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The Black Mirror *

The Black Mirror * From his films Empire (2002) and Anticultural Positions (2009) to a variety of his modes of drawing, a singular concentration on the photographic negative can be found throughout Paul Sietsema's artistic practice. Rather than grounding a medium, Baker argues, the location of photography's logic in the negative preserves the photograph as a space of reversal and inversion, a deep and powerful force of negation rather than a servant of the real. To return, as Sietsema does, to this history and to such processes now, after they have run their course, seems to insist on the negative as a kind of literal afterimage, and also, potentially, as an open image, considering how the negative transmutes the density of the world into transparency, inhabiting a space between the object and the image, the middle point between camera and print, a “medium” in the true but irremediably hybrid sense of the word. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png October MIT Press

The Black Mirror *

October , Volume Fall 2016 (158) – Oct 1, 2016

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2016 October Magazine, Ltd. and Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0162-2870
eISSN
1536-013X
DOI
10.1162/OCTO_a_00269
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

From his films Empire (2002) and Anticultural Positions (2009) to a variety of his modes of drawing, a singular concentration on the photographic negative can be found throughout Paul Sietsema's artistic practice. Rather than grounding a medium, Baker argues, the location of photography's logic in the negative preserves the photograph as a space of reversal and inversion, a deep and powerful force of negation rather than a servant of the real. To return, as Sietsema does, to this history and to such processes now, after they have run their course, seems to insist on the negative as a kind of literal afterimage, and also, potentially, as an open image, considering how the negative transmutes the density of the world into transparency, inhabiting a space between the object and the image, the middle point between camera and print, a “medium” in the true but irremediably hybrid sense of the word.

Journal

OctoberMIT Press

Published: Oct 1, 2016

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