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War Stories, Language Games, and Struggle for Recognition

War Stories, Language Games, and Struggle for Recognition WAR STORIES, LANGUAGE GAMES, AND STRUGGLE FOR RECOGNITION Margaret Litvin 20th Cairo International Festival of Experimental Theatre, Cairo, Egypt, October 10–20, 2008. L ocated on the Nile Corniche, the Semiramis Intercontinental Hotel reveals only a picture-window slice of Cairo. Guests of this year’s Cairo International Festival of Experimental Theatre (CIFET) entered a security fortress: concrete barriers, bomb-sniffing dogs, metal detectors, and handbag searches. Inside, the cappuccinos were perfect; the sunset, through a double filter of pollution and tinted glass, looked magical. Some visitors wondered if this wasn’t too sumptuous a place for the Egyptian Ministry of Culture to lodge the foreign guests it had invited for the festival’s accompanying threeday seminar on “Challenges Facing the Independent Theatre and Threats to Its Survival.” Having lived for a year (2001–2002) as a student in a rooftop flat in downtown Cairo, listening to a constant din of mosque loudspeakers and taxi horns, I appreciated the change of scene that came with being an invited seminar participant. Even more welcome was the conversation. The organizers had assembled a wonderful international group of eleven jurors, eighteen seminar speakers, and eleven “honorees”; the group included Lee Breuer (United States), Paul Chaoul (Lebanon), Baz Kershaw http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

War Stories, Language Games, and Struggle for Recognition

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2009 Margaret Litvin
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/pajj.2009.31.2.65
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

WAR STORIES, LANGUAGE GAMES, AND STRUGGLE FOR RECOGNITION Margaret Litvin 20th Cairo International Festival of Experimental Theatre, Cairo, Egypt, October 10–20, 2008. L ocated on the Nile Corniche, the Semiramis Intercontinental Hotel reveals only a picture-window slice of Cairo. Guests of this year’s Cairo International Festival of Experimental Theatre (CIFET) entered a security fortress: concrete barriers, bomb-sniffing dogs, metal detectors, and handbag searches. Inside, the cappuccinos were perfect; the sunset, through a double filter of pollution and tinted glass, looked magical. Some visitors wondered if this wasn’t too sumptuous a place for the Egyptian Ministry of Culture to lodge the foreign guests it had invited for the festival’s accompanying threeday seminar on “Challenges Facing the Independent Theatre and Threats to Its Survival.” Having lived for a year (2001–2002) as a student in a rooftop flat in downtown Cairo, listening to a constant din of mosque loudspeakers and taxi horns, I appreciated the change of scene that came with being an invited seminar participant. Even more welcome was the conversation. The organizers had assembled a wonderful international group of eleven jurors, eighteen seminar speakers, and eleven “honorees”; the group included Lee Breuer (United States), Paul Chaoul (Lebanon), Baz Kershaw

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: May 1, 2009

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