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The Globe of War

The Globe of War THE GLOBE OF WAR Bonnie Marranca wo years ago, we had begun planning special PAJ issues to highlight the contemporary situation of performance and the visual arts in New York and in European culture in its new era of cooperation on the continent. The events of September 11 compelled us to refocus our plans. Now there was an urgency in confronting more profound social and political issues circulating around art and its public and the very meaning of culture in a time of social crisis. How would artists react to this event? What forms of cultural experience would audiences need now? Where would cultural liberalism position itself in the ensuing dialogue? Since that time world events have taken a tumultuous turn in the response to the Bush administration’s declaration of war on Iraq. Not the least among them are the new conflicts with our European allies in the sharp division in attitudes towards the war, reflected in Europe and in America. Donald Rumsfeld created the designation of the “Old Europe” and the “New Europe” in an ironic tactical maneuver. But, as at least one commentator has pointed out, Poland of the New Europe is actually older as a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2003 Performing Arts Journal, Inc.
Subject
Editorial
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/152028103322491638
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE GLOBE OF WAR Bonnie Marranca wo years ago, we had begun planning special PAJ issues to highlight the contemporary situation of performance and the visual arts in New York and in European culture in its new era of cooperation on the continent. The events of September 11 compelled us to refocus our plans. Now there was an urgency in confronting more profound social and political issues circulating around art and its public and the very meaning of culture in a time of social crisis. How would artists react to this event? What forms of cultural experience would audiences need now? Where would cultural liberalism position itself in the ensuing dialogue? Since that time world events have taken a tumultuous turn in the response to the Bush administration’s declaration of war on Iraq. Not the least among them are the new conflicts with our European allies in the sharp division in attitudes towards the war, reflected in Europe and in America. Donald Rumsfeld created the designation of the “Old Europe” and the “New Europe” in an ironic tactical maneuver. But, as at least one commentator has pointed out, Poland of the New Europe is actually older as a

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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