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Tania Candiani: Sound Piece from Plataforma Sonora/Torre Reloj

Tania Candiani: Sound Piece from Plataforma Sonora/Torre Reloj Contemporaneity is the thematic point of departure; our living contemporaneity is consciously invoked by the radio. The radio follows the day like a clock, where hourly news updates provide us with a shared routine that synchronizes the rhythm of everyday life [1]. Tuning between stations, this contemporaneity changes with the world’s time zones, and each hour has a distinct character. At any time, one can, from one’s local space somewhere on the globe, tune into the daily rhythms of different time zones and visit all places at all times. Today, we assume that the world lives in one global time in a universal existence. But—economically as well as ecologically, we are simultaneously connected to people who find themselves in completely different daily realities and environments. The installation invites the audience to move between the radios in the exhibition space, with the sound changing as one moves. The track on this CD presents a stereo remix intended headphone listening. It is thus a specific work for close-range listening—the experience of being inside the installation is replaced with a pure auditory experience. Reference Fig. 4. Tania Candiani, Sound Piece from Plataforma Sonora/ Torre Reloj, sound installation of 48 alarm clocks recorded in a studio, with 48 aluminum trumpets, 48 speakers, 3 amplifiers and metal structure, Condesa D.F., Mexico City, 2012. (Photo © Tania Candiani) nc tania CanDiani: sound piece froM plaTaforMa sonora/Torre reloj or Maia Urstad is an artist working at the intersection of audio and visual art, predominantly with sound installations and performances. She was educated at the Bergen National Academy of the Arts and also has a background in rock music. Her recent work interrogates the history and methodology of communication technology: from Morse code and other long-range signals to digital terrestrial networks and the use of fiber optics. Radio is a central theme in her work, in that the authority of the medium opens up visual and conceptual possibilities. Urstad’s solo and collaborative work has been presented at spaces such as Singuhr Sound Gallery Berlin, Germany; Reina Sofia Radio Madrid, Spain; Bergen Art Museum, Norway; Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa; Prefix ICA in Toronto, Canada; Mamam do Patio Recife, Brazil; and Electrohype at Malmö Konsthall, Sweden. Urstad curates and produces art projects through her company Maur Projects, and she is one of the founders of Lydgalleriet Sound Art Gallery in Norway. She is a member of the international sound art collective freq-out, curated by CM von Hausswolff, and her soundworks are published by Touch Music [MCPS]. The research processes of Tania Candiani take as starting point language, text and the political implications of the domestic. Her translation strategies among systems—linguistic, visual, phonic—and practices generate associations where there is a constant nostalgia for the obsolete that makes us consider the discursive content of artifacts and our former projections of the future. She has gathered interdisciplinary work teams to achieve poetic intersections between art and technology. Candiani’s work is in private and public collections as the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; the San Diego Museum of Art; the Mexican Museum, San Francisco; Deutsche Bank; INBA, Mexico; among others. Her most recent exhibition at Laboratorio Arte Alameda (LAA) in Mexico City will be followed by a comprehensive research book on the project. She was awarded a fellowship by the Guggenheim Foundation and a grant by the National System of Art Creators of the National Fund for Culture and the Arts of Mexico (FONCA). Her project “Five Variations on Phonic Circumstances and a Pause” received the Award of Distinction in the category Hybrid Arts in the 2013 Prix Ars Electronica. re U Forty-eight alarm clocks recorded in a studio, with 48 aluminum trumpets, 48 speakers, three amplifiers and metal structure, Condesa D.F., Mexico City, 2012. Contact: E-mail: . Website: . This work is an architectonic and sound intervention. My intention was to reflect on the present and on memory, on our activities and schedules, on sleep and rest. With this piece I wanted to explore the possibility of manipulating the perception of time and its sound. If at a symbolic level we use mechanical and programmed rhythms, such as the sounds and melodies of old alarm clocks, as metaphors for the elasticity of time, the physical properties also allow us to talk about continuous symmetries and time translation. Between the two levels, the piece works as much in its capacity for connecting harmonic qualities as in its manifestation of the potential energy stored in the sound waves. To view a video of the installation, see . ct ed MenDi + Keith obaDiKe: auToMaTic Contact: E-mail: . Website: . Automatic is at once a sound art meditation on hip-hop techniques and an homage to the intersecting work of two painters. Keith recorded himself performing words found in the paintings of Raymond Saunders and Jean-Michel Basquiat, and we used the textures and rhythms of those recordings as the foundation of the composition. We riff on these artists as they riff on others. This imaginary sonic meeting (of the more senior West Coast painter Saunders with East Coast painter Basquiat) was created in a real-time performance (not unlike a studio dub mix) with a number of filters from an early hardwarebased digital mixer and a customized granular processor. Both Saunders and Basquiat are famous for employing the language and techniques of graffiti and are well known for creating works that pull from ideas from the street and the gallery. As in hip-hop, Saunders’s and Basquiat’s specific ways of employing found objects are key parts of their own voices. Pr oo 1. Media researcher Lars Nyre, “The Movement of Language in Radio—A Phenomenological Approach to Sound,” Norwegian Journal of Media No. 1 (1998). f LMJ23 CD Contributors’ Notes mitlm9.pages.v2.indd 95 8/26/13 12:47 PM http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Leonardo Music Journal MIT Press

Tania Candiani: Sound Piece from Plataforma Sonora/Torre Reloj

Leonardo Music Journal , Volume December 2013 (23) – Dec 1, 2013

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2013 ISAST
Subject
CD Contributors' Notes
ISSN
0961-1215
eISSN
1531-4812
DOI
10.1162/LMJ_a_00173
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporaneity is the thematic point of departure; our living contemporaneity is consciously invoked by the radio. The radio follows the day like a clock, where hourly news updates provide us with a shared routine that synchronizes the rhythm of everyday life [1]. Tuning between stations, this contemporaneity changes with the world’s time zones, and each hour has a distinct character. At any time, one can, from one’s local space somewhere on the globe, tune into the daily rhythms of different time zones and visit all places at all times. Today, we assume that the world lives in one global time in a universal existence. But—economically as well as ecologically, we are simultaneously connected to people who find themselves in completely different daily realities and environments. The installation invites the audience to move between the radios in the exhibition space, with the sound changing as one moves. The track on this CD presents a stereo remix intended headphone listening. It is thus a specific work for close-range listening—the experience of being inside the installation is replaced with a pure auditory experience. Reference Fig. 4. Tania Candiani, Sound Piece from Plataforma Sonora/ Torre Reloj, sound installation of 48 alarm clocks recorded in a studio, with 48 aluminum trumpets, 48 speakers, 3 amplifiers and metal structure, Condesa D.F., Mexico City, 2012. (Photo © Tania Candiani) nc tania CanDiani: sound piece froM plaTaforMa sonora/Torre reloj or Maia Urstad is an artist working at the intersection of audio and visual art, predominantly with sound installations and performances. She was educated at the Bergen National Academy of the Arts and also has a background in rock music. Her recent work interrogates the history and methodology of communication technology: from Morse code and other long-range signals to digital terrestrial networks and the use of fiber optics. Radio is a central theme in her work, in that the authority of the medium opens up visual and conceptual possibilities. Urstad’s solo and collaborative work has been presented at spaces such as Singuhr Sound Gallery Berlin, Germany; Reina Sofia Radio Madrid, Spain; Bergen Art Museum, Norway; Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa; Prefix ICA in Toronto, Canada; Mamam do Patio Recife, Brazil; and Electrohype at Malmö Konsthall, Sweden. Urstad curates and produces art projects through her company Maur Projects, and she is one of the founders of Lydgalleriet Sound Art Gallery in Norway. She is a member of the international sound art collective freq-out, curated by CM von Hausswolff, and her soundworks are published by Touch Music [MCPS]. The research processes of Tania Candiani take as starting point language, text and the political implications of the domestic. Her translation strategies among systems—linguistic, visual, phonic—and practices generate associations where there is a constant nostalgia for the obsolete that makes us consider the discursive content of artifacts and our former projections of the future. She has gathered interdisciplinary work teams to achieve poetic intersections between art and technology. Candiani’s work is in private and public collections as the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; the San Diego Museum of Art; the Mexican Museum, San Francisco; Deutsche Bank; INBA, Mexico; among others. Her most recent exhibition at Laboratorio Arte Alameda (LAA) in Mexico City will be followed by a comprehensive research book on the project. She was awarded a fellowship by the Guggenheim Foundation and a grant by the National System of Art Creators of the National Fund for Culture and the Arts of Mexico (FONCA). Her project “Five Variations on Phonic Circumstances and a Pause” received the Award of Distinction in the category Hybrid Arts in the 2013 Prix Ars Electronica. re U Forty-eight alarm clocks recorded in a studio, with 48 aluminum trumpets, 48 speakers, three amplifiers and metal structure, Condesa D.F., Mexico City, 2012. Contact: E-mail: . Website: . This work is an architectonic and sound intervention. My intention was to reflect on the present and on memory, on our activities and schedules, on sleep and rest. With this piece I wanted to explore the possibility of manipulating the perception of time and its sound. If at a symbolic level we use mechanical and programmed rhythms, such as the sounds and melodies of old alarm clocks, as metaphors for the elasticity of time, the physical properties also allow us to talk about continuous symmetries and time translation. Between the two levels, the piece works as much in its capacity for connecting harmonic qualities as in its manifestation of the potential energy stored in the sound waves. To view a video of the installation, see . ct ed MenDi + Keith obaDiKe: auToMaTic Contact: E-mail: . Website: . Automatic is at once a sound art meditation on hip-hop techniques and an homage to the intersecting work of two painters. Keith recorded himself performing words found in the paintings of Raymond Saunders and Jean-Michel Basquiat, and we used the textures and rhythms of those recordings as the foundation of the composition. We riff on these artists as they riff on others. This imaginary sonic meeting (of the more senior West Coast painter Saunders with East Coast painter Basquiat) was created in a real-time performance (not unlike a studio dub mix) with a number of filters from an early hardwarebased digital mixer and a customized granular processor. Both Saunders and Basquiat are famous for employing the language and techniques of graffiti and are well known for creating works that pull from ideas from the street and the gallery. As in hip-hop, Saunders’s and Basquiat’s specific ways of employing found objects are key parts of their own voices. Pr oo 1. Media researcher Lars Nyre, “The Movement of Language in Radio—A Phenomenological Approach to Sound,” Norwegian Journal of Media No. 1 (1998). f LMJ23 CD Contributors’ Notes mitlm9.pages.v2.indd 95 8/26/13 12:47 PM

Journal

Leonardo Music JournalMIT Press

Published: Dec 1, 2013

There are no references for this article.