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“‘To quote,’ say the Kabyles, ‘is to bring back to life’”

“‘To quote,’ say the Kabyles, ‘is to bring back to life’” “‘To quote,’ say the Kabyles, ‘is to bring back to life’” ANDREA FRASER Doomed to death, that end which cannot be taken as an end, man is a being without reason for being. It is society, and society alone, which dispenses, to different degrees, the justifications and reasons for existing; it is society which, by producing the affairs or positions that are said to be “important,” produces the acts and agents that are judged to be “important,” for themselves and for the others—characters objectively and subjectively assured of their value and thus liberated from indifference and insignificance. —Pierre Bourdieu, “A Lecture on the Lecture” I am sitting at a desk at the Collège de France, in an office a few doors down from the office Pierre Bourdieu once occupied. I found my way here through the intervention of Inès Champey, who often played the role of mediating my contact with Bourdieu when he was alive. (Bourdieu was the only person I ever sent work to unsolicited, but even after he responded I remained much too shy to call him directly.) Marie-Christine Rivière, Bourdieu’s secretary of many decades, graciously accommodated my need to consult English translations of his writings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png October MIT Press

“‘To quote,’ say the Kabyles, ‘is to bring back to life’”

October , Volume Summer 2002 (101) – Jul 1, 2002

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2002 October Magazine, Ltd. and Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0162-2870
eISSN
1536-013X
DOI
10.1162/octo.2002.101.1.7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

“‘To quote,’ say the Kabyles, ‘is to bring back to life’” ANDREA FRASER Doomed to death, that end which cannot be taken as an end, man is a being without reason for being. It is society, and society alone, which dispenses, to different degrees, the justifications and reasons for existing; it is society which, by producing the affairs or positions that are said to be “important,” produces the acts and agents that are judged to be “important,” for themselves and for the others—characters objectively and subjectively assured of their value and thus liberated from indifference and insignificance. —Pierre Bourdieu, “A Lecture on the Lecture” I am sitting at a desk at the Collège de France, in an office a few doors down from the office Pierre Bourdieu once occupied. I found my way here through the intervention of Inès Champey, who often played the role of mediating my contact with Bourdieu when he was alive. (Bourdieu was the only person I ever sent work to unsolicited, but even after he responded I remained much too shy to call him directly.) Marie-Christine Rivière, Bourdieu’s secretary of many decades, graciously accommodated my need to consult English translations of his writings.

Journal

OctoberMIT Press

Published: Jul 1, 2002

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