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Time and Place Do Exist: Strindberg and Visual Media

Time and Place Do Exist: Strindberg and Visual Media TIME AND PLACE DO EXIST Strindberg and Visual Media Vreni Hockenjos ugust Strindberg’s talents as painter and photographer have received broad recognition in recent years. Several major exhibitions held in Sweden and abroad cast new light on these other sides of the famous playwright. What deserves attention in this context is that Strindberg never kept his writing separate from his interest in visual arts but established a symbiotic relationship between the two fields with manifold ramifications. Ideas freely flow back and forth and the visual came to manifest a key aspect in his literary output. As Evert Sprinchorn noted, “No other major dramatist offers such a rich feast for the eye of the spectator. To see his plays is to walk through a gallery of memorable pictures.”1 Strindberg’s preoccupation with visual means also frequently coincided with his fascination for cutting-edge technologies. The field of photography is perhaps the most prominent example for this overlapping of interests which resulted not only in a number of photographic experiments and snapshots but also in various literary themes and metaphors. In 1895, a new optical technology emerged with the cinema and Strindberg was quick to incorporate the Lumière brothers’ invention into his http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Time and Place Do Exist: Strindberg and Visual Media

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2003 Performing Arts Journal, Inc.
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/152028103322491683
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

TIME AND PLACE DO EXIST Strindberg and Visual Media Vreni Hockenjos ugust Strindberg’s talents as painter and photographer have received broad recognition in recent years. Several major exhibitions held in Sweden and abroad cast new light on these other sides of the famous playwright. What deserves attention in this context is that Strindberg never kept his writing separate from his interest in visual arts but established a symbiotic relationship between the two fields with manifold ramifications. Ideas freely flow back and forth and the visual came to manifest a key aspect in his literary output. As Evert Sprinchorn noted, “No other major dramatist offers such a rich feast for the eye of the spectator. To see his plays is to walk through a gallery of memorable pictures.”1 Strindberg’s preoccupation with visual means also frequently coincided with his fascination for cutting-edge technologies. The field of photography is perhaps the most prominent example for this overlapping of interests which resulted not only in a number of photographic experiments and snapshots but also in various literary themes and metaphors. In 1895, a new optical technology emerged with the cinema and Strindberg was quick to incorporate the Lumière brothers’ invention into his

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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