to each slab in the three pavement sections was calculated.  Based on the prediction results, the number of slabs of the 1430 slabs of S118 TP which  could not be predicted was only 47, all 1250 slabs of S118 HO could be predicted, and  there were only 15 slabs which could not be predicted of the 1000 slabs of XL. The success  rate of the prediction model when applied to the three pavement sections was as high as  96%.  To verify the reliability of the predicted remaining life results, the technical condition  characteristics of the pavement sections in the different remaining life intervals were clas‐ sified; the results are shown in Table 6. The bending modulus of slab  E   was significantly  positively related to the remaining life and the correlation coefficients were all over 0.7.  The thickness of the slabs of S118 TP and XL were significantly positively related to the  remaining life and the correlation coefficients were over 0.8. The thickness of the slab of  S118 HO was also positively related to the remaining life; however, the correlation coeffi‐ cient was less than 0.5. The thickness of the asphalt overlay was weakly positively related  to the remaining life. The equivalent elastic modulus of foundation  E   of S118 TP and XL  was weakly negatively related to the remaining life; however, the equivalent elastic mod‐ ulus of the foundation of S118 HO was weakly positively correlated with the remaining  life.  The results indicate that the statistical remaining life intervals had a high level of  correspondence  with  the  physical  state  of  the  pavement.  The  lower  the  predicted  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  15  of  19  remaining life, the worse the corresponding technical condition of  the pavement. This  suggests that the prediction model proposed in this research has good engineering ap‐ plicability and feasibility.  Table 6. Technical condition characteristics of the pavement in different remaining life intervals.  E   E   h   h   c t c a Intervals  Physical State  S118  S118  S118  S118 HO  XL  S118 HO  XL  S118 HO  XL  S118 HO  TP  TP  TP  Obvious physical defects such  as voids, broken slabs, severe  Less than 0.1a  27,430  27,465  36,813  377  296  424  26.0  24.1  26.3  2.9  reflective cracks in overlay and  pumping, etc.  Slight physical defects such as  voids, broken slabs, severe  0.1a–1a  32,006  33,873  49,915  338  296  414  26.9  24.7  26.5  3.3  reflective cracks in overlay and  pumping, etc.  Uneven subgrade settlement  1a–5a  32,992  35,688  51,498  314  305  407  27.3  24.9  26.6  3.5  under the slab, reflective  cracks in overlay, etc.  Slight reflective cracks in  5a–10a  34,455  37,440  52,933  327  305  384  27.2  24.8  26.3  3.2  overlay, etc.  10a–15a  33,549  37,676  53,557  309  309  369  28.0  25.0  26.5  3.4  Intact  More than 15a  37,190  39,961  55,540  321  295  429  28.3  25.3  27.0  3.3  Intact  4.5. Application of the Prediction Model  The distributions of predicted remaining life of the three pavement sections for dif‐ ferent intervals is shown in Figure 10. Most of slabs of S118 HO and XL were close to the  end of their service life taking the fatigue cracking of the slabs under the joint influence of  fatigue stress and temperature stress as the criterion. The remaining life of more than 70%  of slabs in S118 HO was less than 0.1a; this proportion was more than 90% in XL. S118 TP  performed relatively better. The remaining life of 45.7% slabs in S118 TP was less than  0.1a; in the other five life intervals, S118 TP had a higher proportion.  The mean remaining life of S118 TP, S118 HO and XL was about 2.7a, 2.2a and 2.1a  respectively. Based on Table 2, the three pavement sections have been used for about 26a,  27a and 22a. Thus, their actual years of use were about 29a, 29a, and 24a. Compared to the  30‐year design life of highway and first‐class highway cement pavements, the difference  was most pronounced for the XL section, with the S118 TP and S118 HO sections only  losing 1a. This phenomenon may be related to the limestone stabilized base layer used in  XL which is a kind of pavement material that is not resistant to water washing, especially  in hot and rainy areas. At the same time, it may also relate to the rapid growth in traffic.  The traffic volume of XL showed the largest growth rate of 7%.  In general, the distribution of the remaining life and the corresponding technical con‐ dition of the pavement may be helpful for determining the maintenance strategy of the  project. This is related to the reasonable arrangement of limited maintenance funds and  the  maintenance  priority  of  different  sub‐sections.  The  shorter  the  remaining  life,  the  higher the maintenance treatment priority. The maintenance plan for different sub‐sec‐ tions can be decided based on the detection results of GPR and FWD. The logic flow of  the maintenance decision‐making system is shown in Figure 11.  Considering XL as an example, the investment analysis of the future maintenance  plan showed that the EIRR (economic internal rate of return) was 15.5% greater than the  social discount rate of 8% and the ENPV (economic net present value) was 1.05 million   investment are feasible in  RMB greater than zero. The maintenance plan and maintenance terms of economic benefits.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  16  of  19  Figure 10. Distribution of predicted remaining life of three pavement sections in different inter‐ vals.  Figure 11. Logic flow of maintenance decision‐making system.  5. Conclusions  The paper proposes a fast and non‐destructive model for predicting the remaining  life of PCC rigid pavement, with or without asphalt overlay. The prediction model was  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  17  of  19  applied to three typical pavement sections. GPR was utilized to assess the geometric pa‐ rameters for the predictive model and the physical state of the pavement, and FWD was  utilized to assess the mechanical parameters. The main conclusions are as follows:  (1) A remaining life prediction model for rigid PCC pavement, with or without asphalt  overlay, was proposed based on an inverse design concept and an elastic foundation  single‐layer slab model. Only four to five parameters require to be detected with the  application  of  integrated  non‐destructive  detection  technologies  on  site,  which  greatly simplifies the life prediction process and improves the presentation of pre‐ diction results, with large amounts of data acquired quickly and non‐destructively.  (2) A  two‐  or  three‐layer  mechanical  model  in  the  back‐calculation  process  for  rigid  pavement,  with  or  without  asphalt  overlay,  was  transferred  from  the  multilayer  (more than two or three layers) mechanical model to determine the equivalent elastic  modulus of foundation underneath the concrete layer and the concrete layer bending  modulus. The ratios of the back‐calculated modulus and the laboratory test modulus  ranged from 0.9 to 1.1, with a mean ratio of 1.01.  The success rate of the prediction model when applied to three pavement sections  (3) was as high as 96%. The remaining statistically based life intervals showed good cor‐ respondence with the mechanical parameters, geometric parameters, and the physi‐ cal state of the pavement. The prediction model proposed in this research has good  engineering applicability and feasibility.  (4) A maintenance treatment decision‐making system was proposed based on the distri‐ bution of the remaining life and the corresponding technical condition of the pave‐ ment. This was shown to be feasible in terms of economic benefits, on the basis that  the pavement condition was above the minimum required standard.  In the future, we will compare our study results to those from previous research stud‐ ies to evaluate the model’s advantages in terms of prediction accuracy, speed, and repre‐ sentativeness.  Author Contributions: Conceptualization, C.X., J.Y. and D.W.; methodology, C.X. and Z.Q.; inves‐ tigation, X.H., W.T., Z.W., W.L. and X.W.; formal analysis, W.L., X.W. and W.T.; writing—review  and editing, D.W. and X.H. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the man‐ uscript.  Funding: The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support provided by the “National  Natural Science Foundation of China” (52178426).  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable.  Informed Consent Statement: Informed consent  was  obtained  from all subjects involved  in the  study.  Data Availability Statement: The data presented in this study are available on request from the  corresponding author.  Acknowledgments: The authors also want to thank the Research Project of Guangdong Provincial  Communications Group on Key Technology of Pavement Balanced Durability Design and Solid  Waste Recycling for its support. All the help and support are greatly appreciated.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  Reference  1. DeSantis, J.W.; Sachs, S.G.; Vandenbossche, J.M. Faulting development in concrete pavements and overlays. Int. J. Pavement Eng.  2020, 21, 1445–1460.  2. Choi, J.‐h. Strategy for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from maintenance and rehabilitation of highway pavement. J. Clean.  Prod. 2019, 209, 88–100.  3. Chorzepa, M.G.; Johnson, C.; Durham, S.; Kim, S.S. Forensic Investigation of Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements in  Fair and Poor Condition. J. Perform. Constr. Facil. 2018, 32, 04018031.  4. Abdelaty,  A.;  Jeong,  H.D.;  Smadi,  O.  Barriers  to  Implementing  Data‐Driven  Pavement  Treatment  Performance  Evaluation  Process. J. Transp. Eng. Part B Pavements 2018, 144, 04017022.  Buildings 2022, 12, 868  18  of  19  5. Bhattacharya, B.B.; Gotlif, A.; Darter, M.I.; Khazanovich, L. Impact of Joint Spacing on Bonded Concrete Overlay of Existing  Asphalt Pavement in the AASHTOWare Pavement ME Design Software. J. Transp. Eng. Part B Pavements 2019, 145, 04019018.  6. Qiao,  J.Y.;  Du,  R.;  Labi,  S.;  Fricker,  J.D.;  Sinha,  K.C.  Policy  implications  of  standalone  timing  versus  holistic  timing  of  infrastructure interventions: Findings based on pavement surface roughness. Transp. Res. Part A Policy Pract. 2021, 148, 79–99.  7. Xu, B.; Zhang, W.; Mei, J.; Yue, G.; Yang, L. Optimization of Structure Parameters of Airfield Jointed Concrete Pavements under  Temperature Gradient and Aircraft Loads. Adv. Mater. Sci. Eng. 2019, 2019, 3251590.  8. Wang,  H.;  Thakkar,  C.;  Chen,  X.;  Murrel,  S.  Life‐cycle  assessment  of  airport  pavement  design  alternatives  for  energy  and  environmental impacts. J. Clean. Prod. 2016, 133, 163–171.  9. Qiao, Y.; Labi, S.; Fricker, J.; Sinha, K.C. Costs and effectiveness of standard treatments applied to flexible and rigid pavements:  Case study in Indiana, USA. Infrastruct. Asset Manag. 2019, 6, 15–29.  10. Carvalho, A.F.C.; Santos, L.G.d.P. Maintenance of airport pavements: The use of visual inspection and IRI in the definition of  degradation trends. Int. J. Pavement Eng. 2017, 20, 425–431.  11. Khan, T.U.; Norton, S.T.; Keegan, K.; Gould, J.S.; Jacques, C.D. Use of Multiple Non‐Destructive Evaluation Approaches in  Connecticut to Establish Accurate Joint Repair and Replacement Estimates for Composite Pavement Rehabilitation. Airfield  Highw. Pavements 2017, 2017, 201–208.  12. Yu, J.; Zhang, X.; Xiong, C. A methodology for evaluating micro‐surfacing treatment on asphalt pavement based on grey system  models and grey rational degree theory. Constr. Build. Mater. 2017, 150, 214–226.  13. Kirillov, A.M.; Zavyalov, M.A. Prediction of Remaining Service Life of Asphalt Pavements. Vestn. MGSU 2018, 3, 356–367.  14. Setyawan, A.; Nainggolan, J.; Budiarto, A. Predicting the Remaining Service Life of Road Using Pavement Condition Index.  Procedia Eng. 2015, 125, 417–423.  15. Goenaga,  B.;  Fuentes,  L.;  Mora,  O.  A  Practical  Approach  to  Incorporate  Roughness‐Induced  Dynamic  Loads  in  Pavement  Design and Performance Prediction. Arab. J. Sci. Eng. 2018, 44, 4339–4348.  16. Zhang, Y.; Vennapusa, P.; White, D.J. Assessment Of Designed And Measured Mechanistic Parameters Of Concrete Pavement  Foundation. Balt. J. Road Bridge Eng. 2019, 14, 37–57.  17. NSharifi, P.; Chen, S.; You, Z.; van Dam, T.; Gilbertson, C. A review on the best practices in concrete pavement design and  materials in wet‐freeze climates similar to Michigan. J. Traffic Transp. Eng. 2019, 6, 245–255.  18. Shi,  X.;  Mukhopadhyay,  A.;  Zollinger,  D.;  Grasley,  Z.  Economic  input‐output  life  cycle  assessment  of  concrete  pavement  containing recycled concrete aggregate. J. Clean. Prod. 2019, 225, 414–425.  19. MKashif; Naseem, A.; Iqbal, N.; de Winne, P.; de Backer, H. Evaluating the Early‐Age Crack Induction in Advanced Reinforced  Concrete Pavement Using Partial Surface Saw‐Cuts. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1659.  20. Rasol, M.; Pais, J.C.; Pérez‐Gracia, V.; Solla, M.; Fernandes, F.M.; Fontul, S.; Ayala‐Cabrera, D.; Schmidt, F.; Assadollahi, H. GPR  monitoring for road transport infrastructure: A systematic review and machine learning insights. Constr. Build. Mater. 2022, 324,  126686.  21. Yu, H.; Zhu, Z.; Leng, Z.; Wu, C.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, D.; Oeser, M. Effect of mixing sequence on asphalt mixtures containing  waste tire rubber and warm mix surfactants. J. Clean. Prod. 2020, 246, 119008.  22. Yu,  H.; Leng, Z.; Zhou, Z.; Shih, K.; Xiao, F.; Gao, Z.  Optimization  of  preparation  procedure of  liquid  warm mix additive  modified asphalt rubber. J. Clean. Prod. 2017, 141, 336–345.  23. Yu, H.; Deng, G.; Zhang, Z.; Zhu, M.; Gong, M.; Oeser, M. Workability of rubberized asphalt from a perspective of particle effect.  Transp. Res. Part D Transp. Environ. 2021, 91, 102712.  24. Yu,  J.;  Xiong,  C.;  Zhang,  X.;  Li,  W.  More  accurate  modulus  back‐calculation  by  reducing  noise  information  from  in  situ– measured asphalt pavement deflection basin using regression model. Constr. Build. Mater. 2018, 158, 1026–1034.  25. Kheradmandi, N.; Modarres, A. Precision of back‐calculation analysis and independent parameters‐based models in estimating  the pavement layers modulus‐Field and experimental study. Constr. Build. Mater. 2018, 171, 598–610.  26. Ge, Z.; Wang, H.; Zhang, Q.; Xiong, C. Glass fiber reinforced asphalt membrane for interlayer bonding between asphalt overlay  and concrete pavement. Constr. Build. Mater. 2015, 101, 918–925.  27. Mohamed, M.; Skinner, A.; Abdel‐Rahim, A.; Kassem, E.; Chang, K. Deterioration Characteristics of Waterborne Pavement  Markings Subjected to Different Operating Conditions. J. Transp. Eng. Part B Pavements 2019, 145, 04019003.  28. Mo, T. JTG D 40‐2011 Specifications for Design of Highway Cement Concrete Pavement; People’s Communications Publishing House:  Beijing, China, 2011.  29. White, G. Stochastic strength rating of flexible airport pavements using construction data. Int. J. Pavement Eng. 2018, 21, 1–12.  30. Ministry  of  Transport  of  the  People’s  Republic  of  China.  Specifications  for  Design  of  Highway  Asphalt  Pavement;  Ministry  of  Transport of the People’s Republic of China: Beijing, China, 2017.  31. Goodpave. Available online: http://www.goodpave.com/ (accessed on 20 February 2022).  32. Daokedaopave. Available online: http://www. daokedaopave.com/ (accessed on 25 February 2022).  33. Kang, M.‐S.; Kim, N.; Lee, J.J.; An, Y.‐K. Deep learning‐based automated underground cavity detection using three‐dimensional  ground penetrating radar. Struct. Health Monit. 2019, 19, 173–185.   of flexible pavements.  Int. J.  34. Rabbi, M.F.; Mishra, D. Using FWD deflection basin parameters for network‐level assessment Pavement Eng. 2019, 22, 1–15.     Buildings 2022, 12, 868  19  of  19  35. Xiong,  C.;  Yu,  J.;  Zhang,  X.  Use  of  NDT  systems  to  investigate  pavement  reconstruction  needs  and  improve  maintenance  treatment decision‐making. Int. J. Pavement Eng. 2021, 1–15.  36. Pantelidis, L. The equivalent modulus of elasticity of layered soil mediums for designing shallow foundations with the Winkler  spring hypothesis: A critical review. Eng. Struct. 2019, 201, 109452. 

Journal

BuildingsMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Jun 21, 2022

Keywords: remaining life; rigid PCC pavement; GPR; FWD; inverse design concept

There are no references for this article.