Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Bioinspired Humanoid Foot Mechanism

A Bioinspired Humanoid Foot Mechanism Article  1 2 2 3 2, Matteo Russo  , Betsy D. M. Chaparro‐Rico  , Luigi Pavone  , Gabriele Pasqua   and Daniele Cafolla  *    Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG8 1BB, UK; matteo.russo@notting‐ ham.ac.uk    IRCCS Neuromed, Via dell’Elettronica, 86077 Pozzilli (IS), Italy; betsychaparro@hotmail.com (B.D.M.C.‐R.);  bioingegneria@neuromed.it (L.P.)    Department of Medicine and Health Science, University of Molise, 86100 Campobasso (CB), Italy;  ing.gabrielepasqua@gmail.com  *  Correspondence: contact@danielecafolla.eu  Abstract: This paper introduces an innovative robotic foot design inspired by the functionality and  the anatomy of the human foot. Most humanoid robots are characterized by flat, rigid feet with  limited mobility, which cannot emulate the physical behavior of the foot–ground interaction. The  proposed  foot  mechanism  consists  of  three  main  bodies,  to  represent  the  heel,  plant,  and  toes,  connected  by  compliant  joints  for  improved  balancing  and  impact  absorption.  The  functional  requirements were extracted from medical literature, and were acquired through a motion capture  system, and the proposed design was validated with a numerical simulation.  Keywords: robotics; humanoids; foot mechanism; prosthetics; neurorehabilitation  1. Introduction  Citation: Russo, M.; Chaparro‐Rico,  Humanoid  robotics  has  fascinated  and  challenged  scientists  for  decades  [1].  The  B.D.M.; Pavone, L.; Pasqua, G.;  Cafolla, D. A Bioinspired Humanoid  design of humanoid robots has evolved from the serial design of the first humanoids, such  Foot Mechanism. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11,  as  WABOT  [2],  to  more  refined  architectures  [3–12].  However,  despite  decades  of  1686.  research, the mobility of most of these robots is still limited to the legs, arms, hands, and  https://doi.org/10.3390/app11041686    head only, with very few examples including torso [10] and foot [13–23] mobility, despite  the  feet  and  torso  playing  a  key  role  in  human  motion  [24].  The  reduced  mobility  of  Received: 21 January 2021  humanoid  robots  in  those  regions  hinders  their  capability  to  achieve  balance  and  to  Accepted: 9 February 2021  perform complex dynamic tasks. Human foot architecture is characterized by three main  Published: 13 February 2021  segments—namely the heel, mid‐foot, and toes—that fulfill distinct roles during bipedal  locomotion [25].  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays  However, several humanoid robots use flat, one‐segment feet [2–12]. Some famous  neutral with regard to jurisdictional  examples include Honda’s ASIMO [3], the iCub design and its variants from the Italian  claims in published maps and  Institute of Technology [7], and Softbank Robotics NAO [9]. Several research groups have  institutional affiliations.  tried to improve the foot performance by compensating a limited mechanical design with  an enhanced sensing/control capability, which can be obtained by adding force/pressure  sensors to the plant of the foot [26–30], with mixed results. Others kept a one‐segment  design, but moved from a flat rigid sole to a compliant one [13–15], obtaining significant  Copyright:  ©  2021  by  the  authors.  results and increased performance (e.g., Boston Dynamics’ Atlas [14]). Soft options have  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  This article  is an open access article  been also explored through designs with a highly elastic foot sole directly connected to  distributed  under  the  terms  and  the ankle joint [16].  conditions of the Creative Commons  Some research groups investigated the possibility of using two‐segment feet, with a  Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  heel segment and a toe segment [16–20]. Foot designs with three segments have been  (http://creativecommons.org/licenses proposed to better mimic human‐like motion [21,22], but are usually characterized by  /by/4.0/).  active mechanisms that require a complex control and motion coordination with the rest  of the body [21], or by planar rigid‐body mechanisms [22] that achieve balance through  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11041686  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  2  of  15  spring‐loaded joints only. While successful, the lack of compliance in these three‐segment  designs limits their behavior when obstacles introduce 3D torques and loads.  In this paper, an innovative passive mechanism for robotic feet is presented, which  is able to adapt to the environment without the need of external actuation thanks to joint  elasticity.  First,  the  mobility  requirements  to  achieve  human‐like  motion  are  extracted  from medical literature and experimental gait analysis using a motion capture system.  Then, the proposed design is introduced, along with its main characteristics and technical  details. The foot mechanism is validated through numerical simulation with both Finite  Element Analysis (FEA) and Multibody Dynamics, and a prototype is manufactured with  3D printing in order to prove the feasibility of the proposed mechanism on a range of  terrains and obstacles.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Requirements for Humanoid Foot Mechanisms  In  order  to  obtain  the  mobility  requirements  for  humanoid  foot  mechanisms,  the  human  gait  was  analyzed  in  terms  of  absolute  and  angular  motion  [31–35]  looking  retrospectively at clinical outcomes from patients who outcome a healthy gait cycle. In  accordance with the medical standards, a variation of the Davis protocol [31]—with a  marker on the second metatarsus instead of fifth—was used to acquire the motion of 11  subjects (details in Table 1) over 10 distinct gait sessions of four walking steps each. The  motion  was  acquired  through  a  VICON  Motion  Capture  system,  with  the  following  retroreflective marker set configuration and alignment (Figures 1 and 2):   RA, right ankle marker: Placed at the level of the lateral malleolus;   RT, right toe marker: Placed on the lateral aspect of the foot at the second metatarsal  head;   RQ, right heel marker: Positioned so that the heel–toe marker vector is parallel to (but  offset from) the sole of the foot, and is aligned with the foot progression line (i.e., the  line  from  the  ankle  center  to  the  space  between  the  second  and  third  metatarsal  heads).   LA, left ankle marker: Placed at the level of the lateral malleolus;   LT, left toe marker: Placed on the lateral aspect of the foot at the second metatarsal  head;   LQ, left heel marker: Positioned so that the heel–toe marker vector is parallel to (but  offset from) the sole of the foot, and is aligned with the foot progression line.  Table 1. Data of the subjects for the gait acquisition.  Right  Right  Right  Pelvis  Pelvis  Left Leg  Left Knee  Left Ankle  Weight  Height  Leg  Knee  Ankle  Subject  Age  Gender  Width  Height  Length  Diameter  Diameter  (kg)  (cm)  Length  Diameter  Diameter  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  1  27  F  67  172  26.5  10  34  34  11  11  6  6  2  37  M  75  175  30  8  34  34  10  10  6  6  3  33  M  80  173  24.5  8  35  35  10  10  6.5  6.5  4  31  F  63  161  27.5  8.5  32  32  10.5  10.5  5  5  5  28  F  56  169  25  8  35  34  8  8.5  4.5  5  6  29  M  65  178  20  7  35  35  10  10  6.5  6.5  7  22  F  56  157  24.5  6  30  30  8.5  8.5  5  5  8  25  F  55  168  24  7.5  31  31  9  8.5  5  5  9  27  M  72  172  21.5  8  35  35  8  8  6  6  10  23  M  75  180  23  8.5  33  34  8.5  8.5  7  6.5  11  21  M  70  179  24  11  35  35  8.5  9  7  7  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  3  of  15  Figure 1. Example of the marker placements on the left foot (CAD model), with the left ankle (LA), left toe (LT) and left  heel (LQ) markers.  Figure 2. Example of the marker placements on the right foot of a patient, with the right ankle (RA), right toe (RT) and  right heel (RQ) markers.  The BTW Gaitlab software (BTS Bioengineering Corp., Quincy, MA, USA) [32] was  used for the data processing, according to the following steps:   For each four‐step acquisition, each step of the gait was isolated.   The time of each single step was normalized in a 0 to 100 scale, in which 0 represents  the beginning of the step cycle (stance with dual foot support) and 100 represents the  end of that step cycle, and corresponds to the beginning of the following step.   The normalized step data were filtered and compared for all of the acquisitions in  order  to  remove  out‐of‐phase  outliers,  whereas  the  outliers  on  the  ankle  angle  acquired value were left in the graph in Figure 3 for completeness, but were removed  from further calculations.   The remaining dataset was used to obtain a normalized average gait in terms of ankle  angle, which is illustrated by the black line in Figure 3.  The resulting average angular displacement for the whole motion is approximately  25 degrees, compared to a peak value of 45 degrees of the ankle angular displacement for  some acquisitions. By expressing the angular motion range of the heel part of the foot, the  values in Figure 3 identify all of the possible foot configurations in which the foot must be  in stable contact with the ground in order to support the body, and will be used both for  dimensioning and simulating the proposed humanoid foot mechanism design.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  4  of  15  Figure 3. Normalized average gait as the ankle angle, in normalized time.  2.2. An Underactuated Humanoid Foot Mechanism  The  proposed  foot  mechanism  aims  to  enhance  robot  mobility  and  efficiency  by  enabling body support in all of the stances acquired in Section 2. In order to do so, a three‐ segment design was considered, based on the diagram in Figure 4. During the gait, the  foot motion is ruled by four main centers of rotation, which correspond to the ankle joint,  the heel bone (or calcaneus), the navicular tuberosity, and the metatarsophalangeal (MTP)  joint, as shown in Figure 4. The first segment of the foot can be associated to the calcaneus‐ talus complex, which includes the heel and ankle, and can be approximated to a rigid  body. The motion of the central segment of the foot is enabled by the active stiffening  behavior of the intrinsic foot muscles in the plantar arches, which connect the calcaneus  to the MTP joint. The plantar fascia and several ligaments support the plantar arches,  which store mechanical energy during weight bearing by deforming. This behavior can  be reproduced with the elasticity of a compliant body. The motion of the last segment of  the foot can be approximated to a flexion/extension movement of the toes, which rotate  around the MTP joint and the interphalangeal joints. The MTP joint is usually described  as a condyloid joint, while the interphalangeal joints resemble revolute joints.  Figure 4. Human foot mobility [23], with a focus on the main joints of the foot: the ankle joint (A),  the heel bone (or calcaneus (B)), the navicular tuberosity (C), and the metatarsophalangeal (MTP)  joint (D/E).  In order to replicate the behavior of the human foot, a new compliant foot mechanism  based on the kinematic scheme in Figure 5 is here presented. The proposed mechanism is  based on a compliant mechanism in the plant, which can be approximated with an RRPR  (revolute‐revolute‐prismatic‐revolute)  architecture,  with  revolute  joints  in  points  B,  C,  and D, and a link of varying length between B and D. Furthermore, a second compliant  mechanism is added in the MTP joint in point E, with a rigid revolute joint controlled by  a torsional spring.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  5  of  15  Figure 5. Kinematic scheme of the proposed foot mechanism based on the corresponding points  (A to E) in the foot mobility diagram in Figure 4: (1) hindfoot; (2) midfoot; (3) forefoot; (4)  compliant body.  The mechanism works mainly on the sagittal plane, even if the compliant part can be  designed to balance 3D loads as well. When analyzing the planar behavior of the proposed  foot design, its degrees of freedom can be evaluated from its rigid mechanism equivalent  with  the  Chebychev‐Grübler‐Kutzbach  criterion  as  two,  controlled  respectively  by  the  plantar  compliant  element  and  by  the  torsional  spring  of  the  MTP  joint. An  exemplar  design of the proposed foot mechanism is shown in Figure 6.  Figure 6. CAD model of the proposed foot mechanism, based on the equivalent kinematic scheme  of Figure 5.  3. Results  3.1. Simulation and Results  The behavior of the humanoid foot was checked through a nonlinear, dynamic study  using FEA. Iterative schemes to solve Equation (1) through the Newton–Raphson method  (NR), already integrated in the software, were used for each node (i).  ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆ 𝑀 𝑈 𝐶 𝑈 𝐾 ∆𝑈 (1)  ∆ ∆ 𝑅 𝐹   where:   𝑀 = Mass matrix of the system;   𝐶   = Damping matrix of the system;   𝐾 = Stiffness matrix of the system;   𝑅 = Vector of externally‐applied nodal loads;   𝐹 = Vector of internally‐generated nodal forces at iteration (i−1);   ∆𝑈   = Vector of incremental nodal displacements at iteration (i);   𝑈   = Vector of total displacements at iteration (i);   𝑈 = Vector of total velocities at iteration (i);  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  6  of  15   𝑀 𝑈 = Vector of total accelerations at iteration (i).  In nonlinear static analysis, equations have to be solved at any time step t+Δt. Because  t+Δt (i−1)  the  internal  nodal  forces  {F} depend  on  the  nodal  displacements  at  time  t+Δt,  t+Δt (i) [ΔU] , an iterative method must be used to find a converging solution. The above‐ mentioned iterations have several methodologies in place. The NR scheme was used for  this  simulation.  Within  this  method,  the  tangential  stiffness  matrix  is  formed  and  decomposed  in  a  certain  step  in  every  iteration.  The  NR  method  using  Newmark  integration is used because it has a high rate of convergence, and is quadratic. However,  each iteration generates and decomposes the tangential rigidity, which is prohibitively  costly for larger models. Thus, a different iterative approach may be advantageous.  The humanoid foot was placed above a solid body, simulating the ground. The ground  was fixed, giving it 0 degrees of freedom. A gravity of 9.807 m/s  was set, acting on the entire  assembly.  The  temperature  loads  were  included,  setting  a  constant  temperature  of  298  Kelvin. The mean angular displacement of the ankle acquired from the subject was used as  the input motion for the nonlinear dynamic simulation. The definition of the time curve for  the angle displacement application was set to simulate the mean step duration for 0.63 s,  using a force control technique. The input given to the simulation was extracted by the gait  analysis data, and it corresponds to the average gait of Figure 3. The input motion was  applied to the ankle joint axis, which is highlighted in blue in Figure 7.  Figure 7. Ankle joint axis of the CAD model, on which the input motion is applied.  The humanoid foot is composed of four bodies, three of which are in ABS rigid plastic  (Table  2),  and  the  middle  of  which  is  set  to  thermoplastic  polyurethane  (TPU)  for  his  flexible mechanical properties, simulating the muscle part. Another key component is the  spring—shown in Figure 8—in the forefoot, which passively improves the ability of the  foot to adapt to the ground; the spring was modelled with a 2 mm diameter, five coils,  and  an  8  mm  length,  and  alloy  steel  was  chosen  as  material  in  order  to  simulate  a  commercial part. After setting all of the required parameters, a mesh was generated with  the parameters in Table 3 to perform the FEA.  Table 2. Mechanical properties of the materials in the FEA.  Property  ABS  TPU  Alloy Steel  7 2 7 2 7 2 Yield strength  4.50 × 10  N/m    5.41 × 10  N/m   2.76 × 10  N/m   7 2 7 2 7 2 Tensile strength  7.30 × 10  N/m    7.79 × 10  N/m   6.89 × 10  N/m   9 2  7 2 10 2 Elastic modulus  3.00 × 10  N/m   1.48 × 10  N/m   6.90 × 10  N/m   Poissonʹs ratio  0.35  0.55  0.33  3 3  3 Mass density  1200.00 kg/m    1217.00 kg/m   2700.00 kg/m   Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  7  of  15  Figure 8. Detailed view of the forefoot torsional spring.  Table 3. Mesh parameters.  Mesh information  Values  Jacobian points  4 Points  Maximum element size  2.00 mm  Tolerance  0.10 mm  Total Nodes  175,296  Total Elements  100,015  Figure 9 shows the FEM nonlinear dynamic analysis stress results computed by the  6 2 use of the Von Mises formulation. A maximum value of 2.57∙× 10  N/m  is observed in the  upper  part  of  the  rigid  midfoot,  next  to  the  connection  to  the  compliant  body.  The  maximum value is significantly smaller than the yield limit of the material, thus validating  the proposed humanoid foot for an average walking gait. The behavior of the impact of  the foot on the ground is obtained by applying the mean angle displacement taken from  the analyzed subjects (see Section 2). The results can be observed in the step‐by‐step effect  of  the  load  on  the  different  bodies  of  the  humanoid  foot,  as  is  shown  in  the  linear  displacement distribution reported in Figure 10:   Starting from the rigid body of the hindfoot, the angular displacement is applied to  the ankle joint. The hindfoot is connected to the flexible body of the midfoot, which  starts to deform.   When  the  angular  displacement  causes  the  foot  to  hit  the  ground,  the  midfoot  is  characterized by a stress concentration in the upper part, as per Figure 9.  6 2  The arc bottom part of the foot is loaded with a maximum tension of 1.57 × 10  N/m ,  behaving as the human foot muscle when stepping.   The spring connecting the two bodies of the forefoot is stretched. This helps the foot  to adapt to the ground, and the potential energy of the spring restores the neutral  ‘flat’ position when the contact is released.  These results validate the behavior of the proposed humanoid foot, showing that it  acts similarly to the human foot in terms of stress while walking. Furthermore, the results  prove that the proposed design can safely withstand the loads associated with an average  human gait, including the impact of the foot on the ground.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  8  of  15  Figure 9. Von Mises stress distribution.  Figure 10. Displacement values in the humanoid foot.  3.2. Experimental Tests  Due to the promising simulation results, a preliminary prototype was built at the  Biomechatronics Lab of IRCSS Neuromed in Pozzilli, Italy. The prototype is composed of  six parts: five were manufactured by 3D printing, using the rapid prototyping techniques  explained  by  Cafolla  et  al.  [36],  whereas  the  last  one  is  a  commercial  mechanical  component. The printing materials were chosen from among a wide variety of commercial  resins and plastics, in order to ensure the desired foot behaviour: the four rigid bodies  were printed in PLA filament; the flexible component, representing the midfoot of the  mechanism, was manufactured using a TPU filament with properties matching the ones  of  the  FEA.  The  properties  of  both  materials  are  reported  in  Table  4,  for  reference.  Different infill percentages and patterns were tested for the midfoot, and the final infill  was selected for its optimal TPU stiffness. Both the value of the infill and the 3D support  pattern with which the infill was printed were optimized according to the surface curve  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  9  of  15  of the compliant component through an FEA with constrained motion (as per the acquired  gait).  Table 4. Mechanical properties of the materials of the 3D printed prototype.  Property  ABS  ABS Test Method  TPU  TPU Test Method  Specific gravity  1.24 g/cc  ASTM D1505  1.14 g/cc  ISO 1183   Flow rate  6.0 g/10 min ‐  39 cm /10 min  ISO 1133  Tensile strength  110 MPa (MD)  ASTM D882 ‐  ‐    145 MPa (TD)  ASTM D882 ‐  ‐  Strain at break  160% (MD)  ASTM D882  530%  ISO 527    100% (TD)  ASTM D882 ‐  ‐  Tensile modulus  3310 MPa (MD)  ASTM D882  95 MPa  ISO 527    3860 MPa (TD)  ASTM D882 ‐  ‐  Impact Strength  7.5 KJ/m2 ‐  Notched  ISO 179       No break  Charpy 23C  Hardness ‐  ‐  45 Shore D  ISO 868  The correct relative positioning of the components is defined by male and female  rectangular  pins.  Then,  the  components  are  locked  together  with  interlocking  shapes.  Additionally,  epoxy  glue  was  added  to  the  coupled  surfaces  in  order  to  improve  the  strength of the connection, as it is the most loaded component of the system, as shown in  Figure  9.  The  assembly  of  the  entire  foot  is  shown  in  Figure  11.  The  prototype  of  the  humanoid foot is composed of a rigid hind foot, a flexible mid foot, and a rigid forefoot,  which is made of three 3D printed rigid parts, namely the connection pin, the sole and the  toe, and a commercial part, the spring. The prototype was scaled down from human size  in order to fit a service humanoid robot design [10–12], and thus the whole foot can fit  into a box of (146 × 52 × 41) mm; it weighs 57.80 g.  Figure 11. Humanoid foot prototype assembly.  As a preliminary test, the adaptability of the foot to different step heights was tested.  Figures 12 and 13 show the foot adapting to a 22 mm high step and a 54 mm high step,  respectively. The combination of the forefoot spring and the compliant midfoot actions  allow the proposed foot design to balance on step heights up to approximately 35% of the  length of the foot.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  10  of  15     (a)  (b)  Figure 12. Humanoid foot prototype assembly on a 22 mm step: (a) unloaded test; (b) loaded test.  (a)  (b)  Figure 13. Humanoid foot prototype assembly on a 54 mm step: (a) unloaded test; (b) loaded test.  Further experimental tests were conducted in order to measure the reaction force  between the foot and the ground, and to validate the FEA results of Figures 9 and 10. By  using the experimental setup shown in Figure 14, a load cell was calibrated with a set of  calibration  weights  (accuracy  1%)  before  the  experimental  test,  and  was  then  used  to  measure the force, according to the scheme in Figure 15. A camera was used to measure  the foot motion by tracking the marker in Figure 14 through the Kinovea software. By  using the real dimension of the marker, i.e., 10 × 10 mm, the motion in pixels is converted  to  real‐world  one  with  a  semi‐automated  tracking  process,  which  has  an  estimated  accuracy of 5% (measured through a checkerboard calibration).  Figure 14. Experimental setup for weight and displacement acquisition.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  11  of  15  Figure 15. Experimental setup for weight and displacement acquisition.  A 1‐second stance cycle was manually reproduced, moving according to the motion  in Figure 16, which was measured with the camera during the experiment. During the  load cycle, the marker moved 9.5 mm, with a comparable motion to the corresponding  point in the analysis in Figure 10. The action of the foot on the ground, measured with the  load cell, was reported in Figure 17.  0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Time (−) Figure 16. Ankle angle, as acquired with motion capture by the camera during a gait cycle.  2.5 1.5 0.5 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Time (−) Figure 17. Force (normalized by body weight of 3.6 kg), as acquired by the load cell during a gait  cycle.  Force (Body Weight) (−) Acquired Ankle Angle (deg) Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  12  of  15  The  vertical  ground  reaction  force  applied  to  the  foot  is  bimodal,  with  an  initial  impact peak, followed almost immediately by a propulsive peak as the foot pushes off  against  the  ground.  In  a  conventional  humanoid  robotic  foot,  this  impulsive  force  is  transmitted fully to the ankle, with the risk of disrupting the robot’s balance. Conversely,  the proposed foot is able to dampen this impact through the spring and the compliant  body, significantly reducing the stress on the ankle joint.  Hall [37] and Munro [38] report that for a gait speed between 3.0 m/s to 5.0 m/s, the  impact forces range from 1.6 to 2.3 times the body weight, and the propulsive forces range  from 2.5 to 2.8 times the body weight. In order to compare their results to the experimental  ones, an overall body weight of 3.6 kg was estimated from humanoid robots of similar  sizes and proportions [10]. The acquired results, reported in Figure 16, are in a comparable  range  (6%  error  on  displacement)  of  the  FEA  simulation,  and  show  a  comparable  behaviour  to  that  of  the  human  locomotion  system,  with  a  propulsive  peak  of  approximately 3.0 times body weight.  4. Discussion and Conclusions  In this paper, an innovative robotic foot design was introduced, based on the mobility  of the human foot in walking gaits. Whereas most other humanoid robot feet use a single‐ body  or  two‐segment  design,  the  proposed  system  is  characterized  by  three  underactuated segments that replicate the behavior of the human foot. The motion of the  human foot was studied with gait analysis, which was performed on a sample of 110  human  gaits  in  order  to  acquire  the  motion  requirements  for  the  proposed  design.  A  passive  foot  mechanism  with  compliant  elements  was  then  introduced  in  order  to  improve  humanoid  robots’  impact  absorption  and  stability  during  walking  gaits.  The  proposed design was validated through a simulation with FEA and Multibody Dynamics,  which demonstrated its functionality. Experiments with a 3D printed prototype of the  proposed foot mechanism were also reported to prove the feasibility of this study.  Overall, this work introduced a novel design that increases foot mobility thanks to a  three‐segment foot mechanism, without introducing additional degrees of freedom and  control  complexity  into  the  system.  In  future  works,  the  foot  will  be  assembled  on  a  humanoid robot for full validation. In addition, the proposed humanoid foot is feasible  for future developments and studies in the field of prosthetics and neurorehabilitation.  Author  Contributions:  Conceptualization,  M.R.  and  D.C.;  methodology,  B.D.M.C.‐R.  and  D.C.;  validation,  B.D.M.C.‐R.  and  D.C.;  formal  analysis,  B.D.M.C.‐R.  and  D.C.;  investigation,  M.R.,  B.D.M.C.‐R. and D.C.; resources, L.P. and D.C.; data curation, M.R., B.D.M.C.‐R., L.P., G.P., D.C.;  writing—original draft preparation, M.R. and D.C.; writing—review and editing, B.D.M.C.‐R. and  D.C.;  visualization,  M.R.  and  D.C.;  supervision,  D.C.  All  authors  have  read  and  agreed  to  the  published version of the manuscript.  Funding: This work was funded by a grant from Ministero della Salute (Ricerca Corrente 2021).  Institutional Review  Board  Statement:   This  is  a  retrospective  observational  study where  data  were used from clinical outcomes of 11 patients who outcome a healthy gait cycle. The patients were  diagnosed and treated at IRCCS NEUROMED—the Mediterranean Neurological Institute (Italy),  according to the national guidelines and agreements that govern its hospital center. All data were  collected  as  part  of  routine  diagnosis  and  treatment.  This  study  does  not  report  on  the  use  of  experimental or new protocols. Although the rehabilitation program carried out by the 11 selected  patients is described in this study, the rehabilitation program was neither designed nor modified  for the purposes of this study.  Informed Consent Statement:   Patients entering IRCCS NEUROMED gave a generic consent to  use their data for future scientific research purposes according to GDPR (General Data Protection  Regulation) regulation.  Data  Availability  Statement:   The  data  presented  in  this  study  are  available  on  request  at  the  discretion of the corresponding author. The data are not publicly available due to privacy reasons.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  13  of  15  References  1. Siciliano, B.; Khatib, O. Springer Handbook of Robotics; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2016.  2. Lim, H.‐O.; Takanishi, A. Biped walking robots created at waseda university: Wl and wabian family. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. A  Math. Phys. Eng. Sci. 2007, 365, 49–64.  3. Hirose, M.; Ogawa, K. Honda humanoid robots development. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. A Math. Phys. Eng. Sci. 2007, 365, 11–19.  4. Kajita, S.; Nagasaki, T.; Kaneko, K.; Yokoi, K.; Tanie, K. A hop towards running humanoid biped. In Proceedings of the IEEE  International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA’04, New Orleans, LA, USA, 26 April–1 May 2004; Volume 1, pp.  629–635.  5. Park, I.‐W.; Kim, J.‐Y.; Lee, J.; Oh, J.‐H. Mechanical design of humanoid robot platform khr‐3 (kaist humanoid robot 3: Hubo).  In Proceedings of the 5th IEEE‐RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, Tsukuba, Japan, 5–7 December 2005; pp.  321–326.  6. Tajima,  R.;  Honda,  D.;  Suga,  K.  Fast  running  experiments  involving  a  humanoid  robot.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2009  IEEE  International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Kobe, Japan, 12–17 May 2009; pp. 1571–1576.  7. Tsagarakis, N.G.; Li, Z.; Saglia, J.; Caldwell, D.G. The design of the lower body of the compliant humanoid robot iCub. In  Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Shanghai, China, 9–13 May 2011; pp. 2035– 2040.  8. ZYu; Huang, Q.; Ma, G.; Chen, X.; Zhang, W.; Li, J.; Gao, J. Design and development of the humanoid robot bhr‐5. Adv. Mech.  Eng. 2014, 6, 852937.  9. Gouaillier, D.; Hugel, V.; Blazevic, P.; Kilner, C.; Monceaux, J.; Lafourcade, P.; Marnier, B.; Serre, J.; Maisonnier, B. Mechatronic  design of NAO humanoid. In Proceedings of the 2009 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Kobe, Japan,  12–17 May 2009; pp. 769–774.  10. Russo, M.; Cafolla, D.; Ceccarelli, M. Design and experiments of a novel humanoid robot with parallel architectures. Robotics  2018, 7, 79.  11. Cafolla, D.; Wang, M.; Carbone, G.; Ceccarelli, M. Larmbot: A new humanoid robot with parallel mechanisms. In Proceedings  of  the  Symposium  on  Robot  Design,  Dynamics  and  Control,  Udine,  Italy,  20–23  June  2016;  Springer:  Berlin/Heidelberg,  Germany, 2016; pp. 275–283.  12. Russo, M.; Ceccarelli, M. Dynamics of a humanoid robot with parallel architectures. In Proceedings of the IFToMM World  Congress on Mechanism and Machine Science, Krakow, Poland, 15–18 July 2019; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2019;  pp. 1799–1808.  13. Li,  J.;  Huang,  Q.;  Zhang,  W.;  Yu,  Z.;  Li,  K.  Flexible  foot  design  for  a  humanoid  robot.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2008  IEEE  International Conference on Automation and Logistics, Qingdao, China, 1–3 September 2008; pp. 1414–1419.  14. Boston Dynamics. ATLAS. Available online: https://www.bostondynamics.com/atlas (accessed on 15 June 2020).  15. Lapeyre, M.; Rouanet, P.; Oudeyer, P.‐Y. The poppy humanoid robot: Leg design for biped locomotion. In Proceedings of the  2013 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Tokyo, Japan, 3–7 November 2013; pp. 349–356.  16. Piazza, C.; della Santina, C.; Gasparri, G.M.; Catalano, M.G.; Grioli, G.; Garabini, M.; Bicchi, A. Toward an adaptive foot for  natural  walking.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2016  IEEE‐RAS  16th  International  Conference  on  Humanoid  Robots  (Humanoids),  Cancun, Mexico, 15–17 November 2016; pp. 1204–1210.  17. Nishiwaki, K.; Kagami, S.; Kuniyoshi, Y.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, H. Toe joints that enhance bipedal and full body motion of humanoid  robots.  In  Proceedings  of  the  Proceedings  2002  IEEE  International  Conference  on  Robotics  and  Automation  (Cat.  No.  02CH37292), Washington, DC, USA, 11–15 May 2002; Volume 3, pp. 3105–3110.  18. Buschmann, T.; Lohmeier, S.; Ulbrich, H. Humanoid robot lola: Design and walking control. J. Physiol. 2009, 103, 141–148.  19. Borovac,  B.;  Slavnic,  S.  Design  of  multi‐segment  humanoid  robot  foot.  In  Proceedings  of  the  International  Conference  on  Research and Education in Robotics, Heidelberg, Germany, 22–24 May2008; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2008; pp.  12–18.  20. Agrawal, A.; Banala, S.K.; Agrawal, S.K.; Binder‐Macleod, S.A. Design of a twodegree‐of‐freedom ankle‐foot orthosis for robotic  rehabilitation. In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR, Chicago, IL, USA, 28 June– 1 July 2005; pp. 41–44.  21. Narioka, K.; Homma, T.; Hosoda, K. Humanlike ankle‐foot complex for a bipedrobot. In Proceedings of the 2012 12th IEEE‐ RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids 2012), Osaka, Japan, 29 November–1 December 2012; pp. 15– 20.  22. Hashimoto, K.; Motohashi, H.; Takashima, T.; Lim, H.; Takanishi, A. Shoes‐wearable foot mechanism mimicking characteristics  of  humanʹs  foot  arch  and  skin.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2013  IEEE  International  Conference  on  Robotics  and  Automation,  Karlsruhe, Germany, 6–10 May 2013; pp. 686–691.  23. Torricelli, D.; Gonzalez, J.; Weckx, M.; Jimenez‐Fabian, R.; Vanderborght, B.; Sartori, M.; Dosen, S.; Farina, D.; Lefeber, D.; Pons,  J.L. Human‐like compliant locomotion: State of the art of robotic implementations. Bioinspir. Biomim. 2016, 11, 051002.  24. Knudson, D. Fundamentals of Biomechanics; Springer Science & Business Media: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2007.  25. Holowka, N.B.; Lieberman, D.E. Rethinking the evolution of the human foot: Insights from experimental research. J. Exp. Biol.  2018, 221, jeb174425.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  14  of  15  26. Takahashi, Y.; Nishiwaki, K.; Kagami, S.; Mizoguchi, H.; Inoue, H. High‐speed pressure sensor grid for humanoid robot foot.  In Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 2–6  August 2005; pp. 3909–3914.  27. Kim,  G.‐S.;  Shin,  H.‐J.;  Yoon,  J.  Development  of  6‐axis  force/moment  sensor  for  a  humanoid  robot’s  intelligent  foot.  Sens.  Actuators A Phys. 2008, 141, 276–281.  28. Wu, B.; Luo, J.; Shen, F.; Ren, Y.; Wu, Z. Optimum design method of multi‐axis force sensor integrated in humanoid robot foot  system. Measurement 2011, 44, 1651–1660.  29. Yuan, C.; Luo, L.‐P.; Yuan, Q.; Wu, J.; Yan, R.‐J.; Kim, H.; Shin, K.‐S.; Han, C.‐S. Development and evaluation of a compact 6‐ axis force/moment sensor with a serial structure for the humanoid robot foot. Measurement 2015, 70, 110–122.  30. Nishiwaki,  K.;  Murakami,  Y.;  Kagami,  S.;  Kuniyoshi,  Y.;  Inaba,  M.;  Inoue,  H.  Asix‐axis  force  sensor  with  parallel  support  mechanism to measure the ground reaction force of humanoid robot. In Proceedings of the 2002 IEEE International Conference  on Robotics and Automation (Cat. No. 02CH37292), Washington, DC, USA, 11–15 May 2002; Volume 3, pp. 2277–2282.  31. Davis, R.B.; Ounpuu, S.; Tyburski, D.; Gage, J.R. A Gait Analysis Data Collection and Reduction Technique; Human Movement  Science 1991, 10 (5), 575–587.  32. Gaitlab,  B.  Multifactorial  Gait  Analysis  with  Davis  Protocol.  Available  online:  https://www.btsbioengineering.com/products/bts‐gaitlab‐gait‐analysis (accessed on 14 June 2020).  33. Baker, R. Gait analysis methods in rehabilitation. J. Neuroeng. Rehabil. 2006, 3, 4.  34. Kressig, R.W.; Beauchet, O.; European GAITRite Network Group. Guidelines for clinical applications of spatiotemporal gait  analysis in older adults. Aging Clin. Exp. Res. 2006, 18, 174–176.  35. Perry, J.; Burnfield, J.M. Gait analysis: Normal and pathological function. J. Pediatr. Orthop. 1992, 12, 815.  36. Cafolla, D.; Ceccarelli, M.; Wang, M.; Carbone, G. 3d printing for feasibility check of mechanism design. Int. J. Mech. Control  2016, 17, 3–12.  37. Hall, S. Basic Biomechanics; McGraw‐Hill Higher Education: New York, NY, USA, 2014.  38. Munro, C.F.; Miller, D.I.; Fuglevand, A.J. Ground reaction forces in running: A reexamination. J. Biomech. 1987, 20, 147–155.  Short Biography of Authors    Matteo  Russo  received  the  B.Sc.,  M.Sc.  and  Ph.D.  degrees  in  mechanical  engineering  from  the  University of Cassino, Italy, in 2013, 2015, and 2019, respectively. During his M.Sc. and Ph.D., he was  a visiting researcher at RWTH Aachen University, Germany, at University of the Basque Country,  Spain, and at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan. Since 2019, he was a Research Fellow at the Rolls‐ Royce  University  Technology  Centre  in  Manufacturing  and  On‐Wing  Technology,  University  of  Nottingham, UK.  His  main  research  interests  are  inspection  and  repair  robotics,  mechanism  design,  kinematic  modelling and optimization, parallel manipulators and mobile robots. He is the author of more than  40 peer‐reviewed journal and conference papers. His awards and honours include the IFToMM Young  Delegate Program Award in 2018, and several best paper awards at international conferences. He is a  member of IEEE and IFToMM.    Betsy D. M. Chaparro‐Rico received the degree of Electronic Engineer Magna cum laude in 2011 from  Unisangil University in Colombia. In 2014, she obtained a Master’s degree in Advanced Technology  from  Instituto  Politecnico  Nacional  in  Mexico,  and  received  the  academic  award  Best  Academic  Performance 2013–2014. In 2018, she obtained a PhD degree in Advance Technology from Instituto  Politecnico  Nacional  in  Mexico.  In  addition,  she  obtained  a  PhD  degree  in  Civil,  Mechanical  and  Biomechanics Engineering from University of Cassino and Southern Latium (Italy). From 2006 to 2011,  she was involved in the IDENTUS research group at Unisangil University (Colombia), collaborating  in  bioengineering  and  robotic  projects.  From  2015  to  2018,  she  was  involved  in  the  Institutional  Program of Training of Researchers (BEIFI) at Instituto Politecnico Nacional (Mexico), collaborating  in the development of medical devices and service robots. Currently, she is working as researcher in  the  Biomechatronics  Lab  at  IRCCS  Istituto  Neurologico  Mediterraneo  Neuromed,  Italy.  She  is  interested in medical robotics, service robots, manipulators, and parallel mechanisms.    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  15  of  15    Luigi Pavone received his master’s degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Rome “La  Sapienza” in 2010, and his PhD in Clinical and Translational Medicine in 2020 from the University of  Molise. Since 2009, he started working in Neuroscience research at IRCCS Neuromed with his master’s  thesis,  consisting  in  the  development  of  a  software  for  the  localization  of  subdural  electrodes  in  patients with drug‐resistant epilepsy. Nowadays, he is a project manager at Bioengineering unit of  IRCCS Neuromed. Luigi Pavone is the author of over 20 publications in peer‐reviewed journals, and  he  is  also  the  owner  of  a  patent  (EP2979249A1).  His  research  interests  include  signal  and  image  processing, brain computer interface applications and methods, data mining, and machine learning  methods for neuroscience research.    Gabriele  Pasqua  received  his  Masters  degree  in  Biomedical  Engineering  from  the  University  of  Naples  Federico  II,  Italy,  and  his  Ph.D  degree  in  Traslational  and  Clinical  Medicine  from  the  University  of  Molise,  Italy,  in  2015  and  in  2020,  respectively.  He  is  currently  a  Post‐Doctoral  Researcher  at  the  University  of  Rome,  Sapienza,  in  the  Department  of  Human  Neuroscience.  His  research interests include Neuroimaging and Gait Analysis.    Daniele Cafolla received his Dual Master degree with 110/110 as a mechanical engineer on 2012 at  University of Cassino (Italy) and at Panamerican University (Mexico). He started his Ph.D. in 2013 at  University of Cassino  (Italy). From October 2013 to May 2014,  he attended a period  at Intelligent  Systems Centre (IntelliSys), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, under the supervision of  Prof. I‐Ming Chen. In 2015, he received a PhD in Mechanical Engineering. Since 2018, he has been the  head  of  the  Biomechatronics  Lab  at  Clinical  Research  Institute  (IRCCS)  Neuromed,  Italy.  He  was  involved  in  several  projects,  consultations,  and  International  Symposia  regarding  Mechanics,  Mechatronics, Robotics, Biomechanics, Design and Rapid Prototyping. He is the author of a book on  the  Static  and  Dynamic  Balancing  of  a  Parallel  Manipulator,  and  several  journal  and  conference  papers. He is a member of IFToMM Italy.  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Sciences Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Loading next page...
 
/lp/multidisciplinary-digital-publishing-institute/a-bioinspired-humanoid-foot-mechanism-b0qG0hFEjm
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Copyright
© 1996-2021 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland) unless otherwise stated Disclaimer The statements, opinions and data contained in the journals are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy
ISSN
2076-3417
DOI
10.3390/app11041686
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Article  1 2 2 3 2, Matteo Russo  , Betsy D. M. Chaparro‐Rico  , Luigi Pavone  , Gabriele Pasqua   and Daniele Cafolla  *    Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG8 1BB, UK; matteo.russo@notting‐ ham.ac.uk    IRCCS Neuromed, Via dell’Elettronica, 86077 Pozzilli (IS), Italy; betsychaparro@hotmail.com (B.D.M.C.‐R.);  bioingegneria@neuromed.it (L.P.)    Department of Medicine and Health Science, University of Molise, 86100 Campobasso (CB), Italy;  ing.gabrielepasqua@gmail.com  *  Correspondence: contact@danielecafolla.eu  Abstract: This paper introduces an innovative robotic foot design inspired by the functionality and  the anatomy of the human foot. Most humanoid robots are characterized by flat, rigid feet with  limited mobility, which cannot emulate the physical behavior of the foot–ground interaction. The  proposed  foot  mechanism  consists  of  three  main  bodies,  to  represent  the  heel,  plant,  and  toes,  connected  by  compliant  joints  for  improved  balancing  and  impact  absorption.  The  functional  requirements were extracted from medical literature, and were acquired through a motion capture  system, and the proposed design was validated with a numerical simulation.  Keywords: robotics; humanoids; foot mechanism; prosthetics; neurorehabilitation  1. Introduction  Citation: Russo, M.; Chaparro‐Rico,  Humanoid  robotics  has  fascinated  and  challenged  scientists  for  decades  [1].  The  B.D.M.; Pavone, L.; Pasqua, G.;  Cafolla, D. A Bioinspired Humanoid  design of humanoid robots has evolved from the serial design of the first humanoids, such  Foot Mechanism. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11,  as  WABOT  [2],  to  more  refined  architectures  [3–12].  However,  despite  decades  of  1686.  research, the mobility of most of these robots is still limited to the legs, arms, hands, and  https://doi.org/10.3390/app11041686    head only, with very few examples including torso [10] and foot [13–23] mobility, despite  the  feet  and  torso  playing  a  key  role  in  human  motion  [24].  The  reduced  mobility  of  Received: 21 January 2021  humanoid  robots  in  those  regions  hinders  their  capability  to  achieve  balance  and  to  Accepted: 9 February 2021  perform complex dynamic tasks. Human foot architecture is characterized by three main  Published: 13 February 2021  segments—namely the heel, mid‐foot, and toes—that fulfill distinct roles during bipedal  locomotion [25].  Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays  However, several humanoid robots use flat, one‐segment feet [2–12]. Some famous  neutral with regard to jurisdictional  examples include Honda’s ASIMO [3], the iCub design and its variants from the Italian  claims in published maps and  Institute of Technology [7], and Softbank Robotics NAO [9]. Several research groups have  institutional affiliations.  tried to improve the foot performance by compensating a limited mechanical design with  an enhanced sensing/control capability, which can be obtained by adding force/pressure  sensors to the plant of the foot [26–30], with mixed results. Others kept a one‐segment  design, but moved from a flat rigid sole to a compliant one [13–15], obtaining significant  Copyright:  ©  2021  by  the  authors.  results and increased performance (e.g., Boston Dynamics’ Atlas [14]). Soft options have  Licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  This article  is an open access article  been also explored through designs with a highly elastic foot sole directly connected to  distributed  under  the  terms  and  the ankle joint [16].  conditions of the Creative Commons  Some research groups investigated the possibility of using two‐segment feet, with a  Attribution  (CC  BY)  license  heel segment and a toe segment [16–20]. Foot designs with three segments have been  (http://creativecommons.org/licenses proposed to better mimic human‐like motion [21,22], but are usually characterized by  /by/4.0/).  active mechanisms that require a complex control and motion coordination with the rest  of the body [21], or by planar rigid‐body mechanisms [22] that achieve balance through  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11041686  www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  2  of  15  spring‐loaded joints only. While successful, the lack of compliance in these three‐segment  designs limits their behavior when obstacles introduce 3D torques and loads.  In this paper, an innovative passive mechanism for robotic feet is presented, which  is able to adapt to the environment without the need of external actuation thanks to joint  elasticity.  First,  the  mobility  requirements  to  achieve  human‐like  motion  are  extracted  from medical literature and experimental gait analysis using a motion capture system.  Then, the proposed design is introduced, along with its main characteristics and technical  details. The foot mechanism is validated through numerical simulation with both Finite  Element Analysis (FEA) and Multibody Dynamics, and a prototype is manufactured with  3D printing in order to prove the feasibility of the proposed mechanism on a range of  terrains and obstacles.  2. Materials and Methods  2.1. Requirements for Humanoid Foot Mechanisms  In  order  to  obtain  the  mobility  requirements  for  humanoid  foot  mechanisms,  the  human  gait  was  analyzed  in  terms  of  absolute  and  angular  motion  [31–35]  looking  retrospectively at clinical outcomes from patients who outcome a healthy gait cycle. In  accordance with the medical standards, a variation of the Davis protocol [31]—with a  marker on the second metatarsus instead of fifth—was used to acquire the motion of 11  subjects (details in Table 1) over 10 distinct gait sessions of four walking steps each. The  motion  was  acquired  through  a  VICON  Motion  Capture  system,  with  the  following  retroreflective marker set configuration and alignment (Figures 1 and 2):   RA, right ankle marker: Placed at the level of the lateral malleolus;   RT, right toe marker: Placed on the lateral aspect of the foot at the second metatarsal  head;   RQ, right heel marker: Positioned so that the heel–toe marker vector is parallel to (but  offset from) the sole of the foot, and is aligned with the foot progression line (i.e., the  line  from  the  ankle  center  to  the  space  between  the  second  and  third  metatarsal  heads).   LA, left ankle marker: Placed at the level of the lateral malleolus;   LT, left toe marker: Placed on the lateral aspect of the foot at the second metatarsal  head;   LQ, left heel marker: Positioned so that the heel–toe marker vector is parallel to (but  offset from) the sole of the foot, and is aligned with the foot progression line.  Table 1. Data of the subjects for the gait acquisition.  Right  Right  Right  Pelvis  Pelvis  Left Leg  Left Knee  Left Ankle  Weight  Height  Leg  Knee  Ankle  Subject  Age  Gender  Width  Height  Length  Diameter  Diameter  (kg)  (cm)  Length  Diameter  Diameter  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  (cm)  1  27  F  67  172  26.5  10  34  34  11  11  6  6  2  37  M  75  175  30  8  34  34  10  10  6  6  3  33  M  80  173  24.5  8  35  35  10  10  6.5  6.5  4  31  F  63  161  27.5  8.5  32  32  10.5  10.5  5  5  5  28  F  56  169  25  8  35  34  8  8.5  4.5  5  6  29  M  65  178  20  7  35  35  10  10  6.5  6.5  7  22  F  56  157  24.5  6  30  30  8.5  8.5  5  5  8  25  F  55  168  24  7.5  31  31  9  8.5  5  5  9  27  M  72  172  21.5  8  35  35  8  8  6  6  10  23  M  75  180  23  8.5  33  34  8.5  8.5  7  6.5  11  21  M  70  179  24  11  35  35  8.5  9  7  7  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  3  of  15  Figure 1. Example of the marker placements on the left foot (CAD model), with the left ankle (LA), left toe (LT) and left  heel (LQ) markers.  Figure 2. Example of the marker placements on the right foot of a patient, with the right ankle (RA), right toe (RT) and  right heel (RQ) markers.  The BTW Gaitlab software (BTS Bioengineering Corp., Quincy, MA, USA) [32] was  used for the data processing, according to the following steps:   For each four‐step acquisition, each step of the gait was isolated.   The time of each single step was normalized in a 0 to 100 scale, in which 0 represents  the beginning of the step cycle (stance with dual foot support) and 100 represents the  end of that step cycle, and corresponds to the beginning of the following step.   The normalized step data were filtered and compared for all of the acquisitions in  order  to  remove  out‐of‐phase  outliers,  whereas  the  outliers  on  the  ankle  angle  acquired value were left in the graph in Figure 3 for completeness, but were removed  from further calculations.   The remaining dataset was used to obtain a normalized average gait in terms of ankle  angle, which is illustrated by the black line in Figure 3.  The resulting average angular displacement for the whole motion is approximately  25 degrees, compared to a peak value of 45 degrees of the ankle angular displacement for  some acquisitions. By expressing the angular motion range of the heel part of the foot, the  values in Figure 3 identify all of the possible foot configurations in which the foot must be  in stable contact with the ground in order to support the body, and will be used both for  dimensioning and simulating the proposed humanoid foot mechanism design.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  4  of  15  Figure 3. Normalized average gait as the ankle angle, in normalized time.  2.2. An Underactuated Humanoid Foot Mechanism  The  proposed  foot  mechanism  aims  to  enhance  robot  mobility  and  efficiency  by  enabling body support in all of the stances acquired in Section 2. In order to do so, a three‐ segment design was considered, based on the diagram in Figure 4. During the gait, the  foot motion is ruled by four main centers of rotation, which correspond to the ankle joint,  the heel bone (or calcaneus), the navicular tuberosity, and the metatarsophalangeal (MTP)  joint, as shown in Figure 4. The first segment of the foot can be associated to the calcaneus‐ talus complex, which includes the heel and ankle, and can be approximated to a rigid  body. The motion of the central segment of the foot is enabled by the active stiffening  behavior of the intrinsic foot muscles in the plantar arches, which connect the calcaneus  to the MTP joint. The plantar fascia and several ligaments support the plantar arches,  which store mechanical energy during weight bearing by deforming. This behavior can  be reproduced with the elasticity of a compliant body. The motion of the last segment of  the foot can be approximated to a flexion/extension movement of the toes, which rotate  around the MTP joint and the interphalangeal joints. The MTP joint is usually described  as a condyloid joint, while the interphalangeal joints resemble revolute joints.  Figure 4. Human foot mobility [23], with a focus on the main joints of the foot: the ankle joint (A),  the heel bone (or calcaneus (B)), the navicular tuberosity (C), and the metatarsophalangeal (MTP)  joint (D/E).  In order to replicate the behavior of the human foot, a new compliant foot mechanism  based on the kinematic scheme in Figure 5 is here presented. The proposed mechanism is  based on a compliant mechanism in the plant, which can be approximated with an RRPR  (revolute‐revolute‐prismatic‐revolute)  architecture,  with  revolute  joints  in  points  B,  C,  and D, and a link of varying length between B and D. Furthermore, a second compliant  mechanism is added in the MTP joint in point E, with a rigid revolute joint controlled by  a torsional spring.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  5  of  15  Figure 5. Kinematic scheme of the proposed foot mechanism based on the corresponding points  (A to E) in the foot mobility diagram in Figure 4: (1) hindfoot; (2) midfoot; (3) forefoot; (4)  compliant body.  The mechanism works mainly on the sagittal plane, even if the compliant part can be  designed to balance 3D loads as well. When analyzing the planar behavior of the proposed  foot design, its degrees of freedom can be evaluated from its rigid mechanism equivalent  with  the  Chebychev‐Grübler‐Kutzbach  criterion  as  two,  controlled  respectively  by  the  plantar  compliant  element  and  by  the  torsional  spring  of  the  MTP  joint. An  exemplar  design of the proposed foot mechanism is shown in Figure 6.  Figure 6. CAD model of the proposed foot mechanism, based on the equivalent kinematic scheme  of Figure 5.  3. Results  3.1. Simulation and Results  The behavior of the humanoid foot was checked through a nonlinear, dynamic study  using FEA. Iterative schemes to solve Equation (1) through the Newton–Raphson method  (NR), already integrated in the software, were used for each node (i).  ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆ 𝑀 𝑈 𝐶 𝑈 𝐾 ∆𝑈 (1)  ∆ ∆ 𝑅 𝐹   where:   𝑀 = Mass matrix of the system;   𝐶   = Damping matrix of the system;   𝐾 = Stiffness matrix of the system;   𝑅 = Vector of externally‐applied nodal loads;   𝐹 = Vector of internally‐generated nodal forces at iteration (i−1);   ∆𝑈   = Vector of incremental nodal displacements at iteration (i);   𝑈   = Vector of total displacements at iteration (i);   𝑈 = Vector of total velocities at iteration (i);  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  6  of  15   𝑀 𝑈 = Vector of total accelerations at iteration (i).  In nonlinear static analysis, equations have to be solved at any time step t+Δt. Because  t+Δt (i−1)  the  internal  nodal  forces  {F} depend  on  the  nodal  displacements  at  time  t+Δt,  t+Δt (i) [ΔU] , an iterative method must be used to find a converging solution. The above‐ mentioned iterations have several methodologies in place. The NR scheme was used for  this  simulation.  Within  this  method,  the  tangential  stiffness  matrix  is  formed  and  decomposed  in  a  certain  step  in  every  iteration.  The  NR  method  using  Newmark  integration is used because it has a high rate of convergence, and is quadratic. However,  each iteration generates and decomposes the tangential rigidity, which is prohibitively  costly for larger models. Thus, a different iterative approach may be advantageous.  The humanoid foot was placed above a solid body, simulating the ground. The ground  was fixed, giving it 0 degrees of freedom. A gravity of 9.807 m/s  was set, acting on the entire  assembly.  The  temperature  loads  were  included,  setting  a  constant  temperature  of  298  Kelvin. The mean angular displacement of the ankle acquired from the subject was used as  the input motion for the nonlinear dynamic simulation. The definition of the time curve for  the angle displacement application was set to simulate the mean step duration for 0.63 s,  using a force control technique. The input given to the simulation was extracted by the gait  analysis data, and it corresponds to the average gait of Figure 3. The input motion was  applied to the ankle joint axis, which is highlighted in blue in Figure 7.  Figure 7. Ankle joint axis of the CAD model, on which the input motion is applied.  The humanoid foot is composed of four bodies, three of which are in ABS rigid plastic  (Table  2),  and  the  middle  of  which  is  set  to  thermoplastic  polyurethane  (TPU)  for  his  flexible mechanical properties, simulating the muscle part. Another key component is the  spring—shown in Figure 8—in the forefoot, which passively improves the ability of the  foot to adapt to the ground; the spring was modelled with a 2 mm diameter, five coils,  and  an  8  mm  length,  and  alloy  steel  was  chosen  as  material  in  order  to  simulate  a  commercial part. After setting all of the required parameters, a mesh was generated with  the parameters in Table 3 to perform the FEA.  Table 2. Mechanical properties of the materials in the FEA.  Property  ABS  TPU  Alloy Steel  7 2 7 2 7 2 Yield strength  4.50 × 10  N/m    5.41 × 10  N/m   2.76 × 10  N/m   7 2 7 2 7 2 Tensile strength  7.30 × 10  N/m    7.79 × 10  N/m   6.89 × 10  N/m   9 2  7 2 10 2 Elastic modulus  3.00 × 10  N/m   1.48 × 10  N/m   6.90 × 10  N/m   Poissonʹs ratio  0.35  0.55  0.33  3 3  3 Mass density  1200.00 kg/m    1217.00 kg/m   2700.00 kg/m   Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  7  of  15  Figure 8. Detailed view of the forefoot torsional spring.  Table 3. Mesh parameters.  Mesh information  Values  Jacobian points  4 Points  Maximum element size  2.00 mm  Tolerance  0.10 mm  Total Nodes  175,296  Total Elements  100,015  Figure 9 shows the FEM nonlinear dynamic analysis stress results computed by the  6 2 use of the Von Mises formulation. A maximum value of 2.57∙× 10  N/m  is observed in the  upper  part  of  the  rigid  midfoot,  next  to  the  connection  to  the  compliant  body.  The  maximum value is significantly smaller than the yield limit of the material, thus validating  the proposed humanoid foot for an average walking gait. The behavior of the impact of  the foot on the ground is obtained by applying the mean angle displacement taken from  the analyzed subjects (see Section 2). The results can be observed in the step‐by‐step effect  of  the  load  on  the  different  bodies  of  the  humanoid  foot,  as  is  shown  in  the  linear  displacement distribution reported in Figure 10:   Starting from the rigid body of the hindfoot, the angular displacement is applied to  the ankle joint. The hindfoot is connected to the flexible body of the midfoot, which  starts to deform.   When  the  angular  displacement  causes  the  foot  to  hit  the  ground,  the  midfoot  is  characterized by a stress concentration in the upper part, as per Figure 9.  6 2  The arc bottom part of the foot is loaded with a maximum tension of 1.57 × 10  N/m ,  behaving as the human foot muscle when stepping.   The spring connecting the two bodies of the forefoot is stretched. This helps the foot  to adapt to the ground, and the potential energy of the spring restores the neutral  ‘flat’ position when the contact is released.  These results validate the behavior of the proposed humanoid foot, showing that it  acts similarly to the human foot in terms of stress while walking. Furthermore, the results  prove that the proposed design can safely withstand the loads associated with an average  human gait, including the impact of the foot on the ground.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  8  of  15  Figure 9. Von Mises stress distribution.  Figure 10. Displacement values in the humanoid foot.  3.2. Experimental Tests  Due to the promising simulation results, a preliminary prototype was built at the  Biomechatronics Lab of IRCSS Neuromed in Pozzilli, Italy. The prototype is composed of  six parts: five were manufactured by 3D printing, using the rapid prototyping techniques  explained  by  Cafolla  et  al.  [36],  whereas  the  last  one  is  a  commercial  mechanical  component. The printing materials were chosen from among a wide variety of commercial  resins and plastics, in order to ensure the desired foot behaviour: the four rigid bodies  were printed in PLA filament; the flexible component, representing the midfoot of the  mechanism, was manufactured using a TPU filament with properties matching the ones  of  the  FEA.  The  properties  of  both  materials  are  reported  in  Table  4,  for  reference.  Different infill percentages and patterns were tested for the midfoot, and the final infill  was selected for its optimal TPU stiffness. Both the value of the infill and the 3D support  pattern with which the infill was printed were optimized according to the surface curve  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  9  of  15  of the compliant component through an FEA with constrained motion (as per the acquired  gait).  Table 4. Mechanical properties of the materials of the 3D printed prototype.  Property  ABS  ABS Test Method  TPU  TPU Test Method  Specific gravity  1.24 g/cc  ASTM D1505  1.14 g/cc  ISO 1183   Flow rate  6.0 g/10 min ‐  39 cm /10 min  ISO 1133  Tensile strength  110 MPa (MD)  ASTM D882 ‐  ‐    145 MPa (TD)  ASTM D882 ‐  ‐  Strain at break  160% (MD)  ASTM D882  530%  ISO 527    100% (TD)  ASTM D882 ‐  ‐  Tensile modulus  3310 MPa (MD)  ASTM D882  95 MPa  ISO 527    3860 MPa (TD)  ASTM D882 ‐  ‐  Impact Strength  7.5 KJ/m2 ‐  Notched  ISO 179       No break  Charpy 23C  Hardness ‐  ‐  45 Shore D  ISO 868  The correct relative positioning of the components is defined by male and female  rectangular  pins.  Then,  the  components  are  locked  together  with  interlocking  shapes.  Additionally,  epoxy  glue  was  added  to  the  coupled  surfaces  in  order  to  improve  the  strength of the connection, as it is the most loaded component of the system, as shown in  Figure  9.  The  assembly  of  the  entire  foot  is  shown  in  Figure  11.  The  prototype  of  the  humanoid foot is composed of a rigid hind foot, a flexible mid foot, and a rigid forefoot,  which is made of three 3D printed rigid parts, namely the connection pin, the sole and the  toe, and a commercial part, the spring. The prototype was scaled down from human size  in order to fit a service humanoid robot design [10–12], and thus the whole foot can fit  into a box of (146 × 52 × 41) mm; it weighs 57.80 g.  Figure 11. Humanoid foot prototype assembly.  As a preliminary test, the adaptability of the foot to different step heights was tested.  Figures 12 and 13 show the foot adapting to a 22 mm high step and a 54 mm high step,  respectively. The combination of the forefoot spring and the compliant midfoot actions  allow the proposed foot design to balance on step heights up to approximately 35% of the  length of the foot.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  10  of  15     (a)  (b)  Figure 12. Humanoid foot prototype assembly on a 22 mm step: (a) unloaded test; (b) loaded test.  (a)  (b)  Figure 13. Humanoid foot prototype assembly on a 54 mm step: (a) unloaded test; (b) loaded test.  Further experimental tests were conducted in order to measure the reaction force  between the foot and the ground, and to validate the FEA results of Figures 9 and 10. By  using the experimental setup shown in Figure 14, a load cell was calibrated with a set of  calibration  weights  (accuracy  1%)  before  the  experimental  test,  and  was  then  used  to  measure the force, according to the scheme in Figure 15. A camera was used to measure  the foot motion by tracking the marker in Figure 14 through the Kinovea software. By  using the real dimension of the marker, i.e., 10 × 10 mm, the motion in pixels is converted  to  real‐world  one  with  a  semi‐automated  tracking  process,  which  has  an  estimated  accuracy of 5% (measured through a checkerboard calibration).  Figure 14. Experimental setup for weight and displacement acquisition.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  11  of  15  Figure 15. Experimental setup for weight and displacement acquisition.  A 1‐second stance cycle was manually reproduced, moving according to the motion  in Figure 16, which was measured with the camera during the experiment. During the  load cycle, the marker moved 9.5 mm, with a comparable motion to the corresponding  point in the analysis in Figure 10. The action of the foot on the ground, measured with the  load cell, was reported in Figure 17.  0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Time (−) Figure 16. Ankle angle, as acquired with motion capture by the camera during a gait cycle.  2.5 1.5 0.5 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Time (−) Figure 17. Force (normalized by body weight of 3.6 kg), as acquired by the load cell during a gait  cycle.  Force (Body Weight) (−) Acquired Ankle Angle (deg) Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  12  of  15  The  vertical  ground  reaction  force  applied  to  the  foot  is  bimodal,  with  an  initial  impact peak, followed almost immediately by a propulsive peak as the foot pushes off  against  the  ground.  In  a  conventional  humanoid  robotic  foot,  this  impulsive  force  is  transmitted fully to the ankle, with the risk of disrupting the robot’s balance. Conversely,  the proposed foot is able to dampen this impact through the spring and the compliant  body, significantly reducing the stress on the ankle joint.  Hall [37] and Munro [38] report that for a gait speed between 3.0 m/s to 5.0 m/s, the  impact forces range from 1.6 to 2.3 times the body weight, and the propulsive forces range  from 2.5 to 2.8 times the body weight. In order to compare their results to the experimental  ones, an overall body weight of 3.6 kg was estimated from humanoid robots of similar  sizes and proportions [10]. The acquired results, reported in Figure 16, are in a comparable  range  (6%  error  on  displacement)  of  the  FEA  simulation,  and  show  a  comparable  behaviour  to  that  of  the  human  locomotion  system,  with  a  propulsive  peak  of  approximately 3.0 times body weight.  4. Discussion and Conclusions  In this paper, an innovative robotic foot design was introduced, based on the mobility  of the human foot in walking gaits. Whereas most other humanoid robot feet use a single‐ body  or  two‐segment  design,  the  proposed  system  is  characterized  by  three  underactuated segments that replicate the behavior of the human foot. The motion of the  human foot was studied with gait analysis, which was performed on a sample of 110  human  gaits  in  order  to  acquire  the  motion  requirements  for  the  proposed  design.  A  passive  foot  mechanism  with  compliant  elements  was  then  introduced  in  order  to  improve  humanoid  robots’  impact  absorption  and  stability  during  walking  gaits.  The  proposed design was validated through a simulation with FEA and Multibody Dynamics,  which demonstrated its functionality. Experiments with a 3D printed prototype of the  proposed foot mechanism were also reported to prove the feasibility of this study.  Overall, this work introduced a novel design that increases foot mobility thanks to a  three‐segment foot mechanism, without introducing additional degrees of freedom and  control  complexity  into  the  system.  In  future  works,  the  foot  will  be  assembled  on  a  humanoid robot for full validation. In addition, the proposed humanoid foot is feasible  for future developments and studies in the field of prosthetics and neurorehabilitation.  Author  Contributions:  Conceptualization,  M.R.  and  D.C.;  methodology,  B.D.M.C.‐R.  and  D.C.;  validation,  B.D.M.C.‐R.  and  D.C.;  formal  analysis,  B.D.M.C.‐R.  and  D.C.;  investigation,  M.R.,  B.D.M.C.‐R. and D.C.; resources, L.P. and D.C.; data curation, M.R., B.D.M.C.‐R., L.P., G.P., D.C.;  writing—original draft preparation, M.R. and D.C.; writing—review and editing, B.D.M.C.‐R. and  D.C.;  visualization,  M.R.  and  D.C.;  supervision,  D.C.  All  authors  have  read  and  agreed  to  the  published version of the manuscript.  Funding: This work was funded by a grant from Ministero della Salute (Ricerca Corrente 2021).  Institutional Review  Board  Statement:   This  is  a  retrospective  observational  study where  data  were used from clinical outcomes of 11 patients who outcome a healthy gait cycle. The patients were  diagnosed and treated at IRCCS NEUROMED—the Mediterranean Neurological Institute (Italy),  according to the national guidelines and agreements that govern its hospital center. All data were  collected  as  part  of  routine  diagnosis  and  treatment.  This  study  does  not  report  on  the  use  of  experimental or new protocols. Although the rehabilitation program carried out by the 11 selected  patients is described in this study, the rehabilitation program was neither designed nor modified  for the purposes of this study.  Informed Consent Statement:   Patients entering IRCCS NEUROMED gave a generic consent to  use their data for future scientific research purposes according to GDPR (General Data Protection  Regulation) regulation.  Data  Availability  Statement:   The  data  presented  in  this  study  are  available  on  request  at  the  discretion of the corresponding author. The data are not publicly available due to privacy reasons.  Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  13  of  15  References  1. Siciliano, B.; Khatib, O. Springer Handbook of Robotics; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2016.  2. Lim, H.‐O.; Takanishi, A. Biped walking robots created at waseda university: Wl and wabian family. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. A  Math. Phys. Eng. Sci. 2007, 365, 49–64.  3. Hirose, M.; Ogawa, K. Honda humanoid robots development. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. A Math. Phys. Eng. Sci. 2007, 365, 11–19.  4. Kajita, S.; Nagasaki, T.; Kaneko, K.; Yokoi, K.; Tanie, K. A hop towards running humanoid biped. In Proceedings of the IEEE  International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA’04, New Orleans, LA, USA, 26 April–1 May 2004; Volume 1, pp.  629–635.  5. Park, I.‐W.; Kim, J.‐Y.; Lee, J.; Oh, J.‐H. Mechanical design of humanoid robot platform khr‐3 (kaist humanoid robot 3: Hubo).  In Proceedings of the 5th IEEE‐RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, Tsukuba, Japan, 5–7 December 2005; pp.  321–326.  6. Tajima,  R.;  Honda,  D.;  Suga,  K.  Fast  running  experiments  involving  a  humanoid  robot.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2009  IEEE  International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Kobe, Japan, 12–17 May 2009; pp. 1571–1576.  7. Tsagarakis, N.G.; Li, Z.; Saglia, J.; Caldwell, D.G. The design of the lower body of the compliant humanoid robot iCub. In  Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Shanghai, China, 9–13 May 2011; pp. 2035– 2040.  8. ZYu; Huang, Q.; Ma, G.; Chen, X.; Zhang, W.; Li, J.; Gao, J. Design and development of the humanoid robot bhr‐5. Adv. Mech.  Eng. 2014, 6, 852937.  9. Gouaillier, D.; Hugel, V.; Blazevic, P.; Kilner, C.; Monceaux, J.; Lafourcade, P.; Marnier, B.; Serre, J.; Maisonnier, B. Mechatronic  design of NAO humanoid. In Proceedings of the 2009 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Kobe, Japan,  12–17 May 2009; pp. 769–774.  10. Russo, M.; Cafolla, D.; Ceccarelli, M. Design and experiments of a novel humanoid robot with parallel architectures. Robotics  2018, 7, 79.  11. Cafolla, D.; Wang, M.; Carbone, G.; Ceccarelli, M. Larmbot: A new humanoid robot with parallel mechanisms. In Proceedings  of  the  Symposium  on  Robot  Design,  Dynamics  and  Control,  Udine,  Italy,  20–23  June  2016;  Springer:  Berlin/Heidelberg,  Germany, 2016; pp. 275–283.  12. Russo, M.; Ceccarelli, M. Dynamics of a humanoid robot with parallel architectures. In Proceedings of the IFToMM World  Congress on Mechanism and Machine Science, Krakow, Poland, 15–18 July 2019; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2019;  pp. 1799–1808.  13. Li,  J.;  Huang,  Q.;  Zhang,  W.;  Yu,  Z.;  Li,  K.  Flexible  foot  design  for  a  humanoid  robot.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2008  IEEE  International Conference on Automation and Logistics, Qingdao, China, 1–3 September 2008; pp. 1414–1419.  14. Boston Dynamics. ATLAS. Available online: https://www.bostondynamics.com/atlas (accessed on 15 June 2020).  15. Lapeyre, M.; Rouanet, P.; Oudeyer, P.‐Y. The poppy humanoid robot: Leg design for biped locomotion. In Proceedings of the  2013 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Tokyo, Japan, 3–7 November 2013; pp. 349–356.  16. Piazza, C.; della Santina, C.; Gasparri, G.M.; Catalano, M.G.; Grioli, G.; Garabini, M.; Bicchi, A. Toward an adaptive foot for  natural  walking.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2016  IEEE‐RAS  16th  International  Conference  on  Humanoid  Robots  (Humanoids),  Cancun, Mexico, 15–17 November 2016; pp. 1204–1210.  17. Nishiwaki, K.; Kagami, S.; Kuniyoshi, Y.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, H. Toe joints that enhance bipedal and full body motion of humanoid  robots.  In  Proceedings  of  the  Proceedings  2002  IEEE  International  Conference  on  Robotics  and  Automation  (Cat.  No.  02CH37292), Washington, DC, USA, 11–15 May 2002; Volume 3, pp. 3105–3110.  18. Buschmann, T.; Lohmeier, S.; Ulbrich, H. Humanoid robot lola: Design and walking control. J. Physiol. 2009, 103, 141–148.  19. Borovac,  B.;  Slavnic,  S.  Design  of  multi‐segment  humanoid  robot  foot.  In  Proceedings  of  the  International  Conference  on  Research and Education in Robotics, Heidelberg, Germany, 22–24 May2008; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2008; pp.  12–18.  20. Agrawal, A.; Banala, S.K.; Agrawal, S.K.; Binder‐Macleod, S.A. Design of a twodegree‐of‐freedom ankle‐foot orthosis for robotic  rehabilitation. In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR, Chicago, IL, USA, 28 June– 1 July 2005; pp. 41–44.  21. Narioka, K.; Homma, T.; Hosoda, K. Humanlike ankle‐foot complex for a bipedrobot. In Proceedings of the 2012 12th IEEE‐ RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids 2012), Osaka, Japan, 29 November–1 December 2012; pp. 15– 20.  22. Hashimoto, K.; Motohashi, H.; Takashima, T.; Lim, H.; Takanishi, A. Shoes‐wearable foot mechanism mimicking characteristics  of  humanʹs  foot  arch  and  skin.  In  Proceedings  of  the  2013  IEEE  International  Conference  on  Robotics  and  Automation,  Karlsruhe, Germany, 6–10 May 2013; pp. 686–691.  23. Torricelli, D.; Gonzalez, J.; Weckx, M.; Jimenez‐Fabian, R.; Vanderborght, B.; Sartori, M.; Dosen, S.; Farina, D.; Lefeber, D.; Pons,  J.L. Human‐like compliant locomotion: State of the art of robotic implementations. Bioinspir. Biomim. 2016, 11, 051002.  24. Knudson, D. Fundamentals of Biomechanics; Springer Science & Business Media: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2007.  25. Holowka, N.B.; Lieberman, D.E. Rethinking the evolution of the human foot: Insights from experimental research. J. Exp. Biol.  2018, 221, jeb174425.  Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  14  of  15  26. Takahashi, Y.; Nishiwaki, K.; Kagami, S.; Mizoguchi, H.; Inoue, H. High‐speed pressure sensor grid for humanoid robot foot.  In Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 2–6  August 2005; pp. 3909–3914.  27. Kim,  G.‐S.;  Shin,  H.‐J.;  Yoon,  J.  Development  of  6‐axis  force/moment  sensor  for  a  humanoid  robot’s  intelligent  foot.  Sens.  Actuators A Phys. 2008, 141, 276–281.  28. Wu, B.; Luo, J.; Shen, F.; Ren, Y.; Wu, Z. Optimum design method of multi‐axis force sensor integrated in humanoid robot foot  system. Measurement 2011, 44, 1651–1660.  29. Yuan, C.; Luo, L.‐P.; Yuan, Q.; Wu, J.; Yan, R.‐J.; Kim, H.; Shin, K.‐S.; Han, C.‐S. Development and evaluation of a compact 6‐ axis force/moment sensor with a serial structure for the humanoid robot foot. Measurement 2015, 70, 110–122.  30. Nishiwaki,  K.;  Murakami,  Y.;  Kagami,  S.;  Kuniyoshi,  Y.;  Inaba,  M.;  Inoue,  H.  Asix‐axis  force  sensor  with  parallel  support  mechanism to measure the ground reaction force of humanoid robot. In Proceedings of the 2002 IEEE International Conference  on Robotics and Automation (Cat. No. 02CH37292), Washington, DC, USA, 11–15 May 2002; Volume 3, pp. 2277–2282.  31. Davis, R.B.; Ounpuu, S.; Tyburski, D.; Gage, J.R. A Gait Analysis Data Collection and Reduction Technique; Human Movement  Science 1991, 10 (5), 575–587.  32. Gaitlab,  B.  Multifactorial  Gait  Analysis  with  Davis  Protocol.  Available  online:  https://www.btsbioengineering.com/products/bts‐gaitlab‐gait‐analysis (accessed on 14 June 2020).  33. Baker, R. Gait analysis methods in rehabilitation. J. Neuroeng. Rehabil. 2006, 3, 4.  34. Kressig, R.W.; Beauchet, O.; European GAITRite Network Group. Guidelines for clinical applications of spatiotemporal gait  analysis in older adults. Aging Clin. Exp. Res. 2006, 18, 174–176.  35. Perry, J.; Burnfield, J.M. Gait analysis: Normal and pathological function. J. Pediatr. Orthop. 1992, 12, 815.  36. Cafolla, D.; Ceccarelli, M.; Wang, M.; Carbone, G. 3d printing for feasibility check of mechanism design. Int. J. Mech. Control  2016, 17, 3–12.  37. Hall, S. Basic Biomechanics; McGraw‐Hill Higher Education: New York, NY, USA, 2014.  38. Munro, C.F.; Miller, D.I.; Fuglevand, A.J. Ground reaction forces in running: A reexamination. J. Biomech. 1987, 20, 147–155.  Short Biography of Authors    Matteo  Russo  received  the  B.Sc.,  M.Sc.  and  Ph.D.  degrees  in  mechanical  engineering  from  the  University of Cassino, Italy, in 2013, 2015, and 2019, respectively. During his M.Sc. and Ph.D., he was  a visiting researcher at RWTH Aachen University, Germany, at University of the Basque Country,  Spain, and at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan. Since 2019, he was a Research Fellow at the Rolls‐ Royce  University  Technology  Centre  in  Manufacturing  and  On‐Wing  Technology,  University  of  Nottingham, UK.  His  main  research  interests  are  inspection  and  repair  robotics,  mechanism  design,  kinematic  modelling and optimization, parallel manipulators and mobile robots. He is the author of more than  40 peer‐reviewed journal and conference papers. His awards and honours include the IFToMM Young  Delegate Program Award in 2018, and several best paper awards at international conferences. He is a  member of IEEE and IFToMM.    Betsy D. M. Chaparro‐Rico received the degree of Electronic Engineer Magna cum laude in 2011 from  Unisangil University in Colombia. In 2014, she obtained a Master’s degree in Advanced Technology  from  Instituto  Politecnico  Nacional  in  Mexico,  and  received  the  academic  award  Best  Academic  Performance 2013–2014. In 2018, she obtained a PhD degree in Advance Technology from Instituto  Politecnico  Nacional  in  Mexico.  In  addition,  she  obtained  a  PhD  degree  in  Civil,  Mechanical  and  Biomechanics Engineering from University of Cassino and Southern Latium (Italy). From 2006 to 2011,  she was involved in the IDENTUS research group at Unisangil University (Colombia), collaborating  in  bioengineering  and  robotic  projects.  From  2015  to  2018,  she  was  involved  in  the  Institutional  Program of Training of Researchers (BEIFI) at Instituto Politecnico Nacional (Mexico), collaborating  in the development of medical devices and service robots. Currently, she is working as researcher in  the  Biomechatronics  Lab  at  IRCCS  Istituto  Neurologico  Mediterraneo  Neuromed,  Italy.  She  is  interested in medical robotics, service robots, manipulators, and parallel mechanisms.    Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 1686  15  of  15    Luigi Pavone received his master’s degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Rome “La  Sapienza” in 2010, and his PhD in Clinical and Translational Medicine in 2020 from the University of  Molise. Since 2009, he started working in Neuroscience research at IRCCS Neuromed with his master’s  thesis,  consisting  in  the  development  of  a  software  for  the  localization  of  subdural  electrodes  in  patients with drug‐resistant epilepsy. Nowadays, he is a project manager at Bioengineering unit of  IRCCS Neuromed. Luigi Pavone is the author of over 20 publications in peer‐reviewed journals, and  he  is  also  the  owner  of  a  patent  (EP2979249A1).  His  research  interests  include  signal  and  image  processing, brain computer interface applications and methods, data mining, and machine learning  methods for neuroscience research.    Gabriele  Pasqua  received  his  Masters  degree  in  Biomedical  Engineering  from  the  University  of  Naples  Federico  II,  Italy,  and  his  Ph.D  degree  in  Traslational  and  Clinical  Medicine  from  the  University  of  Molise,  Italy,  in  2015  and  in  2020,  respectively.  He  is  currently  a  Post‐Doctoral  Researcher  at  the  University  of  Rome,  Sapienza,  in  the  Department  of  Human  Neuroscience.  His  research interests include Neuroimaging and Gait Analysis.    Daniele Cafolla received his Dual Master degree with 110/110 as a mechanical engineer on 2012 at  University of Cassino (Italy) and at Panamerican University (Mexico). He started his Ph.D. in 2013 at  University of Cassino  (Italy). From October 2013 to May 2014,  he attended a period  at Intelligent  Systems Centre (IntelliSys), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, under the supervision of  Prof. I‐Ming Chen. In 2015, he received a PhD in Mechanical Engineering. Since 2018, he has been the  head  of  the  Biomechatronics  Lab  at  Clinical  Research  Institute  (IRCCS)  Neuromed,  Italy.  He  was  involved  in  several  projects,  consultations,  and  International  Symposia  regarding  Mechanics,  Mechatronics, Robotics, Biomechanics, Design and Rapid Prototyping. He is the author of a book on  the  Static  and  Dynamic  Balancing  of  a  Parallel  Manipulator,  and  several  journal  and  conference  papers. He is a member of IFToMM Italy. 

Journal

Applied SciencesMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

Published: Feb 13, 2021

There are no references for this article.