Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Conceptual and Systematics for Intelligent Power Management System-Based Cloud Computing: Prospects, and Challenges

A Conceptual and Systematics for Intelligent Power Management System-Based Cloud Computing:... Review  A Conceptual and Systematics for Intelligent Power   Management System‐Based Cloud Computing: Prospects,   and Challenges  1,2, 3 1, Ahmed Hadi Ali AL‐Jumaili  *, Yousif I. Al Mashhadany  , Rossilawati Sulaiman  *   and Zaid Abdi Alkareem Alyasseri      Faculty of Information Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Malaysia;  zaid.alyasseri@ukm.edu.my (Z.A.A.A.)    Computer Centre Department, University of Fallujah, Anbar 00964, Iraq    Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Anbar, Anbar 00964, Iraq;  yousif.mohammed@uoanbar.edu.iq  *  Correspondence: ahmed_hadi@uofallujah.edu.iq (A.H.A.A.‐J.); rossilawati@ukm.edu.my (R.S.)  Abstract: This review describes a cloud‐based intelligent power management system that uses ana‐ lytics as a control signal and processes balance achievement pointer, and describes operator ac‐ knowledgments that must be shared quickly, accurately, and safely. The current study aims to in‐ troduce a conceptual and systematic structure with three main components: demand power (direct  current (DC)‐device), power mix between renewable energy (RE) and other power sources, and a  cloud‐based  power  optimization  intelligent  system.  These  methods  and techniques  monitor  de‐ Citation: AL‐Jumaili, A.H.A.;   mand power (DC‐device), load, and power mix between RE and other power sources. Cloud‐based  Al Mashhadany, Y.I.; Sulaiman, R.;   power optimization intelligent systems lead to an optimal power distribution solution that reduces  Alyasseri, Z.A. A Conceptual and  power consumption or costs. Data has been collected from reliable sources such as Science Direct,  Systematics for Intelligent Power  IEEE Xplore, Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and PubMed. The overall findings of these  Management System‐Based Cloud  studies are visually explained in the proposed conceptual framework through the literature that are  Computing: Prospects, and   considered to be cloud computing based on storing and running the intelligent systems of power  Challenges. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820.  https://doi.org/10.3390/app11219820  management and mixing.  Academic Editors:   Keywords: power management; state of charge; battery aging; dc‐device; power consumption; re‐ Paula Fraga‐Lamas,   newable energy; cloud computing  Tiago M. Fernández‐Caramés   and Sérgio Ivan Lopes  Received: 16 August 2021  1. Introduction  Accepted: 8 October 2021  In the last decade of industrial progress, the world economy has shifted from cheap  Published: 20 October 2021  energy  to  expensive  fuel  consumption.  However,  industrialization  necessitates  an  in‐ creasing amount of energy, which is a condition for humanity’s economic prosperity and  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neu‐ tral with regard to jurisdictional  sustainability [1]. Awareness of the relative constraints of traditional energy resource ex‐ claims in published maps and insti‐ haustion is essential; however, the restricted energy supply from RE sources is necessary.  tutional affiliations.  Thus, these two factors have not only a two‐fold influence on energy and economic de‐ velopment only, but also on the environment. A cyber‐physical system in which electrical  components are controlled by a computer and connected to a network of other computer‐ controlled physical equipment is known as a power grid [2]. The power grid includes the  Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Li‐ movement of electricity and information between the power grid and control centers [3].  censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  Safe and reliable grid operation requires controlling the energy flow such that the supply  This article  is an open access article  and demand can be well balanced in real‐time [4]. It is necessary to ensure that infor‐ distributed under the terms and con‐ mation flows as intended as any disruption in information flow will affect the correct  ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ conduct of energy flow and the system’s safe and dependable functioning [5,6]. In tradi‐ tribution (CC BY) license (http://crea‐ tivecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11219820  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  2  of  42  tional power networks, the supply and demand balancing are generally achieved by ad‐ justing the output of centralized generating units [5]. When consumption rises, the pro‐ duction must increase to keep up. Similarly, as demand falls, the created production must  be reduced [7].  The power system has witnessed significant modifications in recent years due to the  rapid  growth  of  a  distributed  generation  (DG).  DG,  unlike  centralized  generators,  are  mostly weather‐dependent and hence have limited controllability to meet demand. Due  to their various sizes and network tiers to which they are attached, they also add more  unpredictability to the entire operation [8]. Recent environmental worries about growing  carbon dioxide emissions (CDE), expanding energy needs, and the liberalization of the  electrical industry have drawn the world’s attention to renewable energy technology [9].  Although the integration of intermittent RE generation into electrical power systems is  still relatively new in the evolution of electrical systems, it is popular all over the world  due to its technical advantages such as improved voltage profile, power quality (PQ), volt‐ age stability, reliability and grid support [8]. According to the modern grid initiative study  from the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), a modern smart grid (SG) must  be capable of self‐healing and distributing high‐quality power in order to avoid wasting  money due to outages [9].  This study focuses on the uses of a variety of RE sources, including unlimited and  other power sources. Moreover, it focuses on conserving energy and spending it wisely  following its direction and location. Furthermore, reducing costs by using suitable energy  sources depends on prioritizing using a multi‐heuristic technique for intelligent power  systems. All these processes and data will be saves and controlled by a cloud computing  framework using a cloud sim. Cloud computing can be a great addition to any system  aiming for an optimal solution for power distribution to reduce cost and waste power and  time.  1.1. Smart Energy Systems  Societies on a global scale have reached a tipping point from fossil fuel power gener‐ ation to sustainable alternatives. However, wireless connectivity plays a critical role in  this transformation by enabling innovative smart energy systems (SESs) [9]. SES is a novel  solution, which integrates energy generating and storage technologies with ‘intelligent’  applications, regulating and optimizing their usage. Cloud computing can use combined  multiple energy sources with storage systems to manage them [10]. Furthermore, signifi‐ cant points to improve SES require real‐time performance decisions based on technical  features and climatic data, surplus renewable power generation, and building decentral‐ ized energy systems with excellent efficiency and lower cost [11]. In addition, to reduce  rising  environmental  hazards  such  as  increasing  global  mean  temperature  and  green‐ house gas emissions, energy systems are experiencing a rapid transition toward low‐car‐ bon intelligent systems [12]. Unlike traditional energy systems, which dispatch various  generators  to  meet  changing  demand,  future  energy  systems  include  two‐way  energy  flows between providers and consumers and active engagement of customers as prosum‐ ers in various electrical markets [13]. Under the suggested micro‐market, not completely  controllable loads were rescheduled by changing specific lectures, research timelines and  optimization by a self‐crossover genetic algorithm (GA) [14]. The numerical findings re‐ vealed that the suggested micro‐market and algorithm efficiently increased load flexibility  and resulted in increased cost savings for intelligent energy systems [15,16], as shown in  Figure 1.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  3  of  42  Figure 1. The schematic illustrates the smart energy system.  1.2. Background  The fast development of power stockpiling has received considerable attention lately  [17].  The  power  stockpiling  technique  represents  a  popular  system  used  in  the  most  widely fixed and portable way [18]. Technique energy distribution consists of production,  conveyance, allocation, scattered network methods, demand, administration [19]. Modern  gadgets generally include many detectors to regulate and manage process variables di‐ rectly. The detectors may recognize and prevent possible system faults. It is impossible to  improve energy management strategies on the future route until accurate information is  available [19]. As a result, the obvious visibility, high detection levels, and improved level  of performance have attracted much interest. Artificial intelligence (AI) has become the  focus of interest, particularly in industrial sectors, for its smart and precise natural deposit  administration [20]. AI integration of fog will vastly improve the range of computing and  execution speed of its base sensors in the industry [21]. However, a significant issue in  using such energy‐hungry gadgets, battery aging, and intolerable delays on the portable  appliance is a traditional and inefficient fair distribution of precise natural trends. De‐ manding power management and control are critical to enhancing safety [20], reliability  [17], performance, and cost [22]. Demanding power management is a choking technique  due to a complicated process that is difficult to observe. Thus, it is a significant method  for managing batteries to concentrate on developing a cloud‐based battery for managing  batteries based on an intelligent system that employs a machine‐learning technique capa‐ ble  of  operating  consistently  during  changing  environmental  settings  [23].  Enhanced  freightage techniques are essential to later development predictions of more intelligent  batteries, as the freightage efficiency has a significant impact on customer approval or  rejection [24]. Technology‐managing batteries on the cloud are proposed to enhance sys‐ information stored  tems through enhancing arithmetic power ability, amount of data, and  on the internet. The internet‐connected battery data is examined and analyzed and it is  highly reliant on the supervision center framework for computation and connections and  uses a cloud‐based application server to assure procedure continuation independent of  local infrastructure access and availability [21]. In addition, the growing demand for elec‐ tricity worldwide, the environmental pressures, and the large‐scale penetration of inter‐ mittent renewable energy sources (RESs) are compromising the operation of the electricity  grid and creating new technical and economic challenges for network operators [25]. The  worrying rise in power usage, natural pollution, global warming, and the exhaustion of  coal and oil sources is pushing today’s academics to make renewable electricity gathering  easier [26]. The insertion of integrating solar panels in traditional electricity transmission  lines has been proved fruitful [27]. However, variables such as solar irradiance, coverage  of clouds, time of sunlight hours, and heat in the surroundings wreak havoc on renewable  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  4  of  42  output power and total energy efficiency, which may be mitigated by combining renew‐ able panels with energy storage devices [28,29]. The large penetration of solar power can  cause significant voltage swings, through the use of energy storage devices. Solar power  with a manageable energy storage system device also saves money for customers by re‐ ducing power consumption [30,31]. The collected information and data are conveyed to  the cloud smoothly, which leads to creating a battery system’s digital twin, as well as the  battery analytical techniques that will evaluate the information and provide insight into  the battery‐grade level and aging [18,32]. To explore the advancement of information of  data and connection technology, combining fossil fuels with clean power, and implement‐ ing energy management using the cloud, powered pivot, and gathered loads were used  to enhance power economization in a smart society [24].  2. Smart Grids System  The growing energy demand has led researchers to establish a new energy manage‐ ment mechanism or find alternate energy resources [33]. For this purpose, the utility trans‐ forms its infrastructure into intelligent smart grids (SGs) by using bi‐directional commu‐ nication technologies to make wise decisions [34]. SGs mix electric power and bidirec‐ tional  communication  that  supply  the  end‐user  with  a  high‐performance and  efficient  mechanism by combining integration and communication technologies [35,36]. In this sec‐ tion, five of the major aspects will be discussed to show the best scope of these systems  based on smart grid benefits, opportunities and components as depicted in Figure 2. These  aspects are demand response (DR), power supply (PS), distributed energy resource (DER),  microgrid trading (MT) and virtual power plants (VPPs) [37].  Figure 2. Smart grid opportunity, benefits, and components.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  5  of  42  2.1. Demand Response (DR)  The world’s most pressing concern today is energy. As a backup generator, fossil  fuels are frequently employed, although their production of CO2 affects life and the envi‐ ronment [38,39]. A novel technique called DR makes virtual generation better DR [40,41].  Users may program their gadgets using this approach. There are several issues with tra‐ ditional smart‐grid design (without the cloud) [42], which is the master‐slave design that  led to a risk of distributed denial of service (DDoS). However, any error may cause the  entire system to fail [43]. There is a limit on how many clients may serve due to memory  storage limitations, stability, and management [44]. Besides, information and data man‐ agement  challenges,  which  millions  of  intelligent  meters  necessitate  for  an  effective  method for handling massive amounts of data [45]. Cloud computing may provide a cost‐ effective alternative for data analytic and storage methods [46,47]. Recently, the high in‐ sertion of green power, the advancement and implementation of new technology such as  electricity storage methods and electronics technologies, and the effective engagement of  (DR)  from  the  user  aspect,  the  intelligent  network  is  currently  succumbing  to  a  deep  change [48]. Customers’/clients’ power consuming routines are changed by DR due to the  current power cost, benefit plans, and whenever the device dependability is threatened  [49]. DR’s elastic scheduling may be tailored to customers’ economy and power use goals,  that have been used over time to help business, manufacturing, and housing customers  reduce their power consumption [50]. DR scheduling is classified depending on reward  and cost. These two groups are intertwined, and many of their activities are customized  to reach mutually beneficial objectives [51]. DR is the favored procedure of participation  among clients and the electricity network in the electricity marketing development. In ad‐ dition to minimizing the variance among maximum load and maximum valley, the load  profile could be developed; these lead to making the device’s cost cheaper, and to the  system pressure being relieved to obtain more money to be invested in raising the load.  DR lowers the price of their energy usage for energy users, impacting their pleasure [52].  The home load has the highest ability to profoundly alter the requirement peak load amid  the weights that may successfully involve DR [53]. Users may be overseeing and admin‐ istering personal electricity using DR services. Consumers are motivated to employ clean  power  and  allocate  energy‐saving  technologies  to  conserve  electricity,  lower  personal  power costs, and make money by selling their extra electricity to the system through DR  programs [54,55]. It is essential to provide a reliable, accurate, cost‐effective, and safe elec‐ tricity energy. The above technological advances should be able to combine the behaviors  of many participants, buyers, suppliers, and prosumers efficiently [56,57]. The demand  response procedure’s success in regulating supply, conservation, call for cooperation, and  lowering energy costs is proven based on a prototype electrical system [58,59]. For in‐ stance,  the  energy  information  administration’s  last  annual  energy  outlook  study  pre‐ dicted that household power demand will rise in the next few years [60–62].  2.2. Power Supply  An  electrical  device  transforms  electricity  (the  proper  voltage,  current,  and  fre‐ quency) from a source to an electrical load [63]. This section describes the relationship  between power and energy, and their management techniques; as seen in Equation (4)  and (5). Both power and energy are defined in terms of the work that a system accom‐ plishes. It is critical to understand the distinction between power and energy. A reduction  in power consumption does not always imply a reduction in the amount of energy uti‐ lized. For example, reduce central processing units (CPU) performance by lowering volt‐ age and frequency led to reduced power consumption. It may take longer to complete the  program execution in this situation. The amount of energy consumed may not be reduced  even with reducing power usage [64]. As explained in the next parts, energy consumption  may decrease through implementing static power management (SPM), dynamic power  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  6  of  42  management (DPM), or by combining the two solutions and services [65,66]. Furthermore,  electricity consumption may be divided into three categories:  First: The energy consumed via parts of the system due to leaking electricity in the  supplied technique is called SPM. It is unaffected by clock rates and does not rely on use  situations dictated by the device type and architecture used in the service’s CPU [67].  Second: Dynamic power consumption (DPC): This type of energy usage is caused by  device action and is largely influenced by clock rates, I/O traffic, and the utilization situa‐ tion. DPC is caused by two factors: changed capacity and short circuit current [68,69]. To  identify basic terms: Charge can be defined as the quantity of electricity responsible for  electric phenomena in Coulombs (C). Current is defined as the passage of electric signals  through a network for each component during a given period, measured in amperes (A),  which is expressed in Equation (1) [70]. Voltage is the amount of effort or energy necessary  to move an electric charge, measured in volts (V) and expressed in Equation (2). Power is  the system’s rate of work, measured in watts (W), described in Equation (3). Compute  power is the element current multiplied by the element voltage, expressed in Equation (4).  Energy is the entire quantity of tasks finished during a period of time, measured in watt‐ hours (WH), described in Equation (5).  ∆c (1) a   ∆t where a is ampere, ∆c is change of current and ∆𝑡   is change of time.  ∆w (2) v   ∆c where v is Volt and ∆w is change of watt and ∆𝑐   is change of current.  ∆w (3) p   ∆t where p is power, ∆w is change of watt, ∆t  is change of time.  ∆w ∆c ∆w (4) P ∗  a∗ v  ∆t ∆t ∆c via derivation and substitution of variables,  P a∗ v  (5) E P ∗ ∆t  where E stands for energy, P for power, and ∆t stands for alteration of time.  2.2.1. Battery Management  The battery management is worked from different perspectives, such as automati‐ cally controlling the SoG and the system that maintains battery aging and health. The rest  of the research society considered the authority of the power consumption and reduced  the costs of PS [71]. (GA) [72], particle swarm optimization (PSO) [73], fuzzy logic (FL)  [74], metaheuristic optimization algorithms (MOA) [27], etc. have all been used to pre‐ serve battery life and control the charging process, which includes charging from 20% and  stopping when it reaches 95%. These methods and algorithms use a mix of energy sources  ranging from wind energy, fossil energy, solar energy, and RE [75,76]. However, the focus  is to resolve the issues between battery control and energy supplies used during freight‐ age (see Figure 3).  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  7  of  42  Figure 3. Power consumption control.  State of Charge (SoC)  A cell (SoC) depicts current capacity as a function of its rated capacity. The SoC’s  value  ranges  from  0  to  100  percent.  The  cell  is  fully  loaded  if  the  SoC  is  100  percent,  whereas an SoC of zero percent shows that the cell is entirely discharged [77]. In practical  applications, the percentage or level that defines the start or end of the charging process  is varied according to the charging system, whether it is manual or automatic. The begin‐ ning SoC is assigned as 0% and target charging SoC as 80% to compare improvements. In  the same study, the optimal charging current series for 0%–80% SoC with different setting  time had charging times that ranged from 1 to 3 h, with a step of 0.5 h. Knowing the battery  beginning SoC, the target SoC, and the charging time, it has been found that the current  charging command can be easily calculated by the database‐based method. Compared  with the constant current charging strategy, the proposed method can effectively decrease  the charging loss [72]. Furthermore, electrochemical techniques and post‐mortem exami‐ nation allowed the samples kept at 30%, 60%, and 100% SoC and 55 °C to be comprehen‐ sively examined. It was determined that the most severe capacity fading occurred when  the batteries were kept at 55 degrees Celsius and 100% SoC [78]. In addition, higher stored  SoC  resulted  in  a  more  substantial  rise  in  bulk  resistance  (Rb)  and  charge–transfer  re‐ sistance (Rct) of a full battery at 55 °C. Still, the discharge rate capability of the stored bat‐ tery remained unchanged [73]. Furthermore, higher stored SoC resulted in a more sub‐ stantial rise in bulk resistance (Rb) and charge–transfer resistance (Rct) of a full battery at  55 °C. Still, the discharge rate capability of the stored battery remained unchanged [78].  However, the minimum SoC in the study never fell below 20% to avoid reducing battery  life. Therefore, there was always 20% energy in the batteries in this study [73]. Factors  such as charge, discharge rate, and charging/discharging hours played a significant role  in correcting the load characteristic of the grid, and the islanded micro‐grid was the opti‐ mal operation of energy systems [73]. The numerical simulations were used to evaluate  the system’s net savings for various SoC settings in the control strategy. Considering ex‐ panding data samples, the proposed approximate dynamic programming approach beat  the  classic  dynamic  programming  approach  [79].  The  proposed  approximate  dynamic  programming approach for microgrid power system optimization problems is a compu‐ tationally efficient tool [80,81] (Figure 4).  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  8  of  42  Figure 4. State of charge (SoC).  Battery Life  Determining battery aging is a crucial issue to predict the available charge in battery‐ operated systems [82]. According to the literature, the batteries were charged and dis‐ charged in 5 h to produce a 5 kilowatt (KW) average, while the battery life was anticipated  to be around ten years [73]. In comparison to the standard charging method, the results  showed that the multi‐stage constant current charging technique could significantly re‐ duce charging time by 56.8%, extend battery life by 21%, and enhance energy efficiency  by roughly 0.4 percent of constant current and constant voltage [83]. Moreover, we used  four cells for experiments to ensure the consistency of the results and to reduce the effect  of the cell‐to‐cell variations [84]. The cells were new and uncycled and stored in a ther‐ mally managed storage chamber at 10 °C° at 50% SoC before experiments to minimize  their calendar aging [84]. In addition, different temperatures, charge–discharge rates, and  the depth of discharge can give rise to the evolution of the dominant aging reactions that  can offer guidance in selecting a reasonable factor range when designing accelerated aging  tests  [85].  However,  the  autoregressive  recurrent  Gaussian  process  regression  (GPR),  which considers current and historical voltage, current, and temperature measurements,  as well as the prior SoC estimate, increased the estimation performance [86]. In addition,  this battery management system (BMS) with FL controller method improved the battery’s  function and life [87].  Power Consumption  Reducing energy costs is another subject in battery management, as many research‐ ers considered reducing power consumption in their studies. The electricity needed to  operate the system is not produced by the deployed MG system [88]. Therefore, a sizing  method based on the system’s consumption profile and the site’s weather conditions was  introduced to upgrade the MG system to produce the total electricity needed by the load  [89]. Moreover, they found that integration of a photovoltaic system leads to the reduced  economic viability of the battery by reducing the revenues generated by the battery while  performing peak shaving [89]. In addition, we proposed a scheme that creates three clus‐ ters of various objective functions to coordinate charging and discharging cycles; the first  cluster uses time of use tariffs to reduce grid‐integrated energy storage batteries (GIESBs)  power  charging  costs.  The  second  cluster  uses  per‐unit  generation  from  photovoltaics  (PVs) and wind turbines (WTs) to reduce GIESBs charging power. The third cluster, how‐ ever, reduces the GIE’s discharge capacity [90].  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  9  of  42  2.2.2. Renewable Energy (RE)  Integrating RE with other power sources is considered to achieve many objectives: 1)  reduce the carbon footprint; 2) reduce costs of power consumption [91]. This selection  must assure user safety, efficiency, and cost savings for a given application. As a result,  criteria such as  power  consumption,  application  deployment area, cable size, and  line  transmission losses are considered. This method was used to create a 48 V DC bus in a  small‐scale laboratory system with minimal power usage [91]. Furthermore, an electric  bus management system (EBMS) considers variables that may have an impact on distri‐ bution network or bus efficiency, such as the power tariff. To counteract the negative ef‐ fects of opportunity charging systems, RE‐based charging stations can be installed. The  number  of possibilities for  configuring  connections to be lowered during the hours of  22:00–23:00 h, encourages discussion about linked DC motor load with wind and solar  power‐based hybrid power systems based on a simulated outcome [92]. A battery‐based  energy storage system is used to control the excess power generation to maximize the  utilization of these energy sources based on the required load [93]. The switching transi‐ ents of renewable sources and batteries do not affect DC motor speed (load), and hence  constant output power as per requirement is available. The adaptability of artificial neural  networks (ANNs) allows the system to be tested in a different scenario. The controller can  be trained for any change in the signal. The training accuracy is 94% [94]. It will also re‐ quire city utility authorities combining novel grid elements on the Internet of RE domain  in order to actualize a sustainable, transformed smart city. In the future, power business,  pure renewable electricity grid structural assets, and Internet of RE technology will be‐ come increasingly valued [95]. The primary motivation for this expected paradigm shift  toward renewable power grids on the Internet is to manage electricity storage [96]. The  cross‐cutting nature of solely renewable electricity grid architecture on the Internet of RE  platforms and intelligent city elements will help shape future environmentally friendly  towns [94]. Energy management systems (EMS) for various RESs target small DC grids  for remote rural communities with unstable load conditions [97].The technology can be  used to electrify rural settlements with the greatest possible use of RESs and storage de‐ vices. The power dissipates to the consumer through maximum RE penetration and bat‐ teries throughout the day without any divergence in the system, according to simulation  and experimental investigations of the DC micro‐grid with the suggested EMS [97]. Micro‐ grid implementation is a viable method for improving supply quality while lowering sus‐ tainable energy implementation costs.  For a hybrid micro‐grid (HMG), a control scheme presents a structure for ensuring  continuous PS to consumers in fifteen different modes of operation. PV, fuel cells, wind,  and battery storage with configurable characteristics that were all investigated. The su‐ pervisory controller sets the reference values for the generation subsystems using the state  machine approach by following a predetermined path. The discrepancy between the gen‐ erated and demanded power, as well as SoC, are considered by the fuzzy controller dur‐ ing charging and discharging battery banks. As a result, in order to obtain the best system  configuration and component sizing by defining objective functions for energy cost and  power loss probability, the multi‐objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO) meth‐ odology was utilized. The modeling findings show an increase in the price of electricity,  which leads to a significant increase in the use of HMG based on renewable resources. As  a result, harnessing renewable resources to create electric power in India’s remote places  is a viable option [98]. Based on the literature, algorithms of battery management, RE, and  cloud computing are summarized in Tables 1 and 2.      Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  10  of  42  Table 1. Summary of the literature algorithms of battery management, renewable energy, and cloud computing.  Category  Algorithm & Tools  Battery Categories  Ref.  Several types of batteries,  Constant current/Constant voltage (CC/CV)  [99,100]  Lithium‐ion Battery  Arbitrage optimization algorithm  CubeSat battery algorithm (CubeSat)  Non‐Available  (NA)  Maximum efficiency tracking (MEET)  [22,27,101,102]  MOA  First access first charge (FAFC) scheduling  Flat feeder profile  Battery Management  (GA)  Lithium‐ion Battery  [72,103,104]  JAYA algorithm  Pontryagin’s minimum principle (PMP)  Electric vehicles batteries,  PSO  [28,73,75]  Lithium‐ion Battery  Orthogonal least squares algorithm  Lithium‐ion Battery  [86]  MATLAB algorithm  Variety of batteries  [105]  Liquid cold plate control equation  LiFePO4 battery  [106]  Stochastic algorithm  Electric vehicles batteries  [107]  (GA)  NA  [108,109]  Markov decision process (MDP)  Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm (LMA)  Renewable energy  Gaussian algorithm  Several of batteries  [110]  Forgetting factor algorithm  Trust‐region reflective  BMS‐Master and BMS‐Slave  Lithium‐ion and lead‐acid batteries  [18]  The home energy management system (HEMS)  Electric vehicles batteries  [111,112]  Branch and bound algorithm  Cloud Computing  Smart home energy management system (SHEMS)  NA  Energy‐performance trade‐off multi resource cloud task  [113,114]  scheduling algorithm (ETMCTSA)  Table 2. Assessment and analysis of the literature studies for battery management (BM), renewable energy (RE), and cloud  computing (CC).  Implementation  Tools/Algorithm  Achievement  BM  Ref.  RE  CC  Dc‐Device  Constant current (CC)/con‐ Reduce the number of battery chargers to Improvements battery charg‐ ✓  ×  ×  [99]  stant voltage (CV)  ing and management.  Propose a new charging algorithm to reducing the charge energy and  GA  ×  ×  [72]  ✓  loss.  Three types of battery energy storage systems (BESSs) were used to im‐ MEET algorithm  ✓  ×  ×  [102]  prove the system’s availability and energy efficiency.  Orthogonal least squares al‐ Provide a feature stemming from (GPR) for deduces the unknown SoC  ✓  ×  ×  [86]  gorithm  value’s probability allocation  The numerical analysis illustrates adaptive resonant beam charging  Scheduling algorithm  (ARBC) led to 61% battery charging energy and 53%‐ 60% supplied  ✓  ×  ×  [22]  power.  used optimum charging methods are reduced charge times, perfor‐ GA  ✓  ×  ×  [83]  mance improved, and extended battery life  The sorting and cumulative voltage summation (SCVS) was shown to  MATLAB algorithm  perform the best through the solar energy option of charging the bat‐ ✓  ×  ×  [105]  tery.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  11  of  42  PSO developed based on  A hybrid approach uses to manage the electric vehicle charging station  standard IEEE 69‐Buses net‐ (EVCS) to peak shaving and the most efficient charging/discharging of  ✓  ×  ×  [73]  work  EVs applied to a standard network (IEEE 69 buses).  Scheduling controllers can reduce the power consumption and costs of  PSO ✓  ×  ×  [28]  grids.  A battery energy storage system (BESS) capable of discharging for 1.5–2  Arbitrage optimization algo‐ h at maximum power and provides quick response and energy arbi‐ ✓  ×  ×  [115]  rithm  trage.  Choosing electric power system (EPS) architectural converters for solar  CubeSat battery algorithm  ✓  ×  ×  [101]  panels and unregulated dc‐bus have the maximum efficiency.  A double‐layer metaheuristic optimizer provides a novel stochastic  MOA  technique for optimizing solar hosting capacity in distribution net‐ ✓  ×  ×  [27]  works.  Propose a simple statistical model to breaking a battery energy storage  Stochastic algorithm  ✓  ×  ×  [107]  system up into minor segments that lead to significant increases.  Compact and optimized SOC estimating model for statistical error val‐ JAYA algorithm  ✓  ×  ×  [104]  ues such as SOC error used to validate the model’s performance.  Reduce the amount of data sent by extracting features voltage descrip‐ NA  ×  ×  [116]  ✓  tive.  Clean electric power using information and communication technology  NA  ✓  ✓  ×  [117]  (ICT), the user can monitor the load, battery, and panel current.  The household load control system that included (RESs) led to lowered  GA  cost of electricity from (228 to 51) USD and the peak‐to‐average ratio  ×  ✓  ×  [108]  (PAR) from 2.68 to 1.12.  LMA, Gaussian algorithm  Established microgrid system for testing and simulation, focusing on  and Trust‐Region Reflective  dimensioning and control techniques, the residue discovered less than  ×  [110]  ✓  ✓  Algorithm (TRRA)  5%.  The smart monitoring and control system preserves and manipulates  (SHEMS)  data from the PV, wind energy conversion system (WECS), and batter‐ ×  [113]  ✓  ✓  ies.  Propose an energy‐efficient approach that can operate in an online fash‐ Branch and bound algorithm  ×  ×  [111]  ✓  ion ANN‐based approach outperforms all benchmarks.  Propose a cloud control strategy to enhance the analytical electrical en‐ BMS‐Master and BMS‐Slave ergy and information storage in the cloud using lithium‐ion and lead‐ ×  [18]  ✓  ✓  acid batteries.  Propose a closed‐loop program for an effective management strategy  NA  ×  [118]  ✓  ✓  for lithium‐ion batteries by concurrently changing factors.  Propose the energy‐efficient hybrid (EEH) scheme for increasing electri‐ cal energy consumption efficiency using a single strategy to minimize  ETMCTSA  ×  ×  ✓  [114]  energy usage in terms of power use effectiveness (PUE) and data center  energy productivity (DCEP).  Design embedded network platform using smart sensor gadgets with  NA  telecommunication functions and molecular channel systems to main‐ ×  ×  ✓  [119]  tain battery health.  Optimization algorithm of  The combine between a smart thermostat and (HEMSs) a 53.2 percent  ×  ×  ✓  [112]  the HEMS  decrease in daily costs is obtained (TOU)  2.3. Distributed Energy Resource  DER are energy generating and storage systems that supply power where required.  DER systems, which produce less than 10 megawatts (MWs) of power, may generally be  scaled to fit your specific needs and can be installed on‐site. Therefore, one single source  is limited and can probably be costly, whereas to achieve efficient energy storage, a com‐ bination of all technologies is required. Power conversion systems for storage purposes  must also be considered [120]. This is required to increase their control and dependability,  as well as to ensure that storage systems are properly integrated into power networks  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  12  of  42  [121]. A next‐generation SG without energy storage is similar to a computer without a  hard drive—severely limited [122]. A suitable EMS is required to obtain the optimum per‐ formance for clusters of distributed energy resources (DERs). The multi‐agent systems  (MASs) paradigm, as utilized and described, may be used to organize distributed control  methods [123]. Some of the benefits of employing MASs for successful, intelligent grid  operation in the energy market are discussed in [124,125]. The MAS application reduces  the overall cost of power system production, integrated microgrids, comprised dispersed  resources, and lumped loads [126]. To maximize the hybrid RE production system’s eco‐ nomic performance and energy quality, a hybrid immune‐system‐based PSO was pre‐ sented and applied to reduce fuel cost in the generating process [126].  Conversely, the distribution system operator (DSO) can dispatch at least a portion of  the DERs; implementation of a coordinated integration of the various DERs recommends  a centralized method. The best operating strategy of the DER system is generally analyzed  by using a multi‐objective linear programming methodology in centralized control meth‐ ods [127]. The combination of the energy costs with the reduction of environmental effects  suggest  reducing  operational  costs,  including  energy  losses,  curtailed  energy,  reactive  support, and shed energy [128,129]. Additionally implemented is a two‐stage short‐term  scheduling process. The first task is to create a day‐ahead scheduler to optimize DER pro‐ duction for the next day. In the second step, an intra‐day scheduler that modifies sched‐ uling every 15 min is also proposed, which considers the distribution network’s operation  needs and restrictions, as shown in Figure 5 [130].  Figure 5. Schematic illustrating concepts of distributed energy resources.  2.4. Microgrid Trading  Microgrids are small‐scale power networks that provide a more flexible and reliable  energy distribution in limited geographic regions [131]. For fulfilling local demands, they  generally use DERs such as distributed generating units and energy storage facilities. As  a result, they can minimize dependency on the traditional centralized power grid (also  known as a microgrid or primary grid in power system literature) that generally relies on  massive central station generation [132]. Besides, the environmental benefits of using lo‐ cally accessible RESs such as solar panels, fuel cells, or WTs also have economic benefits  because if DERs and loads are physically close together, microgrids can minimize trans‐ mission and distribution losses [133–135]. A microgrid system was used to maintain the  energy arbitrage, balance, reserve frequency regulation and transmission‐level for voltage  control, investment deferral, grid capacity support at the distribution level, time‐of‐use  (TOU) cost management, etc. [136–138]. Furthermore, it considered as a detection device  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  13  of  42  from the connected grid and operate autonomously in island mode if technical or eco‐ nomic situations demand, which is considered as local energy in the surrounding area  [139]. Power delivery from a distance is inefficient because part of the electricity—as much  as 8% to 15%—evaporates in route. A microgrid solves this inefficiency by generating  power close to the people it serves; the generators are either nearby or within [140,141]. A  microgrid system warrants research attention for several reasons: first, it is local, making  electricity close to the people you serve; generators are near or within the building or on  the roof in solar panels. The tiny network addresses inefficiencies in significant networks,  which lose energy during transmission from producing units to transmission and distri‐ bution lines across vast distances. Second, it is independent and can be disconnected from  the primary grid and run on its own. When the electrical system goes down due to a storm  or other disaster, they must deliver power to their consumers. Third, the generators, bat‐ teries, and surrounding building energy systems are all controlled by microgrid intelli‐ gence. In addition, the controller coordinates a variety of resources in order to meet the  energy goals of the microgrid’s consumers, which can be searching for the cheapest en‐ ergy, the cleanest energy, the most reliable electricity, or something else entirely. The con‐ troller accomplishes these objectives by raising or decreasing any of the microgrid’s re‐ sources or combinations of those resources for optimum impact, as shown in Figure 6  [142].  Figure 6. Schematic illustrating concepts of distributed energy resources.  2.5. Virtual Power Plants (VPPs)  Electrical energy has a significant impact on people’s lives all around the world. As  the  demand  for electricity  grew, the  power  infrastructure and  the  global  environment  were  placed  under  additional  strain  [143,144].  Buildings  are  a  substantial  producer  of  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  14  of  42  greenhouse gases (GHGs) [145,146]. An effective EMS is required to address the fast in‐ crease in demand [147]. Furthermore, several nations have committed to submitting an  annual GHG emission reduction plan under the Paris agreement, making the use of (RESs)  essential  [148,149].  Due  to  the  network’s  new  topology  RESs,  traditional  EMSs  are  no  longer effective. In order to aggregate and accommodate RESs while considering geo‐ graphic distribution and uncertainties, an optimal scheduling algorithm must be devel‐ oped [150,151]. The VPP concept is one of the most promising and practical energy man‐ agement solutions, allowing for unique features by integrating embedded technology and  communication  networks into the  energy system.  Despite the  fact that  Awerbuch and  Preston proposed VPP in 1997, there is still no clear description for the VPP [152]. From a  variety of perspectives, VPPs have been proposed in the literature. At the same time, the  usual inclination is to aggregate DERs for energy management purposes [146]. Many re‐ search has concentrated on business and marketing factors [153]. Other publications, how‐ ever, have emphasized technological viewpoints such as Internet of energy (IoE) [154],  EMS [155], combination of RESs [156], an independent microgrid [110], or a data and con‐ nection system [117]. A trading platform used by DERs to make wholesale market con‐ tracts is known as VPP. VPP is a DER aggregator that considers the impact of the network  on their output [157]. VPP is a control system for DERs, flexible loads, and storage that is  defined as an information and communication system. According to the investigation, a  VPP is a collection of DERs, controllable loads, and storage units combined to operate as  a single power plant, with an EMS at its core [158]. VPP is defined as an aggregation of  several DERs distributed at the distribution network’s medium voltage (MV) level [159].  In general, several solutions have been presented in recent years to overcome the  aforementioned difficulties. The VPP concept is one of the most promising energy man‐ agement  concepts,  allowing  for  unique  features  through  the  integration  of  embedded  technologies and communication networks into the energy system. VPP uses a bidirec‐ tional energy flow to provide real‐time monitoring and energy efficiency. As a result, they  were able to exchange their excess electrical energy on the market without the involve‐ ment of a third party [160]. Prosumers, conversely, who install any small‐scale RES, or  storage (batteries) can trade because the scheduling algorithm maximizes their surplus  energy. Customers without RES or storage can also contribute by moving loads, trimming  peaks, and filling valleys, among other things. Lastly, through enhancing operating plan‐ ning, VPP may conform with power administration rules [161,162], as well as the five  main areas that best illustrate the scope of the intelligent grids system, such as DR, PS,  DER, MT and VPPs, as shown in Table 3.  Table 3. Main scope of the smart grids system.  Main scope  Description  A novel technique makes virtual generation better. Users may program their gadgets for interac‐ Demand Response  tion with the power grid to improve load profile, and user power usage costs should be reduced  without compromising their pleasure.  An electrical device transforms electric current from a source to the proper voltage, current, and  Power supply  frequency to power an electrical load.  Distributed Energy  Systems for producing and storing energy for efficient storage and production that distributes  Resource  electricity where it is needed.  Small‐scale power networks provide more flexible and reliable energy distribution in limited ge‐ ographic regions for fulfilling local demands. As a result, it can minimize dependency on the  Microgrid Trading  centralized power grid by detaching and operate autonomously to reduce transmission, distribu‐ tion losses, energy arbitrage, balance.  It is the most important future solution that can be applied in energy management, and integrat‐ Virtual Power Plants  ing systems and networks into the energy system is a system of telecommunication and infor‐ mation that controls DERs, loads that are adaptable, and storage.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  15  of  42  3. Cloud Computing  Cloud computing is an useful computing paradigm that provides on‐demand access  to facilities and shared resources over the Internet [163]. Infrastructure as a service (IaaS),  platform as a service (PaaS), and service as a service (SaaS) are three notable services it  offers, while storage, virtualization, computing and networking are supported [164,165].  Implementing cloud computing applications is a top priority, especially in today’s envi‐ ronment, for things such as providing appropriate financing for social services and pur‐ chasing programs. Grids are geographically distributed platforms for computation. They  provide  high  computational  power  and  merge  extremely  heterogeneous  physical  re‐ sources into a single virtual resource [166,167]. Grid computing is a set of resources; the  primary resource is the central processing unit (CPU), which is mainly used to perform  massive and complicated calculations. Cloud computing technology is used by the major‐ ity of existing information technology (IT)‐based enterprises. Cloud computing is a rap‐ idly  evolving  technology,  and  companies  are  constantly  adding  new  services  to  their  cloud environments to stay competitive and fulfill customers’ expanding demands [168].  Furthermore, many different organizations are moving their IT‐based systems to cloud‐ based models [169]. Customers can use cloud computing resources in the form of virtual  machines (VMs) that are deployed and run‐in data centers. The data centers are composed  of several physical servers, each with its own set of resources [114]. The cloud computing  ecosystem for energy management is described in Figure 7.  Figure 7. The cloud computing ecosystem for energy management.  3.1. Cloud Computing and Storage of Data  The IaaS model of cloud computing provides consumers with storage services. Peo‐ ple have begun to save their data on clouds due to the large storage capacity [170,171].  Through virtualization, the issues around the storage of user data IoT applications can be  solved by providing storage, processing, and networking resources [172]. In mission de‐ velopment, two‐measure CPU usage and storage capacity are the best typical capabilities  of the cloud to reduce local storage overheads [173]. These parameters’ significance may  minimize computation cost, communication, CPU usage reduction, and battery and data  redundancy elimination in terms of storage and computing by performing task schedul‐ ing.  Research  on  storage  techniques  has  gained  momentum  due  to  the  significant  ad‐ vantages of quick storage services in the cloud. Still, these techniques have specific chal‐ lenges because there is a higher demand for quick access and secure storage. Cisco pre‐ dicts, that by 2021, cloud computing systems will account for around 94 percent of all  computing. Furthermore, by 2025, the size of data created and altered is expected to reach  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  16  of  42  175 zettabytes, according to International Data Corporation (IDC) [174]. The aforemen‐ tioned  necessitates  cloud  suppliers  to  establishing  and  simplifying  additional  services  [114,169].  3.2. Cloud Computing and Software Services  Cloud computing using virtualization technology offers end‐users computational re‐ sources, on‐demand resources, flexibility, dependability, dynamism, scalability, and bet‐ ter availability wherever and at any time, which are examples of different services [175].  Elasticity is one of the keys characteristics of cloud computing, which refers to the sys‐ tem’s capacity to respond to changes in workload [176]. Cloud services are now employed  in  most  applications  via  the  internet,  which  has  become  the  contemporary  economy’s  backbone. As a result, resource scheduling has become a hot topic in the cloud because  ineffective scheduling techniques can lead to a variety of issues, including long computa‐ tion times, reduced profit, poorer throughput, higher cost, and inappropriate resource us‐ age, which are all examples of an uneven workload at resources (over‐utilization or under‐ utilization) [177]. Resource usage in cloud computing is directly related to power con‐ sumption  when  resources  are  not  used  properly (over‐utilization  or  under‐utilization)  due to high processing demand from end users and no service delays from the cloud.  Integrating energy‐sensitive servers has become a popular topic in the cloud world [178].  Therefore, future research is required to address the challenges and meet end‐user de‐ mand  within  a  reasonable  timeframe.  Reducing  power  consumption  by switching un‐ derused hosts to sleep or hibernation without violating service level agreements (SLAs),  which are digital contracts between end users and cloud services, ensures quality of ser‐ vice  while  resources  are  ready.  Therefore,  several  energy‐conscious  server  integration  methods have been proposed in the last decade [179]. Either of the two scenarios is in‐ tended to achieve server consolidation. Most of the suggested scheduling methods must  strive toward greater resource utilization and energy efficiency. However, most available  algorithms are still in their infancy due to constraints [180]. Most algorithms focus on a  single parameter (energy) and ignore other factors such as cost, reaction time, elasticity  during run time, etc. [181].  3.3. Cloud Computing and Energy Savings  Local or green power sources are considered an excellent method to conserve energy  at a data center by locating it near where the electricity is generated to reduce transmission  losses [182]. Shutdown, hibernation, and sending in various low‐power stages are exam‐ ples of cloud computing approaches. At the same time, cloud computer energy consump‐ tion should be managed to optimize energy consumption for a specific computing task.  When it comes to reducing energy usage per unit of work, cloud computing is a more  energy‐efficient option [183]. According to studies, employing the cloud might result in a  38 percent reduction in global data center energy expenditures by 2020, but a 31 percent  reduction in data center power usage (from 201.8 terawatt‐hours (TWh) in 2010 to 139.8  (TWh) in 2020). According to another report [183], cloud computing might help businesses  save billions of dollars on their energy expenses. This equates to a reduction in carbon  emissions of millions of metric tons each year [184].  3.4. Cloud Computers as VPPs  A VPP is a network of multiple tiny power stations (a cluster of dispersed generation  facilities, such as microchips, WTs, small hydro, backup gensets, etc.) that operate as if  they are one power unit [185]. There is a necessity to check the cloud computing entity  linked to the power network in multiple locations, frequently given by several suppliers,  connected to different distributors, and operating in multiple countries at the same time  [186]. Energy consumption can be managed with specialist software designed for cloud  computers and based on the VPP concept; generators are seen as resources and flexible  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  17  of  42  users in the same way that cloud computers are [187]. Furthermore, the cloud computer  is a potentially adaptable consumer. The cloud computer software already aggregates and  controls its consumption; therefore, it performs the function of a VPP [187]. Existing cloud  systems as consumers and energy systems as producers are separate systems that typi‐ cally operate in parallel with little cooperation during one‐way PS. To attain higher overall  performance, such parallel networks require more complicated interaction [188]. The load  provided by cloud computer centers provides a reliable picture of consumption demand.  This energy storage device is an effective way for owners to reduce electric power prices  while also reducing demand on the power grid [189]. The SG should be sensitive to the  electricity system’s present load. The computational cost of methods to minimize power  consumption is determined by the required delay and the amount of load to be reduced.  These application execution and scheduling models will need to account for cloud re‐ source availability [190,191]. This strategy could include launching more VMs as demand  for power rises, or expanding cumulative bandwidth capacity to handle a higher sampling  rate of streaming data [185].  4. Big Data  With  the  increased  use  of  numerous  digital  devices  that  generate  heterogeneous,  structured, or unstructured data in recent years, the volume of data has exploded, culmi‐ nating  in  what  is  now  known  as  huge  data  [192].  Traditional  database  systems  have  proven inefficient when it comes to storing, processing, and analyzing large amounts of  data [193]. As a result, handling big data is a critical component of business and manage‐ ment rivalry. Nonetheless, it has posed a new challenge for both science and industry in  terms of information and communication technologies, driving the development of data‐ centric architectures and operational models [194,195].  Since normal tools and methods are not built to manage such huge data quantities,  the emergence of big data has highlighted a serious management dilemma [196]. At the  same time, conventional infrastructures are unable to meet the distributed computational  needs of managing vast amounts and types of data. This is owing to the increasing num‐ ber and complexity of data sets, as well as their volatility, which makes processing and  analysis difficult to perform using standard data management approaches and technology  [197]. Current infrastructure struggles to keep up with massive amounts of data, yet it is  a difficult task [198]. The current methods and technology for handling big data manage‐ ment issues place a premium on volume, variety, and pace [199].  Moreover, big data comprise complex data that are massively produced and man‐ aged in geographically dispersed repositories [200]. To handle enormous data difficulties,  innovative  management  strategies  and  technologies  are  motivated  by  this  complexity  [201]. Although there have been several studies on giant data management, none have  been thoroughly investigated. Giant data mechanisms are summarized in Figure 8.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  18  of  42  Figure 8. Big data mechanisms.  4.1. Big Data in Smart Grid  An intelligent grid architecture model includes a framework from three dimensions  that combines layers, zones, and in the realms of generation, transmission, distribution,  DER, and customer premises, there are several domains to evaluate a SG [202]. An energy  network with an embedded information layer generates a large amount of data in the grid,  such as measurement techniques and monitoring instructions, which must be collected,  transmitted, stored, and analyzed quickly and comprehensively [203]. The data analysis  platform also presented several opportunities and difficulties [202,204]. The massive data  characteristics in SG in many studies are consistent with the widespread 5 V vast data  paradigm as shown in the Table 4 [205,206].  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  19  of  42  Table 4. Main features of big data in smart grids as revealed.  Features of Big Data  Description  Smart meters and advanced sensor technologies are becoming more widely used in the SG  Volume  generates a tremendous quantity of data. As a result, standard database technology can’t  store or interpret data sets that are too big.  The rate at which new data are created and moved while the demand for real‐time data shar‐ Velocity  ing is growing and posing a new issue.  Words, digital images, detector data, and video are examples of unstructured data that may  Variety  be integrated with typical structured data utilizing big data technology.  The messiness and trustworthiness of the data. The effective management of the electricity  system is based on data analysis and state estimate. Therefore, the data transfer faults or de‐ Veracity  vices and a large amount of big data lead to problems in the data analysis results, as well as  measurement mistakes.  The capability to draw out important data from massive amounts of data while maintaining  Virtual  a clear sense of its worth. Big data makes obtaining valuable information harder.  4.1.1. Data Sources in Smart Grids  SGs,  similar  to  intelligent  energy  and  information  system,  have  a  variety  of  data  sources. Data is collected from sub‐stations, distribution switch stations, and power me‐ ters [207]. In addition, nonelectrical data such as trade, economic data, etc. are included in  the  information  source.  For  power  plant  scheduling,  subsystem  functioning,  essential  power equipment maintenance, marketing business behavior, data collecting and analysis  are considered critical [208]. Measurement, business, and outer data are the three types of  data sources described above [209]. Most power system operating characteristics are as‐ sessed using installed sensors and smart meters that offer data on the system’s present  and historical condition [210]. Social activity such as carnivals and weather conditions are  examples of data from outside sources that cannot be monitored by smart meters, yet still  affect the work and design of the electricity system. The data for business mainly consist  of trading techniques and customer demand [211].  4.1.2. Techniques Collecting Data in Smart Grids  The intelligent grid collects and sends data from intelligent meters, providing energy  information to all companies and customers [212]. The amount of intelligent meter read‐ ings for residential customers is anticipated to increase from 24 million per year to 220  million per day for a prominent utility provider [210]. In high voltage (HV)/MV trans‐ formers for voltage control, the present magnitude data is required for the automated on‐ load tap changer [213]. A standard intelligent meter measures voltage at the node, current  at the feeder, load conditions, reactive power flow, and energies over time, complete con‐ cord alteration, and load up demand and among other things [214].  4.1.3. Techniques Transmission Data in Smart Grids  The smart grid’s foundation communication is divided into home space networks,  district space networks, and wide‐space networks [215,216]. The most common forms of  communication  methods  for  intelligent  meters  are  wired  and  wireless  infrastructures  [217]. The technique of wireless connectivity allows acquiring measurement data from  intelligent meters at low prices and simple interfaces while the data center may encounter  a magnetic challenge [218].  4.2. Data Analysis Techniques  Data analysis is the most crucial stage of the hug system for data processing that  provides the foundation for uncovering useful information and assisting in decision mak‐ ing [219]. Data analytics, often known as data mining, is a computer process that uses  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  20  of  42  techniques such as database, statistician, design detection, and expert system to uncover  the possible relationships between variables [220]. However, the resulting data sets may  have varied performance in terms of noise, repetition, and uniformity due to the many  sources [221].  4.2.1. Data Preprocessing  Data integration strategies seek to effectively combine data from several sources into  a  single  picture  [222,223].  Densification  of  data  preprocessing  techniques  to  eliminate  highly linked variables and minimize dataset size due to some algorithms for analysis of  the data can be sensitive to imbalanced data [220]. A logarithm helps correct the distribu‐ tion form of data with severe weakness if the original dataset only contains the highest  and minimum temperature values [219]. Additional features such as temperature differ‐ ential might be computed through the preprocessing stage if the source dataset only has  the most significant and lowest temperature values. These characteristics are frequently  beneficial in improving the accuracy of data analytic findings [221].  4.2.2. Data Analytics Techniques  The model for data analytics may be developed based on the provided data to iden‐ tify the relationship between aspects and the associated types or values using supervised  learning techniques. When analyzing an unnamed data approach, it is typically designed  to identify the different classes across all objects [224].  4.2.3. Procedures of Data Mining in Smart Grids  The fundamental purpose of data analytics in the SG is to extract useful information  from historical data and compare it with real‐time data to guide operation and mainte‐ nance  [225].  Data  management  strategies  are  used  to  organize  and  store  the  massive  amounts of data gathered through intelligent meters and sensors. Following that, a math‐ ematical model may be created using data mining techniques and clean data [226]. The  status may be assessed in the generated model using real‐time data, which gives potential  strategies for guiding actual activities and resolving any issues [227,228].  4.3. Big Data Analytics in Smart Grid  4.3.1. Fault Detection  The SG is considered the driving force in the distribution arrangement system to re‐ duce carbon release and create environmental sustainability [229]. Using distributed gen‐ eration units in current power distribution networks enables the optimal use of widely  available RESs such as wind and solar energy [224]. Furthermore, the microgrid’s prox‐ imity to the generator power delivery dependability is improved, and power transmission  loss is reduced. The ability to operate in island mode also protects the load from harm  caused by power system issues such as voltage fluctuation, frequency deviation, etc. [229].  However, RE has an intermittent nature, which adds to the grid’s unpredictability. When  a large quantity of temperature or energy damages microgrids, the typical sized genera‐ tors are unable to identify and fix the problem in a timely manner due to their low load  capacity, posing a serious threat [230]. Most standard approaches, which focus on detect‐ ing overcurrent and negative sequence currents in large‐scale centralized power systems,  appeared ineffective in microgrids [231].  4.3.2. Method of Troubleshooting/Safety Assessment  Distribution automation (DA) focuses on the distribution level’s functioning and sys‐ tem reliability. A successful DA can locate and isolate distribution system issues, resulting  in faster restoration times and more customer satisfaction [232]. A growing amount of  operational data is being collected via supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA)  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  21  of  42  or sophisticated metering infrastructure for status monitoring and problem diagnosis ad‐ vanced metering infrastructure (AMI) [231]. A significant amount of data may be captured  through AMI and communication foundations due to the advancement of green infor‐ mation and communications technology (ICT) technologies in energy systems [233]. A  data‐driven model of failure phenomena based on a hybridization of evolutionary learn‐ ing and clustering methodologies is the input of a one‐class, power system operational  data, weather data, and relay protection device log data [234]. For accurate online identi‐ fication  of  dangerous  occurrences  in  the  power  system,  the  extreme  learning  machine  (ELM) algorithm is used in an intelligent early warning system. The learning speed of  ELM training is significantly quicker than traditional algorithms since the weights are ar‐ bitrarily generated and then calculated by matrix computing lacking iterative parameter  modification [235]. The data‐driven framework’s ideal balance between earning precision  and warning acuity is also explored. Using a ranking system, it extracted electrical fea‐ tures from high‐impedance fault current and voltage data and generated an effective fea‐ ture set (EFS) [236]. Thus, a statistical classifier for defect detection may be made using a  limited number of signal channels. It also shows how to minimize many phasor measure‐ ment units (PMU) of data while keeping the important information for power system fail‐ ure detection [237].  4.3.3. Transient Stability Analysis (TSA)  Transient stability is a key issue that is closely linked to the power system’s safe op‐ eration. However, rising electricity consumption, rising RE penetration, and a deregulated  market all drive the power grid to operate at or near its safe operational limitations [238].  According to the SG concept, massive data gathering by AMI contributes to the situation  evaluation of energy systems, while assisting with energy administration, functioning of  a system, and decision making [239]. As a result, effective recapitulation algorithms are  necessary  for  identifying  meaningful  patterns  and  uncovering  important  information  from the duplicate evaluation in the power system [240,241].  In addition to green energy sources deployed via the SG, wind farms are being im‐ plemented to utilize abundant and emission‐free natural resources and the extensive in‐ stallation of wind energy in the grid by addressing possible deterioration and instability  caused by the extensive installation of wind power into the electricity network [242]. En‐ ergy fluctuation is the swing of the energy stream on the transport line caused by concur‐ rent machine rotor angles advancing or regressing to each other, which produces high  interruptions. High‐pressure dropping, engine activation, and clearing short‐circuit prob‐ lems are all possible causes [243]. However, using a decision tree (DT)‐based technique  for defect  detection and categorization within the  half‐cycle time during power swing  [244], the DT‐algorithm was used with 21 possible characteristics derived from phasor  measurement unit (PMU) data following the Kalman filter procedure for smart relaying  in the power system [245]. The DT and graded aggregate created a probability frame for  the dynamic performance of energy systems following a disturbance [246]. The unbal‐ anced groupings that may break synchronism could be identified effectively. Although  the PMU and wide area monitoring system (WAMS) give clarity information for designers  to uncover patterns of stable and unstable operation, the low likelihood of events occur‐ ring in the power grid has resulted in a significant issue of class disparity [247]. It is diffi‐ cult to discern the characteristics of uncommon instability from significant synchro phasor  observations using traditional data analytics [248]. A systematic one‐sidedness learning  appliance for short online voltage evaluation is being developed to fully utilize enormous  electricity grid data [237]. To show the power system parameters and external data such  as meteorological information, the random matrix theory was combined with a high‐order  data‐driven model [249,250]. The eigenvalue‐based analysis method has been shown to  be effective for analyzing online transient states [251]. Based on parallel computing and  K‐nearest neighbors learning methods, a live monitor of instantaneous electromechanical  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  22  of  42  dynamics in transmission systems is given [252]. The suggested framework is used to han‐ dle the massive amount of PMU data from the power grid and extract information show‐ ing time‐varying power generation and consumption [253,254]. For an online assessment  evaluation of the (TSA) problem, the core vector machine (CVM) model is trained offline  using 24 characteristics taken from the raw data [234]. A statistical nonparametric regres‐ sion methodology based on the critical clearing time was used to examine the temporary  stability boundary of large‐scale power systems in order to assess if a steady‐state condi‐ tion can recover after a particular fault [255].  4.3.4. Electric Device State Estimation/Health Monitoring  Power  transformers  are  critical  components  for  electrical  energy  conversion,  and  their failure can result in catastrophic blackouts in the power system. As a result, research  into the life‐cycle administration of power transformers founded on precise estimates has  sparked considerable interest in a more stable and dependable power system [256]. Three  traditional methods for association rule mining, including apriori, aprioriTid, and apri‐ oriHybrid,  are  presented  to  obtain  data  about  system  processes  and  climatic  circum‐ stances into state estimate examinations [257]. For possible failure prediction, rule mining  approaches are coupled with a probabilistic graphical model. Building automation sys‐ tems (BAS) are developed and implemented in most commercial buildings to regulate the  heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system to repair optimum heat and hu‐ midity for the inhabitants [258]. FL was used to offer a unique health monitoring system  for detecting abnormal operating conditions [259]. In a power system, the number of aged  assets grows, and various failure models based on variables such as aging time or circum‐ stances have been developed. As a result, lifetime data such as service age, maintenance,  and health index were used to create a failure rate model for general electric power equip‐ ment [260]. The stratified proportional hazards model (PHM) for processing and classify‐ ing lifetime data into multi‐type frequent occurrences was created to make the most effec‐ tive use of this data [261]. This PHM technique may be used to predict possible risk issues  and health conditions [262].  4.3.5. Power Quality Monitoring  Electric PQ is the magnitude, frequency, and waveform of voltage and current in  power systems, and it is closely linked to the power grid’s safe functioning and consumer  satisfaction [263]. In the electrical grid, nonlinear, power electronics‐based loads, genera‐ tors, harmonic distortions, and unstable situations are becoming more common [264]. In  some residential areas, traditional electromechanical analog meters still work, and data  analytics‐based PQ analysis cannot be used effectively [264].  4.3.6. Topology Identification  Using information layers in the SG to address the problems posed by RESs in sup‐ plying the network is a viable solution [265]. SGs are becoming more sensitive and per‐ ceptible by improving sensors and gadgets that measure, monitor, communicate, and reg‐ ulate them [266]. Because of the unpredictability of RES and the uncertainty of the load, a  comprehensive decision based on a large quantity of data collection and analysis is re‐ quired [267]. The SCADA and WAMS systems provide intelligent grid voltage and power  data at sampling rates that are close to real‐time [268]. The network model is built using  both graph theoretical and probabilistic optimal DC power flow technologies that are low  in carbon, which is being pushed by the government using warmth pumps, photovoltaics,  electric cars, and other intelligent appliances in little voltage (LV) sharing networks to  create a greener society [269,270]. As a result, there is increasing interest in visualizing LV  networks using restricted metering and data collecting equipment [271]. A cost‐effective  option is network load profiling, based on identifying typical load profiles of LV systems.  A three‐stage network load profiling technique described by clustering, classification, and  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  23  of  42  scaling seeks to analyze the current LV networks’ capacities to accommodate the technol‐ ogies that are low in carbon [272].  4.3.7. Renewable Energy Forecasting  Wind and solar energies are expected to be the essential sources of energy for the  power  grid,  due  to  the  plentiful  and  environmentally  beneficial  generation  of  energy  [273]. Conversely, randomness and intermittent features are constant roadblocks to the  constant largescale use of RES. The precise and reliable RES predicting technique has been  the hot point worldwide to cope with such massive difficulties and to enhance dispatch  planning, maintenance scheduling, and regulation [274]. The meteorological data is uti‐ lized to categorize the days into distinct groups. Then, a neural network is qualified to  obtain wind energy forecasting data [275,276]. PV diffusion is forecasted using a data‐ driven approach. The suggested regular neural network (RNN) model is designed for ul‐ tra‐short‐term solar power forecast by deconstructing time‐series information using dis‐ tinct wavelet transform [277,278].  4.3.8. Load Forecasting  The actual short‐term load projecting such as the RES estimation is the foundation  for energy administration, system process, and market analysis [279]. Improving forecast‐ ing accuracy may result in several advantages and cost savings, as stated in [280]. The  dynamic and highly efficient electricity of marketplace is constructed on accurate forecasts  of energy consumption as customers frequently use smart networks to avoid neural net‐ work installation issues with a unique level of integration that overcomes load profile in‐ stability and uncertainty [281,282]. As part of the newest deep understanding approaches  for residential load forecasting, a recurrent neural network‐based framework with long  short‐term memory is used [283]. A hidden‐mode Markov decision model is developed  to predict user behavior in real time [284] and to analyze the latest phase of leveraging  societal mass media via cell phone applications to increase consumer interaction and load  forecasting [285]. In addition, the developing trends and obstacles examine the influence  of social activities on prosumers’ creation and consumption habits and the whole effect  on final load and network usage [286].  4.3.9. Load Profiling  Load profiling refers to the process of describing the usual behavior of electric con‐ sumption [287]. In general, demand–load forecast management and capital planning in  the time domain are expressed as an effective method of energy management [288,289].  The rationale for the best DR mechanism is to break down household energy consumption  into three portions: stable, controlled and deferred loads [290]. DR is used to encourage  consumers to modify their usage or feed‐in patterns with a stimulant of charges or eco‐ logical data [291,292]. A good consideration of the unchangeable energy used by clients is  the foundation for DR, that could relieve the distribution system’s burden in terms of tem‐ perature and voltage constraints [293]. Knowing the charging load type of electric vehicles  (EVs) is limited to be a critical phase for the constancy of power grids as they become more  widespread [294]. To extract the charge–load model of an (EV) by measuring the actual  power, Bayesian maximum probability is utilized to check the pliability of the collective  EV charging demand [295]. Increasing the acceptance of smart meters placed according to  the home standard, emphasizes the problem of enormous load profile data, which poses  problems to measurement data transfer and storage, along with important data extraction  out of the vast records [294–296].  4.3.10. Load Disaggregation  Non‐intrusive load monitoring (NILM) is a type of load that separates general load  profiles at the home standard from the power usage of specific machines [297]. NILM, out  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  24  of  42  of just one smart meter, placed in the house is effortless to accept by clients than direct  appliance monitoring framework [298]. The various types of residential electric machines  possess varying possibilities for participation in the DR program, leading to a better un‐ derstanding  of  their  customers’  behavior  and  a  more  energy‐efficient  approach  [299],  [300]. NILM early approaches were mostly centered on detecting an edge in power trans‐ mission to indicate whether a recognized device is on or off [301,302].  4.3.11. Nontechnical Lack Detection  Non‐technical lack (NTL) most often results in electrical rubbery or accounting mis‐ takes of power system companies [303,304]. Non‐cooperative game models for nontech‐ nical lack examination of micro‐distribution systems applied to AMI [305]. A report by  Northeast Group, Limited Liability Company (LLC), shows annual losses due to power  theft that were more than USD 89.3 billion worldwide [303]. Furthermore, large‐scale elec‐ tricity theft has the potential to generate dangerous power system imbalances. As a result,  many researchers are interested in developing a practical outline to identify the NTL in a  composite energy system, which is an approach constructed on the DT and backed by  suggest vector machine (SVM) [292]. DT is programmed with various parameters such as  heavy appliances, the number of people in the house, and climate circumstances to calcu‐ late the predicted rate of power used for the client at any given moment. The computed  consumption is then sent to an SVM classifier that has previously been trained on the  gathered data set to assess if the customer’s conduct is regular or fraudulent. Fraud recog‐ nition is triggered, as a difference is found between power provided by the energy system  and gathered data out of the smart meters. Therefore, the fuzzy clustering technique is  used to find abnormalities in consumption patterns [292].  4.4. Big Data Platform for Intelligent Meter  4.4.1. Smart Grids and Meter Data  SGs  are  classified  into three  parts,  which  are the  information  infrastructure  (data  stream in the smart grid’s cyber portion), computer networks (exchange control signals  and measurement data) [306], and power infrastructure (energy distribution in the phys‐ ical component of smart grids), which includes intelligent meters and energy devices such  as towers, generator and adapters [307]. IT components include modeling, analysis, prof‐ itable transactions, information exchange, and management [308]. Big data management  and analytics are the key problems in  the SG  [202]. Smart metering is causing a huge  growth in the volume of data available. For example, in the United Kingdom, approxi‐ mately 100 million data points are gathered biannual for energy companies to register for  the 27 million residential power users. Power suppliers will be essential to absorb, store,  and fully analyze 4500–9000 times more data when smart metering is perfectly installed  and operating at a 30‐min sample rate. The capacity to cope with massive data problems  in the future will be critical for several essential intelligent grid applications, including  situation awareness, state estimate, event discovery, load forecasting, and claim response  administration [309].  4.4.2. The Analytics of Meter Data  The techniques of mining data are used to analyze the meter data of a variety of ap‐ plications. These may support energy managers in uncovering knowledge and obtaining  insights from large data [310]. The majority of the research is proven via utilizing compar‐ atively modest data collections, such as claim or carry out forecasts [311], customer seg‐ mentation, pattern categorization, recommendations of power tariff, power consumption  of equipment in particular homes, and demand‐side management [312]. One of the most  recent huge data sets published was over one million data points—still far from the pre‐ dicted future [313,314].  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  25  of  42  5. Challenges  This section highlights three energy issues that remain unresolved in cloud compu‐ ting applications for smart grids: energy distribution, energy mix and battery charging.  Therefore, there is a challenge of migrating SG to cloud computing for energy manage‐ ment, information management, and cloud applications [315]. First, open issues for en‐ ergy management, similar to clouds, have a variety of heterogeneous applications. The  microgrids lead to challenging transmission of data between the cloud and the microgrids  with/without real‐time data. Therefore, it is urgent to install a virtual power stream con‐ troller to optimize the energy that can operate in any realistic and efficient mode for the  smart grid. However, to reduce a claim from micro‐grids during summit hours, it a nec‐ essary to mix and share energy storage with a cloud [316]. Second, problems for managing  information, despite cloud computing being effective at managing smart‐meter data, still  have several obstacles to overcome [317]. Solving data‐sharing issues is an excellent idea  for combining public and private clouds for cost‐effective communication in smart grids.  In addition, the integration of mobile multi‐agents in cloud computing may achieve an  effective intelligent network process, which is still a problem due to heterogeneous com‐ munication architecture. It must be able to accommodate diverse energy sources while  also allowing for large‐scale interactive collaboration via cloud services and a reduction  in cloud app delays. As in billing, users need dependable and cost‐effective services. A  single  protocol  failure  may  bring the  entire  intelligent  grid system  down  [318].  Third,  long‐term evolution (LTE) allows for better coverage and lower latency, which presents  challenges  to  existing  cloud  computing  platforms.  Platforms  that  address  some  of  the  long‐term evolution problems related to quality of service (QoS) improve with the radio  access network, network of mobile core, and datum center to supported virtualized infra‐ structural resources. Coordination and synchronized function are encouraged facilities for  monitoring,  preprocessing,  dissemination,  storage,  analysis,  and  alerting  metrics  sup‐ ported between different clouds, which is a unified and suitable interface. The world’s  most pressing concern is energy. As a backup generator, fossil fuels are frequently em‐ ployed, although their production of CO2 affects life and the environment [39]. A novel  technique called DR makes virtual generation better. Users may program their gadgets  using this approach. There are several issues with a traditional smart‐grid design (without  the cloud), which is the master–slave design that leads to a risk of DDoS [41,42]. Any error  may cause the entire system to fail. There is a limit on how many clients can be served due  to memory storage limitations, stability, and management. Furthermore, information and  data management challenges include millions of intelligent meters necessitating effective  handling of massive data. Cloud computing may provide a cost‐effective alternative for  data analytic and storage methods, as shown in Table 5 [319].  Table 5. Main features of big data in smart grids.  Category  Challenges   Heterogeneous   Energy storage systems are insufficient.  Smart grid   Not combining energy storage with the cloud and sharing it   Big data management and analytics   Data‐sharing issues   Lack of integration of multiple mobile agents with the cloud   Dependability not sufficient  Cloud compu‐  Insufficient platform Implementation for offering long‐term evolu‐ ting  tion   Unsynchronized function   Risk of DDoS   Any error leads the system to fail  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  26  of  42   Insufficient methods data analytic and storage methods   Memory storage limitations   Stability  Big data   Management   Insufficient methods for handling massive amounts of data   Information and data management challenges  6. The Framework of the Charge Controller System  Overall, after the long review illustrated in this paper, the proposed framework con‐ tains an EMS stored on the cloud computing service. This system serves three different  goals. The first is to monitor and combine different energy sources in order to obtain the  best optimized system. The second goal is to control the switches in the energy hub, and  the third goal is to manage the charging and discharging process. The system will yield  many benefits:  a. Reduce the carbon footprint by including RESs such as solar plants (photovoltaic),  WTs, and other RESs;  b. Enhance the demand power by monitoring and controlling the power balance at the  same time;  c. Introduce an intelligent system and cloud computing to the power management  field, and make the system manageable.  It is difficult to carry out an actual optimization charge controller on an intelligent  power system via cloud computing, as it is based on numerous nonlinear parameters and  contains many genuine bonds and limitations. Furthermore, because many actual charac‐ teristics are stochastic, handling a power system as a plant (dynamic systems) is problem‐ atic. Therefore, there are two suggestions: the first is to plan the optimization algorithm  for the charge controller based on the real parameters; the next is to implement this pro‐ posed algorithm as a practical system that offers optimal interventional treatment solu‐ tions for all protection requirements. Therefore, this study focuses on presenting a final  chart of the model that will consider three aspects: power demand management, RE, and  cloud computing, which will be the main contribution of the future study conducted in  Figure 9.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  27  of  42  Figure 9. The framework system model for energy sustainability.  7. Conclusions  The study summarized the recently published literature that focuses on methods to  reduce power consumption and costs. Furthermore, the recent literature discussed using  cloud  computing to  store EMSs and  managing them  intelligently.  Furthermore, it  dis‐ cussed how a well‐maintained system of power mixing (power used to charge the batter‐ ies) can lead to better environmental results by reducing the carbon footprint. Further‐ more, it discussed the recent literature that used cloud computing to store EMSs and man‐ age them intelligently. As a result of this extensive literature review, the researcher pro‐ posed a final chart of the model that will consider three aspects: battery management, RE,  and cloud computing, which will be the main contribution of the future study conducted  by the researcher.  Author  Contributions:  Drafted  the  original  manuscript,  conceptualization,  literature  analysis,  A.H.A.A.‐J.; Conceptualization and methodology, Y.I.A.M.; Investigation and supervision and val‐ idation R.S. and Z.A.A.A. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manu‐ script.  Funding: This research was funded by the Malaysian Fundamental Research Grant Scheme (FRGS)  under the code PP‐FTSM‐2021 and TAP‐K01149.  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable.  Informed Consent Statement: Not applicable.  Data Availability Statement: Not applicable.  Acknowledgments: The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Laboratory of  Faculty  of  Information  Science  and  Technology,  Universiti  Kebangsaan  Malaysia,  Malaysia  and  University of Fallujah, Iraq.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  28  of  42  Ethics and Permission to Participate: This manuscript has not been previously released and is not  now under consideration by any journal for publication.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  Abbreviations  In this review, the following abbreviations are used:  Abbreviations  The Details  VPPs  Virtual Power Plants  DC  Direct Current  CDE  Carbon Dioxide Emissions  RE  Renewable Energy  USDOE  United States Department of Energy  SG  Smart Grid  SGs  Smart Grids  SES  Smart Energy Systems  AI  Artificial Intelligence  DR  Demand Response  PS  Power Supply  DER  Distributed Energy Resource  MT  Microgrid Trading  DDoS  Distributed Denial of Service  CPU’s  Central Processing Units  SPM  Static Power Management  DPM  Dynamic Power Management  DPC  Dynamic Power Consumption  C  Coulomb  A  Amperes  V  Volts  W  Watts  WH  Watt‐Hours  GA  Genetic Algorithm  PSO  Particle Swarm Optimization  FL  Fuzzy Logic  MOA  Metaheuristic Optimization Algorithms  SoC  State of Charge  KW  kilowatt  GPR  Gaussian Process Regression  GIESBs  Grid‐Integrated Energy Storage Batteries  PVs  Photo Voltic’s  WTs  Wind Turbines  EBMS  Electric Bus Management System  ANNs  Artificial Neural Networks  EMS  Energy Management System  HMG  Hybrid Micro‐Grid  MOPSO  Multi‐Objective Particle Swarm Optimization  PMP  Pontryagin’s Minimum Principle  MEET  Maximum Efficiency Tracking  FAFC  First Access First Charge  MDP  Markov Decision Process  HEMS  Home energy management system  SHEMS  Smart Home Energy Management System  BMS  Battery Management system  MWs  Mega Watts  Energy‐Performance Trade‐off Multi‐Resource Cloud Task Scheduling Algo‐ ETMCTSA  rithm  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  29  of  42  IT  Information Technology  VMs  Virtual Machines  TWh  Tera Watt‐hours  HV  High Voltage  MV  Medium Voltage  SCADA  Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition  AMI  Advanced Metering Infrastructure  ELM  Extreme Learning Machine  SCVS  Sorting and Cumulative Voltage Summation  EVCS  Electric Vehicle Charging Station  EPS  Electric Power System  EFS  Effective Feature Set  PMU  Phasor Measurement Units  WAMS  Wide Area Monitoring System  TSA  Transient Stability Analysis  CVM  Core Vector Machine  BAS  Building Automation Systems  HVAC  Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning  PHM  Proportional Hazards Model  PQ  Power Quality  LV  Little Voltage  RNN  Regular Neural Network  NILM  Non‐Intrusive Load Monitoring  NTL  Non‐Technical Lack  LLC  Limited Liability Company  SVM  Suggest Vector Machine  DT  Decision Tree  SaaS  Service as a Service  ICT  Information and Communication Technology  PAR  Peak‐to‐Average Ratio  WECS  Wind Energy Conversion System  DCEP  Data Center Energy Productivity  TOU  Time‐Of‐Use  MASs  Multi‐Agent Systems  GHGs  Green House Gases  IoE  Internet of Energy  IaaS  Infrastructure as a Service  PaaS  Platform as a Service  LMA  Levenberg–Marquardt Algorithm  TRRA  Trust‐Region Reflective Algorithm  PUE  Power Use Effectiveness  RESs  Renewable Energy Sources  EFS  Effective Feature Set  BESSs  Battery energy storage systems  EEH  Energy‐Efficient Hybrid  ARBC  Adaptive Resonant Beam Charging  References  1. Lin, B.; Ahmad, I. Technical change, inter‐factor and inter‐fuel substitution possibilities in Pakistan: A trans‐log production  function approach. J. Clean. Prod. 2016, 126, 537–549. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.03.065.  2. Sun, C.C.; Hahn, A.; Liu, C.C. Cyber security of a power grid: State‐of‐the‐art. Int. J. Electr. Power Energy Syst. 2018, 99, 45–56.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijepes.2017.12.020.  3. Meri, A.; Hasan, M.K.; Satar, N.S.M. Success factors affecting the healthcare professionals to utilize cloud computing services.  Asia‐Pac. J. Inf. Technol. Multimed. 2017, 6, 31–42. https://doi.org/10.17576/apjitm‐2017‐0602‐04.  4. Bohani, F.A.; Yahya, S.R.; Abdullah, S.N.H.S. Microgrid Communication and Security: State‐Of‐The‐Art and Future Directions.  J. Integr. Adv. Eng. 2021, 1, 37–52. https://doi.org/10.51662/jiae.v1i1.11.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  30  of  42  5. Begovic, M.M. System protection. In Power System Stability and Control, 3rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, USA, 2017; pp. 4‐1– 4‐10. https://doi.org/10.4324/b12113.  6. Hannan, M.A.; Tan, S.Y.; Al‐Shetwi, A.Q.; Jern, K.P.; Begum, R.A. Optimized controller for renewable energy sources integra‐ tion  into  microgrid:  Functions,  constraints  and  suggestions.  J.  Clean.  Prod.  2020,  256,  120419.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcle‐ pro.2020.120419.  7. Zhang, S.; Luo, X.; Litvinov, E. Serverless computing for cloud‐based power grid emergency generation dispatch. Int. J. Electr.  Power Energy Syst. 2021, 124, 106366. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijepes.2020.106366.  8. Haque, A.N.M.M.; Ibn Saif, A.U.N.; Nguyen, P.H.; Torbaghan, S.S. Exploration of dispatch model integrating wind generators  and electric vehicles. Appl. Energy 2016, 183, 1441–1451. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.09.078.  9. Zaman, K.; el Moemen, M.A. Energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions and economic development: Evaluating alterna‐ tive  and  plausible  environmental  hypothesis  for  sustainable  growth.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2017,  74,  1119–1130.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.02.072.  10. Cai, H.; Xu, B.; Jiang, L.; Vasilakos, A.V. IoT‐Based Big Data Storage Systems in Cloud Computing: Perspectives and Challenges.  IEEE Internet Things J. 2017, 4, 75–87. https://doi.org/10.1109/JIOT.2016.2619369.  11. Bogdanov, D.; Farfan, J.; Sadovskaia, K.; Aghahosseini, A.; Child, M.; Gulagi, A.; Oyewo, A.S.; de Souza Noel Simas Barbosa,  L.; Breyer, C. Radical transformation pathway towards sustainable electricity via evolutionary steps. Nat. Commun. 2019, 10,  1077. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467‐019‐08855‐1.  12. Clack, C.T.M.; Qvist, S.A.; Apt, J.; Bazilian, M.; Brandt, A.R.; Caldeira, K.; Davis, S.J.; Diakov, V.; Handschy, M.A.; Hines, P.D.H.;  et al. Evaluation of a proposal for reliable low‐cost grid power with 100% wind, water, and solar. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2017,  114, 6722–6727. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1610381114.  13. Parag,  Y.;  Sovacool,  B.K.  Electricity  market  design  for  the  prosumer  era.  Nat.  Energy  2016,  1,  16032.  https://doi.org/10.1038/nenergy.2016.32.  14. Xu, F.; Wu, W.; Zhao, F.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wu, R.; Zhang, T.; Wen, Y.; Fan, Y.; Jiang, S. A micro‐market module design for  university  demand‐side  management  using  self‐crossover  genetic  algorithms.  Appl.  Energy  2019,  252,  113456.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2019.113456.  15. Chen, K.; Lin, J.; Song, Y. Trading strategy optimization for a prosumer in continuous double auction‐based peer‐to‐peer mar‐ ket: A prediction‐integration model. Appl. Energy 2019, 242, 1121–1133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2019.03.094.  16. Song, Y.; Ding, Y.; Siano, P.; Meinrenken, C.; Zheng, M.; Strbac, G. Optimization methods and advanced applications for smart  energy systems considering grid‐interactive demand response. Appl. Energy 2020, 259, 113994. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apen‐ ergy.2019.113994.  17. Li, W.; Assaad, M. Matrix Exponential Learning Schemes with Low Informational Exchange. IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 2019,  67, 3140–3153. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSP.2019.2912875.  18. Li, W.; Rentemeister, M.; Badeda, J.; Jöst, D.; Schulte, D.; Sauer, D.U. Digital twin for battery systems: Cloud battery management  system  with  online  state‐of‐charge  and  state‐of‐health  estimation.  J.  Energy  Storage  2020,  30,  101557.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101557.  19. Dai, H.; Jiang, B.; Hu, X.; Lin, X.; Wei, X.; Pecht, M. Advanced battery management strategies for a sustainable energy future:  Multilayer  design  concepts  and  research  trends.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2021,  138,  110480.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2020.110480.  20. Ling, Z.; Luo, M.; Song, J.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Z.; Fang, X. A fast‐heat battery system using the heat released from detonated  supercooled phase change materials. Energy 2021, 219, 119496. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2020.119496.  21. Sharma, S.; Kotturu, P.K.; Narooka, P.C. Implication of IoT Components and Energy Management Monitoring. Swarm Intell.  Optim. 2020, 49–65. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119778868.ch4.  22. Zhang, Q.; Fang, W.; Xiong, M.; Liu, Q.; Wu, J.; Xia, P. Adaptive Resonant Beam Charging for Intelligent Wireless Power Trans‐ fer. IEEE Internet Things J. 2019, 6, 1160–1172. https://doi.org/10.1109/JIOT.2018.2867457.  23. Mehrjerdi, H. Resilience oriented vehicle‐to‐home operation based on battery swapping mechanism. Energy 2021, 218, 119528.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2020.119528.  24. Li, S.; Li, J.; Wang, H. Big data driven Lithium‐ion battery modeling method: A cyber‐physical system approach. In Proceedings  of the 2019 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Cyber Physical Systems (ICPS), Taipei, Taiwan, 6–9 May 2019; pp. 161– 166. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICPHYS.2019.8780152.  25. Kouache, I.; Sebaa, M.; Bey, M.; Allaoui, T.; Denai, M. A new approach to demand response in a microgrid based on coordination  control between smart meter and distributed superconducting magnetic energy storage unit. J. Energy Storage 2020, 32, 101748.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101748.  26. Piovesan, N.; Fernandez Gambin, A.; Miozzo, M.; Rossi, M.; Dini, P. Energy sustainable paradigms and methods for future  mobile networks: A survey. Comput. Commun. 2018, 119, 101–117. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comcom.2018.01.005.  27. Ali, A.; Mahmoud, K.; Lehtonen, M. Maximizing Hosting Capacity of Uncertain Photovoltaics by Coordinated Management of  OLTC,  VAr  Sources  and  Stochastic  EVs.  Int.  J.  Electr.  Power  Energy  Syst.  2021,  127,  106627.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijepes.2020.106627.  28. Faisal, M.; Hannan, M.A.; Ker, P.J.; Rahman, M.S.A.; Begum, R.A.; Mahlia, T.M.I. Particle swarm optimised fuzzy controller for  charging–discharging  and  scheduling  of  battery  energy  storage  system  in  MG  applications.  Energy  Rep.  2020,  6,  215–228.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyr.2020.12.007.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  31  of  42  29. Abdulmula, A.; Sopian, K.; Haw, L.C.; Fazlizan, A. Performance evaluation of standalone double axis solar tracking system  with maximum light detection MLD for telecommunication towers in Malaysia. Int. J. Power Electron. Drive Syst. 2019, 10, 444– 453. https://doi.org/10.11591/ijpeds.v10n1.pp444‐453.  30. Kasturi, K.; Nayak, C.K.; Nayak, M.R. Analysis of photovoltaic & battery energy storage system impacts on electric distribution  system efficacy. Int. J. Electr. Eng. Inform. 2020, 12, 1001–1015. https://doi.org/10.15676/ijeei.2020.12.4.18.  31. Hannan, M.A.; Islam, N.N.; Mohamed, A.; Lipu, M.S.H.; Ker, P.J.; Rashid, M.M.; Shareef, H. Artificial intelligent based damping  controller  optimization  for  the  multi‐machine  power  system:  A  review.  IEEE  Access  2018,  6,  39574–39594.  https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2018.2855681.  32. Choudhary, A.; Govil, M.C.; Singh, G.; Awasthi, L.K.; Pilli, E.S.; Kapil, D. A critical survey of live virtual machine migration  techniques. J. Cloud Comput. 2017, 6, 23. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13677‐017‐0092‐1.  33. Nan, S.; Zhou, M.; Li, G. Optimal residential community demand response scheduling in smart grid. Appl. Energy 2018, 210,  1280–1289. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.06.066.  34. Ben Ghorbel, M.; Hamdaoui, B.; Guizani, M.; Mohamed, A. Long‐Term Power Procurement Scheduling Method for Smart‐Grid  Powered Communication Systems. IEEE Trans. Wirel. Commun. 2018, 17, 2882–2892. https://doi.org/10.1109/TWC.2018.2803181.  35. Du, Y.F.; Jiang, L.; Li, Y.; Wu, Q. A robust optimization approach for demand side scheduling considering uncertainty of man‐ ually operated appliances. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018, 9, 743–755. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2564159.  36. Rahman, A.A.A.; Osman, M.S.; Ng, R.; Abdullah, S.; Rahman, M.A.A.; Mohamad, E.; Rahman, A.A. Integration of simulation  technologies with physical system of reconfigurable material handling. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol. 2018, 12, 139–152, 2018.  37. Rehmani, M.H.; Reisslein, M.; Rachedi, A.; Erol‐Kantarci, M.; Radenkovic, M. Integrating Renewable Energy Resources into the  Smart Grid: Recent Developments in Information and Communication Technologies. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2018, 14, 2814– 2825. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2018.2819169.  38. Hanif, I. Impact of fossil fuels energy consumption, energy policies, and urban sprawl on carbon emissions in East Asia and the  Pacific: A panel investigation. Energy Strategy Rev. 2018, 21, 16–24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.esr.2018.04.006.  39. Kim, H.; Kim, Y.J.; Yang, K.; Thottan, M. Cloud‐based demand response for smart grid: Architecture and distributed algorithms.  In Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Smart Grid Communications (SmartGridComm), Brussels, Bel‐ gium, 17–20 October 2011; pp. 398–403. https://doi.org/10.1109/SmartGridComm.2011.6102355.  40. Menshari, A.; Salehi, G.; Ghiamy, M. A Novel Technique for Multiple Microgrids Planning by Considering Demand Response  Programming and Social Welfare Enhancement in Power Market. Rev. Publicando 2018. Available online: https://www.revista‐ publicando.org/revista/index.php/crv/article/view/1381 (accessed on 16 August 2021).  41. Yang, C.T.; Chen, W.S.; Huang, K.L.; Liu, J.C.; Hsu, W.H.; Hsu, C.H. Implementation of smart power management and service  system on cloud computing. In Proceedings of the IEEE 9th International Conference on Ubiquitous Intelligence and Compu‐ ting and IEEE 9th International Conference on Autonomic and Trusted Computing, Fukuoka, Japan, 4–7 September 2012; pp.  924–929. https://doi.org/10.1109/UIC‐ATC.2012.160.  42. Yaghmaee, M.H.; Moghaddassian, M.; Leon‐Garcia, A. Autonomous Two‐Tier Cloud‐Based Demand Side Management Ap‐ proach with Microgrid. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 1109–1120. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2016.2619070.  43. Pacheco, L.A.B.; Gondim, J.J.C.; Barreto, P.A.S.; Alchieri, E. Evaluation of distributed denial of service threat in the internet of  things. In Proceedings of the 2016 IEEE 15th International Symposium on Network Computing and Applications (NCA), Cam‐ bridge, MA, USA, 31 October–2 November 2016; pp. 89–92. https://doi.org/10.1109/NCA.2016.7778599.  44. Tahir, M.F.; Haoyong, C.; Khan, A.; Javed, M.S.; Laraik, N.A.; Mehmood, K. Optimizing size of variable renewable energy  sources by incorporating energy storage and demand response. IEEE Access 2019, 7, 103115–103126. https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2019.2929297.  45. Munshi, A.A.; Mohamed, Y.A.R.I. Big data framework for analytics in smart grids. Electr. Power Syst. Res. 2017, 151, 369–380.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsr.2017.06.006.  46. Priya,  E.S.;  Suseendran,  G.  Cloud  computing  and  big  data:  A  comprehensive  analysis.  J.  Crit.  Rev.  2020,  7,  185–189.  https://doi.org/10.31838/jcr.07.14.32.  47. Islam,  M.;  Reza,  S.  The  Rise  of  Big  Data  and  Cloud  Computing.  Internet  Things  Cloud  Comput.  2019,  7,  45.  https://doi.org/10.11648/j.iotcc.20190702.12.  48. Antunes, C.H.; Soares, A.; Gomes, Á. An energy management system for residential demand response based on multiobjective  optimization. In Proceedings of the 2016 IEEE Smart Energy Grid Engineering (SEGE), Oshawa, ON, Canada, 21–24 August  2016; pp. 90–94. https://doi.org/10.1109/SEGE.2016.7589506.  49. Martinez, C.M.; Hu, X.; Cao, D.; Velenis, E.; Gao, B.; Wellers, M. Energy Management in Plug‐in Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Recent  Progress  and  a  Connected  Vehicles  Perspective.  IEEE  Trans.  Veh.  Technol.  2017,  66,  4534–4549.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TVT.2016.2582721.  50. Asadinejad, A.; Tomsovic, K. Optimal use of incentive and price based demand response to reduce costs and price volatility.  Electr. Power Syst. Res. 2017, 144, 215–223. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsr.2016.12.012.  51. Jordehi, A.R. Optimisation of demand response in electric power systems, a review. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2019, 103, 308– 319. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2018.12.054.  52. Rieger, A.; Thummert, R.; Fridgen, G.; Kahlen, M.; Ketter, W. Estimating the benefits of cooperation in a residential microgrid:  A data‐driven approach. Appl. Energy 2016, 180, 130–141. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.07.105.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  32  of  42  53. Siano, P.; Sarno, D. Assessing the benefits of residential demand response in a real time distribution energy market. Appl. Energy  2016, 161, 533–551. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2015.10.017.  54. Marzband, M.; Alavi, H.; Ghazimirsaeid, S.S.; Uppal, H.; Fernando, T. Optimal energy management system based on stochastic  approach for a home Microgrid with integrated responsive load demand and energy storage. Sustain. Cities Soc. 2017, 28, 256– 264. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2016.09.017.  55. Amrollahi, M.H.; Bathaee, S.M.T. Techno‐economic optimization of hybrid photovoltaic/wind generation together with energy  storage  system  in  a  stand‐alone  micro‐grid  subjected  to  demand  response.  Appl.  Energy  2017,  202,  66–77.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.05.116.  56. Korkas, C.D.; Baldi, S.; Michailidis, I.; Kosmatopoulos, E.B. Occupancy‐based demand response and thermal comfort opti‐mi‐ zation  in  microgrids  with  renewable  energy  sources  and  energy  storage.  Appl.  Energy  2016,  163,  93–104.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2015.10.140.  57. Honarmand, M.E.; Hosseinnezhad, V.; Ghazizadeh, M.S.; Wang, F.; Siano, P. A peak‐load‐reduction‐based procedure to man‐ age distribution network expansion by applying process‐oriented costing of incoming components. Energy 2019, 186, 115852.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2019.115852.  58. Huang, W.; Zhang, N.; Kang, C.; Li, M.; Huo, M. From demand response to integrated demand response: Review and pro‐spect  of research and application. Prot. Control. Mod. Power Syst. 2019, 4. https://doi.org/10.1186/s41601‐019‐0126‐4.  59. Robert, F.C.; Sisodia, G.S.; Gopalan, S. A critical review on the utilization of storage and demand response for the imple‐men‐ tation of renewable energy microgrids. Sustain. Cities Soc. 2018, 40, 735–745. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2018.04.008.  60. U.S.  Energy  Information  Administration  (EIA).  International  Energy  Outlook  2016;  2016;  Volume  0484.  Available  online:  http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/ieo/(accessed on 16 August 2021).  61. Kober, T.; Schiffer, H.W.; Densing, M.; Panos, E. Global energy perspectives to 2060—WEC’s World Energy Scenarios 2019.  Energy Strategy Rev. 2020, 31, 100523. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.esr.2020.100523.  62. Ahmad, T.; Zhang, D. A critical review of comparative global historical energy consumption and future demand: The story told  so far. Energy Rep. 2020, 6, 1973–1991. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyr.2020.07.020.  63. Ogheneovo  Johnson,  D.  Issues  of  Power  Quality  in  Electrical  Systems.  Int.  J.  Energy  Power  Eng.  2016,  5,  148.  https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijepe.20160504.12.  64. Elshrkawey, M.; Elsherif, S.M.; Wahed, M.E. An Enhancement Approach for Reducing the Energy Consumption in Wireless  Sensor Networks. J. King Saud Univ.—Comput. Inf. Sci. 2018, 30, 259–267. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jksuci.2017.04.002.  65. Mohammed, M.A.; Mohammed, I.A.; Hasan, R.A.; Tapus, N.; Ali, A.H.; Hammood, O.A. Green Energy Sources: Issues and  Challenges. In Proceedings of the 2019 18th RoEduNet Conference: Networking in Education and Research (RoEduNet), Galati,  Romania, 10–12 October 2019. https://doi.org/10.1109/ROEDUNET.2019.8909595.  66. Valentini, G.L.; Lassonde, W.; Khan, S.U.; Min‐Allah, N.; Madani, S.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, L.; Wang, L.; Ghani, N.; Kolodziej, J.; et al.  An  overview  of  energy  efficiency  techniques  in  cluster  computing  systems.  Clust.  Comput.  2013,  16,  3–15.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10586‐011‐0171‐x.  67. Mondal, H.K.; Gade, S.H.; Kishore, R.; Kaushik, S.; Deb, S. Power efficient router architecture for wireless Network‐on‐Chip. In  Proceedings of the 2016 17th International Symposium on Quality Electronic Design (ISQED), Santa Clara, CA, USA, 15–16  March 2016; pp. 227–233. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISQED.2016.7479205.  68. Al‐Dulaimy, A.; Itani, W.; Zekri, A.; Zantout, R. Power management in virtualized data centers: State of the art. J. Cloud Comput.  2016, 5, 6. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13677‐016‐0055‐y.  69. Fountoulakis, E.; Pappas, N.; Ephremides, A. Dynamic Power Control for Time‐Critical Networking with Heterogeneous Traf‐ fic. 2020. Available online: http://arxiv.org/abs/2011.04448 (accessed on 16 August 2021).  70. Holz, C.; Pusch, A. Do powerbanks deliver what they advertise? Measuring voltage, current, power, energy and charge of  powerbanks with an Arduino. Phys. Educ. 2020, 55, 025013. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361‐6552/ab630c.  71. Cheng, C.H.; Bai, Y.W. An automatically peak‐shift control design for charging and discharging of the battery in an ultrabook.  IEICE Trans. Inf. Syst. 2016, E99D, 1108–1116. https://doi.org/10.1587/transinf.2015EDP7297.  72. Chen, Z.; Shu, X.; Sun, M.; Shen, J.; Xiao, R. Charging strategy design of lithium‐ion batteries for energy loss minimization based  on minimum principle. In Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE Transportation Electrification Conference and Expo, Asia‐Pacific (ITEC  Asia‐Pacific), Harbin, China, 7–10 August 2017; pp. 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1109/ITEC‐AP.2017.8080833.  73. Hadian, E.; Akbari, H.; Farzinfar, M.; Saeed, S. Optimal allocation of electric vehicle charging stations with adopted smart  charging/discharging schedule. IEEE Access 2020, 8, 196908–196919. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2020.3033662.  74. Vallejo‐Huanga, D.; Proaño, J.; Morillo, P.; Ortega, H. Fault‐tolerant model based on fuzzy control for mobile devices. Commun.  Comput. Inf. Sci. 2019, 895, 488–499. https://doi.org/10.1007/978‐3‐030‐05532‐5_36.  75. Qin, P.; Sun, J.; Yang, X.; Wang, Q. Battery thermal management system based on the forced‐air convection: A review. eTrans‐ portation 2021, 7, 100097. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.etran.2020.100097.  76. Wu, B.; Widanage, W.D.; Yang, S.; Liu, X. Battery digital twins: Perspectives on the fusion of models, data and artificial intelli‐ gence for smart battery management systems. Energy AI 2020, 1, 100016. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyai.2020.100016.  77. Gharehpetian, G.B.; Agah, S.M.M. Distributed Generation Systems: Design, Operation and Grid Integration; Butterworth‐Heine‐ mann: Oxford, UK, 2017.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  33  of  42  78. Zheng,  Y.;  He,  Y.B.;  Qian,  K.;  Li,  B.;  Wang,  X.;  Li,  J.;  Miao,  C.;  Kang,  F.  Effects  of  state  of  charge  on  the  degradation  of  LiFePO4/graphite  batteries  during  accelerated  storage  test.  J.  Alloys  Compd. 2015,  639,  406–414.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jall‐ com.2015.03.169.  79. Hussein, W.A.; Abdullah, S.N.H.S.; Sahran, S. The Patch‐Levy‐Based Bees Algorithm Applied to Dynamic Optimization Prob‐ lems. Discret. Dyn. Nat. Soc. 2017, 2017, 5678393. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5678393.  80. Das, A.; Ni, Z. A computationally efficient optimization approach for battery systems in islanded microgrid. IEEE Trans. Smart  Grid 2018, 9, 6489–6499. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2017.2713947.  81. Lipu, M.S.H.; Hannan, M.A.; Hussain, A.; Ayob, A.; Saad, M.H.M.; Muttaqi, K.M. State of charge estimation in lithium‐ion  batteries: A neural network optimization approach. Electronics 2020, 9, 1546. https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics9091546.  82. Cuadras, A.; Miró, P.; Ovejas, V.J.; Estrany, F. Entropy generation model to estimate battery ageing. J. Energy Storage 2020, 32.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101740.  83. Lin, Q.; Wang, J.; Xiong, R.; Shen, W.; He, H. Towards a smarter battery management system: A critical review on optimal  charging methods of lithium ion batteries. Energy 2019, 183, 220–234. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2019.06.128.  84. Niri, M.F.; Bui, T.M.N.; Dinh, T.Q.; Hosseinzadeh, E.; Yu, T.F.; Marco, J. Remaining energy estimation for lithium‐ion batteries  via  Gaussian  mixture  and  Markov  models  for  future  load  prediction.  J.  Energy  Storage  2020,  28,  101271.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101271.  85. Xiong, R.; Pan, Y.; Shen, W.; Li, H.; Sun, F. Lithium‐ion battery aging mechanisms and diagnosis method for automotive appli‐ cations:  Recent  advances  and  perspectives.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2020,  131,  110048.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2020.110048.  86. Sahinoglu, G.O.; Pajovic, M.; Sahinoglu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Orlik, P.V.; Wada, T. Battery State‐of‐Charge Estimation Based on Regu‐ lar/Recurrent  Gaussian  Process  Regression.  IEEE  Trans.  Ind.  Electron.  2018,  65,  4311–4321.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TIE.2017.2764869.  87. Aravindan, R.; Thirugnanasambantham, K.G.; Kumar, T.A.; Viswaraj, M.N.; Suthershan, K. A novel integration of battery sys‐ tem  in  automotive  vehicle.  Proc.  Int.  Conf.  Recent  Trends  Mech.  Mater.  Eng.  Icrtmme  2019  2020,  2283,  020051.  https://doi.org/10.1063/5.0024924.  88. Boulmrharj, S.; NaitMalek, Y.; Elmouatamid, A.; Bakhouya, M.; Ouladsine, R.; Zine‐Dine, K.; Khanidar, M.; Siniti, M. Battery  characterization  and  dimensioning  approaches  for  micro‐grid  systems.  Energies  2019,  12,  1305.  https://doi.org/10.3390/en12071305.  89. Campana, P.E.; Cioccolanti, L.; François, B.; Jurasz, J.; Zhang, Y.; Varini, M.; Stridh, B.; Yan, J. Li‐ion batteries for peak shaving,  price arbitrage, and photovoltaic self‐consumption in commercial buildings: A Monte Carlo Analysis. Energy Convers. Manag.  2021, 234, 113889. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enconman.2021.113889.  90. Al Essa, M.J.M. Power management of grid‐integrated energy storage batteries with intermittent renewables. J. Energy Storage  2020, 31, 101762. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101762.  91. Moussa, S.; Ghorbal, M.J.B.; Slama‐Belkhodja, I. Bus voltage level choice for standalone residential DC nanogrid. Sustain. Cities  Soc. 2019, 46, 101431. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2019.101431.  92. Al‐Ogaili, A.S.; Ramasamy, A.; Hashim, T.J.T.; Al‐Masri, A.N.; Hoon, Y.; Jebur, M.N.; Verayiah, R.; Marsadek, M. Estimation of  the energy consumption of battery driven electric buses by integrating digital elevation and longitudinal dynamic models:  Malaysia as a case study. Appl. Energy 2020, 280, 115873. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2020.115873.  93. Masih, A.; Verma, H.K. Renewable Hybrid Battery Energy Management System Using ANN Controller. 2020. Available online:  https://easychair.org/publications/preprint_download/sMG2 (accessed on 16 August 2021).  94. Igbinovia, F.O.; Krupka, J.; Hajek, P.; Muller, Z.; Tlusty, J. Electricity storage in internet of renewable energy (IoRE) domain for  sustainable smart cities. In Proceedings of the 2020 21st International Scientific Conference on Electric Power Engineering (EPE),  Prague, Czech Republic, 19–21 October 2020. https://doi.org/10.1109/EPE51172.2020.9269241.  95. Lilis, G.; Conus, G.; Asadi, N.; Kayal, M. Towards the next generation of intelligent building: An assessment study of current  automation  and  future  IoT  based  systems  with  a  proposal  for  transitional  design.  Sustain.  Cities  Soc.  2017,  28,  473–481.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2016.08.019.  96. Miglani, A.; Kumar, N.; Chamola, V.; Zeadally, S. Blockchain for Internet of Energy management: Review, solutions, and chal‐ lenges. Comput. Commun. 2020, 151, 395–418. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comcom.2020.01.014.  97. Gunasekaran, M.; Ismail, H.M.; Chokkalingam, B.; Mihet‐Popa, L.; Padmanaban, S. Energy management strategy for rural com‐ munities’ DC micro grid power system structure with maximum penetration of renewable energy sources. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8,  585. https://doi.org/10.3390/app8040585.  98. Indragandhi, V.; Logesh, R.; Subramaniyaswamy, V.; Vijayakumar, V.; Siarry, P.; Uden, L. Multi‐objective optimization and  energy management in renewable based AC/DC microgrid. Comput. Electr. Eng. 2018, 70, 179–198. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.com‐ peleceng.2018.01.023.  99. DeSando, M. Universal Programmable Battery Charger with Optional Battery Management System; California Polytechnic State Uni‐ versity: San Luis Obispo, CA, USA, 2015.  100. Setore, Y.D. Modeling and Design of a Level‐2 Onboard Lithium‐ion Battery Charging System for ECADO Four‐Wheel Electric Vehicle;  Adama Science and Technology University: Adama, Ethiopia, 2020.  101. Edpuganti, A.; Khadkikar, V.; Zeineldin, H.; el Moursi, M.S.; al Hosani, M. Comparison of Peak Power Tracking Based Electric  Power System Architectures for CubeSats. IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl. 2021, 57, 2758–2768. https://doi.org/10.1109/TIA.2021.3055449.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  34  of  42  102. Choi, J.Y.; Choi, I.S.; Ahn, G.H.; Won, D.J. Advanced power sharing method to improve the energy efficiency of multiple battery  energy storages system. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018, 9, 1292–1300. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2582842.  103. Mansour, O.M.A.A. Determining the Power and Energy Capacity of a Battery Energy Storage System Utilizing a Smoothing Feeder  Preeder Profile too Accommodate High Photo Accommodate High Photovoltaic Penetration on a Distribution Feeder; Portland State Uni‐ versity: Portland, OR, USA, 2016.  104. Guo, Y.; Yang, Z.; Liu, K.; Zhang, Y.; Feng, W. A compact and optimized neural network approach for battery state‐of‐charge  estimation of energy storage system. Energy 2021, 219, 119529. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2020.119529.  105. Zavos, I. Design and Modeling of Switching Battery Management System for Solar‐Powered Storage Installations; Eindhoven University  of Technology: Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 2020.   management system with heat  106. Li, Y.; Guo, H.; Qi, F.; Guo, Z.; Li, M.; Tjernberg, L.B. Investigation on liquid cold plate thermal pipes  for  LiFePO4  battery  pack  in  electric  vehicles.  Appl.  Therm.  Eng.  2021,  185,  116382.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ap‐ plthermaleng.2020.116382.  107. Rogers, D.J.; Aslett, L.J.M.; Troffaes, M.C.M. Modelling of modular battery systems under cell capacity variation and degrada‐ tion. Appl. Energy 2021, 283, 116360. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2020.116360.  108. Asgher, U.; Babar Rasheed, M.; Al‐Sumaiti, A.S.; Ur‐Rahman, A.; Ali, I.; Alzaidi, A.; Alamri, A. Smart energy optimization using  heuristic  algorithm  in  smart  grid  with  integration  of  solar  energy  sources.  Energies  2018,  11,  3494.  https://doi.org/10.3390/en11123494.  109. Kure, E.H.H.; Maharjan, S.; Gjessing, S.; Zhang, Y. Optimal battery size for a green base station in a smart grid with a renewable  energy source. In Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Smart Grid Communications (SmartGridComm),  Dresden, Germany, 23–27 October 2017; pp. 115–121. https://doi.org/10.1109/SmartGridComm.2017.8340658.  110. Boulmrharj, S.; Ouladsine, R.; NaitMalek, Y.; Bakhouya, M.; Zine‐dine, K.; Khaidar, M.; Siniti, M. Online battery state‐of‐charge  estimation methods in micro‐grid systems. J. Energy Storage 2020, 30, 101518. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101518.  111. Matthiesen, B.; Zappone, A.; Jorswieck, E.A.; Debbah, M. Deep learning for real‐time energy‐efficient power control in mobile  networks. In Proceedings of the 2019 IEEE 20th International Workshop on Signal Processing Advances in Wireless Communi‐ cations (SPAWC), Cannes, France, 2–5 July 2019; pp. 1–5. https://doi.org/10.1109/SPAWC.2019.8815516.  112. Duman, A.C.; Erden, H.S.; Gönül, Ö.; Güler, Ö. A home energy management system with an integrated smart thermostat for  demand response in smart grids. Sustain. Cities Soc. 2021, 65, 102639.  113. Jayaprakash, M.; Kavitha, D.; Ramkumar, M.S.; Balachander, K.; Krishnan, M.S. Achieving efficient and secure data acquisition  for cloud‐supported internet of things in grid connected solar, wind and battery systems. Math. Comput. For. Nat. Resour. Sci.  2019, 11, 144–155.  114. Alarifi, A.; Dubey, K.; Amoon, M.; Altameem, T.; Abd El‐Samie, F.E.; Altameem, A.; Sharma, S.C.; Nasr, A.A. Energy‐Efficient  Hybrid  Framework  for  Green  Cloud  Computing.  IEEE  Access  2020,  8,  115356–115369.  https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2020.3002184.  115. Pusceddu, E.; Zakeri, B.; Gissey, G.C. Synergies between energy arbitrage and fast frequency response for battery energy storage  systems. Applied Energy 2021, 283, 116274. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2020.116274.  116. Vilsen,  S.B.;  Stroe,  D.‐I.  Battery  state‐of‐health  modelling  by  multiple  linear  regression.  J.  Clean.  Prod.  2021,  290,  125700.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2020.125700.  117. Bitzer, B.; Gebretsadik, E.S. Ensuring future clean electrical energy supply through cloud computing.In Proceedings of the 2015  International  Conference  on  Clean  Electrical  Power  (ICCEP),  Taormina,  Italy,  16–18  June  2015;  pp.  155–159.  https://doi.org/10.1109/ICCEP.2015.7177616.  118. Yang, S.; He, R.; Zhang, Z.; Cao, Y.; Gao, X.; Liu, X. CHAIN: Cyber Hierarchy and Interactional Network Enabling Digital  Solution for Battery Full‐Lifespan Management. Matter 2020, 3, 27–41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matt.2020.04.015.  119. Sui, Y.; Yao, F. Application of Embedded Network Distributed Network in Student Physical Health Management Platform.  Microprocess. Microsyst. 2021, 80, 103576. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micpro.2020.103576.  120. Teng, J.H.; Luan, S.W.; Lee, D.J.; Huang, Y.Q. Optimal charging/discharging scheduling of battery storage systems for distribu‐ tion  systems  interconnected  with  sizeable  PV  generation  systems.  IEEE  Trans.  Power  Syst.  2013,  28,  1425–1433.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2012.2230276.  121. Hernández, J.C.; Ruiz‐Rodriguez, F.J.; Jurado, F. Technical impact of photovoltaic‐distributed generation on radial distribution  systems:  Stochastic  simulations  for  a  feeder  in  Spain.  Int.  J.  Electr.  Power  Energy  Syst.  2013,  50,  25–32.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijepes.2013.02.010.  122. Aktas, A.; Erhan, K.; Ozdemir, S.; Ozdemir, E. Experimental investigation of a new smart energy management algorithm for a  hybrid  energy  storage  system  in  smart  grid  applications.  Electr.  Power  Syst.  Res.  2017,  144,  185–196.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsr.2016.11.022.  123. Howell, S.; Rezgui, Y.; Hippolyte, J.L.; Jayan, B.; Li, H. Towards the next generation of smart grids: Semantic and holonic multi‐ agent  management  of  distributed  energy  resources.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2017,  77,  193–214.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.03.107.  124. Shawon, M.H.; Muyeen, S.M.; Ghosh, A.; Islam, S.M.; Baptista, M.S. Multi‐agent systems in ICT enabled smart grid: A status  update  on  technology  framework  and  applications.  IEEE  Access  2019,  7,  97959–97973.  https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2019.2929577.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  35  of  42  125. Khan, M.W.; Wang, J.; Xiong, L.; Ma, M. Modelling and optimal management of distributed microgrid using multi‐agent sys‐ tems. Sustain. Cities Soc. 2018, 41, 154–169. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2018.05.018.  126. Kong, X.; Liu, D.; Xiao, J.; Wang, C. A multi‐agent optimal bidding strategy in microgrids based on artificial immune system.  Energy 2019, 189, 116154. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2019.116154.  127. Espín‐Sarzosa, D.; Palma‐Behnke, R.; Núñez‐Mata, O. Energy management systems for microgrids: Main existing trends in  centralized control architectures. Energies 2020, 13, 547. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13030547.  128. Abdi, H.; Beigvand, S.D.; la Scala, M. A review of optimal power flow studies applied to smart grids and microgrids. Renew.  Sustain. Energy Rev. 2017, 71, 742–766. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2016.12.102.  129. Van Vuuren, D.P.; Stehfest, E.; Gernaat, D.E.; Doelman, J.C.; Van den Berg, M.; Harmsen, M.; de Boar, H.S.; Bouwman, L.F.;   green growth para‐ Daioglou, V.; Edelenbosch, O.Y.; et al. Energy, land‐use and greenhouse gas emissions trajectories under a digm. Glob. Environ. Chang. 2017, 42, 237–250. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2016.05.008.  130. Ghadi, M.J.; Ghavidel, S.; Rajabi, A.; Azizivahed, A.; Li, L.; Zhang, J. A review on economic and technical operation of active  distribution systems. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2019, 104, 38–53. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2019.01.010.  131. Mariam, L.; Basu, M.; Conlon, M.F. Microgrid: Architecture, policy and future trends. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2016, 64, 477– 489. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2016.06.037.  132. Farrokhabadi, M.; Solanki, B.V.; Canizares, C.A.; Bhattacharya, K.; Koenig, S.; Sauter, P.S.; Leibfried, T.; Hohmann, S. Energy  Storage in Microgrids: Compensating for Generation and Demand Fluctuations while Providing Ancillary Services. IEEE Power  Energy Mag. 2017, 15, 81–91. https://doi.org/10.1109/MPE.2017.2708863.  133. Adefarati, T.; Bansal, R.C. Energizing Renewable Energy Systems and Distribution Generation. Pathw. A Smarter Power System.  2019, 29–65. https://doi.org/10.1016/b978‐0‐08‐102592‐5.00002‐8.  134. Chong, W.T.; Muzammil, W.K.; Ong, H.C.; Sopian, K.; Gwani, M.; Fazlizan, A.; Poh, S.C. Performance analysis of the deflector  integrated cross axis wind turbine. Renew. Energy 2019, 138, 675–690. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2019.02.005.  135. Tabatabaeikia, S.; Ghazali, N.N.B.N.; Chong, W.T.; Shahizare, B.; Izadyar, N.; Esmaeilzadeh, A.; Fazlizan, A. Computational  and experimental optimization of the exhaust air energy recovery wind turbine generator. Energy Convers. Manag. 2016, 126,  862–874. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enconman.2016.08.039.  136. Balducci, P.J.; Alam, M.J.E.; Hardy, T.D.; Wu, D. Assigning value to energy storage systems at multiple points in an electrical  grid. Energy Environ. Sci. 2018, 11, 1926–1944. https://doi.org/10.1039/c8ee00569a.  137. Katsanevakis, M.; Stewart, R.A.; Lu, J. Aggregated applications and benefits of energy storage systems with application‐specific  control methods: A review. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2017, 75, 719–741. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2016.11.050.  138. Rosman, M.R.M. The Role of Business Processes in Influencing the Decision Support Capabilities of Enterprise Content Man‐ agement  System  (ECMS):  Towards  a  Framework.  Asia‐Pac.  J.  Inf.  Technol.  Multimed.  2020,  9,  58–68.  https://doi.org/10.17576/apjitm‐2020‐0901‐05.  139. Hartmann, B.; Táczi, I.; Talamon, A.; Vokony, I. Island mode operation in intelligent microgrid—Extensive analysis of a case  study. Int. Trans. Electr. Energy Systems. 2021, 31, 12950. https://doi.org/10.1002/2050‐7038.12950.  140. Nosratabadi, S.M.; Hooshmand, R.A.; Gholipour, E. A comprehensive review on microgrid and virtual power plant concepts  employed  for  distributed  energy  resources  scheduling  in  power  systems.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2017,  67,  341–363.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2016.09.025.  141. Isa, N.M.; Tan, C.W.; Yatim, A.H.M. A comprehensive review of cogeneration system in a microgrid: A perspective from archi‐ tecture and operating system. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2018, 81, 2236–2263. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.06.034.  142. Hirsch, A.; Parag, Y.; Guerrero, J. Microgrids: A review of technologies, key drivers, and outstanding issues. Renew. Sustain.  Energy Rev. 2018, 90, 402–411. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2018.03.040.  143. Kalt, G.; Wiedenhofer, D.; Görg, C.; Haberl, H. Conceptualizing energy services: A review of energy and well‐being along the  Energy Service Cascade. Energy Res. Soc. Sci. 2019, 53, 47–58. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.erss.2019.02.026.  144. Su, Y.W. Residential electricity demand in Taiwan: Consumption behavior and rebound effect. Energy Policy 2019, 124, 36–45.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enpol.2018.09.009.  145. Li, C.; Song, Y.; Kaza, N. Urban form and household electricity consumption: A multilevel study. Energy Build. 2018, 158, 181– 193. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.10.007.  146. Srivastava, C.; Yang, Z.; Jain, R.K. Understanding the adoption and usage of data analytics and simulation among building  energy  management  professionals:  A  nationwide  survey.  Build.  Environ.  2019,  157,  139–164.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.build‐ env.2019.04.016.  147. Ruzbahani, H.M.; Karimipour, H. Optimal incentive‐based demand response management of smart households. In Proceedings  of the 2018 IEEE/IAS 54th Industrial and Commercial Power Systems Technical Conference (I&CPS), Niagara Falls, ON, Can‐ ada, 7–10 May 2018; pp. 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICPS.2018.8369971.  148. Prabatha, T.; Hager, J.; Carneiro, B.; Hewage, K.; Sadiq, R. Analyzing energy options for small‐scale off‐grid communities: A  Canadian case study. J. Clean. Prod. 2020, 249, 119320. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.119320.  149. Sinsel, S.R.; Riemke, R.L.; Hoffmann, V.H. Challenges and solution technologies for the integration of variable renewable energy  sources—A review. Renew. Energy 2020, 145, 2271–2285. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2019.06.147.  150. Alamo, D.H.; Medina, R.N.; Ruano, S.D.; García, S.S.; Moustris, K.P.; Kavadias, K.K.; Zafiraks, D.; Tzanes, G.; Zafeiraki, E.;  Spyropoulos, G.; et al. An Advanced Forecasting System for the Optimum Energy Management of Island Microgrids. Energy  Procedia 2019, 159, 111–116. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egypro.2018.12.027.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  36  of  42  151. Cojocaru, E.G.; Bravo, J.M.; Vasallo, M.J.; Santos, D.M. Optimal scheduling in concentrating solar power plants oriented to low  generation cycling. Renew. Energy 2019, 135, 789–799. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2018.12.026.  152. Morais, H.; Kádár, P.; Cardoso, M.; Vale, Z.A.; Khodr, H. VPP Operating in the Isolated Grid. In Proceedings of the IEEE Power  and Energy Society 2008 General Meeting: Conversion and Delivery of Electrical Energy in the 21st Century, PES, Pittsburgh,  PA, USA, 20–24 July 2008. https://doi.org/10.1109/PES.2008.4596716.  153. Bai, H.; Miao, S.; Ran, X.; Ye, C. Optimal dispatch strategy of a virtual power plant containing battery switch stations in a unified  electricity market. Energies 2015, 8, 2268–2289. https://doi.org/10.3390/en8032268.  154. Zhou,  K.;  Yang,  S.;  Shao,  Z.  Energy  Internet:  The  business  perspective.  Appl.  Energy  2016,  178,  212–222.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.06.052.  155. Zamani, A.G.; Zakariazadeh, A.; Jadid, S.; Kazemi, A. Stochastic operational scheduling of distributed energy resources in a  large scale virtual power plant. Int. J. Electr. Power Energy Syst. 2016, 82, 608–620. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijepes.2016.04.024.  156. Peik‐Herfeh, M.; Seifi, H.; Sheikh‐El‐Eslami, M.K. Two‐stage approach for optimal dispatch of distributed energy resources in  distribution  networks  considering  virtual  power  plant  concept.  Int.  Trans.  Electr.  Energy  Syst.  2014,  24,  43–63.  https://doi.org/10.1002/etep.1694.  157. Petrovic, N.; Strezoski, L.; Dumnic, B. Overview of software tools for integration and active management of high penetration of  DERs in emerging distribution networks. In Proceedings of the EUROCON 2019—18th International Conference on Smart Tech‐ nologies, Novi Sad, Serbia, 1–4 July 2019. https://doi.org/10.1109/EUROCON.2019.8861765.  158. Lombardi, P.; Powalko, M.; Rudion, K. Optimal Operation of a Virtual Power Plant. In Proceedings of the 2009 IEEE Power and  Energy Society General Meeting, PES ’09, Calgary, AB, Canada, 26–30 July 2009. https://doi.org/10.1109/PES.2009.5275995.  159. Justo, J.J. Intelligent energy management strategy considering power distribution networks with nanogrids, microgrids, and  VPP concepts. Handb. Distrib. Gener. Electr. Power Technol. Econ. Environ. Impacts. 2017, 791–815. https://doi.org/10.1007/978‐3‐ 319‐51343‐0_23.  160. Adeyemi, A.; Yan, M.; Shahidehpour, M.; Bahramirad, S.; Paaso, A. Transactive energy markets for managing energy exchanges  in power distribution systems. Electr. J. 2020, 33, 106868. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tej.2020.106868.  161. Adu‐Kankam, K.O.; Camarinha‐Matos, L.M. Towards collaborative Virtual Power Plants: Trends and convergence. Sustain.  Energy Grids Netw. 2018, 16, 217–230. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.segan.2018.08.003.  162. Gharaibeh, A.; Salahuddin, M.A.; Hussini, S.J.; Khreishah, A.; Khalil, I.; Guizani, M.; Al‐Fuqaha, A. Smart Cities: A Survey on  Data  Management,  Security,  and  Enabling  Technologies.  IEEE  Commun.  Surv.  Tutor.  2017,  19,  2456–2501.  https://doi.org/10.1109/COMST.2017.2736886.  163. Hameed, A.; Khoshkbarforoushha, A.; Ranjan, R.; Jayaraman, P.P.; Kolodziej, J.; Balaji, P.; Zeadally, S.; Malluhi, Q.M.; Tziritas,  N.; Vishnu, A.; et al. A survey and taxonomy on energy efficient resource allocation techniques for cloud computing systems.  Computing 2016, 98, 751–774. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00607‐014‐0407‐8.  164. Diaby, T.; Rad, B.B. Cloud Computing: A review of the Concepts and Deployment Models. Int. J. Inf. Technol. Comput. Sci. 2017,  9, 50–58. https://doi.org/10.5815/ijitcs.2017.06.07.  165. Faheem, M.; Akram, U.; Khan, I.; Naqeeb, S.; Shahzad, A.; Ullah, A. Cloud computing environment and security challenges: A  review. Int. J. Adv. Comput. Sci. Appl. 2017, 8, 183–195. https://doi.org/10.14569/ijacsa.2017.081025.  166. Rashid, A.; Chaturvedi, A. Cloud Computing Characteristics and Services: A Brief Review. Int. J. Comput. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7, 421– 426. https://doi.org/10.26438/ijcse/v7i2.421426.  167. Nieuwenhuis, L.J.M.; Ehrenhard, M.L.; Prause, L. The shift to Cloud Computing: The impact of disruptive technology on the  enterprise  software  business  ecosystem.  Technol.  Forecast.  Soc.  Chang.  2018,  129,  308–313.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tech‐ fore.2017.09.037.  168. Ghahramani, M.H.; Zhou, M.; Hon, C.T. Toward cloud computing QoS architecture: Analysis of cloud systems and cloud ser‐ vices. IEEE/CAA J. Autom. Sin. 2017, 4, 6–18. https://doi.org/10.1109/JAS.2017.7510313.  169. Shehabi, A.; Smith, S.J.; Masanet, E.; Koomey, J. Data center growth in the United States: Decoupling the demand for services  from electricity use. Environ. Res. Lett. 2018, 13, 124030. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748‐9326/aaec9c.  170. Cahyani, N.D.W.; Martini, B.; Choo, K.K.R.; Al‐Azhar, A.M.N. Forensic data acquisition from cloud‐of‐things devices: Windows  Smartphones as a case study. Concurr. Comput. 2017, 29, e3855. https://doi.org/10.1002/cpe.3855.  171. Tassone, C.F.R.; Martini, B.; Choo, K.K.R. Visualizing Digital Forensic Datasets: A Proof of Concept. J. Forensic Sci. 2017, 62,  1197–1204. https://doi.org/10.1111/1556‐4029.13431.  172. Rani, R.; Kumar, N.; Khurana, M.; Kumar, A.; Barnawi, A. Storage as a service in Fog computing: A systematic review. J. Syst.  Archit. 2021, 116, 102033. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sysarc.2021.102033.  173. Aazam, M.; Huh, E.N. Fog computing micro datacenter based dynamic resource estimation and pricing model for IoT. In Pro‐ ceedings of the 2015 IEEE 29th International Conference on Advanced Information Networking and Applications, Gwangju,  Korea, 24–27 March 2015; pp. 687–694. https://doi.org/10.1109/AINA.2015.254.  174. Libertson, F.; Velkova, J.; Palm, J. Data‐center infrastructure and energy gentrification: Perspectives from Sweden. Sustain. Sci.  Pract. Policy 2021, 17, 153–162. https://doi.org/10.1080/15487733.2021.1901428.  175. Kumar, M.; Sharma, S.C. Deadline constrained based dynamic load balancing algorithm with elasticity in cloud environment.  Comput. Electr. Eng. 2018, 69, 395–411. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compeleceng.2017.11.018.  176. Kumar, M.; Dubey, K.; Sharma, S.C. Elastic and flexible deadline constraint load Balancing algorithm for Cloud Computing.  Procedia Comput. Sci. 2018, 125, 717–724. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.procs.2017.12.092.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  37  of  42  177. Rana,  S.G.H.  Cloud  Resource  Optimization:  Comparison  of  Probabilistic  Optimization  Algorithms.  2017.  Available  online:  https://www.flackbox.com/cloud‐resource‐pooling‐tutorial (accessed on 16 August 2021).  178. Abohamama, A.S.; Hamouda, E. A hybrid energy–Aware virtual machine placement algorithm for cloud environments. Expert  Syst. Appl. 2020, 150. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eswa.2020.113306.  179. Wang, Q.; Cai, H.; Cao, Q.; Wang, F. An energy‐efficient power management for heterogeneous servers in data centers. Compu‐ ting 2020, 102, 1717–1741. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00607‐020‐00805‐w.  180. Zhang, S.; Qian, Z.; Luo, Z.; Wu, J.; Lu, S. Burstiness‐Aware Resource Reservation for Server Consolidation in Computing  Clouds. IEEE Trans. Parallel Distrib. Syst. 2016, 27, 964–977. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPDS.2015.2425403.  181. Selim, G.E.I.; El‐Rashidy, M.A.; El‐Fishawy, N.A. An efficient resource utilization technique for consolidation of virtual ma‐ chines in cloud computing environments. In Proceedings of the National Radio Science Conference, NRSC, Aswan, Egypt, 22– 25 February 2016; pp. 316–324. https://doi.org/10.1109/NRSC.2016.7450844.  182. Orgerie, A.C.; de Assuncao, M.D.; Lefevre, L. A survey on techniques for improving the energy efficiency of large‐scale distrib‐ uted systems. ACM Comput. Surv. 2014, 46, 1–31. https://doi.org/10.1145/2532637.  183. Haghighi, M.A.; Maeen, M.; Haghparast, M. An Energy‐Efficient Dynamic Resource Management Approach Based on Cluster‐ ing and Meta‐Heuristic Algorithms in Cloud Computing IaaS Platforms: Energy Efficient Dynamic Cloud Resource Manage‐ ment. Wirel. Pers. Commun. 2019, 104, 1367–1391. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11277‐018‐6089‐3.  184. Forestiero, A.; Mastroianni, C.; Meo, M.; Papuzzo, G.; Sheikhalishahi, M. Hierarchical Approach for Efficient Workload Man‐ agement  in  Geo‐Distributed  Data  Centers.  IEEE  Trans.  Green  Commun.  Netw.  2017,  1,  97–111.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TGCN.2016.2603586.  185. Tribus, M.; McIrvine, E.C. Energy and Information. Sci. Am. 1971, 225, 179–188. https://doi.org/10.1038/scientificamerican0971‐ 179.  186. Gupta, B.B.; Quamara, M. An overview of Internet of Things (IoT): Architectural aspects, challenges, and protocols. Concurr.  Comput. 2020, 32, e4946. https://doi.org/10.1002/cpe.4946.  187. Hanini, M.; el Kafhali, S.; Salah, K. Dynamic VM allocation and traffic control to manage QoS and energy consumption in cloud  computing environment. Int. J. Comput. Appl. Technol. 2019, 60, 307–316. https://doi.org/10.1504/IJCAT.2019.101168.  188. Rashid, Z.N.; Zebari, S.R.M.; Sharif, K.H.; Jacksi, K. Distributed Cloud Computing and Distributed Parallel Computing: A Re‐ view. In Proceedings of the ICOASE 2018—International Conference on Advanced Science and Engineering, Duhok, Iraq, 9–11  October 2018; pp. 167–172. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICOASE.2018.8548937.  189. Dabbagh, M.; Hamdaoui, B.; Rayes, A. Peak Power Shaving for Reduced Electricity Costs in Cloud Data Centers: Opportunities  and Challenges. IEEE Netw. 2020, 34, 148–153. https://doi.org/10.1109/MNET.001.1900329.  190. Simmhan, Y.; Giakkoupis, M. On using cloud platforms in a software architecture for smart energy grids. In Proceedings of the  IEEE International Conference on Cloud Computing (CloudCom), Indianapolis, IN, USA, 30 November–3 December 2010; pp.  1–3. Available online: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.232.2334&rep=rep1&type=pdf (accessed on 16  August 2021).  191. Hasan, M.K.; Ahmed, M.M.; Musa, S.S.; Islam, S.; Abdullah, S.N.H.S.; Hossain, E.; Nafi, N.S.; Vo, N. An Improved Dynamic  Thermal Current Rating Model for PMU‐Based Wide Area Measurement Framework for Reliability Analysis Utilizing Sensor  Cloud System. IEEE Access 2021, 9, 14446–14458. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2021.3052368.  192. Elomari, A.; Hassouni, L.; Maizate, A. The main characteristics of five distributed file systems required for big data: A compar‐ ative study. Adv. Sci. Technol. Eng. Syst. 2017, 2, 78–91. https://doi.org/10.25046/aj020411.  193. Ahmad, A.; Khan, M.; Paul, A.; Din, S.; Rathore, M.M.; Jeon, G.; Choi, G.S. Toward modeling and optimization of features  selection in Big Data based social Internet of Things. Future Gener. Comput. Syst. 2018, 82, 715–726. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fu‐ ture.2017.09.028.  194. Zhong, R.Y.; Newman, S.T.; Huang, G.Q.; Lan, S. Big Data for supply chain management in the service and manufacturing  sectors:  Challenges,  opportunities,  and  future  perspectives.  Comput.  Ind.  Eng.  2016,  101,  572–591.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cie.2016.07.013.  195. Mustafa, H.M.J.; Ayob, M.; Albashish, D.; Abu‐Taleb, S. Solving text clustering problem using a memetic differential evolution  algorithm. PLoS ONE 2020, 15, e0232816. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0232816.  196. Bilal, M.; Oyedele, L.O.; Qadir, J.; Munir, K.; Ajayi, S.O.; Akinade, O.O.; Owolabi, H.A.; Alaka, H.A.; Pasha, M. Big Data in the  construction  industry:  A  review  of  present  status,  opportunities,  and  future  trends.  Adv.  Eng.  Inform.  2016,  30,  500–521.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aei.2016.07.001.  197. Li, Y.; Yu, M.; Xu, M.; Yang, J.; Sha, D.; Liu, Q.; Yang, C. Big data and cloud computing. In Manual of Digital Earth; Springer:  Singapore, 2020; pp. 325–355. https://doi.org/10.1007/978‐981‐32‐9915‐3_9.  198. Costin, A.; Adibfar, A.; Hu, H.; Chen, S.S. Building Information Modeling (BIM) for transportation infrastructure—Literature  review,  applications,  challenges,  and  recommendations.  Autom.  Constr.  2018,  94,  257–281.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.autcon.2018.07.001.  199. Chen, C.L.P.; Zhang, C.Y. Data‐intensive applications, challenges, techniques and technologies: A survey on Big Data. Inf. Sci.  2014, 275, 314–347. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ins.2014.01.015s.  200. Kambatla, K.; Kollias, G.; Kumar, V.; Grama, A. Trends in big data analytics. J. Parallel Distrib. Comput. 2014, 74, 2561–2573.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpdc.2014.01.003.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  38  of  42  201. Hu, H.; Wen, Y.; Chua, T.S.; Li, X. Toward scalable systems for big data analytics: A technology tutorial. IEEE Access 2014, 2,  652–687. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2014.2332453.  202. Tu, C.; He, X.; Shuai, Z.; Jiang, F. Big data issues in smart grid—A review. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2017, 79, 1099–1107.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.05.134.  203. Saleem, Y.; Crespi, N.; Rehmani, M.H.; Copeland, R. Internet of Things‐Aided Smart Grid: Technologies, Architectures, Appli‐ cations,  Prototypes,  and  Future  Research  Directions.  IEEE  Access  2019,  7,  62962–63003.  https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2019.2913984.  204. Marjani, M.; Nasaruddin, F.; Gani, A.; Karim, A.; Hashem, I.A.T.; Siddiqa, A.; Yaqoob, I. Big IoT Data Analytics: Architecture,  Opportunities, and Open Research Challenges. IEEE Access 2017, 5, 5247–5261. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2017.2689040.  205. Zhu, T.; Xiao, S.; Zhang, Q.; Gu, Y.; Yi, P.; Li, Y. Emergent Technologies in Big Data Sensing: A Survey. Int. J. Distrib. Sens. Netw.  2015, 11, 902982. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/902982.  206. Jiang,  H.;  Wang,  K.;  Wang,  Y.;  Gao,  M.;  Zhang,  Y.  Energy  big  data:  A  survey.  IEEE  Access  2016,  4,  3844–3861.  https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2016.2580581.  207. Ahmed, S.; Gondal, T.M.; Adil, M.; Malik, S.A.; Qureshi, R. A Survey on Communication Technologies in Smart Grid. In Pro‐ ceedings of the 2019 IEEE PES GTD Grand International Conference and Exposition Asia, GTD Asia 2019, Bangkok, Thailand,  19–23 March 2019; pp. 7–12. https://doi.org/10.1109/GTDAsia.2019.8715993.  208. Yang, T. ICT technologies standards and protocols for active distribution network. Smart Power Distrib. Syst. Control. Commun.  Optim. 2018, 205–230. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978‐0‐12‐812154‐2.00010‐9.  209. Baesens, B.; Bapna, R.; Marsden, J.R.; Vanthienen, J.; Zhao, J.L. Transformational issues of big data and analytics in networked  business. MIS Q. Manag. Inf. Syst. 2016, 40, 807–818. https://doi.org/10.25300/MISQ/2016/40:4.03.  210. Sagiroglu, S.; Terzi, R.; Canbay, Y.; Colak, I. Big data issues in smart grid systems. In Proceedings of the 2016 IEEE International  Conference on Renewable Energy Research and Applications, ICRERA 2016, Birmingham, UK, 20–23 November 2016; pp. 1007– 1012. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICRERA.2016.7884486.  211. El‐Mawla, N.A.; Badawy, M.; Arafat, H. IoT for the Failure of Climate‐Change Mitigation and Adaptation and IIoT as a Future  Solution. World J. Environ. Eng. 2019, 6, 7–16. https://doi.org/10.12691/wjee‐6‐1‐2.  212. Daki, H.; el Hannani, A.; Aqqal, A.; Haidine, A.; Dahbi, A. Big Data management in smart grid: Concepts, requirements and  implementation. J. Big Data 2017, 4, 13. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40537‐017‐0070‐y.  213. Zhang,  Y.;  Huang,  T.;  Bompard,  E.F.  Big  data  analytics  in  smart  grids:  A  review.  Energy  Inform.  2016,  1,  8.  https://doi.org/10.1186/s42162‐018‐0007‐5.  214. Ponocko, J.; Milanovic, J.V. Forecasting Demand Flexibility of Aggregated Residential Load Using Smart Meter Data. IEEE  Trans. Power Syst. 2018, 33, 5446–5455. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2018.2799903.  215. Kalalas, C.; Thrybom, L.; Alonso‐Zarate, J. Cellular communications for smart grid neighborhood area networks: A survey.  IEEE Access 2016, 4, 1469–1493. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2016.2551978.  216. Yu, R.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, Y. Hybrid spectrum access in cognitive Neighborhood Area Networks in the smart grid. In Proceedings  of  the  IEEE  Wireless  Communications  and  Networking  Conference,  WCNC,  Paris,  France,  1–4  April  2012;  pp.  1478–1483.  https://doi.org/10.1109/WCNC.2012.6214014.  217. Gellings, C.W. Smart Grid Technologies: Communication Technologies and Standards, 1st ed.; River Publishers: Aalborg, Denmark,  2021.  218. Baimel, D.; Tapuchi, S.; Baimel, N. Smart grid communication technologies—Overview, research challenges and opportunities.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2016  International  Symposium  on  Power  Electronics,  Electrical  Drives,  Automation  and  Motion,  SPEEDAM, Capri, Italy, 22–24 June 2016; pp. 116–120. https://doi.org/10.1109/SPEEDAM.2016.7526014.  219. Gibert, K.; Sànchez‐Marrè, M.; Izquierdo, J. A survey on pre‐processing techniques: Relevant issues in the context of environ‐ mental data mining. AI Commun. 2016, 29, 627–663. https://doi.org/10.3233/AIC‐160710.  220. Fernández, A.; del Río, S.; Chawla, N.V.; Herrera, F. An insight into imbalanced Big Data classification: Outcomes and chal‐ lenges. Complex Intell. Syst. 2017, 3, 105–120. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40747‐017‐0037‐9.  221. Juneja, A.; Das, N.N. Big Data Quality Framework: Pre‐Processing Data in Weather Monitoring Application. In Proceedings of  the International Conference on Machine Learning, Big Data, Cloud and Parallel Computing: Trends, Prespectives and Pro‐ spects, COMITCon2019, Faridabad, India, 14–16 February 2019; pp. 559–563. https://doi.org/10.1109/COMITCon.2019.8862267.  222. Shi, W.; Zhu, Y.; Huang, T.; Sheng, G.; Lian, Y.; Wang, G.; Chen, Y. An Integrated Data Preprocessing Framework Based on  Apache  Spark  for  Fault  Diagnosis  of  Power  Grid  Equipment.  J.  Signal  Process.  Syst.  2017,  86,  221–236.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11265‐016‐1119‐4.  223. Dileep,  G.  A  survey  on  smart  grid  technologies  and  applications.  Renew.  Energy  2020,  146,  2589–2625.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2019.08.092.  224. Kar, S.; Samantaray, S.R.; Zadeh, M.D. Data‐Mining Model Based Intelligent Differential Microgrid Protection Scheme. IEEE  Syst. J. 2017, 11, 1161–1169. https://doi.org/10.1109/JSYST.2014.2380432.  225. Silva, B.N.; Khan, M.; Jung, C.; Seo, J.; Muhammad, D.; Han, J.; Yoon, Y.; Han, K. Urban planning and smart city decision  management  empowered  by  real‐time  data  processing  using  big  data  analytics.  Sensors  2018,  18,  2994.  https://doi.org/10.3390/s18092994.  226. Sharma, E. Energy forecasting based on predictive data mining techniques in smart energy grids. Energy Inform. 2018, 1, 367– 373. https://doi.org/10.1186/s42162‐018‐0048‐9.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  39  of  42  227. Siryani, J.; Tanju, B.; Eveleigh, T.J. A Machine Learning Decision‐Support System Improves the Internet of Things’ Smart Meter  Operations. IEEE Internet Things J. 2017, 4, 1056–1066. https://doi.org/10.1109/JIOT.2017.2722358.  228. Albashish, D.; Hammouri, A.I.; Braik, M.; Atwan, J.; Sahran, S. Binary biogeography‐based optimization based SVM‐RFE for  feature selection. Appl. Soft Comput. 2021, 101, 107026. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.asoc.2020.107026.  229. Samantaray, S.R.; Mishra, D.P.; Joos, G.; Samantaray, S.R.; Joos, G. A Combined Wavelet and Data‐Mining Based Intelligent  Protection Scheme for Microgrid. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018, 7, 2295–2304. https://doi.org/10.1109/pesgm.2018.8586480.  230. Hashemi, F.; Mohammadi, M.; Kargarian, A. Islanding detection method for microgrid based on extracted features from differ‐ ential  transient  rate  of  change  of  frequency.  IET  Gener.  Transm.  Distrib.  2017,  11,  891–904.  https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐ gtd.2016.0795.  231. Alam, M.R.; Muttaqi, K.M.; Bouzerdoum, A. Evaluating the effectiveness of a machine learning approach based on response  time  and  reliability  for  islanding  detection  of  distributed  generation.  IET  Renew.  Power  Gener.  2017,  11,  1392–1400.  https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐rpg.2016.0987.  232. Elkadeem, M.R.; Alaam, M.A.; Azmy, A.M. Improving performance of underground MV distribution networks using distribu‐ tion automation system: A case study. Ain Shams Eng. J. 2018, 9, 469–481. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.asej.2016.04.004.  233. Santis, E.D.; Rizzi, A.; Sadeghian, A. A learning intelligent System for classification and characterization of localized faults in  Smart Grids. In Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation, CEC 2017—Proceedings, Donostia‐San  Sebastián, Spain, 5–8 June 2017; pp. 2669–2676. https://doi.org/10.1109/CEC.2017.7969631.  234. Wang, J.; Xiong, X.; Zhou, N.; Li, Z.; Wang, W. Early warning method for transmission line galloping based on SVM and Ada‐ Boost bi‐level classifiers. IET Gener. Transm. Distrib. 2016, 10, 3499–3507. https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐gtd.2016.0140.  235. Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Dong, Z.Y.; Xu, Z.; Wong, K.P. Intelligent early warning of power system dynamic insecurity Risk: Toward  optimal accuracy‐earliness tradeoff. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 2544–2554. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2017.2676879.  236. Cui, Q.; El‐Arroudi, K.; Joos, G. An effective feature extraction method in pattern recognition based high impedance fault de‐ tection. In Proceedings of the 2017 19th International Conference on Intelligent System Application to Power Systems (ISAP),  San Antonio, TX, USA, 17–20 September 2017. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISAP.2017.8071380.  237. Zhu, L.; Lu, C.; Dong, Z.Y.; Hong, C. Imbalance Learning Machine‐Based Power System Short‐Term Voltage Stability Assess‐ ment. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 2533–2543. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2017.2696534.  238. Flynn, D.; Rather, Z.; Ardal, A.; D’Arco, S.; Hansen, A.D.; Cutululis, N.A.; Sorensen, P.; Estanquiero, A.; Gómez, E.; Menemenlis,  N.; et al. Technical impacts of high penetration levels of wind power on power system stability. Wiley Interdiscip. Rev. Energy  Environ. 2017, 6, e216. https://doi.org/10.1002/wene.216.  239. Liu, C.; Sun, K.; Rather, Z.H.; Chen, Z.; Bak, C.L.; Thøgersen, P.; Lund, P. A systematic approach for dynamic security assess‐ ment and the corresponding preventive control scheme based on decision trees. IEEE Trans. Power  Syst. 2014, 29, 717–730.  https://doi.org/10.1109/pesgm.2014.6938856.  240. He, C.; Guan, L.; Mo, W. A method for transient stability assessment based on pattern recognition. In Proceedings of the 2016  International Conference on Smart Grid and Clean Energy Technologies, ICSGCE 2016, Chengdu, China, 19–22 October 2016;  pp. 343–347. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICSGCE.2016.7876081.  241. Dimitrovska, T.; Rudez, U.; Mihalic, R. Fast contingency screening based on data mining. In Proceedings of the 17th IEEE In‐ ternational Conference on Smart Technologies, EUROCON 2017—Conference Proceedings, Ohrid, Macedonia, 6–8 July 2017;  pp. 794–798. https://doi.org/10.1109/EUROCON.2017.8011219.  242. Andalib‐Bin‐Karim, C.; Liang, X.; Khan, N.; Zhang, H. Determine Q‐V Characteristics of Grid‐Connected Wind Farms for Volt‐ age  Control  Using  a  Data‐Driven  Analytics  Approach.  IEEE  Trans.  Ind.  Appl.  2017,  53,  4162–4175.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TIA.2017.2716343.  243. Kalair, A.; Abas, N.; Saleem, M.S.; Kalair, A.R.; Khan, N. Role of energy storage systems in energy transition from fossil fuels to  renewables. Energy Storage 2021, 3, e135. https://doi.org/10.1002/est2.135.  244. Swetapadma, A.; Yadav, A. Data‐mining‐based fault during power swing identification in power transmission system. IET Sci.  Meas. Technol. 2016, 10, 130–139. https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐smt.2015.0169.  245. Jena, M.K.; Samantaray, S.R. Data‐Mining‐Based Intelligent Differential Relaying for Transmission Lines Including UPFC and  Wind Farms. IEEE Trans. Neural Netw. Learn. Syst. 2016, 27, 8–17. https://doi.org/10.1109/TNNLS.2015.2404775.  246. Papadopoulos, P.N.; Guo, T.; Milanović, J.V. Probabilistic framework for online identification of dynamic behavior of power  systems with renewable generation. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2018, 33, 45–54. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2017.2688446.  247. Deng, X.; Bian, D.; Wang, W.; Jiang, Z.; Yao, W.; Qiu, W.; Tong, N.; Shi, D.; Liu, Y. Deep learning model to detect various  synchrophasor data anomalies. IET Gener. Transm. Distrib. 2020, 14, 5816–5822. https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐gtd.2020.0526.  248. Tan, B.; Yang, J.; Tang, Y.; Jiang, S.; Xie, P.; Yuan, W. A Deep Imbalanced Learning Framework for Transient Stability Assess‐ ment of Power System. IEEE Access 2019, 7, 81759–81769. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2019.2923799.  249. Wei, L.; Dongxia, Z.; Xinying, W.; Daowei, L.; Qian, W. Power system transient stability analysis based on random matrix  theory. Proc. CSEE 2016, 36, 4854–4863.  250. Xu, X.Y.; He, X.; Ai, Q.; Qiu, C.M. A correlation analysis method for operation status of distribution network based on random  matrix theory. Power Syst. Technol. 2016, 40, 781–790.  251. Malbasa, V.; Zheng, C.; Chen, P.C.; Popovic, T.; Kezunovic, M. Voltage Stability Prediction Using Active Machine Learning.  IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2017, 8, 3117–3124. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2017.2693394.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  40  of  42  252. Zhang, J.; Chung, C.Y.; Wang, Z.; Zheng, X. Instantaneous Electromechanical Dynamics Monitoring in Smart Transmission  Grid. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2016, 12, 844–852. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2015.2492861.  253. Zhao, J.; Zhang, G.; Das, K.; Korres, G.N.; Manousakis, N.M.; Sinha, A.K.; He, Z. Power system real‐time monitoring by using  PMU‐based robust state estimation method. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2016, 7, 300–309. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2015.2431693.  254. Shah, Z.; Anwar, A.; Mahmood, A.N.; Tari, Z.; Zomaya, A.Y. A Spatiotemporal Data Summarization Approach for Real‐Time  Operation of Smart Grid. IEEE Trans. Big Data 2020, 6, 624–637. https://doi.org/10.1109/TBDATA.2017.2691350.  255. Lv, Z.; Song, H.; Basanta‐Val, P.; Steed, A.; Jo, M. Next‐Generation Big Data Analytics: State of the Art, Challenges, and Future  Research Topics. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 1891–1899. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2017.2650204.  256. Reinhardt, A.; Reinhardt, D. Detecting anomalous electrical appliance behavior based on motif transition likelihood matrices.   International Conference on Smart Grid Communications, SmartGridComm 2016, Sydney,  In Proceedings of the 2016 IEEE NSW, Australia, 6–9 November 2016; pp. 680–685. https://doi.org/10.1109/SmartGridComm.2016.7778840.  257. Sheng, G.; Hou, H.; Jiang, X.; Chen, Y. A novel association rule mining method of big data for power transformers state param‐ eters based on probabilistic graph model. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018, 9, 695–702. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2562123.  258. Png, E.; Srinivasan, S.; Bekiroglu, K.; Chaoyang, J.; Su, R.; Poolla, K. An internet of things upgrade for smart and scalable heating,  ventilation and air‐conditioning control in commercial buildings. Appl. Energy 2019, 239, 408–424. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apen‐ ergy.2019.01.229.  259. Allen, W.H.; Rubaai, A.; Chawla, R. Fuzzy Neural Network‐Based Health Monitoring for HVAC System Variable‐Air‐Volume  Unit. IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl. 2016, 52, 2513–2524. https://doi.org/10.1109/TIA.2015.2511160.  260. Azmi, A.; Jasni, J.; Azis, N.; Kadir, M.Z.A.A. Evolution of transformer health index in the form of mathematical equation. Renew.  Sustain. Energy Rev. 2017, 76, 687–700. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.03.094.  261. Goyal, R.; Whelan, M.J.; Cavalline, T.L. Characterising the effect of external factors on deterioration rates of bridge components  using  multivariate  proportional  hazards  regression.  Struct.  Infrastruct.  Eng.  2017,  13,  894–905.  https://doi.org/10.1080/15732479.2016.1217888.  262. Moradi, R.; Groth, K.M. Modernizing risk assessment: A systematic integration of PRA and PHM techniques. Reliab. Eng. Syst.  Saf. 2020, 204, 107194. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ress.2020.107194.  263. Balouji, E.; Salor, O. Classification of power quality events using deep learning on event images. In Proceedings of the 3rd  International Conference on Pattern Analysis and Image Analysis, IPRIA 2017, Shahrekord, Iran, 19–20 April 2017; pp. 216–221.  https://doi.org/10.1109/PRIA.2017.7983049.  264. Borges, F.A.S.; Fernandes, R.A.S.; Silva, I.N.; Silva, C.B.S. Feature Extraction and Power Quality Disturbances Classification  Using Smart Meters Signals. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2016, 12, 824–833. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2015.2486379.  265. Potter, C.W.; Archambault, A.; Westrick, K. Building a smarter smart grid through better renewable energy information. In  Proceedings of the 2009 IEEE/PES Power Systems Conference and Exposition, PSCE 2009, Seattle, WA, USA, 15–18 March 2009.  https://doi.org/10.1109/PSCE.2009.4840110.  266. Alonso,  M.;  Amaris,  H.;  Alcala,  D.;  Florez,  D.M.R.  Smart  sensors  for  smart  grid  reliability.  Sensors  2020,  20,  2187.  https://doi.org/10.3390/s20082187.  267. Supriya, S.; Magheshwari, M.; Udhyalakshmi, S.S.; Subhashini, R.; Musthafa. Smart grid technologies: Communication technol‐ ogies and standards. Int. J. Appl. Eng. Res. 2011, 10, 16932–16941.  268. Brijesh, P.; Lal, A.G.; Manju, A.S.; Joseph, A. Synchrophasors evaluation and applications. In Proceedings of the 2018 IEEE Texas  Power  and  Energy  Conference,  TPEC  2018,  College  Station,  TX,  USA,  8–9  February  2018;  Volume  2018,  pp.  1–6.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TPEC.2018.8312052.  269. Olvera, J.P.; Green, T.; Junyent‐Ferre, A. Using Multi‐Terminal DC Networks to Improve the Hosting Capacity of Distribution  Networks. In Proceedings of the Proceedings—2018 IEEE PES Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Conference Europe, ISGT‐ Europe 2018, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, 21–25 October 2018. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISGTEurope.2018.8571622.  270. Elbreki, A.M.; Sopian, K.; Fazlizan, A.; Ibrahim, A. An innovative technique of passive cooling PV module using lapping fins  and planner reflector. Case Stud. Therm. Eng. 2020, 19, 100607. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.csite.2020.100607.  271. Kumar, H.; Singh, M.K.; Gupta, M.P.; Madaan, J. Moving towards smart cities: Solutions that lead to the Smart City Transfor‐ mation Framework. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 2020, 153, 119281. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2018.04.024.  272. Haben, S.; Arora, S.; Giasemidis, G.; Voss, M.; Greetham, D.V. Review of Low‐Voltage Load Forecasting: Methods, Applications,  and Recommendations. 2021. Available online: http://arxiv.org/abs/2106.00006 (accessed on).  273. Hossain, M.S.; Madlool, N.A.; Rahim, N.A.; Selvaraj, J.; Pandey, A.K.; Khan, A.F. Role of smart grid in renewable energy: An  overview. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2016, 60, 1168–1184. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2015.09.098.  274. Wu, W.; Peng, M. A Data Mining Approach Combining K‐Means Clustering with Bagging Neural Network for Short‐Term  Wind Power Forecasting. IEEE Internet Things J. 2017, 4, 979–986. https://doi.org/10.1109/JIOT.2017.2677578.  275. Yang, M.; Lin, Y.; Han, X. Probabilistic Wind Generation Forecast Based on Sparse Bayesian Classification and Dempster‐Shafer  Theory. IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl. 2016, 52, 1998–2005. https://doi.org/10.1109/TIA.2016.2518995.  276. Khodayar, M.; Kaynak, O.; Khodayar, M.E. Rough Deep Neural Architecture for Short‐Term Wind Speed Forecasting. IEEE  Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 2770–2779. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2017.2730846.  277. Zhao, T.; Zhou, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Ling, P.; Tian, Y. Spatio‐Temporal Analysis and Forecasting of Distributed PV Systems Diffusion:  A  Case  Study  of  Shanghai  Using  a  Data‐Driven  Approach.  IEEE  Access  2017,  5,  5135–5148.  https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2017.2694009.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  41  of  42  278. Nazaripouya, H.; Wang, B.; Wang, Y.; Chu, P.; Pota, H.R.; Gadh, R. Univariate time series prediction of solar power using a  hybrid wavelet‐ARMA‐NARX prediction method. In Proceedings of the IEEE Power Engineering Society Transmission and  Distribution Conference, Dallas, TX, USA, 3–5 May 2016. https://doi.org/10.1109/TDC.2016.7519959.  279. Tayab, U.B.; Zia, A.; Yang, F.; Lu, J.; Kashif, M. Short‐term load forecasting for microgrid energy management system using  hybrid  HHO‐FNN  model  with  best‐basis  stationary  wavelet  packet  transform.  Energy  2020,  203,  117857.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2020.117857.  280. Ding, N.; Benoit, C.; Foggia, G.; Besanger, Y.; Wurtz, F. Neural network‐based model design for short‐term load forecast in  distribution systems. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2016, 31, 72–81. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2015.2390132.  281. Liu, D.; Zeng, L.; Li, C.; Ma, K.; Chen, Y.; Cao, Y. A Distributed Short‐Term Load Forecasting Method Based on Local Weather  Information. IEEE Syst. J. 2018, 12, 208–215. https://doi.org/10.1109/JSYST.2016.2594208. 282. Shi, H.; Xu, M.; Li, R. Deep Learning for Household Load Forecasting—A Novel Pooling Deep RNN. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid  2018, 9, 5271–5280. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2017.2686012.  283. Kong, W.; Dong, Z.Y.; Jia, Y.; Hill, D.J.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, Y. Short‐Term Residential Load Forecasting based on LSTM Recurrent  Neural Network. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2017, 10, 841–851. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2017.2753802.  284. Meyn, S.; Samad, T.; Hiskens, I.; Stoustrup, J. Energy Markets and Responsive Grids. Modeling, Control, and Optimization. The IMA  Volumes  Mathematics  Its  Applications;  2018;  518p.  Available  online:  https://link‐springer‐com.proxy.libraries.uc.edu/con‐ tent/pdf/10.1007%2F978‐1‐4939‐7822‐9.pdf (accessed on 16 August 2021).  285. Moreno‐Munoz, A.; Bellido‐Outeirino, F.J.; Siano, P.; Gomez‐Nieto, M.A. Mobile social media for smart grids customer engage‐ ment:  Emerging  trends  and  challenges.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2016,  53,  1611–1616A.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2015.09.077.  286. Cai, Y.; Huang, T.; Bompard, E.; Cao, Y.; Li, Y. Self‐sustainable community of electricity prosumers in the emerging distribution  system. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2017, 8, 2207–2216. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2518241.  287. Al‐Otaibi, R.; Jin, N.; Wilcox, T.; Flach, P. Feature Construction and Calibration for Clustering Daily Load Curves from Smart‐ Meter Data. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2016, 12, 645–654. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2016.2528819.  288. Peng, W.; Deng, Z.; Zhu, Y.; Lu, J. An analytical method for intelligent electricity use pattern with demand response. In Pro‐ ceedings  of  the  China  International  Conference  on  Electricity  Distribution,  CICED,  Xi’an,  China,  10–13  August  2016.  https://doi.org/10.1109/CICED.2016.7576062.  289. Khan, I.; Huang, J.Z.; Masud, M.A.; Jiang, Q. Segmentation of factories on electricity consumption behaviors using load profile  data. IEEE Access 2016, 4, 8394–8406. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2016.2619898.  290. Li, R.; Li, F.; Smith, N.D. Load Characterization and Low‐Order Approximation for Smart Metering Data in the Spectral Domain.  IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 976–984. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2016.2638319.  291. Zhang, D.; Li, S.; Sun, M.; O’Neill, Z. An Optimal and Learning‐Based Demand Response and Home Energy Management  System. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2016, 7, 1790–1801. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2552169.  292. Jindal, A.; Dua, A.; Kaur, K.; Singh, M.; Kumar, N.; Mishra, S. Decision Tree and SVM‐Based Data Analytics for Theft Detection  in Smart Grid. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2016, 12, 1005–1016. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2016.2543145.  293. Haben, S.; Singleton, C.; Grindrod, P. Analysis and clustering of residential customers energy behavioral demand using smart  meter data. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2016, 7, 136–144. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2015.2409786.  294. Munshi, A.A.; Mohamed, Y.A.R.I. Extracting and defining flexibility of residential electrical vehicle charging loads. IEEE Trans.  Ind. Inform. 2018, 14, 448–461. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2017.2724559.  295. Li, R.; Gu, C.; Li, F.; Shaddick, G.; Dale, M. Development of Low Voltage Network Templates—Part II: Peak Load Estimation  by Clusterwise Regression. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2015, 30, 3045–3052. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2014.2371477.  296. Wang, Y.; Chen, Q.; Kang, C.; Xia, Q.; Luo, M. Sparse and Redundant Representation‐Based Smart Meter Data Compression  and Pattern Extraction. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2017, 32, 2142–2151. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2016.2604389.  297. Gopinath, R.; Kumar, M.; Joshua, C.P.C.; Srinivas, K. Energy management using non‐intrusive load monitoring techniques— State‐of‐the‐art and future research directions. Sustain. Cities Soc. 2020, 62, 102411. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2020.102411.  298. Devlin, M.A.; Hayes, B.P. Non‐Intrusive Load Monitoring and Classification of Activities of Daily Living Using Residential  Smart Meter Data. IEEE Trans. Consum. Electron. 2019, 65, 339–348. https://doi.org/10.1109/TCE.2019.2918922.  299. Javaid, N.; Hafeez, G.; Iqbal, S.; Alrajeh, N.; Alabed, M.S.; Guizani, M. Energy Efficient Integration of Renewable Energy Sources  in  the  Smart  Grid  for  Demand  Side  Management.  IEEE  Access  2018,  6,  77077–77096.  https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2018.2866461.  300. Kong, W.; Dong, Z.Y.; Ma, J.; Hill, D.J.; Zhao, J.; Luo, F. An Extensible Approach for Non‐Intrusive Load Disaggregation with  Smart Meter Data. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018, 9, 3362–3372. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2631238.  301. Henao, N.; Agbossou, K.; Kelouwani, S.; Dube, Y.; Fournier, M. Approach in Nonintrusive Type i Load Monitoring Using Sub‐ tractive Clustering. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2017, 8, 812–821. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2015.2462719.  302. Chung, J.; Gillis, J.M.; Morsi, W.G. Non‐intrusive load monitoring using wavelet design and co‐testing of machine learning  classifiers. In Proceedings of the 2016 IEEE Electrical Power and Energy Conference, EPEC 2016, Ottawa, ON, Canada, 12–14  October 2016. https://doi.org/10.1109/EPEC.2016.7771763.  303. Jokar, P.; Arianpoo, N.; Leung, V.C.M. Electricity theft detection in AMI using customers’ consumption patterns. IEEE Trans.  Smart Grid 2016, 7, 216–226. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2015.2425222.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  42  of  42  304. Zhan, T.S.; Chen, S.J.; Kao, C.C.; Kuo, C.L.; Chen, J.L.; Lin, C.H. Non‐technical loss and power blackout detection under ad‐ vanced metering infrastructure using a cooperative game based inference mechanism. IET Gener. Transm. Distrib. 2016, 10, 873– 882. https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐gtd.2015.0003.  305. Guerrero, J.I.; Monedero, I.; Biscarri, F.; Biscarri, J.; Millan, R.; Leon, C. Non‐Technical Losses Reduction by Improving the In‐ spections Accuracy in a Power Utility. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2018, 33, 1209–1218. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2017.2721435.  306. Yu,  X.;  Xue,  Y.  Smart  Grids:  A  Cyber‐Physical  Systems  Perspective.  Proc.  IEEE  2016,  104,  1058–1070.  https://doi.org/10.1109/JPROC.2015.2503119.  307. Shahinzadeh, H.; Moradi, J.; Gharehpetian, G.B.; Nafisi, H.; Abedi, M. IoT Architecture for smart grids. In Proceedings of the  International  Conference  on  Protection  and  Automation  of  Power  System,  IPAPS,  Iran,  8–9  January  2019;  pp.  22–30.  https://doi.org/10.1109/IPAPS.2019.8641944.  308. Diamantoulakis, P.D.; Kapinas, V.M.; Karagiannidis, G.K. Big Data Analytics for Dynamic Energy Management in Smart Grids.  Big Data Res. 2015, 2, 94–101. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bdr.2015.03.003.  309. Alahakoon, D.; Yu, X. Smart Electricity Meter Data Intelligence for Future Energy Systems: A Survey. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform.  2016, 12, 425–436. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2015.2414355.  310. Zhou, K.; Fu, C.; Yang, S. Big data driven smart energy management: From big data to big insights. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev.  2016, 56, 215–225. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2015.11.050.  311. Al‐Musaylh, M.S.; Deo, R.C.; Adamowski, J.F.; Li, Y. Short‐term electricity demand forecasting with MARS, SVR and ARIMA  models  using  aggregated  demand  data  in  Queensland,  Australia.  Adv.  Eng.  Inform.  2018,  35,  1–16.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aei.2017.11.002.  312. Valogianni, K.; Ketter, W. Effective demand response for smart grids: Evidence from a real‐world pilot. Decis. Support Syst. 2016,  91, 48–66. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dss.2016.07.007.  313. Candanedo, L.M.; Feldheim, V.; Deramaix, D. Data driven prediction models of energy use of appliances in a low‐energy house.  Energy Build. 2017, 140, 81–97. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.01.083.  314. Chou, J.S.; Ngo, N.T. Smart grid data analytics framework for increasing energy savings in residential buildings. Autom. Constr.  2016, 72, 247–257. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.autcon.2016.01.002.  315. Naveen, P.; Ing, W.K.; Danquah, M.K.; Sidhu, A.S.; Abu‐Siada, A. Cloud computing for energy management in smart grid—An  application survey. In Proceedings of the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Miri, Malaysia, 6–8 No‐ vember 2015; Volume 121. https://doi.org/10.1088/1757‐899X/121/1/012010.  316. Dakkak, O.; Nor, S.A.; Sajat, M.S.; Fazea, Y.; Arif, S. From grids to clouds: Recap on challenges and solutions. AIP Conf. Proc.  2018, 2016, 020040. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5055442.  317. Wang, Y.; Chen, Q.; Hong, T.; Kang, C. Review of Smart Meter Data Analytics: Applications, Methodologies, and Challenges.  IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2019, 10, 3125–3148. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2018.2818167.  318. Lin, W.; Peng, G.; Bian, X.; Xu, S.; Chang, V.; Li, Y. Scheduling Algorithms for Heterogeneous Cloud Environment: Main Re‐ source  Load  Balancing  Algorithm  and  Time  Balancing  Algorithm.  J.  Grid  Comput.  2019,  17,  699–726.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10723‐019‐09499‐7.  319. Bera, S.; Misra, S.; Rodrigues, J.J.P.C. IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems Cloud Computing Applications  for Smart Grid: A Survey. 2015. Available online: http://www.ieee.org/publications_standards/publications/rights/index.html  (accessed on 16 August 2021).  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Sciences Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

A Conceptual and Systematics for Intelligent Power Management System-Based Cloud Computing: Prospects, and Challenges

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/a-conceptual-and-systematics-for-intelligent-power-management-system-U0uVFyBd0O
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2021 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2076-3417
DOI
10.3390/app11219820
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Review  A Conceptual and Systematics for Intelligent Power   Management System‐Based Cloud Computing: Prospects,   and Challenges  1,2, 3 1, Ahmed Hadi Ali AL‐Jumaili  *, Yousif I. Al Mashhadany  , Rossilawati Sulaiman  *   and Zaid Abdi Alkareem Alyasseri      Faculty of Information Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Malaysia;  zaid.alyasseri@ukm.edu.my (Z.A.A.A.)    Computer Centre Department, University of Fallujah, Anbar 00964, Iraq    Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Anbar, Anbar 00964, Iraq;  yousif.mohammed@uoanbar.edu.iq  *  Correspondence: ahmed_hadi@uofallujah.edu.iq (A.H.A.A.‐J.); rossilawati@ukm.edu.my (R.S.)  Abstract: This review describes a cloud‐based intelligent power management system that uses ana‐ lytics as a control signal and processes balance achievement pointer, and describes operator ac‐ knowledgments that must be shared quickly, accurately, and safely. The current study aims to in‐ troduce a conceptual and systematic structure with three main components: demand power (direct  current (DC)‐device), power mix between renewable energy (RE) and other power sources, and a  cloud‐based  power  optimization  intelligent  system.  These  methods  and techniques  monitor  de‐ Citation: AL‐Jumaili, A.H.A.;   mand power (DC‐device), load, and power mix between RE and other power sources. Cloud‐based  Al Mashhadany, Y.I.; Sulaiman, R.;   power optimization intelligent systems lead to an optimal power distribution solution that reduces  Alyasseri, Z.A. A Conceptual and  power consumption or costs. Data has been collected from reliable sources such as Science Direct,  Systematics for Intelligent Power  IEEE Xplore, Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and PubMed. The overall findings of these  Management System‐Based Cloud  studies are visually explained in the proposed conceptual framework through the literature that are  Computing: Prospects, and   considered to be cloud computing based on storing and running the intelligent systems of power  Challenges. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820.  https://doi.org/10.3390/app11219820  management and mixing.  Academic Editors:   Keywords: power management; state of charge; battery aging; dc‐device; power consumption; re‐ Paula Fraga‐Lamas,   newable energy; cloud computing  Tiago M. Fernández‐Caramés   and Sérgio Ivan Lopes  Received: 16 August 2021  1. Introduction  Accepted: 8 October 2021  In the last decade of industrial progress, the world economy has shifted from cheap  Published: 20 October 2021  energy  to  expensive  fuel  consumption.  However,  industrialization  necessitates  an  in‐ creasing amount of energy, which is a condition for humanity’s economic prosperity and  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neu‐ tral with regard to jurisdictional  sustainability [1]. Awareness of the relative constraints of traditional energy resource ex‐ claims in published maps and insti‐ haustion is essential; however, the restricted energy supply from RE sources is necessary.  tutional affiliations.  Thus, these two factors have not only a two‐fold influence on energy and economic de‐ velopment only, but also on the environment. A cyber‐physical system in which electrical  components are controlled by a computer and connected to a network of other computer‐ controlled physical equipment is known as a power grid [2]. The power grid includes the  Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Li‐ movement of electricity and information between the power grid and control centers [3].  censee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  Safe and reliable grid operation requires controlling the energy flow such that the supply  This article  is an open access article  and demand can be well balanced in real‐time [4]. It is necessary to ensure that infor‐ distributed under the terms and con‐ mation flows as intended as any disruption in information flow will affect the correct  ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ conduct of energy flow and the system’s safe and dependable functioning [5,6]. In tradi‐ tribution (CC BY) license (http://crea‐ tivecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11219820  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  2  of  42  tional power networks, the supply and demand balancing are generally achieved by ad‐ justing the output of centralized generating units [5]. When consumption rises, the pro‐ duction must increase to keep up. Similarly, as demand falls, the created production must  be reduced [7].  The power system has witnessed significant modifications in recent years due to the  rapid  growth  of  a  distributed  generation  (DG).  DG,  unlike  centralized  generators,  are  mostly weather‐dependent and hence have limited controllability to meet demand. Due  to their various sizes and network tiers to which they are attached, they also add more  unpredictability to the entire operation [8]. Recent environmental worries about growing  carbon dioxide emissions (CDE), expanding energy needs, and the liberalization of the  electrical industry have drawn the world’s attention to renewable energy technology [9].  Although the integration of intermittent RE generation into electrical power systems is  still relatively new in the evolution of electrical systems, it is popular all over the world  due to its technical advantages such as improved voltage profile, power quality (PQ), volt‐ age stability, reliability and grid support [8]. According to the modern grid initiative study  from the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), a modern smart grid (SG) must  be capable of self‐healing and distributing high‐quality power in order to avoid wasting  money due to outages [9].  This study focuses on the uses of a variety of RE sources, including unlimited and  other power sources. Moreover, it focuses on conserving energy and spending it wisely  following its direction and location. Furthermore, reducing costs by using suitable energy  sources depends on prioritizing using a multi‐heuristic technique for intelligent power  systems. All these processes and data will be saves and controlled by a cloud computing  framework using a cloud sim. Cloud computing can be a great addition to any system  aiming for an optimal solution for power distribution to reduce cost and waste power and  time.  1.1. Smart Energy Systems  Societies on a global scale have reached a tipping point from fossil fuel power gener‐ ation to sustainable alternatives. However, wireless connectivity plays a critical role in  this transformation by enabling innovative smart energy systems (SESs) [9]. SES is a novel  solution, which integrates energy generating and storage technologies with ‘intelligent’  applications, regulating and optimizing their usage. Cloud computing can use combined  multiple energy sources with storage systems to manage them [10]. Furthermore, signifi‐ cant points to improve SES require real‐time performance decisions based on technical  features and climatic data, surplus renewable power generation, and building decentral‐ ized energy systems with excellent efficiency and lower cost [11]. In addition, to reduce  rising  environmental  hazards  such  as  increasing  global  mean  temperature  and  green‐ house gas emissions, energy systems are experiencing a rapid transition toward low‐car‐ bon intelligent systems [12]. Unlike traditional energy systems, which dispatch various  generators  to  meet  changing  demand,  future  energy  systems  include  two‐way  energy  flows between providers and consumers and active engagement of customers as prosum‐ ers in various electrical markets [13]. Under the suggested micro‐market, not completely  controllable loads were rescheduled by changing specific lectures, research timelines and  optimization by a self‐crossover genetic algorithm (GA) [14]. The numerical findings re‐ vealed that the suggested micro‐market and algorithm efficiently increased load flexibility  and resulted in increased cost savings for intelligent energy systems [15,16], as shown in  Figure 1.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  3  of  42  Figure 1. The schematic illustrates the smart energy system.  1.2. Background  The fast development of power stockpiling has received considerable attention lately  [17].  The  power  stockpiling  technique  represents  a  popular  system  used  in  the  most  widely fixed and portable way [18]. Technique energy distribution consists of production,  conveyance, allocation, scattered network methods, demand, administration [19]. Modern  gadgets generally include many detectors to regulate and manage process variables di‐ rectly. The detectors may recognize and prevent possible system faults. It is impossible to  improve energy management strategies on the future route until accurate information is  available [19]. As a result, the obvious visibility, high detection levels, and improved level  of performance have attracted much interest. Artificial intelligence (AI) has become the  focus of interest, particularly in industrial sectors, for its smart and precise natural deposit  administration [20]. AI integration of fog will vastly improve the range of computing and  execution speed of its base sensors in the industry [21]. However, a significant issue in  using such energy‐hungry gadgets, battery aging, and intolerable delays on the portable  appliance is a traditional and inefficient fair distribution of precise natural trends. De‐ manding power management and control are critical to enhancing safety [20], reliability  [17], performance, and cost [22]. Demanding power management is a choking technique  due to a complicated process that is difficult to observe. Thus, it is a significant method  for managing batteries to concentrate on developing a cloud‐based battery for managing  batteries based on an intelligent system that employs a machine‐learning technique capa‐ ble  of  operating  consistently  during  changing  environmental  settings  [23].  Enhanced  freightage techniques are essential to later development predictions of more intelligent  batteries, as the freightage efficiency has a significant impact on customer approval or  rejection [24]. Technology‐managing batteries on the cloud are proposed to enhance sys‐ information stored  tems through enhancing arithmetic power ability, amount of data, and  on the internet. The internet‐connected battery data is examined and analyzed and it is  highly reliant on the supervision center framework for computation and connections and  uses a cloud‐based application server to assure procedure continuation independent of  local infrastructure access and availability [21]. In addition, the growing demand for elec‐ tricity worldwide, the environmental pressures, and the large‐scale penetration of inter‐ mittent renewable energy sources (RESs) are compromising the operation of the electricity  grid and creating new technical and economic challenges for network operators [25]. The  worrying rise in power usage, natural pollution, global warming, and the exhaustion of  coal and oil sources is pushing today’s academics to make renewable electricity gathering  easier [26]. The insertion of integrating solar panels in traditional electricity transmission  lines has been proved fruitful [27]. However, variables such as solar irradiance, coverage  of clouds, time of sunlight hours, and heat in the surroundings wreak havoc on renewable  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  4  of  42  output power and total energy efficiency, which may be mitigated by combining renew‐ able panels with energy storage devices [28,29]. The large penetration of solar power can  cause significant voltage swings, through the use of energy storage devices. Solar power  with a manageable energy storage system device also saves money for customers by re‐ ducing power consumption [30,31]. The collected information and data are conveyed to  the cloud smoothly, which leads to creating a battery system’s digital twin, as well as the  battery analytical techniques that will evaluate the information and provide insight into  the battery‐grade level and aging [18,32]. To explore the advancement of information of  data and connection technology, combining fossil fuels with clean power, and implement‐ ing energy management using the cloud, powered pivot, and gathered loads were used  to enhance power economization in a smart society [24].  2. Smart Grids System  The growing energy demand has led researchers to establish a new energy manage‐ ment mechanism or find alternate energy resources [33]. For this purpose, the utility trans‐ forms its infrastructure into intelligent smart grids (SGs) by using bi‐directional commu‐ nication technologies to make wise decisions [34]. SGs mix electric power and bidirec‐ tional  communication  that  supply  the  end‐user  with  a  high‐performance and  efficient  mechanism by combining integration and communication technologies [35,36]. In this sec‐ tion, five of the major aspects will be discussed to show the best scope of these systems  based on smart grid benefits, opportunities and components as depicted in Figure 2. These  aspects are demand response (DR), power supply (PS), distributed energy resource (DER),  microgrid trading (MT) and virtual power plants (VPPs) [37].  Figure 2. Smart grid opportunity, benefits, and components.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  5  of  42  2.1. Demand Response (DR)  The world’s most pressing concern today is energy. As a backup generator, fossil  fuels are frequently employed, although their production of CO2 affects life and the envi‐ ronment [38,39]. A novel technique called DR makes virtual generation better DR [40,41].  Users may program their gadgets using this approach. There are several issues with tra‐ ditional smart‐grid design (without the cloud) [42], which is the master‐slave design that  led to a risk of distributed denial of service (DDoS). However, any error may cause the  entire system to fail [43]. There is a limit on how many clients may serve due to memory  storage limitations, stability, and management [44]. Besides, information and data man‐ agement  challenges,  which  millions  of  intelligent  meters  necessitate  for  an  effective  method for handling massive amounts of data [45]. Cloud computing may provide a cost‐ effective alternative for data analytic and storage methods [46,47]. Recently, the high in‐ sertion of green power, the advancement and implementation of new technology such as  electricity storage methods and electronics technologies, and the effective engagement of  (DR)  from  the  user  aspect,  the  intelligent  network  is  currently  succumbing  to  a  deep  change [48]. Customers’/clients’ power consuming routines are changed by DR due to the  current power cost, benefit plans, and whenever the device dependability is threatened  [49]. DR’s elastic scheduling may be tailored to customers’ economy and power use goals,  that have been used over time to help business, manufacturing, and housing customers  reduce their power consumption [50]. DR scheduling is classified depending on reward  and cost. These two groups are intertwined, and many of their activities are customized  to reach mutually beneficial objectives [51]. DR is the favored procedure of participation  among clients and the electricity network in the electricity marketing development. In ad‐ dition to minimizing the variance among maximum load and maximum valley, the load  profile could be developed; these lead to making the device’s cost cheaper, and to the  system pressure being relieved to obtain more money to be invested in raising the load.  DR lowers the price of their energy usage for energy users, impacting their pleasure [52].  The home load has the highest ability to profoundly alter the requirement peak load amid  the weights that may successfully involve DR [53]. Users may be overseeing and admin‐ istering personal electricity using DR services. Consumers are motivated to employ clean  power  and  allocate  energy‐saving  technologies  to  conserve  electricity,  lower  personal  power costs, and make money by selling their extra electricity to the system through DR  programs [54,55]. It is essential to provide a reliable, accurate, cost‐effective, and safe elec‐ tricity energy. The above technological advances should be able to combine the behaviors  of many participants, buyers, suppliers, and prosumers efficiently [56,57]. The demand  response procedure’s success in regulating supply, conservation, call for cooperation, and  lowering energy costs is proven based on a prototype electrical system [58,59]. For in‐ stance,  the  energy  information  administration’s  last  annual  energy  outlook  study  pre‐ dicted that household power demand will rise in the next few years [60–62].  2.2. Power Supply  An  electrical  device  transforms  electricity  (the  proper  voltage,  current,  and  fre‐ quency) from a source to an electrical load [63]. This section describes the relationship  between power and energy, and their management techniques; as seen in Equation (4)  and (5). Both power and energy are defined in terms of the work that a system accom‐ plishes. It is critical to understand the distinction between power and energy. A reduction  in power consumption does not always imply a reduction in the amount of energy uti‐ lized. For example, reduce central processing units (CPU) performance by lowering volt‐ age and frequency led to reduced power consumption. It may take longer to complete the  program execution in this situation. The amount of energy consumed may not be reduced  even with reducing power usage [64]. As explained in the next parts, energy consumption  may decrease through implementing static power management (SPM), dynamic power  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  6  of  42  management (DPM), or by combining the two solutions and services [65,66]. Furthermore,  electricity consumption may be divided into three categories:  First: The energy consumed via parts of the system due to leaking electricity in the  supplied technique is called SPM. It is unaffected by clock rates and does not rely on use  situations dictated by the device type and architecture used in the service’s CPU [67].  Second: Dynamic power consumption (DPC): This type of energy usage is caused by  device action and is largely influenced by clock rates, I/O traffic, and the utilization situa‐ tion. DPC is caused by two factors: changed capacity and short circuit current [68,69]. To  identify basic terms: Charge can be defined as the quantity of electricity responsible for  electric phenomena in Coulombs (C). Current is defined as the passage of electric signals  through a network for each component during a given period, measured in amperes (A),  which is expressed in Equation (1) [70]. Voltage is the amount of effort or energy necessary  to move an electric charge, measured in volts (V) and expressed in Equation (2). Power is  the system’s rate of work, measured in watts (W), described in Equation (3). Compute  power is the element current multiplied by the element voltage, expressed in Equation (4).  Energy is the entire quantity of tasks finished during a period of time, measured in watt‐ hours (WH), described in Equation (5).  ∆c (1) a   ∆t where a is ampere, ∆c is change of current and ∆𝑡   is change of time.  ∆w (2) v   ∆c where v is Volt and ∆w is change of watt and ∆𝑐   is change of current.  ∆w (3) p   ∆t where p is power, ∆w is change of watt, ∆t  is change of time.  ∆w ∆c ∆w (4) P ∗  a∗ v  ∆t ∆t ∆c via derivation and substitution of variables,  P a∗ v  (5) E P ∗ ∆t  where E stands for energy, P for power, and ∆t stands for alteration of time.  2.2.1. Battery Management  The battery management is worked from different perspectives, such as automati‐ cally controlling the SoG and the system that maintains battery aging and health. The rest  of the research society considered the authority of the power consumption and reduced  the costs of PS [71]. (GA) [72], particle swarm optimization (PSO) [73], fuzzy logic (FL)  [74], metaheuristic optimization algorithms (MOA) [27], etc. have all been used to pre‐ serve battery life and control the charging process, which includes charging from 20% and  stopping when it reaches 95%. These methods and algorithms use a mix of energy sources  ranging from wind energy, fossil energy, solar energy, and RE [75,76]. However, the focus  is to resolve the issues between battery control and energy supplies used during freight‐ age (see Figure 3).  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  7  of  42  Figure 3. Power consumption control.  State of Charge (SoC)  A cell (SoC) depicts current capacity as a function of its rated capacity. The SoC’s  value  ranges  from  0  to  100  percent.  The  cell  is  fully  loaded  if  the  SoC  is  100  percent,  whereas an SoC of zero percent shows that the cell is entirely discharged [77]. In practical  applications, the percentage or level that defines the start or end of the charging process  is varied according to the charging system, whether it is manual or automatic. The begin‐ ning SoC is assigned as 0% and target charging SoC as 80% to compare improvements. In  the same study, the optimal charging current series for 0%–80% SoC with different setting  time had charging times that ranged from 1 to 3 h, with a step of 0.5 h. Knowing the battery  beginning SoC, the target SoC, and the charging time, it has been found that the current  charging command can be easily calculated by the database‐based method. Compared  with the constant current charging strategy, the proposed method can effectively decrease  the charging loss [72]. Furthermore, electrochemical techniques and post‐mortem exami‐ nation allowed the samples kept at 30%, 60%, and 100% SoC and 55 °C to be comprehen‐ sively examined. It was determined that the most severe capacity fading occurred when  the batteries were kept at 55 degrees Celsius and 100% SoC [78]. In addition, higher stored  SoC  resulted  in  a  more  substantial  rise  in  bulk  resistance  (Rb)  and  charge–transfer  re‐ sistance (Rct) of a full battery at 55 °C. Still, the discharge rate capability of the stored bat‐ tery remained unchanged [73]. Furthermore, higher stored SoC resulted in a more sub‐ stantial rise in bulk resistance (Rb) and charge–transfer resistance (Rct) of a full battery at  55 °C. Still, the discharge rate capability of the stored battery remained unchanged [78].  However, the minimum SoC in the study never fell below 20% to avoid reducing battery  life. Therefore, there was always 20% energy in the batteries in this study [73]. Factors  such as charge, discharge rate, and charging/discharging hours played a significant role  in correcting the load characteristic of the grid, and the islanded micro‐grid was the opti‐ mal operation of energy systems [73]. The numerical simulations were used to evaluate  the system’s net savings for various SoC settings in the control strategy. Considering ex‐ panding data samples, the proposed approximate dynamic programming approach beat  the  classic  dynamic  programming  approach  [79].  The  proposed  approximate  dynamic  programming approach for microgrid power system optimization problems is a compu‐ tationally efficient tool [80,81] (Figure 4).  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  8  of  42  Figure 4. State of charge (SoC).  Battery Life  Determining battery aging is a crucial issue to predict the available charge in battery‐ operated systems [82]. According to the literature, the batteries were charged and dis‐ charged in 5 h to produce a 5 kilowatt (KW) average, while the battery life was anticipated  to be around ten years [73]. In comparison to the standard charging method, the results  showed that the multi‐stage constant current charging technique could significantly re‐ duce charging time by 56.8%, extend battery life by 21%, and enhance energy efficiency  by roughly 0.4 percent of constant current and constant voltage [83]. Moreover, we used  four cells for experiments to ensure the consistency of the results and to reduce the effect  of the cell‐to‐cell variations [84]. The cells were new and uncycled and stored in a ther‐ mally managed storage chamber at 10 °C° at 50% SoC before experiments to minimize  their calendar aging [84]. In addition, different temperatures, charge–discharge rates, and  the depth of discharge can give rise to the evolution of the dominant aging reactions that  can offer guidance in selecting a reasonable factor range when designing accelerated aging  tests  [85].  However,  the  autoregressive  recurrent  Gaussian  process  regression  (GPR),  which considers current and historical voltage, current, and temperature measurements,  as well as the prior SoC estimate, increased the estimation performance [86]. In addition,  this battery management system (BMS) with FL controller method improved the battery’s  function and life [87].  Power Consumption  Reducing energy costs is another subject in battery management, as many research‐ ers considered reducing power consumption in their studies. The electricity needed to  operate the system is not produced by the deployed MG system [88]. Therefore, a sizing  method based on the system’s consumption profile and the site’s weather conditions was  introduced to upgrade the MG system to produce the total electricity needed by the load  [89]. Moreover, they found that integration of a photovoltaic system leads to the reduced  economic viability of the battery by reducing the revenues generated by the battery while  performing peak shaving [89]. In addition, we proposed a scheme that creates three clus‐ ters of various objective functions to coordinate charging and discharging cycles; the first  cluster uses time of use tariffs to reduce grid‐integrated energy storage batteries (GIESBs)  power  charging  costs.  The  second  cluster  uses  per‐unit  generation  from  photovoltaics  (PVs) and wind turbines (WTs) to reduce GIESBs charging power. The third cluster, how‐ ever, reduces the GIE’s discharge capacity [90].  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  9  of  42  2.2.2. Renewable Energy (RE)  Integrating RE with other power sources is considered to achieve many objectives: 1)  reduce the carbon footprint; 2) reduce costs of power consumption [91]. This selection  must assure user safety, efficiency, and cost savings for a given application. As a result,  criteria such as  power  consumption,  application  deployment area, cable size, and  line  transmission losses are considered. This method was used to create a 48 V DC bus in a  small‐scale laboratory system with minimal power usage [91]. Furthermore, an electric  bus management system (EBMS) considers variables that may have an impact on distri‐ bution network or bus efficiency, such as the power tariff. To counteract the negative ef‐ fects of opportunity charging systems, RE‐based charging stations can be installed. The  number  of possibilities for  configuring  connections to be lowered during the hours of  22:00–23:00 h, encourages discussion about linked DC motor load with wind and solar  power‐based hybrid power systems based on a simulated outcome [92]. A battery‐based  energy storage system is used to control the excess power generation to maximize the  utilization of these energy sources based on the required load [93]. The switching transi‐ ents of renewable sources and batteries do not affect DC motor speed (load), and hence  constant output power as per requirement is available. The adaptability of artificial neural  networks (ANNs) allows the system to be tested in a different scenario. The controller can  be trained for any change in the signal. The training accuracy is 94% [94]. It will also re‐ quire city utility authorities combining novel grid elements on the Internet of RE domain  in order to actualize a sustainable, transformed smart city. In the future, power business,  pure renewable electricity grid structural assets, and Internet of RE technology will be‐ come increasingly valued [95]. The primary motivation for this expected paradigm shift  toward renewable power grids on the Internet is to manage electricity storage [96]. The  cross‐cutting nature of solely renewable electricity grid architecture on the Internet of RE  platforms and intelligent city elements will help shape future environmentally friendly  towns [94]. Energy management systems (EMS) for various RESs target small DC grids  for remote rural communities with unstable load conditions [97].The technology can be  used to electrify rural settlements with the greatest possible use of RESs and storage de‐ vices. The power dissipates to the consumer through maximum RE penetration and bat‐ teries throughout the day without any divergence in the system, according to simulation  and experimental investigations of the DC micro‐grid with the suggested EMS [97]. Micro‐ grid implementation is a viable method for improving supply quality while lowering sus‐ tainable energy implementation costs.  For a hybrid micro‐grid (HMG), a control scheme presents a structure for ensuring  continuous PS to consumers in fifteen different modes of operation. PV, fuel cells, wind,  and battery storage with configurable characteristics that were all investigated. The su‐ pervisory controller sets the reference values for the generation subsystems using the state  machine approach by following a predetermined path. The discrepancy between the gen‐ erated and demanded power, as well as SoC, are considered by the fuzzy controller dur‐ ing charging and discharging battery banks. As a result, in order to obtain the best system  configuration and component sizing by defining objective functions for energy cost and  power loss probability, the multi‐objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO) meth‐ odology was utilized. The modeling findings show an increase in the price of electricity,  which leads to a significant increase in the use of HMG based on renewable resources. As  a result, harnessing renewable resources to create electric power in India’s remote places  is a viable option [98]. Based on the literature, algorithms of battery management, RE, and  cloud computing are summarized in Tables 1 and 2.      Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  10  of  42  Table 1. Summary of the literature algorithms of battery management, renewable energy, and cloud computing.  Category  Algorithm & Tools  Battery Categories  Ref.  Several types of batteries,  Constant current/Constant voltage (CC/CV)  [99,100]  Lithium‐ion Battery  Arbitrage optimization algorithm  CubeSat battery algorithm (CubeSat)  Non‐Available  (NA)  Maximum efficiency tracking (MEET)  [22,27,101,102]  MOA  First access first charge (FAFC) scheduling  Flat feeder profile  Battery Management  (GA)  Lithium‐ion Battery  [72,103,104]  JAYA algorithm  Pontryagin’s minimum principle (PMP)  Electric vehicles batteries,  PSO  [28,73,75]  Lithium‐ion Battery  Orthogonal least squares algorithm  Lithium‐ion Battery  [86]  MATLAB algorithm  Variety of batteries  [105]  Liquid cold plate control equation  LiFePO4 battery  [106]  Stochastic algorithm  Electric vehicles batteries  [107]  (GA)  NA  [108,109]  Markov decision process (MDP)  Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm (LMA)  Renewable energy  Gaussian algorithm  Several of batteries  [110]  Forgetting factor algorithm  Trust‐region reflective  BMS‐Master and BMS‐Slave  Lithium‐ion and lead‐acid batteries  [18]  The home energy management system (HEMS)  Electric vehicles batteries  [111,112]  Branch and bound algorithm  Cloud Computing  Smart home energy management system (SHEMS)  NA  Energy‐performance trade‐off multi resource cloud task  [113,114]  scheduling algorithm (ETMCTSA)  Table 2. Assessment and analysis of the literature studies for battery management (BM), renewable energy (RE), and cloud  computing (CC).  Implementation  Tools/Algorithm  Achievement  BM  Ref.  RE  CC  Dc‐Device  Constant current (CC)/con‐ Reduce the number of battery chargers to Improvements battery charg‐ ✓  ×  ×  [99]  stant voltage (CV)  ing and management.  Propose a new charging algorithm to reducing the charge energy and  GA  ×  ×  [72]  ✓  loss.  Three types of battery energy storage systems (BESSs) were used to im‐ MEET algorithm  ✓  ×  ×  [102]  prove the system’s availability and energy efficiency.  Orthogonal least squares al‐ Provide a feature stemming from (GPR) for deduces the unknown SoC  ✓  ×  ×  [86]  gorithm  value’s probability allocation  The numerical analysis illustrates adaptive resonant beam charging  Scheduling algorithm  (ARBC) led to 61% battery charging energy and 53%‐ 60% supplied  ✓  ×  ×  [22]  power.  used optimum charging methods are reduced charge times, perfor‐ GA  ✓  ×  ×  [83]  mance improved, and extended battery life  The sorting and cumulative voltage summation (SCVS) was shown to  MATLAB algorithm  perform the best through the solar energy option of charging the bat‐ ✓  ×  ×  [105]  tery.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  11  of  42  PSO developed based on  A hybrid approach uses to manage the electric vehicle charging station  standard IEEE 69‐Buses net‐ (EVCS) to peak shaving and the most efficient charging/discharging of  ✓  ×  ×  [73]  work  EVs applied to a standard network (IEEE 69 buses).  Scheduling controllers can reduce the power consumption and costs of  PSO ✓  ×  ×  [28]  grids.  A battery energy storage system (BESS) capable of discharging for 1.5–2  Arbitrage optimization algo‐ h at maximum power and provides quick response and energy arbi‐ ✓  ×  ×  [115]  rithm  trage.  Choosing electric power system (EPS) architectural converters for solar  CubeSat battery algorithm  ✓  ×  ×  [101]  panels and unregulated dc‐bus have the maximum efficiency.  A double‐layer metaheuristic optimizer provides a novel stochastic  MOA  technique for optimizing solar hosting capacity in distribution net‐ ✓  ×  ×  [27]  works.  Propose a simple statistical model to breaking a battery energy storage  Stochastic algorithm  ✓  ×  ×  [107]  system up into minor segments that lead to significant increases.  Compact and optimized SOC estimating model for statistical error val‐ JAYA algorithm  ✓  ×  ×  [104]  ues such as SOC error used to validate the model’s performance.  Reduce the amount of data sent by extracting features voltage descrip‐ NA  ×  ×  [116]  ✓  tive.  Clean electric power using information and communication technology  NA  ✓  ✓  ×  [117]  (ICT), the user can monitor the load, battery, and panel current.  The household load control system that included (RESs) led to lowered  GA  cost of electricity from (228 to 51) USD and the peak‐to‐average ratio  ×  ✓  ×  [108]  (PAR) from 2.68 to 1.12.  LMA, Gaussian algorithm  Established microgrid system for testing and simulation, focusing on  and Trust‐Region Reflective  dimensioning and control techniques, the residue discovered less than  ×  [110]  ✓  ✓  Algorithm (TRRA)  5%.  The smart monitoring and control system preserves and manipulates  (SHEMS)  data from the PV, wind energy conversion system (WECS), and batter‐ ×  [113]  ✓  ✓  ies.  Propose an energy‐efficient approach that can operate in an online fash‐ Branch and bound algorithm  ×  ×  [111]  ✓  ion ANN‐based approach outperforms all benchmarks.  Propose a cloud control strategy to enhance the analytical electrical en‐ BMS‐Master and BMS‐Slave ergy and information storage in the cloud using lithium‐ion and lead‐ ×  [18]  ✓  ✓  acid batteries.  Propose a closed‐loop program for an effective management strategy  NA  ×  [118]  ✓  ✓  for lithium‐ion batteries by concurrently changing factors.  Propose the energy‐efficient hybrid (EEH) scheme for increasing electri‐ cal energy consumption efficiency using a single strategy to minimize  ETMCTSA  ×  ×  ✓  [114]  energy usage in terms of power use effectiveness (PUE) and data center  energy productivity (DCEP).  Design embedded network platform using smart sensor gadgets with  NA  telecommunication functions and molecular channel systems to main‐ ×  ×  ✓  [119]  tain battery health.  Optimization algorithm of  The combine between a smart thermostat and (HEMSs) a 53.2 percent  ×  ×  ✓  [112]  the HEMS  decrease in daily costs is obtained (TOU)  2.3. Distributed Energy Resource  DER are energy generating and storage systems that supply power where required.  DER systems, which produce less than 10 megawatts (MWs) of power, may generally be  scaled to fit your specific needs and can be installed on‐site. Therefore, one single source  is limited and can probably be costly, whereas to achieve efficient energy storage, a com‐ bination of all technologies is required. Power conversion systems for storage purposes  must also be considered [120]. This is required to increase their control and dependability,  as well as to ensure that storage systems are properly integrated into power networks  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  12  of  42  [121]. A next‐generation SG without energy storage is similar to a computer without a  hard drive—severely limited [122]. A suitable EMS is required to obtain the optimum per‐ formance for clusters of distributed energy resources (DERs). The multi‐agent systems  (MASs) paradigm, as utilized and described, may be used to organize distributed control  methods [123]. Some of the benefits of employing MASs for successful, intelligent grid  operation in the energy market are discussed in [124,125]. The MAS application reduces  the overall cost of power system production, integrated microgrids, comprised dispersed  resources, and lumped loads [126]. To maximize the hybrid RE production system’s eco‐ nomic performance and energy quality, a hybrid immune‐system‐based PSO was pre‐ sented and applied to reduce fuel cost in the generating process [126].  Conversely, the distribution system operator (DSO) can dispatch at least a portion of  the DERs; implementation of a coordinated integration of the various DERs recommends  a centralized method. The best operating strategy of the DER system is generally analyzed  by using a multi‐objective linear programming methodology in centralized control meth‐ ods [127]. The combination of the energy costs with the reduction of environmental effects  suggest  reducing  operational  costs,  including  energy  losses,  curtailed  energy,  reactive  support, and shed energy [128,129]. Additionally implemented is a two‐stage short‐term  scheduling process. The first task is to create a day‐ahead scheduler to optimize DER pro‐ duction for the next day. In the second step, an intra‐day scheduler that modifies sched‐ uling every 15 min is also proposed, which considers the distribution network’s operation  needs and restrictions, as shown in Figure 5 [130].  Figure 5. Schematic illustrating concepts of distributed energy resources.  2.4. Microgrid Trading  Microgrids are small‐scale power networks that provide a more flexible and reliable  energy distribution in limited geographic regions [131]. For fulfilling local demands, they  generally use DERs such as distributed generating units and energy storage facilities. As  a result, they can minimize dependency on the traditional centralized power grid (also  known as a microgrid or primary grid in power system literature) that generally relies on  massive central station generation [132]. Besides, the environmental benefits of using lo‐ cally accessible RESs such as solar panels, fuel cells, or WTs also have economic benefits  because if DERs and loads are physically close together, microgrids can minimize trans‐ mission and distribution losses [133–135]. A microgrid system was used to maintain the  energy arbitrage, balance, reserve frequency regulation and transmission‐level for voltage  control, investment deferral, grid capacity support at the distribution level, time‐of‐use  (TOU) cost management, etc. [136–138]. Furthermore, it considered as a detection device  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  13  of  42  from the connected grid and operate autonomously in island mode if technical or eco‐ nomic situations demand, which is considered as local energy in the surrounding area  [139]. Power delivery from a distance is inefficient because part of the electricity—as much  as 8% to 15%—evaporates in route. A microgrid solves this inefficiency by generating  power close to the people it serves; the generators are either nearby or within [140,141]. A  microgrid system warrants research attention for several reasons: first, it is local, making  electricity close to the people you serve; generators are near or within the building or on  the roof in solar panels. The tiny network addresses inefficiencies in significant networks,  which lose energy during transmission from producing units to transmission and distri‐ bution lines across vast distances. Second, it is independent and can be disconnected from  the primary grid and run on its own. When the electrical system goes down due to a storm  or other disaster, they must deliver power to their consumers. Third, the generators, bat‐ teries, and surrounding building energy systems are all controlled by microgrid intelli‐ gence. In addition, the controller coordinates a variety of resources in order to meet the  energy goals of the microgrid’s consumers, which can be searching for the cheapest en‐ ergy, the cleanest energy, the most reliable electricity, or something else entirely. The con‐ troller accomplishes these objectives by raising or decreasing any of the microgrid’s re‐ sources or combinations of those resources for optimum impact, as shown in Figure 6  [142].  Figure 6. Schematic illustrating concepts of distributed energy resources.  2.5. Virtual Power Plants (VPPs)  Electrical energy has a significant impact on people’s lives all around the world. As  the  demand  for electricity  grew, the  power  infrastructure and  the  global  environment  were  placed  under  additional  strain  [143,144].  Buildings  are  a  substantial  producer  of  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  14  of  42  greenhouse gases (GHGs) [145,146]. An effective EMS is required to address the fast in‐ crease in demand [147]. Furthermore, several nations have committed to submitting an  annual GHG emission reduction plan under the Paris agreement, making the use of (RESs)  essential  [148,149].  Due  to  the  network’s  new  topology  RESs,  traditional  EMSs  are  no  longer effective. In order to aggregate and accommodate RESs while considering geo‐ graphic distribution and uncertainties, an optimal scheduling algorithm must be devel‐ oped [150,151]. The VPP concept is one of the most promising and practical energy man‐ agement solutions, allowing for unique features by integrating embedded technology and  communication  networks into the  energy system.  Despite the  fact that  Awerbuch and  Preston proposed VPP in 1997, there is still no clear description for the VPP [152]. From a  variety of perspectives, VPPs have been proposed in the literature. At the same time, the  usual inclination is to aggregate DERs for energy management purposes [146]. Many re‐ search has concentrated on business and marketing factors [153]. Other publications, how‐ ever, have emphasized technological viewpoints such as Internet of energy (IoE) [154],  EMS [155], combination of RESs [156], an independent microgrid [110], or a data and con‐ nection system [117]. A trading platform used by DERs to make wholesale market con‐ tracts is known as VPP. VPP is a DER aggregator that considers the impact of the network  on their output [157]. VPP is a control system for DERs, flexible loads, and storage that is  defined as an information and communication system. According to the investigation, a  VPP is a collection of DERs, controllable loads, and storage units combined to operate as  a single power plant, with an EMS at its core [158]. VPP is defined as an aggregation of  several DERs distributed at the distribution network’s medium voltage (MV) level [159].  In general, several solutions have been presented in recent years to overcome the  aforementioned difficulties. The VPP concept is one of the most promising energy man‐ agement  concepts,  allowing  for  unique  features  through  the  integration  of  embedded  technologies and communication networks into the energy system. VPP uses a bidirec‐ tional energy flow to provide real‐time monitoring and energy efficiency. As a result, they  were able to exchange their excess electrical energy on the market without the involve‐ ment of a third party [160]. Prosumers, conversely, who install any small‐scale RES, or  storage (batteries) can trade because the scheduling algorithm maximizes their surplus  energy. Customers without RES or storage can also contribute by moving loads, trimming  peaks, and filling valleys, among other things. Lastly, through enhancing operating plan‐ ning, VPP may conform with power administration rules [161,162], as well as the five  main areas that best illustrate the scope of the intelligent grids system, such as DR, PS,  DER, MT and VPPs, as shown in Table 3.  Table 3. Main scope of the smart grids system.  Main scope  Description  A novel technique makes virtual generation better. Users may program their gadgets for interac‐ Demand Response  tion with the power grid to improve load profile, and user power usage costs should be reduced  without compromising their pleasure.  An electrical device transforms electric current from a source to the proper voltage, current, and  Power supply  frequency to power an electrical load.  Distributed Energy  Systems for producing and storing energy for efficient storage and production that distributes  Resource  electricity where it is needed.  Small‐scale power networks provide more flexible and reliable energy distribution in limited ge‐ ographic regions for fulfilling local demands. As a result, it can minimize dependency on the  Microgrid Trading  centralized power grid by detaching and operate autonomously to reduce transmission, distribu‐ tion losses, energy arbitrage, balance.  It is the most important future solution that can be applied in energy management, and integrat‐ Virtual Power Plants  ing systems and networks into the energy system is a system of telecommunication and infor‐ mation that controls DERs, loads that are adaptable, and storage.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  15  of  42  3. Cloud Computing  Cloud computing is an useful computing paradigm that provides on‐demand access  to facilities and shared resources over the Internet [163]. Infrastructure as a service (IaaS),  platform as a service (PaaS), and service as a service (SaaS) are three notable services it  offers, while storage, virtualization, computing and networking are supported [164,165].  Implementing cloud computing applications is a top priority, especially in today’s envi‐ ronment, for things such as providing appropriate financing for social services and pur‐ chasing programs. Grids are geographically distributed platforms for computation. They  provide  high  computational  power  and  merge  extremely  heterogeneous  physical  re‐ sources into a single virtual resource [166,167]. Grid computing is a set of resources; the  primary resource is the central processing unit (CPU), which is mainly used to perform  massive and complicated calculations. Cloud computing technology is used by the major‐ ity of existing information technology (IT)‐based enterprises. Cloud computing is a rap‐ idly  evolving  technology,  and  companies  are  constantly  adding  new  services  to  their  cloud environments to stay competitive and fulfill customers’ expanding demands [168].  Furthermore, many different organizations are moving their IT‐based systems to cloud‐ based models [169]. Customers can use cloud computing resources in the form of virtual  machines (VMs) that are deployed and run‐in data centers. The data centers are composed  of several physical servers, each with its own set of resources [114]. The cloud computing  ecosystem for energy management is described in Figure 7.  Figure 7. The cloud computing ecosystem for energy management.  3.1. Cloud Computing and Storage of Data  The IaaS model of cloud computing provides consumers with storage services. Peo‐ ple have begun to save their data on clouds due to the large storage capacity [170,171].  Through virtualization, the issues around the storage of user data IoT applications can be  solved by providing storage, processing, and networking resources [172]. In mission de‐ velopment, two‐measure CPU usage and storage capacity are the best typical capabilities  of the cloud to reduce local storage overheads [173]. These parameters’ significance may  minimize computation cost, communication, CPU usage reduction, and battery and data  redundancy elimination in terms of storage and computing by performing task schedul‐ ing.  Research  on  storage  techniques  has  gained  momentum  due  to  the  significant  ad‐ vantages of quick storage services in the cloud. Still, these techniques have specific chal‐ lenges because there is a higher demand for quick access and secure storage. Cisco pre‐ dicts, that by 2021, cloud computing systems will account for around 94 percent of all  computing. Furthermore, by 2025, the size of data created and altered is expected to reach  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  16  of  42  175 zettabytes, according to International Data Corporation (IDC) [174]. The aforemen‐ tioned  necessitates  cloud  suppliers  to  establishing  and  simplifying  additional  services  [114,169].  3.2. Cloud Computing and Software Services  Cloud computing using virtualization technology offers end‐users computational re‐ sources, on‐demand resources, flexibility, dependability, dynamism, scalability, and bet‐ ter availability wherever and at any time, which are examples of different services [175].  Elasticity is one of the keys characteristics of cloud computing, which refers to the sys‐ tem’s capacity to respond to changes in workload [176]. Cloud services are now employed  in  most  applications  via  the  internet,  which  has  become  the  contemporary  economy’s  backbone. As a result, resource scheduling has become a hot topic in the cloud because  ineffective scheduling techniques can lead to a variety of issues, including long computa‐ tion times, reduced profit, poorer throughput, higher cost, and inappropriate resource us‐ age, which are all examples of an uneven workload at resources (over‐utilization or under‐ utilization) [177]. Resource usage in cloud computing is directly related to power con‐ sumption  when  resources  are  not  used  properly (over‐utilization  or  under‐utilization)  due to high processing demand from end users and no service delays from the cloud.  Integrating energy‐sensitive servers has become a popular topic in the cloud world [178].  Therefore, future research is required to address the challenges and meet end‐user de‐ mand  within  a  reasonable  timeframe.  Reducing  power  consumption  by switching un‐ derused hosts to sleep or hibernation without violating service level agreements (SLAs),  which are digital contracts between end users and cloud services, ensures quality of ser‐ vice  while  resources  are  ready.  Therefore,  several  energy‐conscious  server  integration  methods have been proposed in the last decade [179]. Either of the two scenarios is in‐ tended to achieve server consolidation. Most of the suggested scheduling methods must  strive toward greater resource utilization and energy efficiency. However, most available  algorithms are still in their infancy due to constraints [180]. Most algorithms focus on a  single parameter (energy) and ignore other factors such as cost, reaction time, elasticity  during run time, etc. [181].  3.3. Cloud Computing and Energy Savings  Local or green power sources are considered an excellent method to conserve energy  at a data center by locating it near where the electricity is generated to reduce transmission  losses [182]. Shutdown, hibernation, and sending in various low‐power stages are exam‐ ples of cloud computing approaches. At the same time, cloud computer energy consump‐ tion should be managed to optimize energy consumption for a specific computing task.  When it comes to reducing energy usage per unit of work, cloud computing is a more  energy‐efficient option [183]. According to studies, employing the cloud might result in a  38 percent reduction in global data center energy expenditures by 2020, but a 31 percent  reduction in data center power usage (from 201.8 terawatt‐hours (TWh) in 2010 to 139.8  (TWh) in 2020). According to another report [183], cloud computing might help businesses  save billions of dollars on their energy expenses. This equates to a reduction in carbon  emissions of millions of metric tons each year [184].  3.4. Cloud Computers as VPPs  A VPP is a network of multiple tiny power stations (a cluster of dispersed generation  facilities, such as microchips, WTs, small hydro, backup gensets, etc.) that operate as if  they are one power unit [185]. There is a necessity to check the cloud computing entity  linked to the power network in multiple locations, frequently given by several suppliers,  connected to different distributors, and operating in multiple countries at the same time  [186]. Energy consumption can be managed with specialist software designed for cloud  computers and based on the VPP concept; generators are seen as resources and flexible  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  17  of  42  users in the same way that cloud computers are [187]. Furthermore, the cloud computer  is a potentially adaptable consumer. The cloud computer software already aggregates and  controls its consumption; therefore, it performs the function of a VPP [187]. Existing cloud  systems as consumers and energy systems as producers are separate systems that typi‐ cally operate in parallel with little cooperation during one‐way PS. To attain higher overall  performance, such parallel networks require more complicated interaction [188]. The load  provided by cloud computer centers provides a reliable picture of consumption demand.  This energy storage device is an effective way for owners to reduce electric power prices  while also reducing demand on the power grid [189]. The SG should be sensitive to the  electricity system’s present load. The computational cost of methods to minimize power  consumption is determined by the required delay and the amount of load to be reduced.  These application execution and scheduling models will need to account for cloud re‐ source availability [190,191]. This strategy could include launching more VMs as demand  for power rises, or expanding cumulative bandwidth capacity to handle a higher sampling  rate of streaming data [185].  4. Big Data  With  the  increased  use  of  numerous  digital  devices  that  generate  heterogeneous,  structured, or unstructured data in recent years, the volume of data has exploded, culmi‐ nating  in  what  is  now  known  as  huge  data  [192].  Traditional  database  systems  have  proven inefficient when it comes to storing, processing, and analyzing large amounts of  data [193]. As a result, handling big data is a critical component of business and manage‐ ment rivalry. Nonetheless, it has posed a new challenge for both science and industry in  terms of information and communication technologies, driving the development of data‐ centric architectures and operational models [194,195].  Since normal tools and methods are not built to manage such huge data quantities,  the emergence of big data has highlighted a serious management dilemma [196]. At the  same time, conventional infrastructures are unable to meet the distributed computational  needs of managing vast amounts and types of data. This is owing to the increasing num‐ ber and complexity of data sets, as well as their volatility, which makes processing and  analysis difficult to perform using standard data management approaches and technology  [197]. Current infrastructure struggles to keep up with massive amounts of data, yet it is  a difficult task [198]. The current methods and technology for handling big data manage‐ ment issues place a premium on volume, variety, and pace [199].  Moreover, big data comprise complex data that are massively produced and man‐ aged in geographically dispersed repositories [200]. To handle enormous data difficulties,  innovative  management  strategies  and  technologies  are  motivated  by  this  complexity  [201]. Although there have been several studies on giant data management, none have  been thoroughly investigated. Giant data mechanisms are summarized in Figure 8.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  18  of  42  Figure 8. Big data mechanisms.  4.1. Big Data in Smart Grid  An intelligent grid architecture model includes a framework from three dimensions  that combines layers, zones, and in the realms of generation, transmission, distribution,  DER, and customer premises, there are several domains to evaluate a SG [202]. An energy  network with an embedded information layer generates a large amount of data in the grid,  such as measurement techniques and monitoring instructions, which must be collected,  transmitted, stored, and analyzed quickly and comprehensively [203]. The data analysis  platform also presented several opportunities and difficulties [202,204]. The massive data  characteristics in SG in many studies are consistent with the widespread 5 V vast data  paradigm as shown in the Table 4 [205,206].  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  19  of  42  Table 4. Main features of big data in smart grids as revealed.  Features of Big Data  Description  Smart meters and advanced sensor technologies are becoming more widely used in the SG  Volume  generates a tremendous quantity of data. As a result, standard database technology can’t  store or interpret data sets that are too big.  The rate at which new data are created and moved while the demand for real‐time data shar‐ Velocity  ing is growing and posing a new issue.  Words, digital images, detector data, and video are examples of unstructured data that may  Variety  be integrated with typical structured data utilizing big data technology.  The messiness and trustworthiness of the data. The effective management of the electricity  system is based on data analysis and state estimate. Therefore, the data transfer faults or de‐ Veracity  vices and a large amount of big data lead to problems in the data analysis results, as well as  measurement mistakes.  The capability to draw out important data from massive amounts of data while maintaining  Virtual  a clear sense of its worth. Big data makes obtaining valuable information harder.  4.1.1. Data Sources in Smart Grids  SGs,  similar  to  intelligent  energy  and  information  system,  have  a  variety  of  data  sources. Data is collected from sub‐stations, distribution switch stations, and power me‐ ters [207]. In addition, nonelectrical data such as trade, economic data, etc. are included in  the  information  source.  For  power  plant  scheduling,  subsystem  functioning,  essential  power equipment maintenance, marketing business behavior, data collecting and analysis  are considered critical [208]. Measurement, business, and outer data are the three types of  data sources described above [209]. Most power system operating characteristics are as‐ sessed using installed sensors and smart meters that offer data on the system’s present  and historical condition [210]. Social activity such as carnivals and weather conditions are  examples of data from outside sources that cannot be monitored by smart meters, yet still  affect the work and design of the electricity system. The data for business mainly consist  of trading techniques and customer demand [211].  4.1.2. Techniques Collecting Data in Smart Grids  The intelligent grid collects and sends data from intelligent meters, providing energy  information to all companies and customers [212]. The amount of intelligent meter read‐ ings for residential customers is anticipated to increase from 24 million per year to 220  million per day for a prominent utility provider [210]. In high voltage (HV)/MV trans‐ formers for voltage control, the present magnitude data is required for the automated on‐ load tap changer [213]. A standard intelligent meter measures voltage at the node, current  at the feeder, load conditions, reactive power flow, and energies over time, complete con‐ cord alteration, and load up demand and among other things [214].  4.1.3. Techniques Transmission Data in Smart Grids  The smart grid’s foundation communication is divided into home space networks,  district space networks, and wide‐space networks [215,216]. The most common forms of  communication  methods  for  intelligent  meters  are  wired  and  wireless  infrastructures  [217]. The technique of wireless connectivity allows acquiring measurement data from  intelligent meters at low prices and simple interfaces while the data center may encounter  a magnetic challenge [218].  4.2. Data Analysis Techniques  Data analysis is the most crucial stage of the hug system for data processing that  provides the foundation for uncovering useful information and assisting in decision mak‐ ing [219]. Data analytics, often known as data mining, is a computer process that uses  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  20  of  42  techniques such as database, statistician, design detection, and expert system to uncover  the possible relationships between variables [220]. However, the resulting data sets may  have varied performance in terms of noise, repetition, and uniformity due to the many  sources [221].  4.2.1. Data Preprocessing  Data integration strategies seek to effectively combine data from several sources into  a  single  picture  [222,223].  Densification  of  data  preprocessing  techniques  to  eliminate  highly linked variables and minimize dataset size due to some algorithms for analysis of  the data can be sensitive to imbalanced data [220]. A logarithm helps correct the distribu‐ tion form of data with severe weakness if the original dataset only contains the highest  and minimum temperature values [219]. Additional features such as temperature differ‐ ential might be computed through the preprocessing stage if the source dataset only has  the most significant and lowest temperature values. These characteristics are frequently  beneficial in improving the accuracy of data analytic findings [221].  4.2.2. Data Analytics Techniques  The model for data analytics may be developed based on the provided data to iden‐ tify the relationship between aspects and the associated types or values using supervised  learning techniques. When analyzing an unnamed data approach, it is typically designed  to identify the different classes across all objects [224].  4.2.3. Procedures of Data Mining in Smart Grids  The fundamental purpose of data analytics in the SG is to extract useful information  from historical data and compare it with real‐time data to guide operation and mainte‐ nance  [225].  Data  management  strategies  are  used  to  organize  and  store  the  massive  amounts of data gathered through intelligent meters and sensors. Following that, a math‐ ematical model may be created using data mining techniques and clean data [226]. The  status may be assessed in the generated model using real‐time data, which gives potential  strategies for guiding actual activities and resolving any issues [227,228].  4.3. Big Data Analytics in Smart Grid  4.3.1. Fault Detection  The SG is considered the driving force in the distribution arrangement system to re‐ duce carbon release and create environmental sustainability [229]. Using distributed gen‐ eration units in current power distribution networks enables the optimal use of widely  available RESs such as wind and solar energy [224]. Furthermore, the microgrid’s prox‐ imity to the generator power delivery dependability is improved, and power transmission  loss is reduced. The ability to operate in island mode also protects the load from harm  caused by power system issues such as voltage fluctuation, frequency deviation, etc. [229].  However, RE has an intermittent nature, which adds to the grid’s unpredictability. When  a large quantity of temperature or energy damages microgrids, the typical sized genera‐ tors are unable to identify and fix the problem in a timely manner due to their low load  capacity, posing a serious threat [230]. Most standard approaches, which focus on detect‐ ing overcurrent and negative sequence currents in large‐scale centralized power systems,  appeared ineffective in microgrids [231].  4.3.2. Method of Troubleshooting/Safety Assessment  Distribution automation (DA) focuses on the distribution level’s functioning and sys‐ tem reliability. A successful DA can locate and isolate distribution system issues, resulting  in faster restoration times and more customer satisfaction [232]. A growing amount of  operational data is being collected via supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA)  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  21  of  42  or sophisticated metering infrastructure for status monitoring and problem diagnosis ad‐ vanced metering infrastructure (AMI) [231]. A significant amount of data may be captured  through AMI and communication foundations due to the advancement of green infor‐ mation and communications technology (ICT) technologies in energy systems [233]. A  data‐driven model of failure phenomena based on a hybridization of evolutionary learn‐ ing and clustering methodologies is the input of a one‐class, power system operational  data, weather data, and relay protection device log data [234]. For accurate online identi‐ fication  of  dangerous  occurrences  in  the  power  system,  the  extreme  learning  machine  (ELM) algorithm is used in an intelligent early warning system. The learning speed of  ELM training is significantly quicker than traditional algorithms since the weights are ar‐ bitrarily generated and then calculated by matrix computing lacking iterative parameter  modification [235]. The data‐driven framework’s ideal balance between earning precision  and warning acuity is also explored. Using a ranking system, it extracted electrical fea‐ tures from high‐impedance fault current and voltage data and generated an effective fea‐ ture set (EFS) [236]. Thus, a statistical classifier for defect detection may be made using a  limited number of signal channels. It also shows how to minimize many phasor measure‐ ment units (PMU) of data while keeping the important information for power system fail‐ ure detection [237].  4.3.3. Transient Stability Analysis (TSA)  Transient stability is a key issue that is closely linked to the power system’s safe op‐ eration. However, rising electricity consumption, rising RE penetration, and a deregulated  market all drive the power grid to operate at or near its safe operational limitations [238].  According to the SG concept, massive data gathering by AMI contributes to the situation  evaluation of energy systems, while assisting with energy administration, functioning of  a system, and decision making [239]. As a result, effective recapitulation algorithms are  necessary  for  identifying  meaningful  patterns  and  uncovering  important  information  from the duplicate evaluation in the power system [240,241].  In addition to green energy sources deployed via the SG, wind farms are being im‐ plemented to utilize abundant and emission‐free natural resources and the extensive in‐ stallation of wind energy in the grid by addressing possible deterioration and instability  caused by the extensive installation of wind power into the electricity network [242]. En‐ ergy fluctuation is the swing of the energy stream on the transport line caused by concur‐ rent machine rotor angles advancing or regressing to each other, which produces high  interruptions. High‐pressure dropping, engine activation, and clearing short‐circuit prob‐ lems are all possible causes [243]. However, using a decision tree (DT)‐based technique  for defect  detection and categorization within the  half‐cycle time during power swing  [244], the DT‐algorithm was used with 21 possible characteristics derived from phasor  measurement unit (PMU) data following the Kalman filter procedure for smart relaying  in the power system [245]. The DT and graded aggregate created a probability frame for  the dynamic performance of energy systems following a disturbance [246]. The unbal‐ anced groupings that may break synchronism could be identified effectively. Although  the PMU and wide area monitoring system (WAMS) give clarity information for designers  to uncover patterns of stable and unstable operation, the low likelihood of events occur‐ ring in the power grid has resulted in a significant issue of class disparity [247]. It is diffi‐ cult to discern the characteristics of uncommon instability from significant synchro phasor  observations using traditional data analytics [248]. A systematic one‐sidedness learning  appliance for short online voltage evaluation is being developed to fully utilize enormous  electricity grid data [237]. To show the power system parameters and external data such  as meteorological information, the random matrix theory was combined with a high‐order  data‐driven model [249,250]. The eigenvalue‐based analysis method has been shown to  be effective for analyzing online transient states [251]. Based on parallel computing and  K‐nearest neighbors learning methods, a live monitor of instantaneous electromechanical  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  22  of  42  dynamics in transmission systems is given [252]. The suggested framework is used to han‐ dle the massive amount of PMU data from the power grid and extract information show‐ ing time‐varying power generation and consumption [253,254]. For an online assessment  evaluation of the (TSA) problem, the core vector machine (CVM) model is trained offline  using 24 characteristics taken from the raw data [234]. A statistical nonparametric regres‐ sion methodology based on the critical clearing time was used to examine the temporary  stability boundary of large‐scale power systems in order to assess if a steady‐state condi‐ tion can recover after a particular fault [255].  4.3.4. Electric Device State Estimation/Health Monitoring  Power  transformers  are  critical  components  for  electrical  energy  conversion,  and  their failure can result in catastrophic blackouts in the power system. As a result, research  into the life‐cycle administration of power transformers founded on precise estimates has  sparked considerable interest in a more stable and dependable power system [256]. Three  traditional methods for association rule mining, including apriori, aprioriTid, and apri‐ oriHybrid,  are  presented  to  obtain  data  about  system  processes  and  climatic  circum‐ stances into state estimate examinations [257]. For possible failure prediction, rule mining  approaches are coupled with a probabilistic graphical model. Building automation sys‐ tems (BAS) are developed and implemented in most commercial buildings to regulate the  heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system to repair optimum heat and hu‐ midity for the inhabitants [258]. FL was used to offer a unique health monitoring system  for detecting abnormal operating conditions [259]. In a power system, the number of aged  assets grows, and various failure models based on variables such as aging time or circum‐ stances have been developed. As a result, lifetime data such as service age, maintenance,  and health index were used to create a failure rate model for general electric power equip‐ ment [260]. The stratified proportional hazards model (PHM) for processing and classify‐ ing lifetime data into multi‐type frequent occurrences was created to make the most effec‐ tive use of this data [261]. This PHM technique may be used to predict possible risk issues  and health conditions [262].  4.3.5. Power Quality Monitoring  Electric PQ is the magnitude, frequency, and waveform of voltage and current in  power systems, and it is closely linked to the power grid’s safe functioning and consumer  satisfaction [263]. In the electrical grid, nonlinear, power electronics‐based loads, genera‐ tors, harmonic distortions, and unstable situations are becoming more common [264]. In  some residential areas, traditional electromechanical analog meters still work, and data  analytics‐based PQ analysis cannot be used effectively [264].  4.3.6. Topology Identification  Using information layers in the SG to address the problems posed by RESs in sup‐ plying the network is a viable solution [265]. SGs are becoming more sensitive and per‐ ceptible by improving sensors and gadgets that measure, monitor, communicate, and reg‐ ulate them [266]. Because of the unpredictability of RES and the uncertainty of the load, a  comprehensive decision based on a large quantity of data collection and analysis is re‐ quired [267]. The SCADA and WAMS systems provide intelligent grid voltage and power  data at sampling rates that are close to real‐time [268]. The network model is built using  both graph theoretical and probabilistic optimal DC power flow technologies that are low  in carbon, which is being pushed by the government using warmth pumps, photovoltaics,  electric cars, and other intelligent appliances in little voltage (LV) sharing networks to  create a greener society [269,270]. As a result, there is increasing interest in visualizing LV  networks using restricted metering and data collecting equipment [271]. A cost‐effective  option is network load profiling, based on identifying typical load profiles of LV systems.  A three‐stage network load profiling technique described by clustering, classification, and  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  23  of  42  scaling seeks to analyze the current LV networks’ capacities to accommodate the technol‐ ogies that are low in carbon [272].  4.3.7. Renewable Energy Forecasting  Wind and solar energies are expected to be the essential sources of energy for the  power  grid,  due  to  the  plentiful  and  environmentally  beneficial  generation  of  energy  [273]. Conversely, randomness and intermittent features are constant roadblocks to the  constant largescale use of RES. The precise and reliable RES predicting technique has been  the hot point worldwide to cope with such massive difficulties and to enhance dispatch  planning, maintenance scheduling, and regulation [274]. The meteorological data is uti‐ lized to categorize the days into distinct groups. Then, a neural network is qualified to  obtain wind energy forecasting data [275,276]. PV diffusion is forecasted using a data‐ driven approach. The suggested regular neural network (RNN) model is designed for ul‐ tra‐short‐term solar power forecast by deconstructing time‐series information using dis‐ tinct wavelet transform [277,278].  4.3.8. Load Forecasting  The actual short‐term load projecting such as the RES estimation is the foundation  for energy administration, system process, and market analysis [279]. Improving forecast‐ ing accuracy may result in several advantages and cost savings, as stated in [280]. The  dynamic and highly efficient electricity of marketplace is constructed on accurate forecasts  of energy consumption as customers frequently use smart networks to avoid neural net‐ work installation issues with a unique level of integration that overcomes load profile in‐ stability and uncertainty [281,282]. As part of the newest deep understanding approaches  for residential load forecasting, a recurrent neural network‐based framework with long  short‐term memory is used [283]. A hidden‐mode Markov decision model is developed  to predict user behavior in real time [284] and to analyze the latest phase of leveraging  societal mass media via cell phone applications to increase consumer interaction and load  forecasting [285]. In addition, the developing trends and obstacles examine the influence  of social activities on prosumers’ creation and consumption habits and the whole effect  on final load and network usage [286].  4.3.9. Load Profiling  Load profiling refers to the process of describing the usual behavior of electric con‐ sumption [287]. In general, demand–load forecast management and capital planning in  the time domain are expressed as an effective method of energy management [288,289].  The rationale for the best DR mechanism is to break down household energy consumption  into three portions: stable, controlled and deferred loads [290]. DR is used to encourage  consumers to modify their usage or feed‐in patterns with a stimulant of charges or eco‐ logical data [291,292]. A good consideration of the unchangeable energy used by clients is  the foundation for DR, that could relieve the distribution system’s burden in terms of tem‐ perature and voltage constraints [293]. Knowing the charging load type of electric vehicles  (EVs) is limited to be a critical phase for the constancy of power grids as they become more  widespread [294]. To extract the charge–load model of an (EV) by measuring the actual  power, Bayesian maximum probability is utilized to check the pliability of the collective  EV charging demand [295]. Increasing the acceptance of smart meters placed according to  the home standard, emphasizes the problem of enormous load profile data, which poses  problems to measurement data transfer and storage, along with important data extraction  out of the vast records [294–296].  4.3.10. Load Disaggregation  Non‐intrusive load monitoring (NILM) is a type of load that separates general load  profiles at the home standard from the power usage of specific machines [297]. NILM, out  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  24  of  42  of just one smart meter, placed in the house is effortless to accept by clients than direct  appliance monitoring framework [298]. The various types of residential electric machines  possess varying possibilities for participation in the DR program, leading to a better un‐ derstanding  of  their  customers’  behavior  and  a  more  energy‐efficient  approach  [299],  [300]. NILM early approaches were mostly centered on detecting an edge in power trans‐ mission to indicate whether a recognized device is on or off [301,302].  4.3.11. Nontechnical Lack Detection  Non‐technical lack (NTL) most often results in electrical rubbery or accounting mis‐ takes of power system companies [303,304]. Non‐cooperative game models for nontech‐ nical lack examination of micro‐distribution systems applied to AMI [305]. A report by  Northeast Group, Limited Liability Company (LLC), shows annual losses due to power  theft that were more than USD 89.3 billion worldwide [303]. Furthermore, large‐scale elec‐ tricity theft has the potential to generate dangerous power system imbalances. As a result,  many researchers are interested in developing a practical outline to identify the NTL in a  composite energy system, which is an approach constructed on the DT and backed by  suggest vector machine (SVM) [292]. DT is programmed with various parameters such as  heavy appliances, the number of people in the house, and climate circumstances to calcu‐ late the predicted rate of power used for the client at any given moment. The computed  consumption is then sent to an SVM classifier that has previously been trained on the  gathered data set to assess if the customer’s conduct is regular or fraudulent. Fraud recog‐ nition is triggered, as a difference is found between power provided by the energy system  and gathered data out of the smart meters. Therefore, the fuzzy clustering technique is  used to find abnormalities in consumption patterns [292].  4.4. Big Data Platform for Intelligent Meter  4.4.1. Smart Grids and Meter Data  SGs  are  classified  into three  parts,  which  are the  information  infrastructure  (data  stream in the smart grid’s cyber portion), computer networks (exchange control signals  and measurement data) [306], and power infrastructure (energy distribution in the phys‐ ical component of smart grids), which includes intelligent meters and energy devices such  as towers, generator and adapters [307]. IT components include modeling, analysis, prof‐ itable transactions, information exchange, and management [308]. Big data management  and analytics are the key problems in  the SG  [202]. Smart metering is causing a huge  growth in the volume of data available. For example, in the United Kingdom, approxi‐ mately 100 million data points are gathered biannual for energy companies to register for  the 27 million residential power users. Power suppliers will be essential to absorb, store,  and fully analyze 4500–9000 times more data when smart metering is perfectly installed  and operating at a 30‐min sample rate. The capacity to cope with massive data problems  in the future will be critical for several essential intelligent grid applications, including  situation awareness, state estimate, event discovery, load forecasting, and claim response  administration [309].  4.4.2. The Analytics of Meter Data  The techniques of mining data are used to analyze the meter data of a variety of ap‐ plications. These may support energy managers in uncovering knowledge and obtaining  insights from large data [310]. The majority of the research is proven via utilizing compar‐ atively modest data collections, such as claim or carry out forecasts [311], customer seg‐ mentation, pattern categorization, recommendations of power tariff, power consumption  of equipment in particular homes, and demand‐side management [312]. One of the most  recent huge data sets published was over one million data points—still far from the pre‐ dicted future [313,314].  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  25  of  42  5. Challenges  This section highlights three energy issues that remain unresolved in cloud compu‐ ting applications for smart grids: energy distribution, energy mix and battery charging.  Therefore, there is a challenge of migrating SG to cloud computing for energy manage‐ ment, information management, and cloud applications [315]. First, open issues for en‐ ergy management, similar to clouds, have a variety of heterogeneous applications. The  microgrids lead to challenging transmission of data between the cloud and the microgrids  with/without real‐time data. Therefore, it is urgent to install a virtual power stream con‐ troller to optimize the energy that can operate in any realistic and efficient mode for the  smart grid. However, to reduce a claim from micro‐grids during summit hours, it a nec‐ essary to mix and share energy storage with a cloud [316]. Second, problems for managing  information, despite cloud computing being effective at managing smart‐meter data, still  have several obstacles to overcome [317]. Solving data‐sharing issues is an excellent idea  for combining public and private clouds for cost‐effective communication in smart grids.  In addition, the integration of mobile multi‐agents in cloud computing may achieve an  effective intelligent network process, which is still a problem due to heterogeneous com‐ munication architecture. It must be able to accommodate diverse energy sources while  also allowing for large‐scale interactive collaboration via cloud services and a reduction  in cloud app delays. As in billing, users need dependable and cost‐effective services. A  single  protocol  failure  may  bring the  entire  intelligent  grid system  down  [318].  Third,  long‐term evolution (LTE) allows for better coverage and lower latency, which presents  challenges  to  existing  cloud  computing  platforms.  Platforms  that  address  some  of  the  long‐term evolution problems related to quality of service (QoS) improve with the radio  access network, network of mobile core, and datum center to supported virtualized infra‐ structural resources. Coordination and synchronized function are encouraged facilities for  monitoring,  preprocessing,  dissemination,  storage,  analysis,  and  alerting  metrics  sup‐ ported between different clouds, which is a unified and suitable interface. The world’s  most pressing concern is energy. As a backup generator, fossil fuels are frequently em‐ ployed, although their production of CO2 affects life and the environment [39]. A novel  technique called DR makes virtual generation better. Users may program their gadgets  using this approach. There are several issues with a traditional smart‐grid design (without  the cloud), which is the master–slave design that leads to a risk of DDoS [41,42]. Any error  may cause the entire system to fail. There is a limit on how many clients can be served due  to memory storage limitations, stability, and management. Furthermore, information and  data management challenges include millions of intelligent meters necessitating effective  handling of massive data. Cloud computing may provide a cost‐effective alternative for  data analytic and storage methods, as shown in Table 5 [319].  Table 5. Main features of big data in smart grids.  Category  Challenges   Heterogeneous   Energy storage systems are insufficient.  Smart grid   Not combining energy storage with the cloud and sharing it   Big data management and analytics   Data‐sharing issues   Lack of integration of multiple mobile agents with the cloud   Dependability not sufficient  Cloud compu‐  Insufficient platform Implementation for offering long‐term evolu‐ ting  tion   Unsynchronized function   Risk of DDoS   Any error leads the system to fail  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  26  of  42   Insufficient methods data analytic and storage methods   Memory storage limitations   Stability  Big data   Management   Insufficient methods for handling massive amounts of data   Information and data management challenges  6. The Framework of the Charge Controller System  Overall, after the long review illustrated in this paper, the proposed framework con‐ tains an EMS stored on the cloud computing service. This system serves three different  goals. The first is to monitor and combine different energy sources in order to obtain the  best optimized system. The second goal is to control the switches in the energy hub, and  the third goal is to manage the charging and discharging process. The system will yield  many benefits:  a. Reduce the carbon footprint by including RESs such as solar plants (photovoltaic),  WTs, and other RESs;  b. Enhance the demand power by monitoring and controlling the power balance at the  same time;  c. Introduce an intelligent system and cloud computing to the power management  field, and make the system manageable.  It is difficult to carry out an actual optimization charge controller on an intelligent  power system via cloud computing, as it is based on numerous nonlinear parameters and  contains many genuine bonds and limitations. Furthermore, because many actual charac‐ teristics are stochastic, handling a power system as a plant (dynamic systems) is problem‐ atic. Therefore, there are two suggestions: the first is to plan the optimization algorithm  for the charge controller based on the real parameters; the next is to implement this pro‐ posed algorithm as a practical system that offers optimal interventional treatment solu‐ tions for all protection requirements. Therefore, this study focuses on presenting a final  chart of the model that will consider three aspects: power demand management, RE, and  cloud computing, which will be the main contribution of the future study conducted in  Figure 9.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  27  of  42  Figure 9. The framework system model for energy sustainability.  7. Conclusions  The study summarized the recently published literature that focuses on methods to  reduce power consumption and costs. Furthermore, the recent literature discussed using  cloud  computing to  store EMSs and  managing them  intelligently.  Furthermore, it  dis‐ cussed how a well‐maintained system of power mixing (power used to charge the batter‐ ies) can lead to better environmental results by reducing the carbon footprint. Further‐ more, it discussed the recent literature that used cloud computing to store EMSs and man‐ age them intelligently. As a result of this extensive literature review, the researcher pro‐ posed a final chart of the model that will consider three aspects: battery management, RE,  and cloud computing, which will be the main contribution of the future study conducted  by the researcher.  Author  Contributions:  Drafted  the  original  manuscript,  conceptualization,  literature  analysis,  A.H.A.A.‐J.; Conceptualization and methodology, Y.I.A.M.; Investigation and supervision and val‐ idation R.S. and Z.A.A.A. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manu‐ script.  Funding: This research was funded by the Malaysian Fundamental Research Grant Scheme (FRGS)  under the code PP‐FTSM‐2021 and TAP‐K01149.  Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable.  Informed Consent Statement: Not applicable.  Data Availability Statement: Not applicable.  Acknowledgments: The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Laboratory of  Faculty  of  Information  Science  and  Technology,  Universiti  Kebangsaan  Malaysia,  Malaysia  and  University of Fallujah, Iraq.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  28  of  42  Ethics and Permission to Participate: This manuscript has not been previously released and is not  now under consideration by any journal for publication.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  Abbreviations  In this review, the following abbreviations are used:  Abbreviations  The Details  VPPs  Virtual Power Plants  DC  Direct Current  CDE  Carbon Dioxide Emissions  RE  Renewable Energy  USDOE  United States Department of Energy  SG  Smart Grid  SGs  Smart Grids  SES  Smart Energy Systems  AI  Artificial Intelligence  DR  Demand Response  PS  Power Supply  DER  Distributed Energy Resource  MT  Microgrid Trading  DDoS  Distributed Denial of Service  CPU’s  Central Processing Units  SPM  Static Power Management  DPM  Dynamic Power Management  DPC  Dynamic Power Consumption  C  Coulomb  A  Amperes  V  Volts  W  Watts  WH  Watt‐Hours  GA  Genetic Algorithm  PSO  Particle Swarm Optimization  FL  Fuzzy Logic  MOA  Metaheuristic Optimization Algorithms  SoC  State of Charge  KW  kilowatt  GPR  Gaussian Process Regression  GIESBs  Grid‐Integrated Energy Storage Batteries  PVs  Photo Voltic’s  WTs  Wind Turbines  EBMS  Electric Bus Management System  ANNs  Artificial Neural Networks  EMS  Energy Management System  HMG  Hybrid Micro‐Grid  MOPSO  Multi‐Objective Particle Swarm Optimization  PMP  Pontryagin’s Minimum Principle  MEET  Maximum Efficiency Tracking  FAFC  First Access First Charge  MDP  Markov Decision Process  HEMS  Home energy management system  SHEMS  Smart Home Energy Management System  BMS  Battery Management system  MWs  Mega Watts  Energy‐Performance Trade‐off Multi‐Resource Cloud Task Scheduling Algo‐ ETMCTSA  rithm  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  29  of  42  IT  Information Technology  VMs  Virtual Machines  TWh  Tera Watt‐hours  HV  High Voltage  MV  Medium Voltage  SCADA  Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition  AMI  Advanced Metering Infrastructure  ELM  Extreme Learning Machine  SCVS  Sorting and Cumulative Voltage Summation  EVCS  Electric Vehicle Charging Station  EPS  Electric Power System  EFS  Effective Feature Set  PMU  Phasor Measurement Units  WAMS  Wide Area Monitoring System  TSA  Transient Stability Analysis  CVM  Core Vector Machine  BAS  Building Automation Systems  HVAC  Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning  PHM  Proportional Hazards Model  PQ  Power Quality  LV  Little Voltage  RNN  Regular Neural Network  NILM  Non‐Intrusive Load Monitoring  NTL  Non‐Technical Lack  LLC  Limited Liability Company  SVM  Suggest Vector Machine  DT  Decision Tree  SaaS  Service as a Service  ICT  Information and Communication Technology  PAR  Peak‐to‐Average Ratio  WECS  Wind Energy Conversion System  DCEP  Data Center Energy Productivity  TOU  Time‐Of‐Use  MASs  Multi‐Agent Systems  GHGs  Green House Gases  IoE  Internet of Energy  IaaS  Infrastructure as a Service  PaaS  Platform as a Service  LMA  Levenberg–Marquardt Algorithm  TRRA  Trust‐Region Reflective Algorithm  PUE  Power Use Effectiveness  RESs  Renewable Energy Sources  EFS  Effective Feature Set  BESSs  Battery energy storage systems  EEH  Energy‐Efficient Hybrid  ARBC  Adaptive Resonant Beam Charging  References  1. Lin, B.; Ahmad, I. Technical change, inter‐factor and inter‐fuel substitution possibilities in Pakistan: A trans‐log production  function approach. J. Clean. Prod. 2016, 126, 537–549. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.03.065.  2. Sun, C.C.; Hahn, A.; Liu, C.C. Cyber security of a power grid: State‐of‐the‐art. Int. J. Electr. Power Energy Syst. 2018, 99, 45–56.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijepes.2017.12.020.  3. Meri, A.; Hasan, M.K.; Satar, N.S.M. Success factors affecting the healthcare professionals to utilize cloud computing services.  Asia‐Pac. J. Inf. Technol. Multimed. 2017, 6, 31–42. https://doi.org/10.17576/apjitm‐2017‐0602‐04.  4. Bohani, F.A.; Yahya, S.R.; Abdullah, S.N.H.S. Microgrid Communication and Security: State‐Of‐The‐Art and Future Directions.  J. Integr. Adv. Eng. 2021, 1, 37–52. https://doi.org/10.51662/jiae.v1i1.11.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  30  of  42  5. Begovic, M.M. System protection. In Power System Stability and Control, 3rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, USA, 2017; pp. 4‐1– 4‐10. https://doi.org/10.4324/b12113.  6. Hannan, M.A.; Tan, S.Y.; Al‐Shetwi, A.Q.; Jern, K.P.; Begum, R.A. Optimized controller for renewable energy sources integra‐ tion  into  microgrid:  Functions,  constraints  and  suggestions.  J.  Clean.  Prod.  2020,  256,  120419.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcle‐ pro.2020.120419.  7. Zhang, S.; Luo, X.; Litvinov, E. Serverless computing for cloud‐based power grid emergency generation dispatch. Int. J. Electr.  Power Energy Syst. 2021, 124, 106366. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijepes.2020.106366.  8. Haque, A.N.M.M.; Ibn Saif, A.U.N.; Nguyen, P.H.; Torbaghan, S.S. Exploration of dispatch model integrating wind generators  and electric vehicles. Appl. Energy 2016, 183, 1441–1451. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.09.078.  9. Zaman, K.; el Moemen, M.A. Energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions and economic development: Evaluating alterna‐ tive  and  plausible  environmental  hypothesis  for  sustainable  growth.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2017,  74,  1119–1130.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.02.072.  10. Cai, H.; Xu, B.; Jiang, L.; Vasilakos, A.V. IoT‐Based Big Data Storage Systems in Cloud Computing: Perspectives and Challenges.  IEEE Internet Things J. 2017, 4, 75–87. https://doi.org/10.1109/JIOT.2016.2619369.  11. Bogdanov, D.; Farfan, J.; Sadovskaia, K.; Aghahosseini, A.; Child, M.; Gulagi, A.; Oyewo, A.S.; de Souza Noel Simas Barbosa,  L.; Breyer, C. Radical transformation pathway towards sustainable electricity via evolutionary steps. Nat. Commun. 2019, 10,  1077. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467‐019‐08855‐1.  12. Clack, C.T.M.; Qvist, S.A.; Apt, J.; Bazilian, M.; Brandt, A.R.; Caldeira, K.; Davis, S.J.; Diakov, V.; Handschy, M.A.; Hines, P.D.H.;  et al. Evaluation of a proposal for reliable low‐cost grid power with 100% wind, water, and solar. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2017,  114, 6722–6727. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1610381114.  13. Parag,  Y.;  Sovacool,  B.K.  Electricity  market  design  for  the  prosumer  era.  Nat.  Energy  2016,  1,  16032.  https://doi.org/10.1038/nenergy.2016.32.  14. Xu, F.; Wu, W.; Zhao, F.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wu, R.; Zhang, T.; Wen, Y.; Fan, Y.; Jiang, S. A micro‐market module design for  university  demand‐side  management  using  self‐crossover  genetic  algorithms.  Appl.  Energy  2019,  252,  113456.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2019.113456.  15. Chen, K.; Lin, J.; Song, Y. Trading strategy optimization for a prosumer in continuous double auction‐based peer‐to‐peer mar‐ ket: A prediction‐integration model. Appl. Energy 2019, 242, 1121–1133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2019.03.094.  16. Song, Y.; Ding, Y.; Siano, P.; Meinrenken, C.; Zheng, M.; Strbac, G. Optimization methods and advanced applications for smart  energy systems considering grid‐interactive demand response. Appl. Energy 2020, 259, 113994. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apen‐ ergy.2019.113994.  17. Li, W.; Assaad, M. Matrix Exponential Learning Schemes with Low Informational Exchange. IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 2019,  67, 3140–3153. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSP.2019.2912875.  18. Li, W.; Rentemeister, M.; Badeda, J.; Jöst, D.; Schulte, D.; Sauer, D.U. Digital twin for battery systems: Cloud battery management  system  with  online  state‐of‐charge  and  state‐of‐health  estimation.  J.  Energy  Storage  2020,  30,  101557.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101557.  19. Dai, H.; Jiang, B.; Hu, X.; Lin, X.; Wei, X.; Pecht, M. Advanced battery management strategies for a sustainable energy future:  Multilayer  design  concepts  and  research  trends.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2021,  138,  110480.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2020.110480.  20. Ling, Z.; Luo, M.; Song, J.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Z.; Fang, X. A fast‐heat battery system using the heat released from detonated  supercooled phase change materials. Energy 2021, 219, 119496. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2020.119496.  21. Sharma, S.; Kotturu, P.K.; Narooka, P.C. Implication of IoT Components and Energy Management Monitoring. Swarm Intell.  Optim. 2020, 49–65. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119778868.ch4.  22. Zhang, Q.; Fang, W.; Xiong, M.; Liu, Q.; Wu, J.; Xia, P. Adaptive Resonant Beam Charging for Intelligent Wireless Power Trans‐ fer. IEEE Internet Things J. 2019, 6, 1160–1172. https://doi.org/10.1109/JIOT.2018.2867457.  23. Mehrjerdi, H. Resilience oriented vehicle‐to‐home operation based on battery swapping mechanism. Energy 2021, 218, 119528.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2020.119528.  24. Li, S.; Li, J.; Wang, H. Big data driven Lithium‐ion battery modeling method: A cyber‐physical system approach. In Proceedings  of the 2019 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Cyber Physical Systems (ICPS), Taipei, Taiwan, 6–9 May 2019; pp. 161– 166. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICPHYS.2019.8780152.  25. Kouache, I.; Sebaa, M.; Bey, M.; Allaoui, T.; Denai, M. A new approach to demand response in a microgrid based on coordination  control between smart meter and distributed superconducting magnetic energy storage unit. J. Energy Storage 2020, 32, 101748.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101748.  26. Piovesan, N.; Fernandez Gambin, A.; Miozzo, M.; Rossi, M.; Dini, P. Energy sustainable paradigms and methods for future  mobile networks: A survey. Comput. Commun. 2018, 119, 101–117. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comcom.2018.01.005.  27. Ali, A.; Mahmoud, K.; Lehtonen, M. Maximizing Hosting Capacity of Uncertain Photovoltaics by Coordinated Management of  OLTC,  VAr  Sources  and  Stochastic  EVs.  Int.  J.  Electr.  Power  Energy  Syst.  2021,  127,  106627.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijepes.2020.106627.  28. Faisal, M.; Hannan, M.A.; Ker, P.J.; Rahman, M.S.A.; Begum, R.A.; Mahlia, T.M.I. Particle swarm optimised fuzzy controller for  charging–discharging  and  scheduling  of  battery  energy  storage  system  in  MG  applications.  Energy  Rep.  2020,  6,  215–228.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyr.2020.12.007.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  31  of  42  29. Abdulmula, A.; Sopian, K.; Haw, L.C.; Fazlizan, A. Performance evaluation of standalone double axis solar tracking system  with maximum light detection MLD for telecommunication towers in Malaysia. Int. J. Power Electron. Drive Syst. 2019, 10, 444– 453. https://doi.org/10.11591/ijpeds.v10n1.pp444‐453.  30. Kasturi, K.; Nayak, C.K.; Nayak, M.R. Analysis of photovoltaic & battery energy storage system impacts on electric distribution  system efficacy. Int. J. Electr. Eng. Inform. 2020, 12, 1001–1015. https://doi.org/10.15676/ijeei.2020.12.4.18.  31. Hannan, M.A.; Islam, N.N.; Mohamed, A.; Lipu, M.S.H.; Ker, P.J.; Rashid, M.M.; Shareef, H. Artificial intelligent based damping  controller  optimization  for  the  multi‐machine  power  system:  A  review.  IEEE  Access  2018,  6,  39574–39594.  https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2018.2855681.  32. Choudhary, A.; Govil, M.C.; Singh, G.; Awasthi, L.K.; Pilli, E.S.; Kapil, D. A critical survey of live virtual machine migration  techniques. J. Cloud Comput. 2017, 6, 23. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13677‐017‐0092‐1.  33. Nan, S.; Zhou, M.; Li, G. Optimal residential community demand response scheduling in smart grid. Appl. Energy 2018, 210,  1280–1289. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.06.066.  34. Ben Ghorbel, M.; Hamdaoui, B.; Guizani, M.; Mohamed, A. Long‐Term Power Procurement Scheduling Method for Smart‐Grid  Powered Communication Systems. IEEE Trans. Wirel. Commun. 2018, 17, 2882–2892. https://doi.org/10.1109/TWC.2018.2803181.  35. Du, Y.F.; Jiang, L.; Li, Y.; Wu, Q. A robust optimization approach for demand side scheduling considering uncertainty of man‐ ually operated appliances. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018, 9, 743–755. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2564159.  36. Rahman, A.A.A.; Osman, M.S.; Ng, R.; Abdullah, S.; Rahman, M.A.A.; Mohamad, E.; Rahman, A.A. Integration of simulation  technologies with physical system of reconfigurable material handling. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol. 2018, 12, 139–152, 2018.  37. Rehmani, M.H.; Reisslein, M.; Rachedi, A.; Erol‐Kantarci, M.; Radenkovic, M. Integrating Renewable Energy Resources into the  Smart Grid: Recent Developments in Information and Communication Technologies. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2018, 14, 2814– 2825. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2018.2819169.  38. Hanif, I. Impact of fossil fuels energy consumption, energy policies, and urban sprawl on carbon emissions in East Asia and the  Pacific: A panel investigation. Energy Strategy Rev. 2018, 21, 16–24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.esr.2018.04.006.  39. Kim, H.; Kim, Y.J.; Yang, K.; Thottan, M. Cloud‐based demand response for smart grid: Architecture and distributed algorithms.  In Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Smart Grid Communications (SmartGridComm), Brussels, Bel‐ gium, 17–20 October 2011; pp. 398–403. https://doi.org/10.1109/SmartGridComm.2011.6102355.  40. Menshari, A.; Salehi, G.; Ghiamy, M. A Novel Technique for Multiple Microgrids Planning by Considering Demand Response  Programming and Social Welfare Enhancement in Power Market. Rev. Publicando 2018. Available online: https://www.revista‐ publicando.org/revista/index.php/crv/article/view/1381 (accessed on 16 August 2021).  41. Yang, C.T.; Chen, W.S.; Huang, K.L.; Liu, J.C.; Hsu, W.H.; Hsu, C.H. Implementation of smart power management and service  system on cloud computing. In Proceedings of the IEEE 9th International Conference on Ubiquitous Intelligence and Compu‐ ting and IEEE 9th International Conference on Autonomic and Trusted Computing, Fukuoka, Japan, 4–7 September 2012; pp.  924–929. https://doi.org/10.1109/UIC‐ATC.2012.160.  42. Yaghmaee, M.H.; Moghaddassian, M.; Leon‐Garcia, A. Autonomous Two‐Tier Cloud‐Based Demand Side Management Ap‐ proach with Microgrid. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 1109–1120. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2016.2619070.  43. Pacheco, L.A.B.; Gondim, J.J.C.; Barreto, P.A.S.; Alchieri, E. Evaluation of distributed denial of service threat in the internet of  things. In Proceedings of the 2016 IEEE 15th International Symposium on Network Computing and Applications (NCA), Cam‐ bridge, MA, USA, 31 October–2 November 2016; pp. 89–92. https://doi.org/10.1109/NCA.2016.7778599.  44. Tahir, M.F.; Haoyong, C.; Khan, A.; Javed, M.S.; Laraik, N.A.; Mehmood, K. Optimizing size of variable renewable energy  sources by incorporating energy storage and demand response. IEEE Access 2019, 7, 103115–103126. https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2019.2929297.  45. Munshi, A.A.; Mohamed, Y.A.R.I. Big data framework for analytics in smart grids. Electr. Power Syst. Res. 2017, 151, 369–380.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsr.2017.06.006.  46. Priya,  E.S.;  Suseendran,  G.  Cloud  computing  and  big  data:  A  comprehensive  analysis.  J.  Crit.  Rev.  2020,  7,  185–189.  https://doi.org/10.31838/jcr.07.14.32.  47. Islam,  M.;  Reza,  S.  The  Rise  of  Big  Data  and  Cloud  Computing.  Internet  Things  Cloud  Comput.  2019,  7,  45.  https://doi.org/10.11648/j.iotcc.20190702.12.  48. Antunes, C.H.; Soares, A.; Gomes, Á. An energy management system for residential demand response based on multiobjective  optimization. In Proceedings of the 2016 IEEE Smart Energy Grid Engineering (SEGE), Oshawa, ON, Canada, 21–24 August  2016; pp. 90–94. https://doi.org/10.1109/SEGE.2016.7589506.  49. Martinez, C.M.; Hu, X.; Cao, D.; Velenis, E.; Gao, B.; Wellers, M. Energy Management in Plug‐in Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Recent  Progress  and  a  Connected  Vehicles  Perspective.  IEEE  Trans.  Veh.  Technol.  2017,  66,  4534–4549.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TVT.2016.2582721.  50. Asadinejad, A.; Tomsovic, K. Optimal use of incentive and price based demand response to reduce costs and price volatility.  Electr. Power Syst. Res. 2017, 144, 215–223. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsr.2016.12.012.  51. Jordehi, A.R. Optimisation of demand response in electric power systems, a review. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2019, 103, 308– 319. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2018.12.054.  52. Rieger, A.; Thummert, R.; Fridgen, G.; Kahlen, M.; Ketter, W. Estimating the benefits of cooperation in a residential microgrid:  A data‐driven approach. Appl. Energy 2016, 180, 130–141. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.07.105.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  32  of  42  53. Siano, P.; Sarno, D. Assessing the benefits of residential demand response in a real time distribution energy market. Appl. Energy  2016, 161, 533–551. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2015.10.017.  54. Marzband, M.; Alavi, H.; Ghazimirsaeid, S.S.; Uppal, H.; Fernando, T. Optimal energy management system based on stochastic  approach for a home Microgrid with integrated responsive load demand and energy storage. Sustain. Cities Soc. 2017, 28, 256– 264. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2016.09.017.  55. Amrollahi, M.H.; Bathaee, S.M.T. Techno‐economic optimization of hybrid photovoltaic/wind generation together with energy  storage  system  in  a  stand‐alone  micro‐grid  subjected  to  demand  response.  Appl.  Energy  2017,  202,  66–77.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.05.116.  56. Korkas, C.D.; Baldi, S.; Michailidis, I.; Kosmatopoulos, E.B. Occupancy‐based demand response and thermal comfort opti‐mi‐ zation  in  microgrids  with  renewable  energy  sources  and  energy  storage.  Appl.  Energy  2016,  163,  93–104.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2015.10.140.  57. Honarmand, M.E.; Hosseinnezhad, V.; Ghazizadeh, M.S.; Wang, F.; Siano, P. A peak‐load‐reduction‐based procedure to man‐ age distribution network expansion by applying process‐oriented costing of incoming components. Energy 2019, 186, 115852.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2019.115852.  58. Huang, W.; Zhang, N.; Kang, C.; Li, M.; Huo, M. From demand response to integrated demand response: Review and pro‐spect  of research and application. Prot. Control. Mod. Power Syst. 2019, 4. https://doi.org/10.1186/s41601‐019‐0126‐4.  59. Robert, F.C.; Sisodia, G.S.; Gopalan, S. A critical review on the utilization of storage and demand response for the imple‐men‐ tation of renewable energy microgrids. Sustain. Cities Soc. 2018, 40, 735–745. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2018.04.008.  60. U.S.  Energy  Information  Administration  (EIA).  International  Energy  Outlook  2016;  2016;  Volume  0484.  Available  online:  http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/ieo/(accessed on 16 August 2021).  61. Kober, T.; Schiffer, H.W.; Densing, M.; Panos, E. Global energy perspectives to 2060—WEC’s World Energy Scenarios 2019.  Energy Strategy Rev. 2020, 31, 100523. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.esr.2020.100523.  62. Ahmad, T.; Zhang, D. A critical review of comparative global historical energy consumption and future demand: The story told  so far. Energy Rep. 2020, 6, 1973–1991. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyr.2020.07.020.  63. Ogheneovo  Johnson,  D.  Issues  of  Power  Quality  in  Electrical  Systems.  Int.  J.  Energy  Power  Eng.  2016,  5,  148.  https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijepe.20160504.12.  64. Elshrkawey, M.; Elsherif, S.M.; Wahed, M.E. An Enhancement Approach for Reducing the Energy Consumption in Wireless  Sensor Networks. J. King Saud Univ.—Comput. Inf. Sci. 2018, 30, 259–267. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jksuci.2017.04.002.  65. Mohammed, M.A.; Mohammed, I.A.; Hasan, R.A.; Tapus, N.; Ali, A.H.; Hammood, O.A. Green Energy Sources: Issues and  Challenges. In Proceedings of the 2019 18th RoEduNet Conference: Networking in Education and Research (RoEduNet), Galati,  Romania, 10–12 October 2019. https://doi.org/10.1109/ROEDUNET.2019.8909595.  66. Valentini, G.L.; Lassonde, W.; Khan, S.U.; Min‐Allah, N.; Madani, S.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, L.; Wang, L.; Ghani, N.; Kolodziej, J.; et al.  An  overview  of  energy  efficiency  techniques  in  cluster  computing  systems.  Clust.  Comput.  2013,  16,  3–15.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10586‐011‐0171‐x.  67. Mondal, H.K.; Gade, S.H.; Kishore, R.; Kaushik, S.; Deb, S. Power efficient router architecture for wireless Network‐on‐Chip. In  Proceedings of the 2016 17th International Symposium on Quality Electronic Design (ISQED), Santa Clara, CA, USA, 15–16  March 2016; pp. 227–233. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISQED.2016.7479205.  68. Al‐Dulaimy, A.; Itani, W.; Zekri, A.; Zantout, R. Power management in virtualized data centers: State of the art. J. Cloud Comput.  2016, 5, 6. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13677‐016‐0055‐y.  69. Fountoulakis, E.; Pappas, N.; Ephremides, A. Dynamic Power Control for Time‐Critical Networking with Heterogeneous Traf‐ fic. 2020. Available online: http://arxiv.org/abs/2011.04448 (accessed on 16 August 2021).  70. Holz, C.; Pusch, A. Do powerbanks deliver what they advertise? Measuring voltage, current, power, energy and charge of  powerbanks with an Arduino. Phys. Educ. 2020, 55, 025013. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361‐6552/ab630c.  71. Cheng, C.H.; Bai, Y.W. An automatically peak‐shift control design for charging and discharging of the battery in an ultrabook.  IEICE Trans. Inf. Syst. 2016, E99D, 1108–1116. https://doi.org/10.1587/transinf.2015EDP7297.  72. Chen, Z.; Shu, X.; Sun, M.; Shen, J.; Xiao, R. Charging strategy design of lithium‐ion batteries for energy loss minimization based  on minimum principle. In Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE Transportation Electrification Conference and Expo, Asia‐Pacific (ITEC  Asia‐Pacific), Harbin, China, 7–10 August 2017; pp. 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1109/ITEC‐AP.2017.8080833.  73. Hadian, E.; Akbari, H.; Farzinfar, M.; Saeed, S. Optimal allocation of electric vehicle charging stations with adopted smart  charging/discharging schedule. IEEE Access 2020, 8, 196908–196919. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2020.3033662.  74. Vallejo‐Huanga, D.; Proaño, J.; Morillo, P.; Ortega, H. Fault‐tolerant model based on fuzzy control for mobile devices. Commun.  Comput. Inf. Sci. 2019, 895, 488–499. https://doi.org/10.1007/978‐3‐030‐05532‐5_36.  75. Qin, P.; Sun, J.; Yang, X.; Wang, Q. Battery thermal management system based on the forced‐air convection: A review. eTrans‐ portation 2021, 7, 100097. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.etran.2020.100097.  76. Wu, B.; Widanage, W.D.; Yang, S.; Liu, X. Battery digital twins: Perspectives on the fusion of models, data and artificial intelli‐ gence for smart battery management systems. Energy AI 2020, 1, 100016. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyai.2020.100016.  77. Gharehpetian, G.B.; Agah, S.M.M. Distributed Generation Systems: Design, Operation and Grid Integration; Butterworth‐Heine‐ mann: Oxford, UK, 2017.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  33  of  42  78. Zheng,  Y.;  He,  Y.B.;  Qian,  K.;  Li,  B.;  Wang,  X.;  Li,  J.;  Miao,  C.;  Kang,  F.  Effects  of  state  of  charge  on  the  degradation  of  LiFePO4/graphite  batteries  during  accelerated  storage  test.  J.  Alloys  Compd. 2015,  639,  406–414.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jall‐ com.2015.03.169.  79. Hussein, W.A.; Abdullah, S.N.H.S.; Sahran, S. The Patch‐Levy‐Based Bees Algorithm Applied to Dynamic Optimization Prob‐ lems. Discret. Dyn. Nat. Soc. 2017, 2017, 5678393. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5678393.  80. Das, A.; Ni, Z. A computationally efficient optimization approach for battery systems in islanded microgrid. IEEE Trans. Smart  Grid 2018, 9, 6489–6499. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2017.2713947.  81. Lipu, M.S.H.; Hannan, M.A.; Hussain, A.; Ayob, A.; Saad, M.H.M.; Muttaqi, K.M. State of charge estimation in lithium‐ion  batteries: A neural network optimization approach. Electronics 2020, 9, 1546. https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics9091546.  82. Cuadras, A.; Miró, P.; Ovejas, V.J.; Estrany, F. Entropy generation model to estimate battery ageing. J. Energy Storage 2020, 32.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101740.  83. Lin, Q.; Wang, J.; Xiong, R.; Shen, W.; He, H. Towards a smarter battery management system: A critical review on optimal  charging methods of lithium ion batteries. Energy 2019, 183, 220–234. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2019.06.128.  84. Niri, M.F.; Bui, T.M.N.; Dinh, T.Q.; Hosseinzadeh, E.; Yu, T.F.; Marco, J. Remaining energy estimation for lithium‐ion batteries  via  Gaussian  mixture  and  Markov  models  for  future  load  prediction.  J.  Energy  Storage  2020,  28,  101271.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101271.  85. Xiong, R.; Pan, Y.; Shen, W.; Li, H.; Sun, F. Lithium‐ion battery aging mechanisms and diagnosis method for automotive appli‐ cations:  Recent  advances  and  perspectives.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2020,  131,  110048.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2020.110048.  86. Sahinoglu, G.O.; Pajovic, M.; Sahinoglu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Orlik, P.V.; Wada, T. Battery State‐of‐Charge Estimation Based on Regu‐ lar/Recurrent  Gaussian  Process  Regression.  IEEE  Trans.  Ind.  Electron.  2018,  65,  4311–4321.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TIE.2017.2764869.  87. Aravindan, R.; Thirugnanasambantham, K.G.; Kumar, T.A.; Viswaraj, M.N.; Suthershan, K. A novel integration of battery sys‐ tem  in  automotive  vehicle.  Proc.  Int.  Conf.  Recent  Trends  Mech.  Mater.  Eng.  Icrtmme  2019  2020,  2283,  020051.  https://doi.org/10.1063/5.0024924.  88. Boulmrharj, S.; NaitMalek, Y.; Elmouatamid, A.; Bakhouya, M.; Ouladsine, R.; Zine‐Dine, K.; Khanidar, M.; Siniti, M. Battery  characterization  and  dimensioning  approaches  for  micro‐grid  systems.  Energies  2019,  12,  1305.  https://doi.org/10.3390/en12071305.  89. Campana, P.E.; Cioccolanti, L.; François, B.; Jurasz, J.; Zhang, Y.; Varini, M.; Stridh, B.; Yan, J. Li‐ion batteries for peak shaving,  price arbitrage, and photovoltaic self‐consumption in commercial buildings: A Monte Carlo Analysis. Energy Convers. Manag.  2021, 234, 113889. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enconman.2021.113889.  90. Al Essa, M.J.M. Power management of grid‐integrated energy storage batteries with intermittent renewables. J. Energy Storage  2020, 31, 101762. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101762.  91. Moussa, S.; Ghorbal, M.J.B.; Slama‐Belkhodja, I. Bus voltage level choice for standalone residential DC nanogrid. Sustain. Cities  Soc. 2019, 46, 101431. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2019.101431.  92. Al‐Ogaili, A.S.; Ramasamy, A.; Hashim, T.J.T.; Al‐Masri, A.N.; Hoon, Y.; Jebur, M.N.; Verayiah, R.; Marsadek, M. Estimation of  the energy consumption of battery driven electric buses by integrating digital elevation and longitudinal dynamic models:  Malaysia as a case study. Appl. Energy 2020, 280, 115873. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2020.115873.  93. Masih, A.; Verma, H.K. Renewable Hybrid Battery Energy Management System Using ANN Controller. 2020. Available online:  https://easychair.org/publications/preprint_download/sMG2 (accessed on 16 August 2021).  94. Igbinovia, F.O.; Krupka, J.; Hajek, P.; Muller, Z.; Tlusty, J. Electricity storage in internet of renewable energy (IoRE) domain for  sustainable smart cities. In Proceedings of the 2020 21st International Scientific Conference on Electric Power Engineering (EPE),  Prague, Czech Republic, 19–21 October 2020. https://doi.org/10.1109/EPE51172.2020.9269241.  95. Lilis, G.; Conus, G.; Asadi, N.; Kayal, M. Towards the next generation of intelligent building: An assessment study of current  automation  and  future  IoT  based  systems  with  a  proposal  for  transitional  design.  Sustain.  Cities  Soc.  2017,  28,  473–481.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2016.08.019.  96. Miglani, A.; Kumar, N.; Chamola, V.; Zeadally, S. Blockchain for Internet of Energy management: Review, solutions, and chal‐ lenges. Comput. Commun. 2020, 151, 395–418. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comcom.2020.01.014.  97. Gunasekaran, M.; Ismail, H.M.; Chokkalingam, B.; Mihet‐Popa, L.; Padmanaban, S. Energy management strategy for rural com‐ munities’ DC micro grid power system structure with maximum penetration of renewable energy sources. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8,  585. https://doi.org/10.3390/app8040585.  98. Indragandhi, V.; Logesh, R.; Subramaniyaswamy, V.; Vijayakumar, V.; Siarry, P.; Uden, L. Multi‐objective optimization and  energy management in renewable based AC/DC microgrid. Comput. Electr. Eng. 2018, 70, 179–198. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.com‐ peleceng.2018.01.023.  99. DeSando, M. Universal Programmable Battery Charger with Optional Battery Management System; California Polytechnic State Uni‐ versity: San Luis Obispo, CA, USA, 2015.  100. Setore, Y.D. Modeling and Design of a Level‐2 Onboard Lithium‐ion Battery Charging System for ECADO Four‐Wheel Electric Vehicle;  Adama Science and Technology University: Adama, Ethiopia, 2020.  101. Edpuganti, A.; Khadkikar, V.; Zeineldin, H.; el Moursi, M.S.; al Hosani, M. Comparison of Peak Power Tracking Based Electric  Power System Architectures for CubeSats. IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl. 2021, 57, 2758–2768. https://doi.org/10.1109/TIA.2021.3055449.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  34  of  42  102. Choi, J.Y.; Choi, I.S.; Ahn, G.H.; Won, D.J. Advanced power sharing method to improve the energy efficiency of multiple battery  energy storages system. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018, 9, 1292–1300. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2582842.  103. Mansour, O.M.A.A. Determining the Power and Energy Capacity of a Battery Energy Storage System Utilizing a Smoothing Feeder  Preeder Profile too Accommodate High Photo Accommodate High Photovoltaic Penetration on a Distribution Feeder; Portland State Uni‐ versity: Portland, OR, USA, 2016.  104. Guo, Y.; Yang, Z.; Liu, K.; Zhang, Y.; Feng, W. A compact and optimized neural network approach for battery state‐of‐charge  estimation of energy storage system. Energy 2021, 219, 119529. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2020.119529.  105. Zavos, I. Design and Modeling of Switching Battery Management System for Solar‐Powered Storage Installations; Eindhoven University  of Technology: Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 2020.   management system with heat  106. Li, Y.; Guo, H.; Qi, F.; Guo, Z.; Li, M.; Tjernberg, L.B. Investigation on liquid cold plate thermal pipes  for  LiFePO4  battery  pack  in  electric  vehicles.  Appl.  Therm.  Eng.  2021,  185,  116382.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ap‐ plthermaleng.2020.116382.  107. Rogers, D.J.; Aslett, L.J.M.; Troffaes, M.C.M. Modelling of modular battery systems under cell capacity variation and degrada‐ tion. Appl. Energy 2021, 283, 116360. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2020.116360.  108. Asgher, U.; Babar Rasheed, M.; Al‐Sumaiti, A.S.; Ur‐Rahman, A.; Ali, I.; Alzaidi, A.; Alamri, A. Smart energy optimization using  heuristic  algorithm  in  smart  grid  with  integration  of  solar  energy  sources.  Energies  2018,  11,  3494.  https://doi.org/10.3390/en11123494.  109. Kure, E.H.H.; Maharjan, S.; Gjessing, S.; Zhang, Y. Optimal battery size for a green base station in a smart grid with a renewable  energy source. In Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Smart Grid Communications (SmartGridComm),  Dresden, Germany, 23–27 October 2017; pp. 115–121. https://doi.org/10.1109/SmartGridComm.2017.8340658.  110. Boulmrharj, S.; Ouladsine, R.; NaitMalek, Y.; Bakhouya, M.; Zine‐dine, K.; Khaidar, M.; Siniti, M. Online battery state‐of‐charge  estimation methods in micro‐grid systems. J. Energy Storage 2020, 30, 101518. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101518.  111. Matthiesen, B.; Zappone, A.; Jorswieck, E.A.; Debbah, M. Deep learning for real‐time energy‐efficient power control in mobile  networks. In Proceedings of the 2019 IEEE 20th International Workshop on Signal Processing Advances in Wireless Communi‐ cations (SPAWC), Cannes, France, 2–5 July 2019; pp. 1–5. https://doi.org/10.1109/SPAWC.2019.8815516.  112. Duman, A.C.; Erden, H.S.; Gönül, Ö.; Güler, Ö. A home energy management system with an integrated smart thermostat for  demand response in smart grids. Sustain. Cities Soc. 2021, 65, 102639.  113. Jayaprakash, M.; Kavitha, D.; Ramkumar, M.S.; Balachander, K.; Krishnan, M.S. Achieving efficient and secure data acquisition  for cloud‐supported internet of things in grid connected solar, wind and battery systems. Math. Comput. For. Nat. Resour. Sci.  2019, 11, 144–155.  114. Alarifi, A.; Dubey, K.; Amoon, M.; Altameem, T.; Abd El‐Samie, F.E.; Altameem, A.; Sharma, S.C.; Nasr, A.A. Energy‐Efficient  Hybrid  Framework  for  Green  Cloud  Computing.  IEEE  Access  2020,  8,  115356–115369.  https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2020.3002184.  115. Pusceddu, E.; Zakeri, B.; Gissey, G.C. Synergies between energy arbitrage and fast frequency response for battery energy storage  systems. Applied Energy 2021, 283, 116274. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2020.116274.  116. Vilsen,  S.B.;  Stroe,  D.‐I.  Battery  state‐of‐health  modelling  by  multiple  linear  regression.  J.  Clean.  Prod.  2021,  290,  125700.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2020.125700.  117. Bitzer, B.; Gebretsadik, E.S. Ensuring future clean electrical energy supply through cloud computing.In Proceedings of the 2015  International  Conference  on  Clean  Electrical  Power  (ICCEP),  Taormina,  Italy,  16–18  June  2015;  pp.  155–159.  https://doi.org/10.1109/ICCEP.2015.7177616.  118. Yang, S.; He, R.; Zhang, Z.; Cao, Y.; Gao, X.; Liu, X. CHAIN: Cyber Hierarchy and Interactional Network Enabling Digital  Solution for Battery Full‐Lifespan Management. Matter 2020, 3, 27–41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matt.2020.04.015.  119. Sui, Y.; Yao, F. Application of Embedded Network Distributed Network in Student Physical Health Management Platform.  Microprocess. Microsyst. 2021, 80, 103576. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micpro.2020.103576.  120. Teng, J.H.; Luan, S.W.; Lee, D.J.; Huang, Y.Q. Optimal charging/discharging scheduling of battery storage systems for distribu‐ tion  systems  interconnected  with  sizeable  PV  generation  systems.  IEEE  Trans.  Power  Syst.  2013,  28,  1425–1433.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2012.2230276.  121. Hernández, J.C.; Ruiz‐Rodriguez, F.J.; Jurado, F. Technical impact of photovoltaic‐distributed generation on radial distribution  systems:  Stochastic  simulations  for  a  feeder  in  Spain.  Int.  J.  Electr.  Power  Energy  Syst.  2013,  50,  25–32.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijepes.2013.02.010.  122. Aktas, A.; Erhan, K.; Ozdemir, S.; Ozdemir, E. Experimental investigation of a new smart energy management algorithm for a  hybrid  energy  storage  system  in  smart  grid  applications.  Electr.  Power  Syst.  Res.  2017,  144,  185–196.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsr.2016.11.022.  123. Howell, S.; Rezgui, Y.; Hippolyte, J.L.; Jayan, B.; Li, H. Towards the next generation of smart grids: Semantic and holonic multi‐ agent  management  of  distributed  energy  resources.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2017,  77,  193–214.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.03.107.  124. Shawon, M.H.; Muyeen, S.M.; Ghosh, A.; Islam, S.M.; Baptista, M.S. Multi‐agent systems in ICT enabled smart grid: A status  update  on  technology  framework  and  applications.  IEEE  Access  2019,  7,  97959–97973.  https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2019.2929577.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  35  of  42  125. Khan, M.W.; Wang, J.; Xiong, L.; Ma, M. Modelling and optimal management of distributed microgrid using multi‐agent sys‐ tems. Sustain. Cities Soc. 2018, 41, 154–169. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2018.05.018.  126. Kong, X.; Liu, D.; Xiao, J.; Wang, C. A multi‐agent optimal bidding strategy in microgrids based on artificial immune system.  Energy 2019, 189, 116154. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2019.116154.  127. Espín‐Sarzosa, D.; Palma‐Behnke, R.; Núñez‐Mata, O. Energy management systems for microgrids: Main existing trends in  centralized control architectures. Energies 2020, 13, 547. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13030547.  128. Abdi, H.; Beigvand, S.D.; la Scala, M. A review of optimal power flow studies applied to smart grids and microgrids. Renew.  Sustain. Energy Rev. 2017, 71, 742–766. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2016.12.102.  129. Van Vuuren, D.P.; Stehfest, E.; Gernaat, D.E.; Doelman, J.C.; Van den Berg, M.; Harmsen, M.; de Boar, H.S.; Bouwman, L.F.;   green growth para‐ Daioglou, V.; Edelenbosch, O.Y.; et al. Energy, land‐use and greenhouse gas emissions trajectories under a digm. Glob. Environ. Chang. 2017, 42, 237–250. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2016.05.008.  130. Ghadi, M.J.; Ghavidel, S.; Rajabi, A.; Azizivahed, A.; Li, L.; Zhang, J. A review on economic and technical operation of active  distribution systems. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2019, 104, 38–53. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2019.01.010.  131. Mariam, L.; Basu, M.; Conlon, M.F. Microgrid: Architecture, policy and future trends. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2016, 64, 477– 489. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2016.06.037.  132. Farrokhabadi, M.; Solanki, B.V.; Canizares, C.A.; Bhattacharya, K.; Koenig, S.; Sauter, P.S.; Leibfried, T.; Hohmann, S. Energy  Storage in Microgrids: Compensating for Generation and Demand Fluctuations while Providing Ancillary Services. IEEE Power  Energy Mag. 2017, 15, 81–91. https://doi.org/10.1109/MPE.2017.2708863.  133. Adefarati, T.; Bansal, R.C. Energizing Renewable Energy Systems and Distribution Generation. Pathw. A Smarter Power System.  2019, 29–65. https://doi.org/10.1016/b978‐0‐08‐102592‐5.00002‐8.  134. Chong, W.T.; Muzammil, W.K.; Ong, H.C.; Sopian, K.; Gwani, M.; Fazlizan, A.; Poh, S.C. Performance analysis of the deflector  integrated cross axis wind turbine. Renew. Energy 2019, 138, 675–690. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2019.02.005.  135. Tabatabaeikia, S.; Ghazali, N.N.B.N.; Chong, W.T.; Shahizare, B.; Izadyar, N.; Esmaeilzadeh, A.; Fazlizan, A. Computational  and experimental optimization of the exhaust air energy recovery wind turbine generator. Energy Convers. Manag. 2016, 126,  862–874. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enconman.2016.08.039.  136. Balducci, P.J.; Alam, M.J.E.; Hardy, T.D.; Wu, D. Assigning value to energy storage systems at multiple points in an electrical  grid. Energy Environ. Sci. 2018, 11, 1926–1944. https://doi.org/10.1039/c8ee00569a.  137. Katsanevakis, M.; Stewart, R.A.; Lu, J. Aggregated applications and benefits of energy storage systems with application‐specific  control methods: A review. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2017, 75, 719–741. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2016.11.050.  138. Rosman, M.R.M. The Role of Business Processes in Influencing the Decision Support Capabilities of Enterprise Content Man‐ agement  System  (ECMS):  Towards  a  Framework.  Asia‐Pac.  J.  Inf.  Technol.  Multimed.  2020,  9,  58–68.  https://doi.org/10.17576/apjitm‐2020‐0901‐05.  139. Hartmann, B.; Táczi, I.; Talamon, A.; Vokony, I. Island mode operation in intelligent microgrid—Extensive analysis of a case  study. Int. Trans. Electr. Energy Systems. 2021, 31, 12950. https://doi.org/10.1002/2050‐7038.12950.  140. Nosratabadi, S.M.; Hooshmand, R.A.; Gholipour, E. A comprehensive review on microgrid and virtual power plant concepts  employed  for  distributed  energy  resources  scheduling  in  power  systems.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2017,  67,  341–363.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2016.09.025.  141. Isa, N.M.; Tan, C.W.; Yatim, A.H.M. A comprehensive review of cogeneration system in a microgrid: A perspective from archi‐ tecture and operating system. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2018, 81, 2236–2263. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.06.034.  142. Hirsch, A.; Parag, Y.; Guerrero, J. Microgrids: A review of technologies, key drivers, and outstanding issues. Renew. Sustain.  Energy Rev. 2018, 90, 402–411. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2018.03.040.  143. Kalt, G.; Wiedenhofer, D.; Görg, C.; Haberl, H. Conceptualizing energy services: A review of energy and well‐being along the  Energy Service Cascade. Energy Res. Soc. Sci. 2019, 53, 47–58. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.erss.2019.02.026.  144. Su, Y.W. Residential electricity demand in Taiwan: Consumption behavior and rebound effect. Energy Policy 2019, 124, 36–45.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enpol.2018.09.009.  145. Li, C.; Song, Y.; Kaza, N. Urban form and household electricity consumption: A multilevel study. Energy Build. 2018, 158, 181– 193. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.10.007.  146. Srivastava, C.; Yang, Z.; Jain, R.K. Understanding the adoption and usage of data analytics and simulation among building  energy  management  professionals:  A  nationwide  survey.  Build.  Environ.  2019,  157,  139–164.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.build‐ env.2019.04.016.  147. Ruzbahani, H.M.; Karimipour, H. Optimal incentive‐based demand response management of smart households. In Proceedings  of the 2018 IEEE/IAS 54th Industrial and Commercial Power Systems Technical Conference (I&CPS), Niagara Falls, ON, Can‐ ada, 7–10 May 2018; pp. 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICPS.2018.8369971.  148. Prabatha, T.; Hager, J.; Carneiro, B.; Hewage, K.; Sadiq, R. Analyzing energy options for small‐scale off‐grid communities: A  Canadian case study. J. Clean. Prod. 2020, 249, 119320. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.119320.  149. Sinsel, S.R.; Riemke, R.L.; Hoffmann, V.H. Challenges and solution technologies for the integration of variable renewable energy  sources—A review. Renew. Energy 2020, 145, 2271–2285. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2019.06.147.  150. Alamo, D.H.; Medina, R.N.; Ruano, S.D.; García, S.S.; Moustris, K.P.; Kavadias, K.K.; Zafiraks, D.; Tzanes, G.; Zafeiraki, E.;  Spyropoulos, G.; et al. An Advanced Forecasting System for the Optimum Energy Management of Island Microgrids. Energy  Procedia 2019, 159, 111–116. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egypro.2018.12.027.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  36  of  42  151. Cojocaru, E.G.; Bravo, J.M.; Vasallo, M.J.; Santos, D.M. Optimal scheduling in concentrating solar power plants oriented to low  generation cycling. Renew. Energy 2019, 135, 789–799. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2018.12.026.  152. Morais, H.; Kádár, P.; Cardoso, M.; Vale, Z.A.; Khodr, H. VPP Operating in the Isolated Grid. In Proceedings of the IEEE Power  and Energy Society 2008 General Meeting: Conversion and Delivery of Electrical Energy in the 21st Century, PES, Pittsburgh,  PA, USA, 20–24 July 2008. https://doi.org/10.1109/PES.2008.4596716.  153. Bai, H.; Miao, S.; Ran, X.; Ye, C. Optimal dispatch strategy of a virtual power plant containing battery switch stations in a unified  electricity market. Energies 2015, 8, 2268–2289. https://doi.org/10.3390/en8032268.  154. Zhou,  K.;  Yang,  S.;  Shao,  Z.  Energy  Internet:  The  business  perspective.  Appl.  Energy  2016,  178,  212–222.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.06.052.  155. Zamani, A.G.; Zakariazadeh, A.; Jadid, S.; Kazemi, A. Stochastic operational scheduling of distributed energy resources in a  large scale virtual power plant. Int. J. Electr. Power Energy Syst. 2016, 82, 608–620. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijepes.2016.04.024.  156. Peik‐Herfeh, M.; Seifi, H.; Sheikh‐El‐Eslami, M.K. Two‐stage approach for optimal dispatch of distributed energy resources in  distribution  networks  considering  virtual  power  plant  concept.  Int.  Trans.  Electr.  Energy  Syst.  2014,  24,  43–63.  https://doi.org/10.1002/etep.1694.  157. Petrovic, N.; Strezoski, L.; Dumnic, B. Overview of software tools for integration and active management of high penetration of  DERs in emerging distribution networks. In Proceedings of the EUROCON 2019—18th International Conference on Smart Tech‐ nologies, Novi Sad, Serbia, 1–4 July 2019. https://doi.org/10.1109/EUROCON.2019.8861765.  158. Lombardi, P.; Powalko, M.; Rudion, K. Optimal Operation of a Virtual Power Plant. In Proceedings of the 2009 IEEE Power and  Energy Society General Meeting, PES ’09, Calgary, AB, Canada, 26–30 July 2009. https://doi.org/10.1109/PES.2009.5275995.  159. Justo, J.J. Intelligent energy management strategy considering power distribution networks with nanogrids, microgrids, and  VPP concepts. Handb. Distrib. Gener. Electr. Power Technol. Econ. Environ. Impacts. 2017, 791–815. https://doi.org/10.1007/978‐3‐ 319‐51343‐0_23.  160. Adeyemi, A.; Yan, M.; Shahidehpour, M.; Bahramirad, S.; Paaso, A. Transactive energy markets for managing energy exchanges  in power distribution systems. Electr. J. 2020, 33, 106868. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tej.2020.106868.  161. Adu‐Kankam, K.O.; Camarinha‐Matos, L.M. Towards collaborative Virtual Power Plants: Trends and convergence. Sustain.  Energy Grids Netw. 2018, 16, 217–230. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.segan.2018.08.003.  162. Gharaibeh, A.; Salahuddin, M.A.; Hussini, S.J.; Khreishah, A.; Khalil, I.; Guizani, M.; Al‐Fuqaha, A. Smart Cities: A Survey on  Data  Management,  Security,  and  Enabling  Technologies.  IEEE  Commun.  Surv.  Tutor.  2017,  19,  2456–2501.  https://doi.org/10.1109/COMST.2017.2736886.  163. Hameed, A.; Khoshkbarforoushha, A.; Ranjan, R.; Jayaraman, P.P.; Kolodziej, J.; Balaji, P.; Zeadally, S.; Malluhi, Q.M.; Tziritas,  N.; Vishnu, A.; et al. A survey and taxonomy on energy efficient resource allocation techniques for cloud computing systems.  Computing 2016, 98, 751–774. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00607‐014‐0407‐8.  164. Diaby, T.; Rad, B.B. Cloud Computing: A review of the Concepts and Deployment Models. Int. J. Inf. Technol. Comput. Sci. 2017,  9, 50–58. https://doi.org/10.5815/ijitcs.2017.06.07.  165. Faheem, M.; Akram, U.; Khan, I.; Naqeeb, S.; Shahzad, A.; Ullah, A. Cloud computing environment and security challenges: A  review. Int. J. Adv. Comput. Sci. Appl. 2017, 8, 183–195. https://doi.org/10.14569/ijacsa.2017.081025.  166. Rashid, A.; Chaturvedi, A. Cloud Computing Characteristics and Services: A Brief Review. Int. J. Comput. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7, 421– 426. https://doi.org/10.26438/ijcse/v7i2.421426.  167. Nieuwenhuis, L.J.M.; Ehrenhard, M.L.; Prause, L. The shift to Cloud Computing: The impact of disruptive technology on the  enterprise  software  business  ecosystem.  Technol.  Forecast.  Soc.  Chang.  2018,  129,  308–313.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tech‐ fore.2017.09.037.  168. Ghahramani, M.H.; Zhou, M.; Hon, C.T. Toward cloud computing QoS architecture: Analysis of cloud systems and cloud ser‐ vices. IEEE/CAA J. Autom. Sin. 2017, 4, 6–18. https://doi.org/10.1109/JAS.2017.7510313.  169. Shehabi, A.; Smith, S.J.; Masanet, E.; Koomey, J. Data center growth in the United States: Decoupling the demand for services  from electricity use. Environ. Res. Lett. 2018, 13, 124030. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748‐9326/aaec9c.  170. Cahyani, N.D.W.; Martini, B.; Choo, K.K.R.; Al‐Azhar, A.M.N. Forensic data acquisition from cloud‐of‐things devices: Windows  Smartphones as a case study. Concurr. Comput. 2017, 29, e3855. https://doi.org/10.1002/cpe.3855.  171. Tassone, C.F.R.; Martini, B.; Choo, K.K.R. Visualizing Digital Forensic Datasets: A Proof of Concept. J. Forensic Sci. 2017, 62,  1197–1204. https://doi.org/10.1111/1556‐4029.13431.  172. Rani, R.; Kumar, N.; Khurana, M.; Kumar, A.; Barnawi, A. Storage as a service in Fog computing: A systematic review. J. Syst.  Archit. 2021, 116, 102033. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sysarc.2021.102033.  173. Aazam, M.; Huh, E.N. Fog computing micro datacenter based dynamic resource estimation and pricing model for IoT. In Pro‐ ceedings of the 2015 IEEE 29th International Conference on Advanced Information Networking and Applications, Gwangju,  Korea, 24–27 March 2015; pp. 687–694. https://doi.org/10.1109/AINA.2015.254.  174. Libertson, F.; Velkova, J.; Palm, J. Data‐center infrastructure and energy gentrification: Perspectives from Sweden. Sustain. Sci.  Pract. Policy 2021, 17, 153–162. https://doi.org/10.1080/15487733.2021.1901428.  175. Kumar, M.; Sharma, S.C. Deadline constrained based dynamic load balancing algorithm with elasticity in cloud environment.  Comput. Electr. Eng. 2018, 69, 395–411. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compeleceng.2017.11.018.  176. Kumar, M.; Dubey, K.; Sharma, S.C. Elastic and flexible deadline constraint load Balancing algorithm for Cloud Computing.  Procedia Comput. Sci. 2018, 125, 717–724. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.procs.2017.12.092.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  37  of  42  177. Rana,  S.G.H.  Cloud  Resource  Optimization:  Comparison  of  Probabilistic  Optimization  Algorithms.  2017.  Available  online:  https://www.flackbox.com/cloud‐resource‐pooling‐tutorial (accessed on 16 August 2021).  178. Abohamama, A.S.; Hamouda, E. A hybrid energy–Aware virtual machine placement algorithm for cloud environments. Expert  Syst. Appl. 2020, 150. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eswa.2020.113306.  179. Wang, Q.; Cai, H.; Cao, Q.; Wang, F. An energy‐efficient power management for heterogeneous servers in data centers. Compu‐ ting 2020, 102, 1717–1741. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00607‐020‐00805‐w.  180. Zhang, S.; Qian, Z.; Luo, Z.; Wu, J.; Lu, S. Burstiness‐Aware Resource Reservation for Server Consolidation in Computing  Clouds. IEEE Trans. Parallel Distrib. Syst. 2016, 27, 964–977. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPDS.2015.2425403.  181. Selim, G.E.I.; El‐Rashidy, M.A.; El‐Fishawy, N.A. An efficient resource utilization technique for consolidation of virtual ma‐ chines in cloud computing environments. In Proceedings of the National Radio Science Conference, NRSC, Aswan, Egypt, 22– 25 February 2016; pp. 316–324. https://doi.org/10.1109/NRSC.2016.7450844.  182. Orgerie, A.C.; de Assuncao, M.D.; Lefevre, L. A survey on techniques for improving the energy efficiency of large‐scale distrib‐ uted systems. ACM Comput. Surv. 2014, 46, 1–31. https://doi.org/10.1145/2532637.  183. Haghighi, M.A.; Maeen, M.; Haghparast, M. An Energy‐Efficient Dynamic Resource Management Approach Based on Cluster‐ ing and Meta‐Heuristic Algorithms in Cloud Computing IaaS Platforms: Energy Efficient Dynamic Cloud Resource Manage‐ ment. Wirel. Pers. Commun. 2019, 104, 1367–1391. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11277‐018‐6089‐3.  184. Forestiero, A.; Mastroianni, C.; Meo, M.; Papuzzo, G.; Sheikhalishahi, M. Hierarchical Approach for Efficient Workload Man‐ agement  in  Geo‐Distributed  Data  Centers.  IEEE  Trans.  Green  Commun.  Netw.  2017,  1,  97–111.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TGCN.2016.2603586.  185. Tribus, M.; McIrvine, E.C. Energy and Information. Sci. Am. 1971, 225, 179–188. https://doi.org/10.1038/scientificamerican0971‐ 179.  186. Gupta, B.B.; Quamara, M. An overview of Internet of Things (IoT): Architectural aspects, challenges, and protocols. Concurr.  Comput. 2020, 32, e4946. https://doi.org/10.1002/cpe.4946.  187. Hanini, M.; el Kafhali, S.; Salah, K. Dynamic VM allocation and traffic control to manage QoS and energy consumption in cloud  computing environment. Int. J. Comput. Appl. Technol. 2019, 60, 307–316. https://doi.org/10.1504/IJCAT.2019.101168.  188. Rashid, Z.N.; Zebari, S.R.M.; Sharif, K.H.; Jacksi, K. Distributed Cloud Computing and Distributed Parallel Computing: A Re‐ view. In Proceedings of the ICOASE 2018—International Conference on Advanced Science and Engineering, Duhok, Iraq, 9–11  October 2018; pp. 167–172. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICOASE.2018.8548937.  189. Dabbagh, M.; Hamdaoui, B.; Rayes, A. Peak Power Shaving for Reduced Electricity Costs in Cloud Data Centers: Opportunities  and Challenges. IEEE Netw. 2020, 34, 148–153. https://doi.org/10.1109/MNET.001.1900329.  190. Simmhan, Y.; Giakkoupis, M. On using cloud platforms in a software architecture for smart energy grids. In Proceedings of the  IEEE International Conference on Cloud Computing (CloudCom), Indianapolis, IN, USA, 30 November–3 December 2010; pp.  1–3. Available online: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.232.2334&rep=rep1&type=pdf (accessed on 16  August 2021).  191. Hasan, M.K.; Ahmed, M.M.; Musa, S.S.; Islam, S.; Abdullah, S.N.H.S.; Hossain, E.; Nafi, N.S.; Vo, N. An Improved Dynamic  Thermal Current Rating Model for PMU‐Based Wide Area Measurement Framework for Reliability Analysis Utilizing Sensor  Cloud System. IEEE Access 2021, 9, 14446–14458. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2021.3052368.  192. Elomari, A.; Hassouni, L.; Maizate, A. The main characteristics of five distributed file systems required for big data: A compar‐ ative study. Adv. Sci. Technol. Eng. Syst. 2017, 2, 78–91. https://doi.org/10.25046/aj020411.  193. Ahmad, A.; Khan, M.; Paul, A.; Din, S.; Rathore, M.M.; Jeon, G.; Choi, G.S. Toward modeling and optimization of features  selection in Big Data based social Internet of Things. Future Gener. Comput. Syst. 2018, 82, 715–726. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fu‐ ture.2017.09.028.  194. Zhong, R.Y.; Newman, S.T.; Huang, G.Q.; Lan, S. Big Data for supply chain management in the service and manufacturing  sectors:  Challenges,  opportunities,  and  future  perspectives.  Comput.  Ind.  Eng.  2016,  101,  572–591.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cie.2016.07.013.  195. Mustafa, H.M.J.; Ayob, M.; Albashish, D.; Abu‐Taleb, S. Solving text clustering problem using a memetic differential evolution  algorithm. PLoS ONE 2020, 15, e0232816. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0232816.  196. Bilal, M.; Oyedele, L.O.; Qadir, J.; Munir, K.; Ajayi, S.O.; Akinade, O.O.; Owolabi, H.A.; Alaka, H.A.; Pasha, M. Big Data in the  construction  industry:  A  review  of  present  status,  opportunities,  and  future  trends.  Adv.  Eng.  Inform.  2016,  30,  500–521.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aei.2016.07.001.  197. Li, Y.; Yu, M.; Xu, M.; Yang, J.; Sha, D.; Liu, Q.; Yang, C. Big data and cloud computing. In Manual of Digital Earth; Springer:  Singapore, 2020; pp. 325–355. https://doi.org/10.1007/978‐981‐32‐9915‐3_9.  198. Costin, A.; Adibfar, A.; Hu, H.; Chen, S.S. Building Information Modeling (BIM) for transportation infrastructure—Literature  review,  applications,  challenges,  and  recommendations.  Autom.  Constr.  2018,  94,  257–281.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.autcon.2018.07.001.  199. Chen, C.L.P.; Zhang, C.Y. Data‐intensive applications, challenges, techniques and technologies: A survey on Big Data. Inf. Sci.  2014, 275, 314–347. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ins.2014.01.015s.  200. Kambatla, K.; Kollias, G.; Kumar, V.; Grama, A. Trends in big data analytics. J. Parallel Distrib. Comput. 2014, 74, 2561–2573.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpdc.2014.01.003.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  38  of  42  201. Hu, H.; Wen, Y.; Chua, T.S.; Li, X. Toward scalable systems for big data analytics: A technology tutorial. IEEE Access 2014, 2,  652–687. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2014.2332453.  202. Tu, C.; He, X.; Shuai, Z.; Jiang, F. Big data issues in smart grid—A review. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2017, 79, 1099–1107.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.05.134.  203. Saleem, Y.; Crespi, N.; Rehmani, M.H.; Copeland, R. Internet of Things‐Aided Smart Grid: Technologies, Architectures, Appli‐ cations,  Prototypes,  and  Future  Research  Directions.  IEEE  Access  2019,  7,  62962–63003.  https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2019.2913984.  204. Marjani, M.; Nasaruddin, F.; Gani, A.; Karim, A.; Hashem, I.A.T.; Siddiqa, A.; Yaqoob, I. Big IoT Data Analytics: Architecture,  Opportunities, and Open Research Challenges. IEEE Access 2017, 5, 5247–5261. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2017.2689040.  205. Zhu, T.; Xiao, S.; Zhang, Q.; Gu, Y.; Yi, P.; Li, Y. Emergent Technologies in Big Data Sensing: A Survey. Int. J. Distrib. Sens. Netw.  2015, 11, 902982. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/902982.  206. Jiang,  H.;  Wang,  K.;  Wang,  Y.;  Gao,  M.;  Zhang,  Y.  Energy  big  data:  A  survey.  IEEE  Access  2016,  4,  3844–3861.  https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2016.2580581.  207. Ahmed, S.; Gondal, T.M.; Adil, M.; Malik, S.A.; Qureshi, R. A Survey on Communication Technologies in Smart Grid. In Pro‐ ceedings of the 2019 IEEE PES GTD Grand International Conference and Exposition Asia, GTD Asia 2019, Bangkok, Thailand,  19–23 March 2019; pp. 7–12. https://doi.org/10.1109/GTDAsia.2019.8715993.  208. Yang, T. ICT technologies standards and protocols for active distribution network. Smart Power Distrib. Syst. Control. Commun.  Optim. 2018, 205–230. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978‐0‐12‐812154‐2.00010‐9.  209. Baesens, B.; Bapna, R.; Marsden, J.R.; Vanthienen, J.; Zhao, J.L. Transformational issues of big data and analytics in networked  business. MIS Q. Manag. Inf. Syst. 2016, 40, 807–818. https://doi.org/10.25300/MISQ/2016/40:4.03.  210. Sagiroglu, S.; Terzi, R.; Canbay, Y.; Colak, I. Big data issues in smart grid systems. In Proceedings of the 2016 IEEE International  Conference on Renewable Energy Research and Applications, ICRERA 2016, Birmingham, UK, 20–23 November 2016; pp. 1007– 1012. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICRERA.2016.7884486.  211. El‐Mawla, N.A.; Badawy, M.; Arafat, H. IoT for the Failure of Climate‐Change Mitigation and Adaptation and IIoT as a Future  Solution. World J. Environ. Eng. 2019, 6, 7–16. https://doi.org/10.12691/wjee‐6‐1‐2.  212. Daki, H.; el Hannani, A.; Aqqal, A.; Haidine, A.; Dahbi, A. Big Data management in smart grid: Concepts, requirements and  implementation. J. Big Data 2017, 4, 13. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40537‐017‐0070‐y.  213. Zhang,  Y.;  Huang,  T.;  Bompard,  E.F.  Big  data  analytics  in  smart  grids:  A  review.  Energy  Inform.  2016,  1,  8.  https://doi.org/10.1186/s42162‐018‐0007‐5.  214. Ponocko, J.; Milanovic, J.V. Forecasting Demand Flexibility of Aggregated Residential Load Using Smart Meter Data. IEEE  Trans. Power Syst. 2018, 33, 5446–5455. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2018.2799903.  215. Kalalas, C.; Thrybom, L.; Alonso‐Zarate, J. Cellular communications for smart grid neighborhood area networks: A survey.  IEEE Access 2016, 4, 1469–1493. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2016.2551978.  216. Yu, R.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, Y. Hybrid spectrum access in cognitive Neighborhood Area Networks in the smart grid. In Proceedings  of  the  IEEE  Wireless  Communications  and  Networking  Conference,  WCNC,  Paris,  France,  1–4  April  2012;  pp.  1478–1483.  https://doi.org/10.1109/WCNC.2012.6214014.  217. Gellings, C.W. Smart Grid Technologies: Communication Technologies and Standards, 1st ed.; River Publishers: Aalborg, Denmark,  2021.  218. Baimel, D.; Tapuchi, S.; Baimel, N. Smart grid communication technologies—Overview, research challenges and opportunities.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2016  International  Symposium  on  Power  Electronics,  Electrical  Drives,  Automation  and  Motion,  SPEEDAM, Capri, Italy, 22–24 June 2016; pp. 116–120. https://doi.org/10.1109/SPEEDAM.2016.7526014.  219. Gibert, K.; Sànchez‐Marrè, M.; Izquierdo, J. A survey on pre‐processing techniques: Relevant issues in the context of environ‐ mental data mining. AI Commun. 2016, 29, 627–663. https://doi.org/10.3233/AIC‐160710.  220. Fernández, A.; del Río, S.; Chawla, N.V.; Herrera, F. An insight into imbalanced Big Data classification: Outcomes and chal‐ lenges. Complex Intell. Syst. 2017, 3, 105–120. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40747‐017‐0037‐9.  221. Juneja, A.; Das, N.N. Big Data Quality Framework: Pre‐Processing Data in Weather Monitoring Application. In Proceedings of  the International Conference on Machine Learning, Big Data, Cloud and Parallel Computing: Trends, Prespectives and Pro‐ spects, COMITCon2019, Faridabad, India, 14–16 February 2019; pp. 559–563. https://doi.org/10.1109/COMITCon.2019.8862267.  222. Shi, W.; Zhu, Y.; Huang, T.; Sheng, G.; Lian, Y.; Wang, G.; Chen, Y. An Integrated Data Preprocessing Framework Based on  Apache  Spark  for  Fault  Diagnosis  of  Power  Grid  Equipment.  J.  Signal  Process.  Syst.  2017,  86,  221–236.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11265‐016‐1119‐4.  223. Dileep,  G.  A  survey  on  smart  grid  technologies  and  applications.  Renew.  Energy  2020,  146,  2589–2625.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2019.08.092.  224. Kar, S.; Samantaray, S.R.; Zadeh, M.D. Data‐Mining Model Based Intelligent Differential Microgrid Protection Scheme. IEEE  Syst. J. 2017, 11, 1161–1169. https://doi.org/10.1109/JSYST.2014.2380432.  225. Silva, B.N.; Khan, M.; Jung, C.; Seo, J.; Muhammad, D.; Han, J.; Yoon, Y.; Han, K. Urban planning and smart city decision  management  empowered  by  real‐time  data  processing  using  big  data  analytics.  Sensors  2018,  18,  2994.  https://doi.org/10.3390/s18092994.  226. Sharma, E. Energy forecasting based on predictive data mining techniques in smart energy grids. Energy Inform. 2018, 1, 367– 373. https://doi.org/10.1186/s42162‐018‐0048‐9.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  39  of  42  227. Siryani, J.; Tanju, B.; Eveleigh, T.J. A Machine Learning Decision‐Support System Improves the Internet of Things’ Smart Meter  Operations. IEEE Internet Things J. 2017, 4, 1056–1066. https://doi.org/10.1109/JIOT.2017.2722358.  228. Albashish, D.; Hammouri, A.I.; Braik, M.; Atwan, J.; Sahran, S. Binary biogeography‐based optimization based SVM‐RFE for  feature selection. Appl. Soft Comput. 2021, 101, 107026. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.asoc.2020.107026.  229. Samantaray, S.R.; Mishra, D.P.; Joos, G.; Samantaray, S.R.; Joos, G. A Combined Wavelet and Data‐Mining Based Intelligent  Protection Scheme for Microgrid. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018, 7, 2295–2304. https://doi.org/10.1109/pesgm.2018.8586480.  230. Hashemi, F.; Mohammadi, M.; Kargarian, A. Islanding detection method for microgrid based on extracted features from differ‐ ential  transient  rate  of  change  of  frequency.  IET  Gener.  Transm.  Distrib.  2017,  11,  891–904.  https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐ gtd.2016.0795.  231. Alam, M.R.; Muttaqi, K.M.; Bouzerdoum, A. Evaluating the effectiveness of a machine learning approach based on response  time  and  reliability  for  islanding  detection  of  distributed  generation.  IET  Renew.  Power  Gener.  2017,  11,  1392–1400.  https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐rpg.2016.0987.  232. Elkadeem, M.R.; Alaam, M.A.; Azmy, A.M. Improving performance of underground MV distribution networks using distribu‐ tion automation system: A case study. Ain Shams Eng. J. 2018, 9, 469–481. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.asej.2016.04.004.  233. Santis, E.D.; Rizzi, A.; Sadeghian, A. A learning intelligent System for classification and characterization of localized faults in  Smart Grids. In Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation, CEC 2017—Proceedings, Donostia‐San  Sebastián, Spain, 5–8 June 2017; pp. 2669–2676. https://doi.org/10.1109/CEC.2017.7969631.  234. Wang, J.; Xiong, X.; Zhou, N.; Li, Z.; Wang, W. Early warning method for transmission line galloping based on SVM and Ada‐ Boost bi‐level classifiers. IET Gener. Transm. Distrib. 2016, 10, 3499–3507. https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐gtd.2016.0140.  235. Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Dong, Z.Y.; Xu, Z.; Wong, K.P. Intelligent early warning of power system dynamic insecurity Risk: Toward  optimal accuracy‐earliness tradeoff. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 2544–2554. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2017.2676879.  236. Cui, Q.; El‐Arroudi, K.; Joos, G. An effective feature extraction method in pattern recognition based high impedance fault de‐ tection. In Proceedings of the 2017 19th International Conference on Intelligent System Application to Power Systems (ISAP),  San Antonio, TX, USA, 17–20 September 2017. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISAP.2017.8071380.  237. Zhu, L.; Lu, C.; Dong, Z.Y.; Hong, C. Imbalance Learning Machine‐Based Power System Short‐Term Voltage Stability Assess‐ ment. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 2533–2543. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2017.2696534.  238. Flynn, D.; Rather, Z.; Ardal, A.; D’Arco, S.; Hansen, A.D.; Cutululis, N.A.; Sorensen, P.; Estanquiero, A.; Gómez, E.; Menemenlis,  N.; et al. Technical impacts of high penetration levels of wind power on power system stability. Wiley Interdiscip. Rev. Energy  Environ. 2017, 6, e216. https://doi.org/10.1002/wene.216.  239. Liu, C.; Sun, K.; Rather, Z.H.; Chen, Z.; Bak, C.L.; Thøgersen, P.; Lund, P. A systematic approach for dynamic security assess‐ ment and the corresponding preventive control scheme based on decision trees. IEEE Trans. Power  Syst. 2014, 29, 717–730.  https://doi.org/10.1109/pesgm.2014.6938856.  240. He, C.; Guan, L.; Mo, W. A method for transient stability assessment based on pattern recognition. In Proceedings of the 2016  International Conference on Smart Grid and Clean Energy Technologies, ICSGCE 2016, Chengdu, China, 19–22 October 2016;  pp. 343–347. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICSGCE.2016.7876081.  241. Dimitrovska, T.; Rudez, U.; Mihalic, R. Fast contingency screening based on data mining. In Proceedings of the 17th IEEE In‐ ternational Conference on Smart Technologies, EUROCON 2017—Conference Proceedings, Ohrid, Macedonia, 6–8 July 2017;  pp. 794–798. https://doi.org/10.1109/EUROCON.2017.8011219.  242. Andalib‐Bin‐Karim, C.; Liang, X.; Khan, N.; Zhang, H. Determine Q‐V Characteristics of Grid‐Connected Wind Farms for Volt‐ age  Control  Using  a  Data‐Driven  Analytics  Approach.  IEEE  Trans.  Ind.  Appl.  2017,  53,  4162–4175.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TIA.2017.2716343.  243. Kalair, A.; Abas, N.; Saleem, M.S.; Kalair, A.R.; Khan, N. Role of energy storage systems in energy transition from fossil fuels to  renewables. Energy Storage 2021, 3, e135. https://doi.org/10.1002/est2.135.  244. Swetapadma, A.; Yadav, A. Data‐mining‐based fault during power swing identification in power transmission system. IET Sci.  Meas. Technol. 2016, 10, 130–139. https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐smt.2015.0169.  245. Jena, M.K.; Samantaray, S.R. Data‐Mining‐Based Intelligent Differential Relaying for Transmission Lines Including UPFC and  Wind Farms. IEEE Trans. Neural Netw. Learn. Syst. 2016, 27, 8–17. https://doi.org/10.1109/TNNLS.2015.2404775.  246. Papadopoulos, P.N.; Guo, T.; Milanović, J.V. Probabilistic framework for online identification of dynamic behavior of power  systems with renewable generation. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2018, 33, 45–54. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2017.2688446.  247. Deng, X.; Bian, D.; Wang, W.; Jiang, Z.; Yao, W.; Qiu, W.; Tong, N.; Shi, D.; Liu, Y. Deep learning model to detect various  synchrophasor data anomalies. IET Gener. Transm. Distrib. 2020, 14, 5816–5822. https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐gtd.2020.0526.  248. Tan, B.; Yang, J.; Tang, Y.; Jiang, S.; Xie, P.; Yuan, W. A Deep Imbalanced Learning Framework for Transient Stability Assess‐ ment of Power System. IEEE Access 2019, 7, 81759–81769. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2019.2923799.  249. Wei, L.; Dongxia, Z.; Xinying, W.; Daowei, L.; Qian, W. Power system transient stability analysis based on random matrix  theory. Proc. CSEE 2016, 36, 4854–4863.  250. Xu, X.Y.; He, X.; Ai, Q.; Qiu, C.M. A correlation analysis method for operation status of distribution network based on random  matrix theory. Power Syst. Technol. 2016, 40, 781–790.  251. Malbasa, V.; Zheng, C.; Chen, P.C.; Popovic, T.; Kezunovic, M. Voltage Stability Prediction Using Active Machine Learning.  IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2017, 8, 3117–3124. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2017.2693394.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  40  of  42  252. Zhang, J.; Chung, C.Y.; Wang, Z.; Zheng, X. Instantaneous Electromechanical Dynamics Monitoring in Smart Transmission  Grid. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2016, 12, 844–852. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2015.2492861.  253. Zhao, J.; Zhang, G.; Das, K.; Korres, G.N.; Manousakis, N.M.; Sinha, A.K.; He, Z. Power system real‐time monitoring by using  PMU‐based robust state estimation method. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2016, 7, 300–309. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2015.2431693.  254. Shah, Z.; Anwar, A.; Mahmood, A.N.; Tari, Z.; Zomaya, A.Y. A Spatiotemporal Data Summarization Approach for Real‐Time  Operation of Smart Grid. IEEE Trans. Big Data 2020, 6, 624–637. https://doi.org/10.1109/TBDATA.2017.2691350.  255. Lv, Z.; Song, H.; Basanta‐Val, P.; Steed, A.; Jo, M. Next‐Generation Big Data Analytics: State of the Art, Challenges, and Future  Research Topics. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 1891–1899. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2017.2650204.  256. Reinhardt, A.; Reinhardt, D. Detecting anomalous electrical appliance behavior based on motif transition likelihood matrices.   International Conference on Smart Grid Communications, SmartGridComm 2016, Sydney,  In Proceedings of the 2016 IEEE NSW, Australia, 6–9 November 2016; pp. 680–685. https://doi.org/10.1109/SmartGridComm.2016.7778840.  257. Sheng, G.; Hou, H.; Jiang, X.; Chen, Y. A novel association rule mining method of big data for power transformers state param‐ eters based on probabilistic graph model. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018, 9, 695–702. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2562123.  258. Png, E.; Srinivasan, S.; Bekiroglu, K.; Chaoyang, J.; Su, R.; Poolla, K. An internet of things upgrade for smart and scalable heating,  ventilation and air‐conditioning control in commercial buildings. Appl. Energy 2019, 239, 408–424. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apen‐ ergy.2019.01.229.  259. Allen, W.H.; Rubaai, A.; Chawla, R. Fuzzy Neural Network‐Based Health Monitoring for HVAC System Variable‐Air‐Volume  Unit. IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl. 2016, 52, 2513–2524. https://doi.org/10.1109/TIA.2015.2511160.  260. Azmi, A.; Jasni, J.; Azis, N.; Kadir, M.Z.A.A. Evolution of transformer health index in the form of mathematical equation. Renew.  Sustain. Energy Rev. 2017, 76, 687–700. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.03.094.  261. Goyal, R.; Whelan, M.J.; Cavalline, T.L. Characterising the effect of external factors on deterioration rates of bridge components  using  multivariate  proportional  hazards  regression.  Struct.  Infrastruct.  Eng.  2017,  13,  894–905.  https://doi.org/10.1080/15732479.2016.1217888.  262. Moradi, R.; Groth, K.M. Modernizing risk assessment: A systematic integration of PRA and PHM techniques. Reliab. Eng. Syst.  Saf. 2020, 204, 107194. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ress.2020.107194.  263. Balouji, E.; Salor, O. Classification of power quality events using deep learning on event images. In Proceedings of the 3rd  International Conference on Pattern Analysis and Image Analysis, IPRIA 2017, Shahrekord, Iran, 19–20 April 2017; pp. 216–221.  https://doi.org/10.1109/PRIA.2017.7983049.  264. Borges, F.A.S.; Fernandes, R.A.S.; Silva, I.N.; Silva, C.B.S. Feature Extraction and Power Quality Disturbances Classification  Using Smart Meters Signals. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2016, 12, 824–833. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2015.2486379.  265. Potter, C.W.; Archambault, A.; Westrick, K. Building a smarter smart grid through better renewable energy information. In  Proceedings of the 2009 IEEE/PES Power Systems Conference and Exposition, PSCE 2009, Seattle, WA, USA, 15–18 March 2009.  https://doi.org/10.1109/PSCE.2009.4840110.  266. Alonso,  M.;  Amaris,  H.;  Alcala,  D.;  Florez,  D.M.R.  Smart  sensors  for  smart  grid  reliability.  Sensors  2020,  20,  2187.  https://doi.org/10.3390/s20082187.  267. Supriya, S.; Magheshwari, M.; Udhyalakshmi, S.S.; Subhashini, R.; Musthafa. Smart grid technologies: Communication technol‐ ogies and standards. Int. J. Appl. Eng. Res. 2011, 10, 16932–16941.  268. Brijesh, P.; Lal, A.G.; Manju, A.S.; Joseph, A. Synchrophasors evaluation and applications. In Proceedings of the 2018 IEEE Texas  Power  and  Energy  Conference,  TPEC  2018,  College  Station,  TX,  USA,  8–9  February  2018;  Volume  2018,  pp.  1–6.  https://doi.org/10.1109/TPEC.2018.8312052.  269. Olvera, J.P.; Green, T.; Junyent‐Ferre, A. Using Multi‐Terminal DC Networks to Improve the Hosting Capacity of Distribution  Networks. In Proceedings of the Proceedings—2018 IEEE PES Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Conference Europe, ISGT‐ Europe 2018, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, 21–25 October 2018. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISGTEurope.2018.8571622.  270. Elbreki, A.M.; Sopian, K.; Fazlizan, A.; Ibrahim, A. An innovative technique of passive cooling PV module using lapping fins  and planner reflector. Case Stud. Therm. Eng. 2020, 19, 100607. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.csite.2020.100607.  271. Kumar, H.; Singh, M.K.; Gupta, M.P.; Madaan, J. Moving towards smart cities: Solutions that lead to the Smart City Transfor‐ mation Framework. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 2020, 153, 119281. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2018.04.024.  272. Haben, S.; Arora, S.; Giasemidis, G.; Voss, M.; Greetham, D.V. Review of Low‐Voltage Load Forecasting: Methods, Applications,  and Recommendations. 2021. Available online: http://arxiv.org/abs/2106.00006 (accessed on).  273. Hossain, M.S.; Madlool, N.A.; Rahim, N.A.; Selvaraj, J.; Pandey, A.K.; Khan, A.F. Role of smart grid in renewable energy: An  overview. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2016, 60, 1168–1184. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2015.09.098.  274. Wu, W.; Peng, M. A Data Mining Approach Combining K‐Means Clustering with Bagging Neural Network for Short‐Term  Wind Power Forecasting. IEEE Internet Things J. 2017, 4, 979–986. https://doi.org/10.1109/JIOT.2017.2677578.  275. Yang, M.; Lin, Y.; Han, X. Probabilistic Wind Generation Forecast Based on Sparse Bayesian Classification and Dempster‐Shafer  Theory. IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl. 2016, 52, 1998–2005. https://doi.org/10.1109/TIA.2016.2518995.  276. Khodayar, M.; Kaynak, O.; Khodayar, M.E. Rough Deep Neural Architecture for Short‐Term Wind Speed Forecasting. IEEE  Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 2770–2779. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2017.2730846.  277. Zhao, T.; Zhou, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Ling, P.; Tian, Y. Spatio‐Temporal Analysis and Forecasting of Distributed PV Systems Diffusion:  A  Case  Study  of  Shanghai  Using  a  Data‐Driven  Approach.  IEEE  Access  2017,  5,  5135–5148.  https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2017.2694009.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  41  of  42  278. Nazaripouya, H.; Wang, B.; Wang, Y.; Chu, P.; Pota, H.R.; Gadh, R. Univariate time series prediction of solar power using a  hybrid wavelet‐ARMA‐NARX prediction method. In Proceedings of the IEEE Power Engineering Society Transmission and  Distribution Conference, Dallas, TX, USA, 3–5 May 2016. https://doi.org/10.1109/TDC.2016.7519959.  279. Tayab, U.B.; Zia, A.; Yang, F.; Lu, J.; Kashif, M. Short‐term load forecasting for microgrid energy management system using  hybrid  HHO‐FNN  model  with  best‐basis  stationary  wavelet  packet  transform.  Energy  2020,  203,  117857.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2020.117857.  280. Ding, N.; Benoit, C.; Foggia, G.; Besanger, Y.; Wurtz, F. Neural network‐based model design for short‐term load forecast in  distribution systems. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2016, 31, 72–81. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2015.2390132.  281. Liu, D.; Zeng, L.; Li, C.; Ma, K.; Chen, Y.; Cao, Y. A Distributed Short‐Term Load Forecasting Method Based on Local Weather  Information. IEEE Syst. J. 2018, 12, 208–215. https://doi.org/10.1109/JSYST.2016.2594208. 282. Shi, H.; Xu, M.; Li, R. Deep Learning for Household Load Forecasting—A Novel Pooling Deep RNN. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid  2018, 9, 5271–5280. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2017.2686012.  283. Kong, W.; Dong, Z.Y.; Jia, Y.; Hill, D.J.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, Y. Short‐Term Residential Load Forecasting based on LSTM Recurrent  Neural Network. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2017, 10, 841–851. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2017.2753802.  284. Meyn, S.; Samad, T.; Hiskens, I.; Stoustrup, J. Energy Markets and Responsive Grids. Modeling, Control, and Optimization. The IMA  Volumes  Mathematics  Its  Applications;  2018;  518p.  Available  online:  https://link‐springer‐com.proxy.libraries.uc.edu/con‐ tent/pdf/10.1007%2F978‐1‐4939‐7822‐9.pdf (accessed on 16 August 2021).  285. Moreno‐Munoz, A.; Bellido‐Outeirino, F.J.; Siano, P.; Gomez‐Nieto, M.A. Mobile social media for smart grids customer engage‐ ment:  Emerging  trends  and  challenges.  Renew.  Sustain.  Energy  Rev.  2016,  53,  1611–1616A.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2015.09.077.  286. Cai, Y.; Huang, T.; Bompard, E.; Cao, Y.; Li, Y. Self‐sustainable community of electricity prosumers in the emerging distribution  system. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2017, 8, 2207–2216. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2518241.  287. Al‐Otaibi, R.; Jin, N.; Wilcox, T.; Flach, P. Feature Construction and Calibration for Clustering Daily Load Curves from Smart‐ Meter Data. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2016, 12, 645–654. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2016.2528819.  288. Peng, W.; Deng, Z.; Zhu, Y.; Lu, J. An analytical method for intelligent electricity use pattern with demand response. In Pro‐ ceedings  of  the  China  International  Conference  on  Electricity  Distribution,  CICED,  Xi’an,  China,  10–13  August  2016.  https://doi.org/10.1109/CICED.2016.7576062.  289. Khan, I.; Huang, J.Z.; Masud, M.A.; Jiang, Q. Segmentation of factories on electricity consumption behaviors using load profile  data. IEEE Access 2016, 4, 8394–8406. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2016.2619898.  290. Li, R.; Li, F.; Smith, N.D. Load Characterization and Low‐Order Approximation for Smart Metering Data in the Spectral Domain.  IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2017, 13, 976–984. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2016.2638319.  291. Zhang, D.; Li, S.; Sun, M.; O’Neill, Z. An Optimal and Learning‐Based Demand Response and Home Energy Management  System. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2016, 7, 1790–1801. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2552169.  292. Jindal, A.; Dua, A.; Kaur, K.; Singh, M.; Kumar, N.; Mishra, S. Decision Tree and SVM‐Based Data Analytics for Theft Detection  in Smart Grid. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform. 2016, 12, 1005–1016. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2016.2543145.  293. Haben, S.; Singleton, C.; Grindrod, P. Analysis and clustering of residential customers energy behavioral demand using smart  meter data. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2016, 7, 136–144. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2015.2409786.  294. Munshi, A.A.; Mohamed, Y.A.R.I. Extracting and defining flexibility of residential electrical vehicle charging loads. IEEE Trans.  Ind. Inform. 2018, 14, 448–461. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2017.2724559.  295. Li, R.; Gu, C.; Li, F.; Shaddick, G.; Dale, M. Development of Low Voltage Network Templates—Part II: Peak Load Estimation  by Clusterwise Regression. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2015, 30, 3045–3052. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2014.2371477.  296. Wang, Y.; Chen, Q.; Kang, C.; Xia, Q.; Luo, M. Sparse and Redundant Representation‐Based Smart Meter Data Compression  and Pattern Extraction. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2017, 32, 2142–2151. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2016.2604389.  297. Gopinath, R.; Kumar, M.; Joshua, C.P.C.; Srinivas, K. Energy management using non‐intrusive load monitoring techniques— State‐of‐the‐art and future research directions. Sustain. Cities Soc. 2020, 62, 102411. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2020.102411.  298. Devlin, M.A.; Hayes, B.P. Non‐Intrusive Load Monitoring and Classification of Activities of Daily Living Using Residential  Smart Meter Data. IEEE Trans. Consum. Electron. 2019, 65, 339–348. https://doi.org/10.1109/TCE.2019.2918922.  299. Javaid, N.; Hafeez, G.; Iqbal, S.; Alrajeh, N.; Alabed, M.S.; Guizani, M. Energy Efficient Integration of Renewable Energy Sources  in  the  Smart  Grid  for  Demand  Side  Management.  IEEE  Access  2018,  6,  77077–77096.  https://doi.org/10.1109/AC‐ CESS.2018.2866461.  300. Kong, W.; Dong, Z.Y.; Ma, J.; Hill, D.J.; Zhao, J.; Luo, F. An Extensible Approach for Non‐Intrusive Load Disaggregation with  Smart Meter Data. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018, 9, 3362–3372. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2016.2631238.  301. Henao, N.; Agbossou, K.; Kelouwani, S.; Dube, Y.; Fournier, M. Approach in Nonintrusive Type i Load Monitoring Using Sub‐ tractive Clustering. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2017, 8, 812–821. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2015.2462719.  302. Chung, J.; Gillis, J.M.; Morsi, W.G. Non‐intrusive load monitoring using wavelet design and co‐testing of machine learning  classifiers. In Proceedings of the 2016 IEEE Electrical Power and Energy Conference, EPEC 2016, Ottawa, ON, Canada, 12–14  October 2016. https://doi.org/10.1109/EPEC.2016.7771763.  303. Jokar, P.; Arianpoo, N.; Leung, V.C.M. Electricity theft detection in AMI using customers’ consumption patterns. IEEE Trans.  Smart Grid 2016, 7, 216–226. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2015.2425222.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9820  42  of  42  304. Zhan, T.S.; Chen, S.J.; Kao, C.C.; Kuo, C.L.; Chen, J.L.; Lin, C.H. Non‐technical loss and power blackout detection under ad‐ vanced metering infrastructure using a cooperative game based inference mechanism. IET Gener. Transm. Distrib. 2016, 10, 873– 882. https://doi.org/10.1049/iet‐gtd.2015.0003.  305. Guerrero, J.I.; Monedero, I.; Biscarri, F.; Biscarri, J.; Millan, R.; Leon, C. Non‐Technical Losses Reduction by Improving the In‐ spections Accuracy in a Power Utility. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2018, 33, 1209–1218. https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2017.2721435.  306. Yu,  X.;  Xue,  Y.  Smart  Grids:  A  Cyber‐Physical  Systems  Perspective.  Proc.  IEEE  2016,  104,  1058–1070.  https://doi.org/10.1109/JPROC.2015.2503119.  307. Shahinzadeh, H.; Moradi, J.; Gharehpetian, G.B.; Nafisi, H.; Abedi, M. IoT Architecture for smart grids. In Proceedings of the  International  Conference  on  Protection  and  Automation  of  Power  System,  IPAPS,  Iran,  8–9  January  2019;  pp.  22–30.  https://doi.org/10.1109/IPAPS.2019.8641944.  308. Diamantoulakis, P.D.; Kapinas, V.M.; Karagiannidis, G.K. Big Data Analytics for Dynamic Energy Management in Smart Grids.  Big Data Res. 2015, 2, 94–101. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bdr.2015.03.003.  309. Alahakoon, D.; Yu, X. Smart Electricity Meter Data Intelligence for Future Energy Systems: A Survey. IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform.  2016, 12, 425–436. https://doi.org/10.1109/TII.2015.2414355.  310. Zhou, K.; Fu, C.; Yang, S. Big data driven smart energy management: From big data to big insights. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev.  2016, 56, 215–225. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2015.11.050.  311. Al‐Musaylh, M.S.; Deo, R.C.; Adamowski, J.F.; Li, Y. Short‐term electricity demand forecasting with MARS, SVR and ARIMA  models  using  aggregated  demand  data  in  Queensland,  Australia.  Adv.  Eng.  Inform.  2018,  35,  1–16.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aei.2017.11.002.  312. Valogianni, K.; Ketter, W. Effective demand response for smart grids: Evidence from a real‐world pilot. Decis. Support Syst. 2016,  91, 48–66. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dss.2016.07.007.  313. Candanedo, L.M.; Feldheim, V.; Deramaix, D. Data driven prediction models of energy use of appliances in a low‐energy house.  Energy Build. 2017, 140, 81–97. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.01.083.  314. Chou, J.S.; Ngo, N.T. Smart grid data analytics framework for increasing energy savings in residential buildings. Autom. Constr.  2016, 72, 247–257. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.autcon.2016.01.002.  315. Naveen, P.; Ing, W.K.; Danquah, M.K.; Sidhu, A.S.; Abu‐Siada, A. Cloud computing for energy management in smart grid—An  application survey. In Proceedings of the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Miri, Malaysia, 6–8 No‐ vember 2015; Volume 121. https://doi.org/10.1088/1757‐899X/121/1/012010.  316. Dakkak, O.; Nor, S.A.; Sajat, M.S.; Fazea, Y.; Arif, S. From grids to clouds: Recap on challenges and solutions. AIP Conf. Proc.  2018, 2016, 020040. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5055442.  317. Wang, Y.; Chen, Q.; Hong, T.; Kang, C. Review of Smart Meter Data Analytics: Applications, Methodologies, and Challenges.  IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2019, 10, 3125–3148. https://doi.org/10.1109/TSG.2018.2818167.  318. Lin, W.; Peng, G.; Bian, X.; Xu, S.; Chang, V.; Li, Y. Scheduling Algorithms for Heterogeneous Cloud Environment: Main Re‐ source  Load  Balancing  Algorithm  and  Time  Balancing  Algorithm.  J.  Grid  Comput.  2019,  17,  699–726.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10723‐019‐09499‐7.  319. Bera, S.; Misra, S.; Rodrigues, J.J.P.C. IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems Cloud Computing Applications  for Smart Grid: A Survey. 2015. Available online: http://www.ieee.org/publications_standards/publications/rights/index.html  (accessed on 16 August 2021). 

Journal

Applied SciencesMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Oct 20, 2021

Keywords: power management; state of charge; battery aging; dc-device; power consumption; renewable energy; cloud computing

There are no references for this article.