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Tadeusz Kantor's Practice: A Postmodern Notebook

Tadeusz Kantor's Practice: A Postmodern Notebook TADEUSZ KANTOR’S PRACTICE A Postmodern Notebook Michal Kobialka hen I was invited to contribute an essay for one of the thirtieth-year anniversary issues of PAJ, there was no question in my mind what the topic of the essay should be. Even though medieval theatre and theatre historiography are the primary focus of my scholarship, the obsessive nature of my encounters with Tadeusz Kantor and his theatre over the last 20 years has unequivocally proven to me that I could never fully abandon his theatre. “Forget Kantor,” an essay which I wrote in 1994 [PAJ 47], was my attempt to close that chapter of my academic life. But then, by the end of that essay, it became clear to me that forgetting, like Kantor’s Emballage, would shelter, protect, preserve, and restore his shape trying to escape the passage of time.1 Now, in 2005, I am thinking about Kantor’s theatre practice again. This year, 2005, marks the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of Cricot 2 Theatre, the thirtieth anniversary of The Dead Class, the twenty-fifth anniversary of Wielopole, Wielopole, the twentieth anniversary of Let the Artists Die, and the fifteenth anniversary of Tadeusz Kantor’s death. To celebrate them, the Cricoteka http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Tadeusz Kantor's Practice: A Postmodern Notebook

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2005 Michal Kobialka
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/152028106775329633
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

TADEUSZ KANTOR’S PRACTICE A Postmodern Notebook Michal Kobialka hen I was invited to contribute an essay for one of the thirtieth-year anniversary issues of PAJ, there was no question in my mind what the topic of the essay should be. Even though medieval theatre and theatre historiography are the primary focus of my scholarship, the obsessive nature of my encounters with Tadeusz Kantor and his theatre over the last 20 years has unequivocally proven to me that I could never fully abandon his theatre. “Forget Kantor,” an essay which I wrote in 1994 [PAJ 47], was my attempt to close that chapter of my academic life. But then, by the end of that essay, it became clear to me that forgetting, like Kantor’s Emballage, would shelter, protect, preserve, and restore his shape trying to escape the passage of time.1 Now, in 2005, I am thinking about Kantor’s theatre practice again. This year, 2005, marks the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of Cricot 2 Theatre, the thirtieth anniversary of The Dead Class, the twenty-fifth anniversary of Wielopole, Wielopole, the twentieth anniversary of Let the Artists Die, and the fifteenth anniversary of Tadeusz Kantor’s death. To celebrate them, the Cricoteka

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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