Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Materiality of Impermanence

The Materiality of Impermanence THE MATERIALITY OF IMPERMANENCE Kristine Marx Tacita Dean, Hugo Boss Prize 2006, an exhibition at the Solomon R.  Guggenheim Museum, New York City, February 23–June 6, 2007. shiny  pink  plastic  strip  streams  through  masses  of  machinery   at  its  birthplace  in  Chalonsur-Saône, France. This celluloid is the  protagonist  of Tacita  Dean’s  forty-four  minute film Kodak (2006). As part of her  winning the Hugo Boss Prize in 2006,  Dean exhibited the film and other recent  work  at  the  Guggenheim  Museum  in  New York. Like her earlier films, Kodak  addresses  themes  of  obsolescence,  nostalgia, and longing.  Dean  records  a  Kodak  manufacturing  plant, the material’s point of origin, to  make a work about the death of film. The  factory was the last in Europe to produce  black  and  white  standard  16 mm  film  stock,  the  artist’s  medium  of  choice.  When  Dean  contacted  them  to  make  her  film  the  factory  was  preparing  to  close its operations. The black and white  takes  interspersed  in  Kodak  were  shot  on  some  of  the  last  few  rolls  of  stock.  These  bits  document  the  final  images  of  the  film’s  own  making,  underscoring the reflexivity of her project. There  are  many  films  about  filmmaking,  but  usually  from  the  perspective  of  film  as  64    PAJ 88 (2008), pp. 64–70.  A  a creative artifice—its direction, acting,  and  storytelling.  Kodak  is  about  the  physical  making  of  film—its  materiality and its impermanence. It shows the  production of film before it is overtaken  by digital technologies. Meditative and  melancholic, it is a record of loss. It  took  some  time  for  Dean  to  obtain  permission  from  the  factory  to  make  her film, but the wait proved fortuitous.  Normally  the  buildings  that  are  used  for the emulsion process are kept completely  dark  due  to  the  material’s  light  sensitivity. On the day of shooting, the  plant  decided  to  run  tests  through  the  system with brown paper, allowing lights  to  illuminate  the  factory’s  dark  spaces.  Because the polyester film was still in the  machines when the tests were conducted,  Dean was able to record the glistening  translucent plastic in contrast to the dull,  opaque paper. In an interview, the artist  described the scene:  The pink film travels through, all  illuminated, and then suddenly  they  send  this  paper  through,  and  it’s  brutal,  absolutely  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

The Materiality of Impermanence

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art , Volume 30 (1) – Jan 1, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/mit-press/the-materiality-of-impermanence-hoDgMii0xE
Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2008 Kristine Marx
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/pajj.2008.30.1.64
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE MATERIALITY OF IMPERMANENCE Kristine Marx Tacita Dean, Hugo Boss Prize 2006, an exhibition at the Solomon R.  Guggenheim Museum, New York City, February 23–June 6, 2007. shiny  pink  plastic  strip  streams  through  masses  of  machinery   at  its  birthplace  in  Chalonsur-Saône, France. This celluloid is the  protagonist  of Tacita  Dean’s  forty-four  minute film Kodak (2006). As part of her  winning the Hugo Boss Prize in 2006,  Dean exhibited the film and other recent  work  at  the  Guggenheim  Museum  in  New York. Like her earlier films, Kodak  addresses  themes  of  obsolescence,  nostalgia, and longing.  Dean  records  a  Kodak  manufacturing  plant, the material’s point of origin, to  make a work about the death of film. The  factory was the last in Europe to produce  black  and  white  standard  16 mm  film  stock,  the  artist’s  medium  of  choice.  When  Dean  contacted  them  to  make  her  film  the  factory  was  preparing  to  close its operations. The black and white  takes  interspersed  in  Kodak  were  shot  on  some  of  the  last  few  rolls  of  stock.  These  bits  document  the  final  images  of  the  film’s  own  making,  underscoring the reflexivity of her project. There  are  many  films  about  filmmaking,  but  usually  from  the  perspective  of  film  as  64    PAJ 88 (2008), pp. 64–70.  A  a creative artifice—its direction, acting,  and  storytelling.  Kodak  is  about  the  physical  making  of  film—its  materiality and its impermanence. It shows the  production of film before it is overtaken  by digital technologies. Meditative and  melancholic, it is a record of loss. It  took  some  time  for  Dean  to  obtain  permission  from  the  factory  to  make  her film, but the wait proved fortuitous.  Normally  the  buildings  that  are  used  for the emulsion process are kept completely  dark  due  to  the  material’s  light  sensitivity. On the day of shooting, the  plant  decided  to  run  tests  through  the  system with brown paper, allowing lights  to  illuminate  the  factory’s  dark  spaces.  Because the polyester film was still in the  machines when the tests were conducted,  Dean was able to record the glistening  translucent plastic in contrast to the dull,  opaque paper. In an interview, the artist  described the scene:  The pink film travels through, all  illuminated, and then suddenly  they  send  this  paper  through,  and  it’s  brutal,  absolutely 

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Jan 1, 2008

There are no references for this article.